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Sample records for afm contact angle

  1. Utilization of profilometry, SEM, AFM and contact angle measurements in describing surfaces of plastic floor coverings and explaining their cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuisma, R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Saarikoski, I.; Sjöberg, A.-M.; Hautala, M.

    2005-06-01

    The tendency to soil and cleanability of ten commercial plastic floor coverings: eight vinyl (PVC) floor coverings, one vinyl composite tile and one plastic composite tile, were examined. Floor coverings were soiled with inorganic, organic and biological soil. The cleanability was measured both by bioluminescence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and colorimetrically. The surface topography was studied by AFM, SEM and with a profilometer. From the 2D- and 3D-profilometric measurements several characteristic parameters of the surface profiles were extracted. The tendency to soil and cleanability were compared with the characteristics of the surface. A weak correlation was found between roughness and soilability but no correlation between roughness and cleanability. Roughness had no correlation with contact angle.

  2. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  3. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  4. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle. PMID:20060981

  5. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  6. Advancing contact angles on large structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Yumiko; Itakura, Yoshinori; Gobo, Junichi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To understand wetting phenomena on complex surfaces, simple modeling experiments in two-dimension system would be one of the most efficient approaches. We develop a new experimental method for wetting dynamics using a large pseudo two- dimensional droplet. This method is useful to examine theoretical studies developed in two dimensional systems. In this study, we examine a pinning and depinning phenomena on millimeter-size structured surface to explain the origin of contact angle hysteresis. Contact lines of the droplet are pinned and deppined at the edge of surface texture. The contact lines can move when the contact angle is equal to the Young's contact angle which are determined by the balance of the surface and interfacial tension immediate vicinity of the contact lines, which is different from the Wenzel's low. Our approach enables to realize a macroscopic modelling experiment of wetting on complex surfaces, which opens a path to design functional surfaces with chemical and physical structure.

  7. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A. PMID:27612817

  8. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  9. Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Atsushi; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-02-16

    Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis for probe liquids were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of bis((tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl)-dimethylsiloxy)methylsilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(2)O)(2)SiCH(3)H, (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH). Oxidized aluminum surfaces were prepared by photooxidation/cleaning of sputter-coated aluminum on silicon wafers (Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3)))) using oxygen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed that this facile CVD method produces a monolayer with a thickness of 1.1 nm on the Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface without a discernible change in surface morphology. After monolayer deposition, the hydrophilic Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface became both hydrophobic and oleophobic and exhibited essentially no contact angle hysteresis for water and n-hexadecane (advancing/receding contact angles (theta(A)/theta(R)) = 110 degrees/109 degrees and 52 degrees/50 degrees, respectively). Droplets move very easily on this surface and roll off of slightly tilted surfaces, independently of the contact angle (which is a practical definition of ultralyophobic). A conventional fluoroalkylsilane monolayer was also prepared from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(7)CH(2)CH(2)Si(OCH(3))(3), R(F)Si(OMe)(3)) for comparison. The theta(A)/theta(R) values for water and n-hexadecane are 121 degrees/106 degrees and 76 degrees/71 degrees, respectively. The larger hysteresis values indicate the "pinning" of probe liquids, even though advancing contact angles are larger than those of the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers. The (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers have excellent hydrolytic stability in water. We propose that the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers are flexible and liquidlike and that drops in contact with these surfaces experience very low energy barriers between metastable states, leading to the

  10. The influence of incident angle on physical properties of a novel back contact prepared by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yue; Feng, Yue; Shen, Jiesheng; Liang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Jian; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, oblique vacuum thermal evaporation and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique are used to produce a novel back contact electrode (BCE) of CuInS2 solar cell. These novel back contact electrodes (BCEs) are based on a layered structure of Mo/Ag/Mo (MAM). The influence of vapor source incidence angle θ on optical-electrical properties of novel BCE is investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Surface Profiler, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-vis-IR Spectrometer, and Four-point Probe Method. According to the analysis of AFM images of BCEs, the variation tendencies of surface roughness and uniformity are closely related to the incidence angle θ. The surface roughness increases with the increase of incidence angle θ, but the uniformity becomes poor at same time. This phenomenon can be attributed to the variation of interlayer Ag films (the density and inclined angle of Ag nanorods). The results of four-point probe test show that the novel BCE deposited by vapor source incidence angle θ equal to 45° owns the lowest resistance value of 3.71 × 10-8 Ω m, which is probably due to a loose and multi-point contact interface between Ag layer and top layer (Mo2). The reflectance of novel BCEs deposited by incident angle less than 45° is higher than that of normal bi-layer Mo (Mo12) BCE. As a result, the efficiency of corresponding solar cell may be upgraded.

  11. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  12. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  13. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  14. Study of the advancing and receding contact angles: liquid sorption as a cause of contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lam, C N C; Wu, R; Li, D; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2002-02-25

    Two types of experiments were used to study the behavior of both advancing and receding contact angles, namely the dynamic one-cycle contact angle (DOCA) and the dynamic cycling contact angle (DCCA) experiments. For the preliminary study, DOCA measurements of different liquids on different solids were performed using an automated axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P). From these experimental results, four patterns of receding contact angle were observed: (1) time-dependent receding contact angle; (2) constant receding contact angle; (3) 'stick/slip'; (4) no receding contact angle. For the purpose of illustration, results from four different solid surfaces are shown. These solids are: FC-732-coated surface; poly(methyl methacrylate/n-butyl methacrylate) [P(MMA/nBMA)]; poly(lactic acid) (DL-PLA); and poly(lactic/glycolic acid) 50/50 (DL-PLGA 50/50). Since most of the surfaces in our studies exhibit time dependence in the receding contact angle, a more extended study was conducted using only FC-732-coated surfaces to better understand the possible causes of decreasing receding contact angle and contact angle hysteresis. Contact angle measurements of 21 liquids from two homologous series (i.e. n-alkanes and 1-alcohols) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCMTS) on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. It is apparent that the contact angle hysteresis decreases with the chain length of the liquid. It was found that the receding contact angle equals the advancing angle when the alkane molecules are infinitely large. These results strongly suggest that the chain length and size of the liquid molecule could contribute to contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Furthermore, DCCA measurements of six liquids from the two homologous series on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. With these experimental results, one can construe that the time dependence of contact angle hysteresis on relatively smooth and homogeneous surfaces is mainly caused by liquid retention

  15. Elastic modulus of nanomaterials: resonant contact-AFM measurement and reduced-size effects (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, Bernard; Fretigny, Christian; Cuenot, Stephane

    2005-05-01

    Resonant contact atomic force microscopy (resonant C-AFM) is used to quantitatively measure the elastic modulus of polymer nanotubes and metallic nanowires. To achieve this, an oscillating electric field is applied between the sample holder and the microscope head to excite the oscillation of the cantilever in contact with the nanostructures suspended over the pores of a membrane. The resonance frequency of the cantilever with the tip in contact with a nanostructure is shifted to higher values with respect to the resonance frequency of the free cantilever. It is demonstrated that the system can simply be modeled by a cantilever with the tip in contact with two springs. The measurement of the frequency shift enables the direct determination of the spring stiffness, i.e. the nanowires or nanotube stiffness. The method also enables the determination of the boundary conditions of the nanobeam on the membrane. The tensile elastic modulus is then simply determined using the classical theory of beam deflection. The obtained results for the larger nanostructures fairly agree to the values reported in the literature for the macroscopic elastic modulus of the corresponding materials. The measured modulus of the nanomaterials with smaller diameters is significantly higher than that of the larger ones. The increase of the apparent elastic modulus for the smaller diameters is attributed to the surface tension effects. It is thus demonstrated that resonant C-AFM enables the measurement of the elastic modulus and of the surface tension of nanomaterials.

  16. STM and AFM; Which is Better for Surface Structural Analysis? Non- contact AFM Studies on Ge/Si(105) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been utilized to determine surface atomic structure with its highly resolved images. Probing surface electronic states near the Fermi energy (EF), STM images, however, do not necessarily represent the atomic structure of surfaces. It has been believed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides us surface topographic images without being disturbed by the electronic states. In order to prove the surpassing performance, we performed noncontact (nc) AFM on the Ge/Si(105) surface [1], which is a facet plane of the ?hut? clusters formed on Ge-deposited Si(001) surface. It is found that STM images taken on the surface, either filled- or empty-state images, do not show all surface atoms because of the electronic effect; some surface atoms have dangling bond states below EF and other surface atoms have states above EF. [2]. In a nc-AFM image, on the other hand, all surface atoms having a dangling bond are observed [3], directly representing an atomic structure of the surface. Electronic information can also be obtained in AFM by using a Kelvin-probe method. From atomically resolved potential profile we obtained, charge transfer among the dangling bond states is directly demonstrated. These results clearly demonstrate that highly-resolved nc-AFM with a Kelvin-probe method is an ideal tool for analysis of atomic structures and electronic properties of surfaces. This work was done in collaboration with T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama, T. An, and M. Ono, ISSP, Univ. Tokyo and JST, Y. Fujikawa and T. Sakurai, IMR. Tohoku Univ. T. Hashimoto, AIST, Y. Morikawa, ISIR, Osaka Univ. K. Terakura, Hokkaido Univ., and M.G. Lagally, University of Wisconsin-Madison. [1] T. Eguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 266102 (2004). [2] Y. Fujikawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176101 (2002). [3] T. Eguchi and Y. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 256105 (2002)

  17. From hygrophilic to superhygrophobic: theoretical conditions for making high-contact-angle surfaces from low-contact-angle materials.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2008-07-15

    The possibility of making high-contact-angle, rough surfaces from low-contact-angle materials has recently been suggested and demonstrated. A thermodynamic analysis of this possibility in terms of feasibility and stability is presented. It turns out that only roughness topographies that conform to a feasibility condition which is developed in the present paper can support this phenomenon. Even under conditions that support the phenomenon, the high-contact-angle state may not be stable, and transition from the heterogeneous (Cassie-Baxter) wetting regime to the homogeneous (Wenzel) regime with a lower contact angle may occur. In addition, it is suggested to use the general terms hygrophilic and hygrophobic (based on the Greek prefix hygro- that means liquid) to describe low- and high-contact-angle surfaces, respectively. PMID:18543997

  18. Tribological behavior of micro/nano-patterned surfaces in contact with AFM colloidal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiu; Kong, Wen; Yi, Gewen; Jia, Junhong

    2011-10-01

    In effort to investigate the influence of the micro/nano-patterning or surface texturing on the nanotribological properties of patterned surfaces, the patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars were fabricated by replica molding technique. The surface morphologies of patterned PDMS surfaces with varying pillar sizes and spacing between pillars were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AFM/FFM was used to acquire the friction force images of micro/nano-patterned surfaces using a colloidal probe. A difference in friction force produced a contrast on the friction force images when the colloidal probe slid over different regions of the patterned polymer surfaces. The average friction force of patterned surface was related to the spacing between the pillars and their size. It decreased with the decreasing of spacing between the pillars and the increasing of pillar size. A reduction in friction force was attributed to the reduced area of contact between patterned surface and colloidal probe. Additionally, the average friction force increased with increasing applied load and sliding velocity.

  19. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USMT,2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  20. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  1. Static and Dynamic Contact Angles of Immersed Ferrofluid Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Souvick; Bhowmik, Dipanwita; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Ganguly, Ranjan

    2013-11-01

    Ferrofluid plug driven micro-pumps are useful for manipulating micro-volume of liquids by providing remote actuation using a localized magnetic field gradient. Inside a microchannel, the ferrofluid experiences combined actions of different relevant body forces. While the pressure, viscous and magnetic forces can be estimated using established techniques, the surface tension force requires information about the contact angle between the ferrofluid and glass capillary wall. We address this phenomenon through experimental characterization of static and dynamic contact angles of oil based ferrofluid (EFH3) droplets on glass surface immersed in pure or surfacted distilled water. The equilibrium static contact angle is found to significantly reduce in presence of a magnetic field. Dynamic contact angles are measured through high-speed imaging as the ferrofluid droplets slide along an inclined glass surface. Variation of contact angle hysteresis, which falls outside the Hoffmann Tanner equation for this case, is also investigated as a function of contact line velocity. A strong dependence is found between the contact angle hysteresis and the wetting time. Findings of the work is useful for designing ferrofluid plug-driven microfluidic plugs for different lab-on-a-chip applications.

  2. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  3. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  4. Molecular Modeling of Three Phase Contact for Static and Dynamic Contact Angle Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malani, Ateeque; Amat, Miguel; Raghavanpillai, Anilkumar; Wysong, Ernest; Rutledge, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    Interfacial phenomena arise in a number of industrially important situations, such as repellency of liquids on surfaces, condensation, etc. In designing materials for such applications, the key component is their wetting behavior, which is characterized by three-phase static and dynamic contact angle phenomena. Molecular modeling has the potential to provide basic insight into the detailed picture of the three-phase contact line resolved on the sub-nanometer scale which is essential for the success of these materials. We have proposed a computational strategy to study three-phase contact phenomena, where buoyancy of a solid rod or particle is studied in a planar liquid film. The contact angle is readily evaluated by measuring the position of solid and liquid interfaces. As proof of concept, the methodology has been validated extensively using a simple Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid in contact with an LJ surface. In the dynamic contact angle analysis, the evolution of contact angle as a function of force applied to the rod or particle is characterized by the pinning and slipping of the three phase contact line. Ultimately, complete wetting or de-wetting is observed, allowing molecular level characterization of the contact angle hysteresis.

  5. Contact angles of drops on curved superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Viswanadam, Goutham; Chase, George G

    2012-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have contact angles that exceed 150 degrees and are known to reduce surface fouling, protect surfaces, and improve liquid-liquid separations. Electrospun sub-micron fiber mats can perform as superhydrophobic surfaces. Superhydrophobic behavior is typically measured on planar surfaces, whereas applications may require curved surfaces. This paper discuses the measurement of water contact angles of fiber mats formed on cylindrical surfaces to create superhydrophobic behavior on curved surfaces. Equations are derived that relate the radius of curvature of spherical and cylindrical surfaces and drop size to the observed contact angle on the curved surfaces. Calculations from the equations agree well with experimental observations on spherical surfaces reported in literature and on cylindrical surfaces created in our lab. PMID:22129634

  6. High contact angle hysteresis of superhydrophobic surfaces: Hydrophobic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-08-01

    A typical superhydrophobic surface is essentially nonadhesive and exhibits very low water contact angle (CA) hysteresis, so-called Lotus effect. However, leaves of some plants such as scallion and garlic with an advancing angle exceeding 150° show very serious CA hysteresis. Although surface roughness and epicuticular wax can explain the very high advancing CA, our analysis indicates that the unusual hydrophobic defect, diallyl disulfide, is the key element responsible for contact line pinning on allium leaves. After smearing diallyl disulfide on an extended polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film, which is originally absent of CA hysteresis, the surface remains superhydrophobic but becomes highly adhesive.

  7. Static contact angle in lattice Boltzmann models of immiscible fluids.

    PubMed

    Latva-Kokko, M; Rothman, Daniel H

    2005-10-01

    We study numerically the capillary rise between two horizontal plates and in a rectangular tube, using a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method. We derive an equation for the static fluid-solid contact angle as a function of the wetting tendency of the walls and test its validity. We show that the generalized Laplace law with two independent radii of curvature is followed in capillary rise in rectangular tubes. Our method removes the history dependence of the fluid-solid contact angle that had been present in earlier LB schemes. PMID:16383561

  8. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  9. Dynamic Contact Angle at the Nanoscale: A Unified View.

    PubMed

    Lukyanov, Alex V; Likhtman, Alexei E

    2016-06-28

    Generation of a dynamic contact angle in the course of wetting is a fundamental phenomenon of nature. Dynamic wetting processes have a direct impact on flows at the nanoscale, and therefore, understanding them is exceptionally important to emerging technologies. Here, we reveal the microscopic mechanism of dynamic contact angle generation. It has been demonstrated using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of bead-spring model fluids that the main cause of local contact angle variations is the distribution of microscopic force acting at the contact line region. We were able to retrieve this elusive force with high accuracy. It has been directly established that the force distribution can be solely predicted on the basis of a general friction law for liquid flow at solid surfaces by Thompson and Troian. The relationship with the friction law provides both an explanation of the phenomenon of dynamic contact angle and a methodology for future predictions. The mechanism is intrinsically microscopic, universal, and irreducible and is applicable to a wide range of problems associated with wetting phenomena. PMID:27276341

  10. Contact Angle Measurements Using a Simplified Experimental Setup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamour, Guillaume; Hamraoui, Ahmed; Buvailo, Andrii; Xing, Yangjun; Keuleyan, Sean; Prakash, Vivek; Eftekhari-Bafrooei, Ali; Borguet, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A basic and affordable experimental apparatus is described that measures the static contact angle of a liquid drop in contact with a solid. The image of the drop is made with a simple digital camera by taking a picture that is magnified by an optical lens. The profile of the drop is then processed with ImageJ free software. The ImageJ contact…

  11. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Role of Disorder on Contact Angle Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, Angelina N.; Merten, Victoria E.; Pettersen, Michael S.

    2012-02-01

    Hysteretic behavior of the contact angle of a liquid on a solid is often ascribed to topographic or chemical heterogeneity of the surface. Recent experiments by Rolley and GuthmannootnotetextE. Rolley and C. Guthmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166105 (2007). on liquid hydrogen on cesium suggest that both the hysteresis and the contact line dynamics might be explained in terms of the mesoscale structure of the cesium surface. We have investigated a room temperature system with similar wetting and structural properties, tetradecane on dodecanethiol-treated evaporated gold films, and compare the results with a model of the expected hysteresis due to the topographical heterogeneity as measured by AFM, and reported disorder in the thiol film.ootnotetextE. Delamarche, B. Michel, H. Kang and C.Gerber, Langmuir 10, 4103 (1994).

  12. Dynamic contact angle of water-based titanium oxide nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of TiO2-deionized water nanofluids. Two mechanisms of energy dissipation, (1) contact line friction and (2) wedge film viscosity, govern the dynamics of contact line motion. The primary stage of spreading has the contact line friction as the dominant dissipative mechanism. At the secondary stage of spreading, the wedge film viscosity is the dominant dissipative mechanism. A theoretical model based on combination of molecular kinetic theory and hydrodynamic theory which incorporates non-Newtonian viscosity of solutions is used. The model agreement with experimental data is reasonable. Complex interparticle interactions, local pinning of the contact line, and variations in solid–liquid interfacial tension are attributed to errors. PMID:23759071

  13. Effects of temperature and conditioning on contact lens wetting angles.

    PubMed

    Knick, P D; Huff, J W

    1991-07-01

    Because wettability is not always examined under standard conditions, we investigated the temperature dependence of saline wettability on unconditioned and conditioned polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), and three silicone acrylate lens materials. Sessile drop contact angles were measured in a humidity chamber at 23 degrees C and 34 degrees C using laser-assisted contact angle goniometry. In separate experiments, saline-stored and preconditioned lenses were examined either with or without rinsing. Sessile drop contact angles at 34 degrees C were within 2 degrees to 5 degrees of the room temperature values for both conditioned and unconditioned lenses, demonstrating a negligible temperature dependence. At both temperatures, the conditioned PMMA, CAB, silafocon A, and pasifocon C lenses wet slightly better, by 1 degree to 12 degrees, than unconditioned lenses. However, this increase was only significant with PMMA and silafocon A (P less than 0.05) and reversed when the preconditioned lenses were rinsed repeatedly in saline and reexamined. The results suggest that for these materials: 1) in vitro saline contact angles do not approach those seen on the eye, and this discrepancy can not be explained by temperature or conditioning; and 2) conditioning does not increase material wettability but merely forms a temporary hydrophilic interface that is more wettable than the lens material. PMID:1654228

  14. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. PMID:21889152

  15. A "Conveyor Belt" Model for the Dynamic Contact Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della Volpe, C.; Siboni, S.

    2011-01-01

    The familiar Young contact angle measurement of a liquid at equilibrium on a solid is a fundamental aspect of capillary phenomena. But in the real world it is not so easy to observe it. This is due to the roughness and/or heterogeneity of real surfaces, which typically are not perfectly planar and chemically homogeneous. What can be easily…

  16. In situ measurement of contact angles and surface tensions of interfacial nanobubbles in ethanol aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binyu; Wang, Xingya; Wang, Shuo; Tai, Renzhong; Zhang, Lijuan; Hu, Jun

    2016-04-14

    The astonishing long lifetime and large contact angles of interfacial nanobubbles are still in hot debate despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies. One hypothesis to reconcile the two abnormalities of interfacial nanobubbles is that they have low surface tensions. However, few studies have been reported to measure the surface tensions of nanobubbles due to the lack of effective measurements. Herein, we investigate the in situ contact angles and surface tensions of individual interfacial nanobubbles immersed in different ethanol aqueous solutions using quantitative nanomechanical atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the contact angles of nanobubbles in the studied ethanol solutions were also much larger than the corresponding macroscopic counterparts on the same substrate, and they decreased with increasing ethanol concentrations. More significantly, the surface tensions calculated were much lower than those of the gas-liquid interfaces of the solutions at the macroscopic scale but have similar tendencies with increasing ethanol concentrations. Those results are expected to be helpful in further understanding the stability of interfacial nanobubbles in complex solutions. PMID:26954468

  17. Contact angle and film pressure: study of a talc surface.

    PubMed

    Douillard, J M; Zajac, J; Malandrini, H; Clauss, F

    2002-11-15

    Talc samples in both sheet and powder form are studied by adsorption calorimetry and adsorption isotherm techniques. A model is used to determine the solid surface energy, the solid surface tension and the dispersive, acidic, and basic components of these terms. These results are introduced in an approximate equation relating adsorption to contact angle data. Experimental contact angles are in correct agreement with this approach. The Neumann equation of state is used to fit the data and discussed. It appears as a numerical form of the general equation taking into account gas adsorption and film pressure. Behaviors of talc in contact with liquids do not appear very different whether the solid is in sheet or powder form. PMID:12505082

  18. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°. PMID:26538412

  19. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  20. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  1. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  2. Water adsorption kinetics and contact angles of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Muster, Tim H; Prestidge, Clive A

    2005-04-01

    Water sorption kinetics and water contact angles have been characterized for a range of pharmaceutical powders: ambroxol hydrochloride, griseofulvin, N,n-octyl-D-gluconamide, paracetamol, sulfathiazole, and theophylline. The uptake of water by powder samples at saturated vapor pressure was modeled using a pseudo first-order kinetic relationship. Parameters from this model have been correlated with the concentration and reactivity of the active surface sites of the pharmaceutical powders and their contact angles. The study has shown that analysis of water adsorption kinetics can be a powerful technique for characterizing the surface chemistry and wettability of pharmaceutical powders, and is particularly sensitive to their surface modification through excipient adsorption: ethyl(hydroxyethyl)cellulose treatment of griseofulvin and butyryl chloride treatment of sulfathiazole are reported as case studies. PMID:15736196

  3. Simulations of contact angle induced pearling for sliding drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCue, Scott; Mayo, Lisa; Moroney, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Droplets sliding down an incline can develop a corner or a cusp at their rear, or undergo a pearling transition whereby the tail breaks up into a number of smaller satellite droplets. These phenomena have been of interest since the experimental work of. It appears that the experimental investigation of this problem is limited due to the inherent difficulty of minimising contact angle hysteresis, whereby physical or chemical heterogeneities of the substrate cause pinning and distortion of the droplet. By applying a lubrication model with a disjoining pressure term, we investigate these flows numerically in order to further shed light on how certain conditions (such as contact angle) affect the corner-cusp-pearling transition. We acknowledge support from the ARC Linkage Project LP100200476.

  4. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops. PMID:27300959

  5. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1 -2 μ m and length 100 -200 μ m is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  6. Magnetic controllable biorecognition process of doxorubicin detected by electrochemical contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Renyun; Li, Xiaomao; Gutmann, Sebastian; Lv, Gang; Wang, Xuemei

    2007-08-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles are the most commonly used magnetic materials with promising applications in biomedical and biochemical engineering. In this study, a novel application of the tetraheptylammonium capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles in controllable biorecognition process of anticancer drug doxorubicin through combination with external static magnetic field has been demonstrated. Our AFM and electrochemical studies illustrate that the presence of the tetraheptylammonium capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles could promote the binding behavior of doxorubicin to DNA. And the results of the electrochemical contact angle measurements indicate that the controllable biomolecular recognition of doxorubicin could be readily achieved by combining these functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles with changing the positions of external magnetic field. PMID:17685324

  7. Dynamic contact angle and three-phase contact line of water drop on copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, E. G.; Feoktistov, D. V.; Batishcheva, K. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays there is a lack of experimental data describing the physical process of drop spreading on a solid metal surface for developing wetting and spreading theory. The experimental data obtained by using the high speed video-recording will allow to identify unknown previously spreading modes as well as the change of the dynamic contact angle and the three-phase contact line. The purpose of the work is to determine the effect of the drop growth rate and the copper substrate surface roughness on the dynamic contact angle and the three-phase contact line speed at distilled water drop spreading. Shadow and Schlieren methods are used to obtain experimental data. Three drop spreading modes on the rough surfaces were identified. Time dependences of the dynamic contact angle and contact line speed were obtained. Experimental results can be used for assessing the validity of the developed mathematical models of wetting and spreading processes in the field of micro- and nanoelectronics, ink jet printing, thin-film coatings, spray cooling, and optoelectronics.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Contact Angles and Contact Lines in Multiphase Flows using Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendota, Premchand

    Many physical phenomena and industrial applications involve multiphase fluid flows and hence it is of high importance to be able to simulate various aspects of these flows accurately. The Dynamic Contact Angles (DCA) and the contact lines at the wall boundaries are a couple of such important aspects. In the past few decades, many mathematical models were developed for predicting the contact angles of the inter-face with the wall boundary under various flow conditions. These models are used to incorporate the physics of DCA and contact line motion in numerical simulations using various interface capturing/tracking techniques. In the current thesis, a simple approach to incorporate the static and dynamic contact angle boundary conditions using the level set method is developed and implemented in multiphase CFD codes, LIT (Level set Interface Tracking) (Herrmann (2008)) and NGA (flow solver) (Desjardins et al (2008)). Various DCA models and associated boundary conditions are reviewed. In addition, numerical aspects such as the occurrence of a stress singularity at the contact lines and grid convergence of macroscopic interface shape are dealt with in the context of the level set approach.

  9. Reversible wetting of NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidities below deliquescence observed by environmental non-contact AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzewicz, D.A.; Lewis, E.; Ocko, B. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2009-12-14

    The behavior of NaCl nanoparticles as a function of relative humidity (RH) was characterized by depositing particles on a prepared hydrophobic surface and measuring their height via non-contact environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact AFM allows greater sensitivity to changes in the size of particles than does contact AFM or scanning electron microscopy, and greater sensitivity to changes in shape than do mass-based techniques. Crystalline cubic NaCl nanoparticles with sides of 35 to 150 nm were found to reversibly take up water with increasing RH, and to form a liquid-like surface layer of thickness 2 to 4 nm at humidities well below the deliquescence point of 75.0% at 20°C. Measurable uptake begins at 70% RH. The maximum thickness of the layer increases with increasing RH for a given particle size and, for a given RH, increases with increasing particle size over the range studied. The liquid-like behavior of the layer is indicated by a reversible “rounding” at the tops of the particles, where the ratio of particle height to radius of curvature increases from zero (flat top) at 68% RH to 0.7 at 74% RH. These observations suggest that a reorganization of mass occurs on the solid NaCl nanoparticle, and hence that the behavior of NaCl aerosol nanoparticles at RH between 70 and 75% RH is more complex than an abrupt first-order phase transition. Theoretical treatments of the phase transition should therefore account for both the presence of a liquid-like layer prior to deliquescence, and the RH-dependent thickness of the layer.

  10. Surface tension and contact angles: Molecular origins and associated microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    Gradient theory converts the molecular theory of inhomogeneous fluid into nonlinear boundary value problems for density and stress distributions in fluid interfaces, contact line regions, nuclei and microdroplets, and other fluid microstructures. The relationship between the basic patterns of fluid phase behavior and the occurrence and stability of fluid microstructures was clearly established by the theory. All the inputs of the theory have molecular expressions which are computable from simple models. On another level, the theory becomes a phenomenological framework in which the equation of state of homogeneous fluid and sets of influence parameters of inhomogeneous fluids are the inputs and the structures, stress tensions and contact angles of menisci are the outputs. These outputs, which find applications in the science and technology of drops and bubbles, are discussed.

  11. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization of devices and controlled nanostructuring of materials, the importance of atomic-scale information on surfaces and surface properties is growing continuously. The astonishing progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology that took place during the last two decades was in many ways related to recent progress in high-resolution imaging techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Since the mid-1990s, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) performed in ultrahigh vacuum has evolved as an alternative technique that achieves atomic resolution, but without the restriction to conducting surfaces of the previously established techniques. Advances of the rapidly developing field of NC-AFM are discussed at annual conferences as part of a series that started in 1998 in Osaka, Japan. This special issue of Nanotechnology is a compilation of original work presented at the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy that took place in Seattle, USA, 12-15 September 2004. Over the years, the conference grew in size and scope. Atomic resolution imaging of oxides and semiconductors remains an issue. Noticeable new developments have been presented in this regard such as, e.g., the demonstrated ability to manipulate individual atoms. Additionally, the investigation of individual molecules, clusters, and organic materials gains more and more attention. In this context, considerable effort is undertaken to transfer the NC-AFM principle based on frequency modulation to applications in air and liquids with the goal of enabling high-resolution surface studies of biological material in native environments, as well as to reduce the experimental complexity, which so far involves the availability of (costly) vacuum systems. Force spectroscopy methods continue to be improved and are applied to topics such as the imaging of the three-dimensional force field as a function of the distance with

  12. Design of a Condensation-Based Contact Angle Goniometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopesh, Ajay; Damle, Viraj; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    Condensation of low surface tension fluids such as refrigerants, natural gas, and carbon dioxide is important to a variety of industrial processes. Condensation of these fluids often occurs at elevated pressures and/or cryogenic temperatures, making measurement of their wetting properties using standard approaches challenging. It was recently demonstrated that these properties are critical in designing omniphobic surfaces for low surface tension fluid condensation rate enhancement. To this end, we have developed an alternative goniometer design capable of contact angle measurement at wide pressure and temperature range. In this design, droplets are not dispensed through a pipette but generated through localized condensation on a tip of a preferentially cooled small metal wire encapsulated within a thick thermal insulator layer. Here we present a computational and an experimental study of the relation between the condensation-based goniometer geometry, subcooling, and droplet generation rate. We also compare water contact angle measurements using standard and condensation-based goniometer. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU.

  13. Hydrophilic property by contact angle change of ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chan Young; Kil, Jae Keun

    2008-02-15

    In this study, ion implantation was performed onto a polymer, polycarbonate (PC), in order to investigate surface hydrophilic property through contact angle measurement. PC was irradiated with N, Ar, and Xe ions at the irradiation energy of 20-50 keV and the dose range of 5x10{sup 15}, 1x10{sup 16}, 7x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The contact angle of water was estimated by means of the sessile drop method and was reduced with increasing fluence and ion mass but increased with increasing implanted energy. The changes of chemical and structural properties are discussed in view of Furier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which shows increasing C-O bonding and C-C bonding. The surface roughness examined by atomic force microscopy measurement changed smoothly from 3.59 to 2.22 A as the fluence increased. It is concluded that the change in wettability may be caused by surface carbonization and oxidation as well as surface roughness.

  14. Cleaning of Dust between Interactive Contact Surfaces by Application of Normal Loads of Artificial Stainless-Cantilever in AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seungchol; Horie, Mikio; Ando, Yasuhisa

    In this study, we investigated that interactive contact surfaces were affected by dust and applied normal loads of cantilever such as bristles. In order to study the effect of interactive contact surfaces, spherical particles (dry borosilicate glass sphere, plastic sphere) with curvature radius (R=5 μm, R=10 μm) were glued to artificial stainless cantilevers (spring constant k=576.7 N/m). The experiments were performed on various normal applied loads using an AFM (Atomic force microscope). The results indicate that spheres with a small curvature radius removed dust more effectively than did either of those with a large curvature radius, abraded by using the stainless cantilever, over the wide contact area (50 μmx50 μm). The plastic spheres tend to deform more than do the borosilicate glass spheres under the same applied load and the spheres with a smaller curvature radius tend to deform than do those with a larger curvature radius and the same material properties. Therefore, it had an influence on interactive surface forces. Restructuring dust aggregates by sliding a cantilever, as well as applying loads and contact pressure, forms a new micro contact area, which influences micro surface forces.

  15. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  16. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy, held in Bad Essen, Germany, from 15 18th August 2005, attracted a record breaking number of participants presenting excellent contributions from a variety of scientific fields. This clearly demonstrated the high level of activity and innovation present in the community of NC-AFM researchers and the continuous growth of the field. The strongest ever participation of companies for a NC-AFM meeting is a sign for the emergence of new markets for the growing NC-AFM community; and the high standard of the products presented at the exhibition, many of them brand-new developments, reflected the unbroken progress in technology. The development of novel technologies and the sophistication of known techniques in research laboratories and their subsequent commercialization is still a major driving force for progress in this area of nanoscience. The conference was a perfect demonstration of how progress in the development of enabling technologies can readily be transcribed into basic research yielding fundamental insight with an impact across disciplines. The NC-AFM 2005 scientific programme was based on five cornerstones, each representing an area of vivid research and scientific progress. Atomic resolution imaging on oxide surfaces, which has long been a vision for the catalysis community, appears to be routine in several laboratories and after a period of demonstrative experiments NC-AFM now makes unique contributions to the understanding of processes in surface chemistry. These capabilities also open up new routes for the analysis of clusters and molecules deposited on dielectric surfaces where resolution limits are pushed towards the single atom level. Atomic precision manipulation with the dynamic AFM left the cradle of its infancy and flourishes in the family of bottom-up fabrication nanotechnologies. The systematic development of established and the introduction of new concepts of contrast

  17. Ultrasonic estimation of the contact angle of a sessile droplet

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero, R.; Simonetti, F.

    2014-02-18

    Radiation of energy by large amplitude leaky Rayleigh waves is regarded as one of the key physical mechanisms regulating the actuation and manipulation of droplets in surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic devices. The interaction between a SAW and a droplet is highly complex and is presently the subject of extensive research. This paper investigates the existence of an additional interaction mechanism based on the propagation of quasi-Stoneley waves inside sessile droplets deposited on a solid substrate. In contrast with the leaky Rayleigh wave, the energy of the Stoneley wave is confined within a thin fluid layer in contact with the substrate. The hypothesis is confirmed by three-dimensional finite element simulations and ultrasonic scattering experiments measuring the reflection of Rayleigh waves from droplets of different diameters. Moreover, real-time monitoring of the droplet evaporation process reveals a clear correlation between the droplet contact angle and the spectral information of the reflected Rayleigh signal, thus paving the way for ultrasonic measurements of surface tension.

  18. AFM-based tribological study of nanopatterned surfaces: the influence of contact area instabilities.

    PubMed

    Rota, A; Serpini, E; Gazzadi, G C; Valeri, S

    2016-04-01

    Although the importance of morphology on the tribological properties of surfaces has long been proved, an exhaustive understanding of nanopatterning effects is still lacking due to the difficulty in both fabricating 'really nano-' structures and detecting their tribological properties. In the present work we show how the probe-surface contact area can be a critical parameter due to its remarkable local variability, making a correct interpretation of the data very difficult in the case of extremely small nanofeatures. Regular arrays of parallel 1D straight nanoprotrusions were fabricated by means of a low-dose focused ion beam, taking advantage of the amorphization-related swelling effect. The tribological properties of the patterns were detected in the presence of air and in vacuum (dry ambient) by atomic force microscopy. We have introduced a novel procedure and data analysis to reduce the uncertainties related to contact instabilities. The real time estimation of the radius of curvature of the contacting asperity enables us to study the dependence of the tribological properties of the patterns from their geometrical characteristics. The effect of the patterns on both adhesion and the coefficient of friction strongly depends on the contact area, which is linked to the local radius of curvature of the probe. However, a detectable hydrophobic character induced on the hydrophilic native SiO2 has been observed as well. The results suggest a scenario for capillary formation on the patterns. PMID:26934217

  19. AFM-based tribological study of nanopatterned surfaces: the influence of contact area instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, A.; Serpini, E.; Gazzadi, G. C.; Valeri, S.

    2016-04-01

    Although the importance of morphology on the tribological properties of surfaces has long been proved, an exhaustive understanding of nanopatterning effects is still lacking due to the difficulty in both fabricating ‘really nano-’ structures and detecting their tribological properties. In the present work we show how the probe-surface contact area can be a critical parameter due to its remarkable local variability, making a correct interpretation of the data very difficult in the case of extremely small nanofeatures. Regular arrays of parallel 1D straight nanoprotrusions were fabricated by means of a low-dose focused ion beam, taking advantage of the amorphization-related swelling effect. The tribological properties of the patterns were detected in the presence of air and in vacuum (dry ambient) by atomic force microscopy. We have introduced a novel procedure and data analysis to reduce the uncertainties related to contact instabilities. The real time estimation of the radius of curvature of the contacting asperity enables us to study the dependence of the tribological properties of the patterns from their geometrical characteristics. The effect of the patterns on both adhesion and the coefficient of friction strongly depends on the contact area, which is linked to the local radius of curvature of the probe. However, a detectable hydrophobic character induced on the hydrophilic native SiO2 has been observed as well. The results suggest a scenario for capillary formation on the patterns.

  20. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose contact angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets. PMID:26837184

  1. Dynamic contact angle analysis of protein adsorption on polysaccharide multilayer's films for biomaterial reendothelialization.

    PubMed

    Benni, Safiya; Avramoglou, Thierry; Hlawaty, Hanna; Mora, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease. One of the side effects is restenosis. The aim of this work was to study the coating of stents by dextran derivates based polyelectrolyte's multilayer (PEM) films in order to increase endothelialization of injured arterial wall after stent implantation. Films were composed with diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE) as polycation and dextran sulphate (DS) as polyanion. One film was composed with 4 bilayers of (DEAE-DS)4 and was labeled D-. The other film was the same as D- but with an added terminal layer of DEAE polycation: (DEAE-DS)4-DEAE (labeled D+). The dynamic adsorption/desorption of proteins on the films were characterized by dynamic contact angle (DCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion and proliferation were quantified and correlated to protein adsorption analyzed by DCA for fibronectin, vitronectin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Our results showed that the endothelial cell response was optimal for films composed of DS as external layer. Fibronectin was found to be the only protein to exhibit a reversible change in conformation after desorption test. This behavior was only observed for (DEAE-DS)4 films. (DEAE-DS)4 films could enhance HUVEC proliferation in agreement with fibronectin ability to easily change from conformation. PMID:25276808

  2. Contact angle saturation in electrowetting: Injection of ions into the surrounding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Doi, Masao; Andelman, David

    2015-12-01

    We use the Poisson-Boltzmann theory to predict contact angle saturation of aqueous droplets in electrowetting. Our theory predicts that injection of ions from the droplet into its surrounding medium is responsible for the deviation of the apparent contact angle from the Young-Lippmann equation for large applied voltages. The ion injection substantially decreases the Maxwell stress and increases the osmotic pressure at the interface between the two media, leading to saturation of the apparent contact angle. Moreover, we find that the contact angle does not saturate, but only has a broad minimum that increases again upon further increase of the applied voltage, in agreement with experiments.

  3. Estimation of Intrinsic Contact Angle of Various Liquids on PTFE by Utilizing Ultrasonic Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Takuya; Kamai, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2016-06-01

    The contact angle measured using the sessile drop method is typically an advancing contact angle, which is often used for the evaluation of wettability. However, the precise measurement of the contact angle on rough substrates has been required for developing various industrial processes. In this study, a new measuring method by achieving the minimum total free energy by ultrasonic vibration (USV) was developed. The new method has been demonstrated for different rough surfaces, droplet volumes, and wettability conditions. The advancing contact angle significantly decreased when the USV is applied, but it immediately increased after stopping the USV. In order to capture the droplet behavior at the beginning and end of the USV, a high-speed camera was used. The contact angle was apparently a receding contact angle after stopping the ultrasonic vibration. Accordingly, the intrinsic contact angle was estimated using the values of the advancing contact angles obtained before applying the ultrasonic vibration and the receding contact angles obtained after stopping the ultrasonic vibration.

  4. CONTACT ANGLE OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN WELDED TUFF WITH WATER AND BRINES

    SciTech Connect

    H. Kalia

    2006-04-30

    A number of tests were performed to acquire contact angles between Yucca Mountain welded tuff from Topopah Springs Lower Lithophysal geologic unit and various brine solutions. The tests were performed on core disks received from Sample Management Facility (SMF), oven dried to a constant weight and the core disks vacuum saturated in: distilled water, J-13 water, calcium chloride brine and sodium chloride brine to constant weight. The contact angles were acquired from eight points on the surface of the core disks, four on rough surface, and four on polished surface. The contact angle was measured by placing a droplet of the test fluid, distilled water, J-13 water, calcium chloride brine and sodium chloride brine on the core disks. The objective of this test was to acquire contact angles as a potential input to estimating capillary forces in accumulated dust on the waste packages and drip shields slated for the proposed High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. It was noted that once the droplet contacts the test surface, it continues to spread hence the contact angle continues to decrease with elapsed time. The maximum observed angle was at time 0 or when the drop contacted the rock surface. The measured contact angle, in all cases has significant scatter. In general, the time zero contact angles for core disks saturated in sodium chloride brine were smaller than those saturated in calcium chloride brine, distilled water, and J-13 water. The contact angles for samples saturated in distilled water, J-13 water and calcium chloride brine at time zero were similar. There was slight difference between the observed contact angles for smooth and rough surface of the test samples. The contact angles for smooth surfaces were smaller than for the rough surfaces.

  5. Investigation of mussel adhesive protein adsorption on polystyrene and poly(octadecyl methacrylate) using angle dependent XPS, ATR-FTIR, and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, A.M.; Suci, P.A.; Tyler, B.J.; Geesey, G.G.

    1996-02-10

    Despite many years of research effort, the molecular interactions that are responsible for microbial adhesion and fouling of surfaces remain obscure. An understanding of these interactions would contribute to the development of surfaces that resist colonization of microorganisms. The irreversible adsorption of mussel adhesive proteins (MAP) from the marine mussel Mytilus edulis has been investigated on polystyrene (PS) and poly(octadecyl methacrylate) (POMA) surfaces using angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Angle resolved XPS was used to quantify the elemental composition with depth of the upper 90 {angstrom} of the surface, and AFM was used to obtain the surface topography. The adsorption pattern of MAP, revealed by AFM images, is distinctly different on the two polymer surfaces and suggests that the substratum influences protein adhesion. The depth profiles of MAP, obtained from angle resolved XPS, show differences in nitrogen composition with depth for MAP adsorbed to PS and POMA. Infrared spectra of hydrated adsorbed MAP revealed significant differences in the amide III region and in two bands which may originate from residues in the tandemly repeated sequences of MAP. This data demonstrates that the chemistry of the polymer film that is present at the protein-polymer interface can influence protein-protein and protein-surface interactions.

  6. Contact-angle of water drop on a sloped water repellent soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Bachmann, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Soil water repellency is a well-known phenomenon worldwide and currently well documented in the scientific literature. Most methods used to characterize the magnitude and/or persistency of soil water repellency is directly or indirectly related to the initial advancing contact angle at the solid-liquid-vapor interface. These methods are commonly involved by placing a water (or solution) drops on horizontal surface of water repellent soil (WRS)particles attached to a plane surface. Under natural conditions, however, a soil surface layer is mostly sloped due to micro and/or macro topography. Therefore, the formation of advancing contact angle (downhill) and receding contact angle (uphill) should be considered, rather than a unique value of the contact angle. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angle values is defined as the contact angle hysteresis, commonly attributed to surface roughness and/or chemical heterogeneities. For a given tilt angle, a water drop exceeding a critical volume will slide downhill. Alternatively, for a given drop volume, a critical sliding angle can be defined. Measurements of advancing, receding and sliding angles on sloped WRS is indispensable for our understanding on water adhesion due to hysteresis and may provide critical values for predicting the initiation of water runoff in sloped landscapes on the micro and macro scales of WRS. Accordingly, the main objective of this study was to measure the advancing and receding contact angles on a sloped WRS as a function of: i) water drop volume, ii) particle size distribution and iii) surface slope. The measurements of contact angles on sloped WRS were taken with an advanced goniometer microscope (OCA20, DataPhysics) with external tilting device and SCA20 software for analyzing contact angles highly resolved with respect to time and spatial scales. The results obtained will be presented and the rolling-drop-criteria will be discussed.

  7. Measurement of contact angles of aqueous solutions on some rock forming minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakura, M.; Katsura, M.; Nakashima, S.

    2007-12-01

    Wetting properties of fluids on earth's materials are controlling fluid flows and dynamics of the geological systems. Although the wetting behavior of industrial materials have been widely examined often by contact angle measurements, contact angles of rock-forming materials have not been commonly measured. Therefore, we have been measuring contact angles of some representative rock-forming minerals. The surfaces of solid samples were polished successively by emery papers then by grinding powders (alumina: up to \\sharp3000: grain size about 5 micrometers). Water droplet from a micro-syringe needle are placed on solid surfaces by moving up the sample stage. Images of water drops on the solid surfaces are captured from the horizontal direction with a CCD camera. Contact angles can be determined from the height and the length of the images by assuming them to be parts of circles. Over 60 measurements of contact angles of pure water on (101) and (011) faces plates cut from a natural quartz single crystal were repeated. The average contact angles of pure water on (101) and (011) faces of quartz were 48 ± 5 degrees and 52 ± 3 degrees, respectively. Contact angles of pure water on a natural calcite single crystal was also measured in the same way to be 37 ± 8 degrees. Contact angles of various aqueous solutions such as NaCl and NaHCO3 on these minerals will also be measured in order to evaluate wetting properties of natural rock-water systems.

  8. Cell surface energy, contact angles and phase partition. II. Bacterial cells in biphasic aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, D F; Akit, J

    1980-11-01

    Partition coefficients in biphasic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and Dextran are compared to cell surface energies obtained from contact angles of each liquid phase on cell layers. Linear relationships are observed between these two independent measurements for a variety of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the importance of interfacial phenomena and contact angles in the phase-partition process. PMID:6159003

  9. Apparent-contact-angle model at partial wetting and evaporation: impact of surface forces.

    PubMed

    Janeček, V; Nikolayev, V S

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and numerical study deals with evaporation of a fluid wedge in contact with its pure vapor. The model describes a regime where the continuous wetting film is absent and the actual line of the triple gas-liquid-solid contact appears. A constant temperature higher than the saturation temperature is imposed at the solid substrate. The fluid flow is solved in the lubrication approximation. The introduction of the surface forces in the case of the partial wetting is discussed. The apparent contact angle (the gas-liquid interface slope far from the contact line) is studied numerically as a function of the substrate superheating, contact line velocity, and parameters related to the solid-fluid interaction (Young and microscopic contact angles, Hamaker constant, etc.). The dependence of the apparent contact angle on the substrate temperature is in agreement with existing approaches. For water, the apparent contact angle may be 20° larger than the Young contact angle for 1 K superheating. The effect of the surface forces on the apparent contact angle is found to be weak. PMID:23410341

  10. Apparent-contact-angle model at partial wetting and evaporation: Impact of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeček, V.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and numerical study deals with evaporation of a fluid wedge in contact with its pure vapor. The model describes a regime where the continuous wetting film is absent and the actual line of the triple gas-liquid-solid contact appears. A constant temperature higher than the saturation temperature is imposed at the solid substrate. The fluid flow is solved in the lubrication approximation. The introduction of the surface forces in the case of the partial wetting is discussed. The apparent contact angle (the gas-liquid interface slope far from the contact line) is studied numerically as a function of the substrate superheating, contact line velocity, and parameters related to the solid-fluid interaction (Young and microscopic contact angles, Hamaker constant, etc.). The dependence of the apparent contact angle on the substrate temperature is in agreement with existing approaches. For water, the apparent contact angle may be 20∘ larger than the Young contact angle for 1 K superheating. The effect of the surface forces on the apparent contact angle is found to be weak.

  11. Mechanism of contact angle saturation and an energy-based model for electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Zhao; Zhong-Cheng, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Electrowetting, as a well-known approach to increasing droplet wettability on a solid surface by electrical bias, has broad applications. However, it is limited by contact angle saturation at large voltage. Although several debated hypotheses have been proposed to describe it, the physical origin of contact angle saturation still remains obscure. In this work, the physical factors responsible for the onset of contact angle saturation are explored, and the correlated theoretical models are established to characterize electrowetting behavior. Combination of the proper 3-phase system employed succeeds in dropping the saturating contact angle below 25°, and validates that the contact angle saturation is not a result of device-related imperfection. Project supported by the Fund from the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. ZSF0402).

  12. Estimation of bearing contact angle in-situ by X-ray kinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, P. H.; Manders, F.

    1982-01-01

    The mounted, preloaded contact angle of the structural bearings in the assembled design mechanical assembly was measured. A modification of the Turns method is presented, based upon the clarity and definition of moving parts achieved with X-ray technique and cinematic display. Contact angle is estimated by counting the number of bearings passing a given point as a function of number of turns of the shaft. Ball and pitch diameter variations are discussed. Ball train and shaft angle uncertainties are also discussed.

  13. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  14. Contact angle adjustment in equation-of-state-based pseudopotential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Anjie; Li, Longjian; Uddin, Rizwan; Liu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The single component pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model has been widely applied in multiphase simulation due to its simplicity and stability. In many studies, it has been claimed that this model can be stable for density ratios larger than 1000. However, the application of the model is still limited to small density ratios when the contact angle is considered. The reason is that the original contact angle adjustment method influences the stability of the model. Moreover, simulation results in the present work show that, by applying the original contact angle adjustment method, the density distribution near the wall is artificially changed, and the contact angle is dependent on the surface tension. Hence, it is very inconvenient to apply this method with a fixed contact angle, and the accuracy of the model cannot be guaranteed. To solve these problems, a contact angle adjustment method based on the geometry analysis is proposed and numerically compared with the original method. Simulation results show that, with our contact angle adjustment method, the stability of the model is highly improved when the density ratio is relatively large, and it is independent of the surface tension.

  15. Simultaneous Soft Sensing of Tissue Contact Angle and Force for Millimeter-scale Medical Robots

    PubMed Central

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Gosline, Andrew; Wood, Robert J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic sensor is proposed to measure both the contact angle and the force acting between the tip of a surgical robot and soft tissue. The sensor is manufactured using a planar lithography process that generates microchannels that are subsequently filled with a conductive liquid. The planar geometry is then molded onto a hemispherical plastic scaffolding in a geometric configuration enabling estimation of the contact angle (angle between robot tip tangent and tissue surface normal) by the rotation of the sensor around its roll axis. Contact force can also be estimated by monitoring the changes in resistance in each microchannel. Bench top experimental results indicate that, on average, the sensor can estimate the angle of contact to within ±2° and the contact force to within ±5.3 g. PMID:24241496

  16. Measuring contact angle and meniscus shape with a reflected laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibach, T. F.; Fell, D.; Nguyen, H.; Butt, H. J.; Auernhammer, G. K.

    2014-01-01

    Side-view imaging of the contact angle between an extended planar solid surface and a liquid is problematic. Even when aligning the view perfectly parallel to the contact line, focusing one point of the contact line is not possible. We describe a new measurement technique for determining contact angles with the reflection of a widened laser sheet on a moving contact line. We verified this new technique measuring the contact angle on a cylinder, rotating partially immersed in a liquid. A laser sheet is inclined under an angle φ to the unperturbed liquid surface and is reflected off the meniscus. Collected on a screen, the reflection image contains information to determine the contact angle. When dividing the laser sheet into an array of laser rays by placing a mesh into the beam path, the shape of the meniscus can be reconstructed from the reflection image. We verified the method by measuring the receding contact angle versus speed for aqueous cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide solutions on a smooth hydrophobized as well as on a rough polystyrene surface.

  17. Measuring contact angle and meniscus shape with a reflected laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Eibach, T. F.; Nguyen, H.; Butt, H. J.; Auernhammer, G. K.; Fell, D.

    2014-01-15

    Side-view imaging of the contact angle between an extended planar solid surface and a liquid is problematic. Even when aligning the view perfectly parallel to the contact line, focusing one point of the contact line is not possible. We describe a new measurement technique for determining contact angles with the reflection of a widened laser sheet on a moving contact line. We verified this new technique measuring the contact angle on a cylinder, rotating partially immersed in a liquid. A laser sheet is inclined under an angle φ to the unperturbed liquid surface and is reflected off the meniscus. Collected on a screen, the reflection image contains information to determine the contact angle. When dividing the laser sheet into an array of laser rays by placing a mesh into the beam path, the shape of the meniscus can be reconstructed from the reflection image. We verified the method by measuring the receding contact angle versus speed for aqueous cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide solutions on a smooth hydrophobized as well as on a rough polystyrene surface.

  18. Effect of relative humidity on contact angle of inkjet-printed evaporating colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhasatia, Viral; Joshi, Abhijit; Sun, Ying

    2010-11-01

    The deposition behavior of inkjet-printed aqueous colloidal drops onto glass and polymer (PEN and PET) substrates has been investigated by using fluorescence microscopy, a high-resolution CCD camera, and scanning electron microscopy. Real-time side-view images show that the contact angle of an evaporating colloidal drop is a function of the ambient humidity. The relative humidity also affects the extent to which the drop is able to spread after impacting a substrate, the evaporation rate at the drop surface, and the evaporatively-driven flow inside the drop that drives the suspended particles towards the contact line. The difference between the contact line velocity and liquid velocity at the drop contact line induced by evaporation creates a larger contact angle compared to that of the case without evaporation. This increase in contact angle becomes more significant for a low ambient humidity. Results also show that the particle deposition area and pattern change with the ambient humidity.

  19. How pinning and contact angle hysteresis govern quasi-static liquid drop transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tang, T; Zhao, H; Law, K-Y; Amirfazli, A

    2016-02-21

    This paper presents both experimental and numerical simulations of liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with contact angle hysteresis (CAH). Systematic studies on the role of the advancing contact angle (θa), receding contact angle (θr) and CAH in determining the transfer ratio (volume of the liquid transferred onto the acceptor surface over the total liquid volume) and the maximum adhesion force (Fmax) were performed. The transfer ratio was found to be governed by contact line pinning at the end of the transfer process caused by CAH of surfaces. A map based on θr of the two surfaces was generated to identify the three regimes for liquid transfer: (I) contact line pinning occurs only on the donor surface, (II) contact line pinning occurs on both surfaces, and (III) contact line pinning occurs only on the acceptor surface. With this map, an empirical equation is provided which is able to estimate the transfer ratio by only knowing θr of the two surfaces. The value of Fmax is found to be strongly influenced by the contact line pinning in the early stretching stage. For symmetric liquid bridges between two identical surfaces, Fmax may be determined only by θa, only by θr, or by both θa and θr, depending on the magnitude of the contact angles. For asymmetric bridges, Fmax is found to be affected by the period when contact lines are pinned on both surfaces. PMID:26777599

  20. Wettability Control of Gold Surfaces Modified with Benzenethiol Derivatives: Water Contact Angle and Thermal Stability.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Shingo; Kuzumoto, Yasutaka; Kitamura, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    The water wettability of Au surfaces has been controlled using various benzenethiol derivatives including 4-methylbenzenethiol, pentafluorobenzenethiol, 4-flubrobenzenethiol, 4-methoxy-benzenethiol, 4-nitrobenzenethiol, and 4-hydroxybenzenethiol. The water contact angle of the Au surface modified with the benzenethiol derivative was found to vary in the wide range of 30.9° to 88.3°. The contact angle of the modified Au films annealed was also measured in order to investigate their thermal stability. The change in the contact angle indicated that the modified surface is stable at temperatures below about 400 K. Meanwhile, the activation energy of desorption from the modified surface was estimated from the change in the contact angle. The modified Au surface was also examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. PMID:27451620

  1. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M. Elena; Savage, Michael D.; Cerro, Ramon L.

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations—particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  2. Effect of contact angle on capillary displacement curvatures in pore throats formed by spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Morrow, N.R. )

    1994-11-01

    The curvature of an interface in a pore depends upon the shape of the pore and the operative contact angle that the interface makes with the solid surface. Even relatively simple pores formed by the surfaces of equal spheres have a complex shape including nonaxisymmetric cross-section and converging-diverging geometry. For such pores, a theory for meniscus behavior has been devised that uses a combination of a theory for meniscus curvature in rods together with the toroidal approximation of Purcell. The results of the theory show that converging-diverging geometry tends to compensate for the effect of contact angle. This is because the position at which the nonzero contact angle meniscus has maximum curvature in a converging-diverging pore is not the narrowest part of the pore throat. Due to this compensation, the effect of contact angle on maximum meniscus curvatures for drainage is approximately proportional to cos 2/3 [theta] (rather than the cos [theta] appropriate for cylindrical tubes). Experiments on pores formed by PTFE spheres using partially wetting liquids confirmed the theoretical prediction. Contact angle measurements on the PTFE spheres also demonstrated that, because of microscopic surface roughness, receding contact angles (these being operative with respect to drainage) on ground surfaces are significantly lower than values for smooth surfaces.

  3. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  4. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  5. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  6. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies. PMID:26891762

  7. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies. PMID:26891762

  8. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies.

  9. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  10. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1 -0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012), 10.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  11. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, Bernard D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter M.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-02-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts on gold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurements silicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha solution. Interestingly, these different AFM tip cleaning procedures drastically affected the observed adhesion forces. Water contact angle measurements on the corresponding AFM probe chips showed that piranha treatment resulted in a significant increase of AFM probe chip surface hydrophilicity compared to the organic solvent treatment. Obviously this hydrophilicity change caused drastic, even opposite changes in the tip-PFS adhesive force measurement upon electrode potential change to reversibly oxidize and reduce the PFS grafts. Our findings are of pivotal importance for AFM tip adhesion measurements utilizing standard silicon nitride AFM tips. Probe hydrophilicity must be carefully taken into consideration and controlled.

  12. Simultaneous non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM imaging and force spectroscopy of Si(1 0 0)(2×1) with small oscillation amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özer, H. Özgür; Atabak, Mehrdad; Ellialtıoğlu, Recai M.; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-03-01

    Si(1 0 0)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM with sub-Ångström oscillation amplitudes using stiff tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and STM images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance ( f- d) curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM.

  13. Ternary free-energy lattice Boltzmann model with tunable surface tensions and contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprebon, Ciro; Krüger, Timm; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-03-01

    We present a ternary free-energy lattice Boltzmann model. The distinguishing feature of our model is that we are able to analytically derive and independently vary all fluid-fluid surface tensions and the solid surface contact angles. We carry out a number of benchmark tests: (i) double emulsions and liquid lenses to validate the surface tensions, (ii) ternary fluids in contact with a square well to compare the contact angles against analytical predictions, and (iii) ternary phase separation to verify that the multicomponent fluid dynamics is accurately captured. Additionally we also describe how the model presented here can be extended to include an arbitrary number of fluid components.

  14. Color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating droplet motion with contact-angle hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Sun, Jinju; Zheng, Rongye

    2013-10-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is an effective tool for simulating the contact-line motion due to the nature of its microscopic dynamics. In contact-line motion, contact-angle hysteresis is an inherent phenomenon, but it is neglected in most existing color-gradient based LBMs. In this paper, a color-gradient based multiphase LBM is developed to simulate the contact-line motion, particularly with the hysteresis of contact angle involved. In this model, the perturbation operator based on the continuum surface force concept is introduced to model the interfacial tension, and the recoloring operator proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is used to produce phase segregation and resolve the lattice pinning problem. At the solid surface, the color-conserving wetting boundary condition [Hollis , IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/hxr008 76, 726 (2011)] is applied to improve the accuracy of simulations and suppress spurious currents at the contact line. In particular, we present a numerical algorithm to allow for the effect of the contact-angle hysteresis, in which an iterative procedure is used to determine the dynamic contact angle. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the developed model, including the droplet partial wetting process and droplet dynamical behavior in a simple shear flow. The obtained results are compared with theoretical solutions and experimental data, indicating that the model is able to predict the equilibrium droplet shape as well as the dynamic process of partial wetting and thus permits accurate prediction of contact-line motion with the consideration of contact-angle hysteresis.

  15. Line energy and the relation between advancing, receding, and young contact angles.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Rafael

    2004-08-31

    The line energy associated with the triple phase contact line is a function of local surface defects (chemical and topographical); however, it can still be calculated from the advancing and receding contact angles to which those defects give rise. In this study an expression for the line energy associated with the triple phase contact line is developed. The expression relates the line energy to the drop volume, the interfacial energies, and the actual contact angle (be it advancing, receding, or in between). From the expression we can back calculate the equilibrium Young contact angle, theta0, as a function of the maximal advancing, thetaA, and minimal receding, thetaR, contact angles. To keep a certain maximal hysteresis between advancing and receding angles, different line energies are required depending on the three interfacial energies and the drop's volume V. We learn from the obtained expressions that the hysteresis is determined by some dimensionless parameter, K, which is some normalized line energy. The value of K required to keep a constant hysteresis (thetaA-thetaR) rises to infinity as we get closer to theta0 = 90 degrees. PMID:15323516

  16. Experimental Investigation of the Contact Angle at Wetting the Non-ferrous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feoktistov, D. V.; Orlova, E. G.; Ponomarev, K. O.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental dependences on the effect of the drop volume from the contact angle under the conditions of the static three-phase contact line formation during wetting the nonferrous metals (aluminium, magnalium, copper and brass) are presented in the work. The surface of the substrates was investigated by modern equipment (profilometer "Micro Measure 3D station" and microscope TM-3000). The drop was placed on the surface by the precision electronic single-channel pipette (Thermo scientific). Shadow method was used to obtain the drop profile; symmetry of the drop was controlled by Schlieren method. The comparison of the methods used to determine the contact angle on the image of the drop profile was executed. It was established that in spite of influencing the friction and gravity forces the structure of metal surfaces affects greatly the value of the contact angle.

  17. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  18. Wetting of biopolymer coatings: contact angle kinetics and image analysis investigation.

    PubMed

    Farris, Stefano; Introzzi, Laura; Biagioni, Paolo; Holz, Torsten; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2011-06-21

    The surface wetting of five biopolymers, used as coating materials for a plastic film, was monitored over a span of 8 min by means of the optical contact angle technique. Because most of the total variation was observed to occur during the first 60 s, we decided to focus on this curtailed temporal window. Initial contact angle values (θ(0)) ranged from ∼91° for chitosan to ∼30° for pullulan. However, the water drop profile began to change immediately following drop deposition for all biocoatings, confirming that the concept of water contact angle equilibrium is not applicable to most biopolymers. First, a three-parameter decay equation [θ(t) = θ(0) exp(kt(n))] was fit to the experimental contact angle data to describe the kinetics of the contact angle change for each biocoating. Interestingly, the k constant correlated well with the contact angle evolution rate and the n exponent seemed to be somehow linked to the physicochemical phenomena underlying the overall kinetics process. Second, to achieve a reliable description of droplet evolution, the contact angle (CA) analysis was coupled with image analysis (IA) through a combined geometric/trigonometric approach. Absorption and spreading were the key factors governing the overall mechanism of surface wetting during the 60 s analysis, although the individual quantification of both phenomena demonstrated that spreading provided the largest contribution for all biopolymers, with the only exception of gelatin, which showed two quasi-equivalent and counterbalancing effects. The possible correlation between these two phenomena and the topography of the biopolymer surfaces are then discussed on the basis of atomic force microscopy analyses. PMID:21619017

  19. Darcy's Flow with Prescribed Contact Angle: Well-Posedness and Lubrication Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knüpfer, Hans; Masmoudi, Nader

    2015-11-01

    We consider the spreading of a thin two-dimensional droplet on a solid substrate. We use a model for viscous fluids where the evolution is governed by Darcy's law. At the contact point where air and liquid meet the solid substrate, a constant, non-zero contact angle ( partial wetting) is assumed. We show local and global well-posedness of this free boundary problem in the presence of the moving contact point. Our estimates are uniform in the contact angle assumed by the liquid at the contact point. In the so-called lubrication approximation (long-wave limit) we show that the solutions converge to the solution of a one-dimensional degenerate parabolic fourth order equation which belongs to a family of thin-film equations. The main technical difficulty is to describe the evolution of the non-smooth domain and to identify suitable spaces that capture the transition to the asymptotic model uniformly in the small parameter.

  20. Detailed statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on inclining silicon-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M; Groß, K; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Contact angle determination by sessile drop technique is essential to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. Different specific angles can be observed on every solid which are correlated with the advancing or the receding of the triple line. Different procedures and definitions for the determination of specific angles exist which are often not comprehensible or reproducible. Therefore one of the most important things in this area is to build standard, reproducible and valid methods for determining advancing/receding contact angles. This contribution introduces novel techniques to analyse dynamic contact angle measurements (sessile drop) in detail which are applicable for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric drops. Not only the recently presented fit solution by sigmoid function and the independent analysis of the different parameters (inclination, contact angle, velocity of the triple point) but also the dependent analysis will be firstly explained in detail. These approaches lead to contact angle data and different access on specific contact angles which are independent from "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator. As example the motion behaviour of droplets on flat silicon-oxide surfaces after different surface treatments is dynamically measured by sessile drop technique when inclining the sample plate. The triple points, the inclination angles, the downhill (advancing motion) and the uphill angles (receding motion) obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are independently and dependently statistically analysed. Due to the small covered distance for the dependent analysis (<0.4mm) and the dominance of counted events with small velocity the measurements are less influenced by motion dynamics and the procedure can be called "slow moving" analysis. The presented procedures as performed are especially sensitive to the range which reaches from the static to the "slow moving" dynamic contact angle determination. They are characterised by

  1. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system. PMID:26509282

  2. Investigation of surface porosity measurements and compaction pressure as means to ensure consistent contact angle determinations.

    PubMed

    Holm, René; Borkenfelt, Simon; Allesø, Morten; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Beato, Stefania; Holm, Per

    2016-02-10

    Compounds wettability is critical for a number of central processes including disintegration, dispersion, solubilisation and dissolution. It is therefore an important optimisation parameter both in drug discovery but also as guidance for formulation selection and optimisation. Wettability for a compound is determined by its contact angle to a liquid, which in the present study was measured using the sessile drop method applied to a disc compact of the compound. Precise determination of the contact angle is important should it be used to either rank compounds or selected excipients to e.g. increase the wetting from a solid dosage form. Since surface roughness of the compact has been suggested to influence the measurement this study investigated if the surface quality, in terms of surface porosity, had an influence on the measured contact angle. A correlation to surface porosity was observed, however for six out of seven compounds similar results were obtained by applying a standard pressure (866 MPa) to the discs in their preparation. The data presented in the present work therefore suggest that a constant high pressure should be sufficient for most compounds when determining the contact angle. Only for special cases where compounds have poor compressibility would there be a need for a surface-quality-control step before the contact angle determination. PMID:26688037

  3. Hysteresis of the Contact Angle of a Meniscus Inside a Capillary with Smooth, Homogeneous Solid Walls.

    PubMed

    Kuchin, Igor V; Starov, Victor M

    2016-05-31

    A theory of contact angle hysteresis of a meniscus inside thin capillaries with smooth, homogeneous solid walls is developed in terms of surface forces (disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm) using a quasi-equilibrium approach. The disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm includes electrostatic, intermolecular, and structural components. The values of the static receding θr, advancing θa, and equilibrium θe contact angles in thin capillaries were calculated on the basis of the shape of the disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm. It was shown that both advancing and receding contact angles depend on the capillary radius. The suggested mechanism of the contact angle hysteresis has a direct experimental confirmation: the process of receding is accompanied by the formation of thick β-films on the capillary walls. The effect of the transition from partial to complete wetting in thin capillaries is predicted and analyzed. This effect takes place in very thin capillaries, when the receding contact angle decreases to zero. PMID:27163285

  4. Relaxation of contact-line singularities solely by the Kelvin effect and apparent contact angles for isothermal volatile liquids in contact with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The contact (triple) line of a volatile liquid on a flat solid is studied theoretically. Like with a pure-vapor atmosphere [Phys. Rev. E 87, 010401, 2013], but here for isothermal diffusion-limited evaporation/condensation in the presence of an inert gas, we rigorously show that the notorious contact-line singularities (related to motion or phase change itself) can be regularized solely on account of the Kelvin effect (curvature dependence of the saturation conditions). No disjoining pressure, precursor films or Navier slip are in fact needed to this purpose, and nor are they taken into consideration here (``minimalist'' approach). The model applies to both perfect (zero Young's angle) and partial wetting, and is in particular used to study the related issue of evaporation-induced contact angles. Their modification by the contact-line motion (either advancing or receding) is assessed. The formulation is posed for a distinguished immediate vicinity of the contact line (the ``microregion''), the corresponding problem decoupling to leading order, here up to one unknown coefficient, from what actually happens at the macroscale. The lubrication approximation (implying sufficiently small contact angles) is used in the liquid, coupled with the diffusion equation in the gaz phase. Supported by ESA and BELSPO PRODEX and F.R.S.-FNRS.

  5. Manipulation of Contact Angles and Interfacial Lengths of Liquid Drops using Electro-Kinetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Nolte, D. D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, capillary pressure is determined by increasing or decreasing external fluid pressures to change the immiscible fluid saturation in a porous medium. The resulting saturation and interfacial area are then linked to the capillary pressure through constitutive equations. A key question is whether externally measured pressures are sensitive to changes in distributions that arise from internal changes in contact angles. As a first step in addressing this question, we investigated the effect of electro-kinetic manipulation on interfacial area and contact angles for a fixed saturation. An EWOD (electro-wetting on dielectric) technique was used to alter the contact angle of single 10 μL droplets of a 1M KCl-H2O solution. A liquid droplet was placed on a glass cover slip (18 mm x 18 mm) coated with a layer of silver (100 nm in thickness) to act as an electrode and then spin-coated with polyimide (a dielectric). A platinum wire was inserted into the droplet and connected to an AC voltage source. The glass plate electrode was connected to ground. Measurements were made for Vrms voltages between 0 to 300 V at a frequency of 50 Hz. Two CCD cameras were used to image changes in the shape of a droplet. One camera was placed on a microscope to capture a top view of a drop in order to measure changes in areal extent and the perimeter of the drop. The second camera imaged a drop from the side to measure contact angles and side-view areal extent and perimeter. At low voltages, the cosine of the contact angle, θ, after applying voltage was linearly dependent on Vrms2. Several experiments showed that the slope of the low-voltage relationship of cos θ vs Vrms2 remained constant for all trials. As the voltage increased, the contact angle saturated. From the side-view images, the contact angle and interfacial length decreased with increasing voltage. From the top-view images, the drop shape changed from circular to elliptical-to irregular as the voltage increased

  6. Experimental Study on the Effect of Liquid Contact Angle on Bubble Movement under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanjie, Yang; Li, Shiyou; Yiyong, Huang; Guangyu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The experimental study of bubble dynamics under microgravity has been conducted utilizing the Drop Tower Beijing(NMLC). A pottery sized of 20mm in length, 10mm in width and 1.2mm in height was used as the heater. The fluid was HFE7500 and distilled water. During the experiment under microgravity the nucleate boiling and film boiling were observed. At the same heating power the bubble of HFE7500 whose contact angle is smaller grew faster and bigger, moved quickly on the heating surface, combined into center big bubble by colliding and reached its CHF earlier to film boiling. The bubble of distilled water whose contact angle is bigger didn't move obviously on heating surface, and it transferred from nucleate boiling to film boiling at its original place meanwhile it absorbed smaller bubble around. Key words: microgravity; bubble movement; contact angle; drop tower

  7. Shape of menisci in spinning horizontal tubes: Application to contact angle determination

    SciTech Connect

    Princen, H.M.; Vaidya, R.N.

    1995-09-01

    The authors have computed the shape of an axisymmetric fluid/liquid meniscus in a capillary that is spun about its horizontal axis. The solutions were used to establish the relationship between the fluid/liquid/solid contact angle on the one hand and several experimentally accessible parameters (tube radius, interfacial tension, densities, angular velocity, and certain meniscus dimensions) on the other. This opens the way to a novel method for determining contact angles. Using the results for single menisci, the authors have in addition developed a method whereby the contact angle may be obtained from the critical speed at which a finite drop (or slug) is either released from the tube wall (if the drop phase is the less dense phase) or penetrated axially by the other phase (if the drop phase is the denser phase).

  8. Contact angles and wettability of ionic liquids on polar and non-polar surfaces†

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications involving ionic liquids (ILs) require the knowledge of their interfacial behaviour, such as wettability and adhesion. In this context, herein, two approaches were combined aiming at understanding the impact of the IL chemical structures on their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces, namely: (i) the experimental determination of the contact angles of a broad range of ILs (covering a wide number of anions of variable polarity, cations, and cation alkyl side chain lengths) on polar and non-polar solid substrates (glass, Al-plate, and poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)); and (ii) the correlation of the experimental contact angles with the cation–anion pair interaction energies generated by the Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). The combined results reveal that the hydrogen-bond basicity of ILs, and thus the IL anion, plays a major role through their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces. The increase of the IL hydrogen-bond accepting ability leads to an improved wettability of more polar surfaces (lower contact angles) while the opposite trend is observed on non-polar surfaces. The cation nature and alkyl side chain lengths have however a smaller impact on the wetting ability of ILs. Linear correlations were found between the experimental contact angles and the cation–anion hydrogen-bonding and cation ring energies, estimated using COSMO-RS, suggesting that these features primarily control the wetting ability of ILs. Furthermore, two-descriptor correlations are proposed here to predict the contact angles of a wide variety of ILs on glass, Al-plate, and PTFE surfaces. A new extended list is provided for the contact angles of ILs on three surfaces, which can be used as a priori information to choose appropriate ILs before a given application. PMID:26554705

  9. Contact angles and wettability of ionic liquids on polar and non-polar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Matheus M; Kurnia, Kiki A; Sousa, Filipa L; Silva, Nuno J O; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G

    2015-12-21

    Many applications involving ionic liquids (ILs) require the knowledge of their interfacial behaviour, such as wettability and adhesion. In this context, herein, two approaches were combined aiming at understanding the impact of the IL chemical structures on their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces, namely: (i) the experimental determination of the contact angles of a broad range of ILs (covering a wide number of anions of variable polarity, cations, and cation alkyl side chain lengths) on polar and non-polar solid substrates (glass, Al-plate, and poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)); and (ii) the correlation of the experimental contact angles with the cation-anion pair interaction energies generated by the Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). The combined results reveal that the hydrogen-bond basicity of ILs, and thus the IL anion, plays a major role through their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces. The increase of the IL hydrogen-bond accepting ability leads to an improved wettability of more polar surfaces (lower contact angles) while the opposite trend is observed on non-polar surfaces. The cation nature and alkyl side chain lengths have however a smaller impact on the wetting ability of ILs. Linear correlations were found between the experimental contact angles and the cation-anion hydrogen-bonding and cation ring energies, estimated using COSMO-RS, suggesting that these features primarily control the wetting ability of ILs. Furthermore, two-descriptor correlations are proposed here to predict the contact angles of a wide variety of ILs on glass, Al-plate, and PTFE surfaces. A new extended list is provided for the contact angles of ILs on three surfaces, which can be used as a priori information to choose appropriate ILs before a given application. PMID:26554705

  10. Dynamic contact angle of a liquid spreading on a heated plate

    SciTech Connect

    Ripple, D.

    1999-06-01

    An equation determining the steady-state profile of a liquid meniscus advancing or receding across a heated plate is derived. The effects of liquid evaporation, intermolecular interaction with the plate, and thermocapillarity are included. Numerical and analytical estimates of the dynamic contact angle are calculated for water and the refrigerant 1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane. The dynamic contact angle depends primarily on three dimensionless parameters: one proportional to the velocity of the interface, one proportional to the rate of evaporation from the surface, and one proportional to the thermal coefficient of the liquid-vapor surface tension.

  11. Superhydrophobic surfaces: A model approach to predict contact angle and surface energy of soil particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; Hamlett, Christopher; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael; Bachmann, Joerg; Woche, S.

    2010-05-01

    C. Hamlett(a), G. McHALE(a), N. Shirtcliffe(a), M. Newton(a), S.K. Woche(b), and J. BACHMANN(b) aSchool of Science & Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham, NG11 8NS, UK and bInstitute of Soil Science, Leibniz University Hannover, Herrenhaeuser Str.2, 30419, Hannover, Germany. Summary Wettability of soil affects a wide variety of processes including infiltration, preferential flow and surface runoff. The problem of determining contact angles and surface energy of powders, such as soil particles, remains unsolved. So far, several theories and approaches have been proposed, but formulation of surface and interfacial free energy, as regards its components, is still a very debatable issue. In the present study, the general problem of the interpretation of contact angles and surface free energy on chemically heterogeneous and rough soil particle surfaces are evaluated by a reformulation of the Cassie-Baxter equation assuming that the particles are attached on to a plane and rigid surface. Compared with common approaches, our model considers a roughness factor which depends on the Young's Law contact angle determined by the surface chemistry. Results of the model are discussed and compared with independent contact angle measurements using the Sessile Drop and the Wilhelmy Plate methods. Based on contact angle data, the critical surface tension of the grains were determined by the method proposed by Zisman. Experiments were made with glass beads and three soil materials ranging from sand to clay. Soil particles were coated with different loadings of dichlorodimethylsilane (DCDMS) to vary the wettability. Varying the solid surface tension using DCDMS treatments provided pure water wetting behaviours ranging from wettable to extremely hydrophobic with contact angles >150°. Results showed that the critical surface energy measured on grains with the highest DCDMS loadings was similar to the surface energy measured independently on ideal DCDMS

  12. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film. PMID:12520439

  13. Statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on a horizontal silicon-oxide surface.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Sessile drop experiments on horizontal surfaces are commonly used to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. The advancing angle and the receding angle are measurable on every solid. Specially on horizontal surfaces even the notions themselves are critically questioned by some authors. Building a standard, reproducible and valid method of measuring and defining specific (advancing/receding) contact angles is an important challenge of surface science. Recently we have developed two/three approaches, by sigmoid fitting, by independent and by dependent statistical analyses, which are practicable for the determination of specific angles/slopes if inclining the sample surface. These approaches lead to contact angle data which are independent on "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator which is also of urgent need to evaluate dynamic measurements of contact angles. We will show in this contribution that the slightly modified procedures are also applicable to find specific angles for experiments on horizontal surfaces. As an example droplets on a flat freshly cleaned silicon-oxide surface (wafer) are dynamically measured by sessile drop technique while the volume of the liquid is increased/decreased. The triple points, the time, the contact angles during the advancing and the receding of the drop obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are statistically analysed. As stated in the previous contribution the procedure is called "slow movement" analysis due to the small covered distance and the dominance of data points with low velocity. Even smallest variations in velocity such as the minimal advancing motion during the withdrawing of the liquid are identifiable which confirms the flatness and the chemical homogeneity of the sample surface and the high sensitivity of the presented approaches. PMID:25524007

  14. Liquid-bridge stability and breakup on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J

    2016-08-10

    We study the stability and breakup of liquid bridges with a free contact line on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis (CAH) under zero-gravity conditions. Non-ideal surfaces exhibit CAH because of surface imperfections, by which the constraints on three-phase contact lines are influenced. Given that interfacial instabilities are constraint-sensitive, understanding how CAH affects the stability and breakup of liquid bridges is crucial for predicting the drop size in contact-drop dispensing. Unlike ideal surfaces on which contact lines are always free irrespective of surface wettability, contact lines may undergo transitions from pinned to free and vice versa during drop deposition on non-ideal surfaces. Here, we experimentally and theoretically examine how stability and breakup are affected by CAH, highlighting cases where stability is lost during a transition from a pinned-pinned (more constrained) to pinned-free (less constrained) interface-rather than a critical state. This provides a practical means of expediting or delaying stability loss. We also demonstrate how the dynamic contact angle can control the contact-line radius following stability loss. PMID:27443494

  15. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla, Reynier I.

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe–sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10–20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin–ultrathin layers (h < 10–50 nm). Under the same conditions the z–piezo distance at the JIC follows approximately a linear behavior with the film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD–SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material.

  16. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Reynier I

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe-sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10-20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin-ultrathin layers (h < 10-50 nm). Under the same conditions the z-piezo distance at the JIC follows approximately a linear behavior with the film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD-SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material. PMID:27199351

  17. Effect of Ankle Joint Contact Angle and Ground Contact Time on Depth Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua H; Flanagan, Sean P

    2015-11-01

    Athletes often need to both jump high and get off the ground quickly, but getting off the ground quickly can decrease the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) impulse, impeding jump height. Energy stored in the muscle-tendon complex during the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) may mitigate the effects of short ground contact times (GCTs). To take advantage of the SSC, several coaches recommend "attacking" the ground with the foot in a dorsiflexed (DF) position at contact. However, the efficacy of this technique has not been tested. This investigation tested the hypotheses that shorter GCTs would lead to smaller vertical depth jump heights (VDJH), and that this difference could be mitigated by instructing the athletes to land in a DF as opposed to a plantar flexed (PF) foot position. Eighteen healthy junior college athletes performed depth jumps from a 45-cm box onto force platforms under instruction to achieve one of the 2 objectives (maximum jump height [hmax] or minimal GCT [tmin]), with one of the 2 foot conditions (DF or PF). These variations created 4 distinct jump conditions: DF-hmax, DF-tmin, PF-hmax, and PF-tmin. For all variables examined, there were no significant interactions. For all 4 conditions, the ankle was PF during landing, but the DF condition was 28.87% less PF than the PF condition. The tmin conditions had a 23.48% shorter GCT than hmax. There were no significant main effects for jump height. The peak impact force for tmin was 22.14% greater than hmax and 19.11% greater for DF compared with PF conditions. A shorter GCT did not necessitate a smaller jump height, and a less PF foot did not lead to improvements in jump height or contact time during a depth jump from a 45-cm box. The same jump height was attained in less PF and shorter GCT conditions by larger impact forces. To decrease contact time while maintaining jump height, athletes should be instructed to "get off the ground as fast as possible." This cue seems to be more important than foot

  18. Identifying Differences and Similarities in Static and Dynamic Contact Angles between Nanoscale and Microscale Textured Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Mitchell R; Shirts, Michael R

    2015-07-28

    We quantify some of the effects of patterned nanoscale surface texture on static contact angles, dynamic contact angles, and dynamic contact angle hysteresis using molecular dynamics simulations of a moving Lennard-Jones droplet in contact with a solid surface. We observe static contact angles that change with the introduction of surface texture in a manner consistent with theoretical and experimental expectations. However, we find that the introduction of nanoscale surface texture at the length scale of 5-10 times the fluid particle size does not affect dynamic contact angle hysteresis even though it changes both the advancing and receding contact angles significantly. This result differs significantly from microscale experimental results where dynamic contact angle hysteresis decreases with the addition of surface texture due to an increase in the receding contact angle. Instead, we find that molecular-kinetic theory, previously applied only to nonpatterned surfaces, accurately describes dynamic contact angle and dynamic contact angle hysteresis behavior as a function of terminal fluid velocity. Therefore, at length scales of tens of nanometers, the kinetic phenomena such as contact line pinning observed at larger scales become insignificant in comparison to the effects of molecular fluctuations for moving droplets, even though the static properties are essentially scale-invariant. These findings may have implications for the design of highly hierarchical structures with particular wetting properties. We also find that quantitatively determining the trends observed in this article requires the careful selection of system and analysis parameters in order to achieve sufficient accuracy and precision in calculated contact angles. Therefore, we provide a detailed description of our two-surface, circular-fit approach to calculating static and dynamic contact angles on surfaces with nanoscale texturing. PMID:26110823

  19. New Method Developed to Measure Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2002-01-01

    The spreading of an evaporating liquid on a solid surface occurs in many practical processes and is of importance in a number of practical situations such as painting, textile dyeing, coating, gluing, and thermal engineering. Typical processes involving heat transfer where the contact angle plays an important role are film cooling, boiling, and the heat transfer through heat pipes. The biological phenomenon of cell spreading also is analogous to a drop spreading (ref. 1). In the study of spreading, the dynamic contact angle describes the interfacial properties on solid substrates and, therefore, has been studied by physicists and fluid mechanics investigators. The dynamic contact angle of a spreading nonvolatile liquid drop provides a simple tool in the study of the free-boundary problem, but the study of the spreading of a volatile liquid drop is of more practical interest because the evaporation of common liquids is inevitable in practical processes. The most common method to measure the contact angle, the contact radius, and the height of a sessile drop on a solid surface is to view the drop from its edge through an optical microscope. However, this method gives only local information in the view direction. Zhang and Yang (ref. 2) developed a laser shadowgraphy method to investigate the evaporation of sessile drop on a glass plate. As described here, Zhang and Chao (refs. 3 and 4) improved the method and suggested a new optical arrangement to measure the dynamic contact angle and the instant evaporation rate of a sessile drop with much higher accuracy (less than 1 percent). With this method, any fluid motion in the evaporating drop can be visualized through shadowgraphy without using a tracer, which often affects the field under investigation.

  20. Numerical investigation of relationship between water contact angle and drag reduction ratio of superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Shi, Shu-Yuan; Lu, Yao; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Wei

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel bubble model to analyze drag reduction. The relationship between the slip length and air bubble height is discussed. The numerical relationship between the surface contact angle and slip length is obtained using the solid-liquid contact ratio in the Cassie equation. The surface drag reduction ratio increases by 40% at low velocities when the solid liquid contact ratio decreases from 90% to 10%. An experimental setup to study liquid/solid friction drag is reported. The drag reduction ratio for the superhydrophobic surface tested experimentally is 30%-35% at low velocities. These results are similar to the simulation results obtained at low velocities.

  1. On the physically based modeling of surface tension and moving contact lines with dynamic contact angles on the continuum scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M.; Keller, F.; Säckel, W.; Hirschler, M.; Kunz, P.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Nieken, U.

    2016-04-01

    The description of wetting phenomena is a challenging problem on every considerable length-scale. The behavior of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale is caused by intermolecular interactions like the Van der Waals forces. Therefore, to describe surface tension and the resulting dynamics of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale, appropriate formulations must be developed. While the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model is well-engineered for the description of interfaces, there is still a lack of treatment of contact lines, which are defined by the intersection of an ending fluid interface and a solid boundary surface. In our approach we use a balance equation for the contact line and extend the Navier-Stokes equations in analogy to the extension of a two-phase interface in the CSF model. Since this model depicts a physically motivated approach on the continuum scale, no fitting parameters are introduced and the deterministic description leads to a dynamical evolution of the system. As verification of our theory, we show a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model and simulate the evolution of droplet shapes and their corresponding contact angles.

  2. Tuning the Receding Contact Angle on Hydrogels by Addition of Particles.

    PubMed

    Boulogne, François; Ingremeau, François; Limat, Laurent; Stone, Howard A

    2016-06-01

    Control of the swelling, chemical functionalization, and adhesivity of hydrogels are finding new applications in a wide range of material systems. We investigate experimentally the effect of adsorbed particles on hydrogels on the depinning of contact lines. In our experiments, a water drop containing polystyrene microspheres is deposited on a swelling hydrogel, which leads to the drop absorption and particle deposition. Two regimes are observed: a decreasing drop height with a pinned contact line followed by a receding contact line. We show that increasing the particles concentration increases the duration of the first regime and significantly decreases the total absorption time. The adsorbed particles increase the pinning force at the contact line. Finally, we develop a method to measure the receding contact angle with the consideration of the hydrogel swelling. PMID:27185647

  3. On canonical cylinder sections for accurate determination of contact angle in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Zabihi, Farhad

    1992-01-01

    Large shifts of liquid arising from small changes in certain container shapes in zero gravity can be used as a basis for accurately determining contact angle. Canonical geometries for this purpose, recently developed mathematically, are investigated here computationally. It is found that the desired nearly-discontinuous behavior can be obtained and that the shifts of liquid have sufficient volume to be readily observed.

  4. Contact angle and detachment energy of shape anisotropic particles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Anjali, Thriveni G; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-09-15

    The three phase contact angle of particles, a measure of its wettability, is an important factor that greatly influences their behaviour at interfaces. It is one of the principal design parameters for potential applications of particles as emulsion/foam stabilizers, functional coatings and other novel materials. In the present work, the effect of size, shape and surface chemistry of particles on their contact angle is investigated using the gel trapping technique, which facilitates the direct visualization of the equilibrium position of particles at interfaces. The contact angle of hematite particles of spherocylindrical, peanut and cuboidal shapes, hematite-silica core-shell and silica shells is reported at a single particle level. The spherocylindrical and peanut shaped particles are always positioned with their major axis parallel to the interface. However, for cuboidal particles at air-water as well as decane-water interfaces, different orientations namely - face-up, edge-up and the vertex-up - are observed. The influence of gravity on the equilibrium position of the colloidal particles at the interface is studied using the hematite-silica core-shell particles and the silica shells. The measured contact angle values are utilized in the calculations of the detachment and surface energies of the hematite particles adsorbed at the interface. PMID:27285780

  5. Numerical study of drop motion on a surface with stepwise wettability gradient and contact angle hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Haibo; Wang, Xinzhu

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the motion of a two-dimensional drop on a surface with stepwise wettability gradient (WG) is studied numerically by a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann finite-difference method. We incorporate the geometric wetting boundary condition that allows accurate implementation of a contact angle hysteresis (CAH) model. The method is first validated through a series of tests that check different constituents of the numerical model. Then, simulations of a drop on a wall with given stepwise WG are performed under different conditions. The effects of the Reynolds number, the viscosity ratio, the WG, as well as the CAH on the drop motion are investigated in detail. It was discovered that the shape of the drop in steady motion may be fitted by two arcs that give two apparent contact angles, which are related to the respective contact line velocities and the relevant contact angles (that specify the WG and CAH) through the relation derived by Cox ["The dynamics of the spreading of liquids on a solid surface. Part 1. viscous flow," J. Fluid Mech. 168, 169-194 (1986)] if the slip length in simulation is defined according to Yue et al. ["Sharp-interface limit of the Cahn-Hilliard model for moving contact lines," J. Fluid Mech. 645, 279-294 (2010)]. It was also found that the steady capillary number of the drop is significantly affected by the viscosity ratio, the magnitudes of the WG, and the CAH, whereas it almost shows no dependence on the Reynolds number.

  6. Characterization of critically cleaned sapphire single-crystal substrates by atomic force microscopy, XPS and contact angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Wang, You; Gan, Yang

    2013-06-01

    A contaminant-free surface of single-crystal α-Al2O3 (or sapphire) substrates is key to the experimental studies of its surface and interfacial properties at ambient conditions. Here we critically evaluated methods reported in the literature using comprehensive surface analysis techniques including atomic force microscopy, XPS and contact angle measurements. We found that reported methods did not perform well in terms of removing both organic and particulate contaminants from the (0 0 0 1) basal surface. After thoroughly examining the cleaning effect of various chemical solutions and UV light and plasma irradiation, and based on modified RCA cleaning protocols, we proposed a new wet-cleaning method showing outstanding cleaning performance. This new reliable method will be very useful for the next-step surface chemistry study of single-crystal α-Al2O3. It was also demonstrated that AFM, due to its high spatial resolution and sensitivity as a local probe technique, was an indispensable tool for surface contamination control studies.

  7. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Avramoglou, T; Garcia, A; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid-base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie-Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles. PMID:26652458

  8. Effective Darcy-Scale Contact Angles in Porous Media Imbibing Solutions of Various Surface Tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, Noam; McGinnis, Thomas; Rockhold, Mark L.; Niemet, Mike; Selker, John S.

    2009-10-17

    Surface tensions of high-salinity solutions are significantly different from those of pure water. Our objective was to develop and test a methodology to determine whether these surface-tension effects predictably alter imbibition into dry and moist porous media. Static and dynamic experiments were performed using four grades of quartz sand to determine the effects of solution salinity on imbibition. Results were quantified as apparent contact angles between the sand and three solutions (pure water, 5 molal NaNO3, n-hexane). Contact angles determined using a static method in initially air-dried sand ranged from 23° to 31°, with the same values found for both water and the NaNO3 solution. Effective contact angles determined for the air-dried sand using a dynamic method based on a modified version of the Green and Ampt model were about twice those found using the static method, averaging 45° and 62° for water and the NaNO3 solution, respectively. In pre-wetted sands, the dynamic imbibition data yielded apparent contact angles of 2° and 21° for water and the NaNO3 solution, respectively, with the latter value comparing well to a predicted value of 25° for the NaNO3 solution based solely on surface-tension contrast. The results of this study indicate that on the Darcy-scale, saline solutions appear to follow the relationship of non-zero contact angles with other miscible fluids of different surface tensions used to pre-wet the sand grains, in agreement with the macro-scale infiltration results of Weisbrod et al. [2004].

  9. The effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet motion and collisions on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    The effect of varying the contact angle hysteresis of a superhydrophobic surface on the characteristics and dynamics of water droplet motion and their subsequent collision are investigated using a high-speed camera. The surfaces are created by imparting random roughness to Teflon through sanding. With this technique, it is possible to create surfaces with similar advancing contact angles near 150 degrees, but with varying contact angle hysteresis. This talk will focus on a number of interesting experimental observations pertaining to drop dynamics along a surface with uniform hysteresis, drop motion along surfaces with transition zones from one hysteresis to another, and the collision of droplets on surfaces of uniform hysteresis. For single drop studies, gravity is used as the driving force, while the collision studies use pressurized air to propel one drop into the other. For the case of droplet collision, the effect of hysteresis, Weber number, and impact number on the maximum deformation of the drops, and the post-collision dynamics will be discussed. For the single droplet measurements, the resistance to motion will be characterized as well as the transition from rolling to sliding as a function of drop size, inclination angle, and hysteresis. Additionally, we will quantify the effect of surface transitions on the resulting motion, mixing, and deflection of the drops.

  10. Investigation of Contact Angle Behavior and Stability of Drops to Airflow Forcing on Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmucker, Jason; White, Edward

    2011-11-01

    A method for measuring full-field, instantaneous drop interface profiles on rough surfaces has been implemented to study contact angles and stability to wind forcing on metallic surfaces with micron-scale roughness. Wind tunnel experiments are conducted to produce criteria for runback of drops and set these thresholds for measured water drops spanning a range of Bond numbers from Bo = 0 . 5 to 5 on roughness in the range of RA = 0 . 8 to 4 . 9 with drop based Reynolds numbers spanning an order of magnitude. More importantly, these stability limits are tested with particular care taken to observe their relation to the behavior of both the contact line and contact angle distribution as the drop adjusts its configuration to find a stable condition until it is no longer able to do so and is blown downstream. Results such as critical shear rates and contact angles are discussed and compared with previous numerical studies in the literature such as Dimitrakopoulos [J.Fluid.Mech. 580, 2007] and Ding and Spelt [J.Coll.Sci. 599, 2008] along with experimental results such as Milne [Langmuir 25:24, 2009].

  11. Relationship Between Hand Contact Angle and Shoulder Loading During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion by Individuals with Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Mulroy, Sara J.; Ruparel, Puja; Hatchett, Patricia E.; Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Eberly, Valerie J.; Gronley, JoAnne K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shoulder loading during manual wheelchair propulsion (WCP) contributes to the development of shoulder pain in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective: To use regression analysis to investigate the relationships between the hand contact angle (location of the hand on the pushrim at initial contact and release during the push phase of the WCP cycle) with propulsion characteristics, pushrim forces, and shoulder kinetics during WCP in individuals with paraplegia. Methods: Biomechanical data were collected from 222 individuals (198 men and 24 women) with paraplegia from SCI during WCP on a stationary ergometer at a self-selected speed. The average age of participants was 34.7 years (±9.3), mean time since SCI was 9.3 years (±6.1), and average body weight was 74.4 kg (±15.9). The majority (n = 127; 56%) of participants had lower level paraplegia (T8 to L5) and 95 (42%) had high paraplegia (T2 to T7). Results: Increased push arc (mean = 75.3°) was associated with greater velocity (R = 0.384, P < .001) and cycle distance (R = 0.658, P < .001) and reduced cadence (R = -0.419, P < .001). Initial contact angle and hand release angles were equally associated with cycle distance and cadence, whereas a more anterior release angle was associated with greater velocity (R = 0.372, P < .001). When controlling for body weight, a more posterior initial contact angle was associated with greater posterior shoulder net joint force (R = 0.229, P = .001) and greater flexor net joint moment (R = 0.204, P = .002), whereas a more anterior hand release angle was significantly associated with increased vertical (R = 0.270, P < .001) and greater lateral (R = .293, P < .001) pushrim forces; greater shoulder net joint forces in all 3 planes — posterior (R = 0.164, P = .015), superior (R = 0.176, P = .009), and medial (R = 0.284, P < .001); and greater external rotator (R = 0.176, P = .009) and adductor (R = 0.259, P = .001) net joint moments. Conclusions: Current

  12. Effect of contact angle on the orientation, stability, and assembly of dense floating cubes.

    PubMed

    Daniello, Robert; Khan, Kashan; Donnell, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of contact angle, density, and size on the orientation, stability, and assembly of floating cubes was investigated. All the cubes tested were more dense than water. Floatation occurred as a result of capillary stresses induced by deformation of the air-water interface. The advancing contact angle of the bare acrylic cubes was measured to be 85°. The contact angle of the cubes was increased by painting the cubes with a commercially available superhydrophobic paint to reach an advancing contact angle of 150°. Depending on their size, density, and contact angle, the cubes were observed to float in one of three primary orientations: edge up, vertex up, and face up. An experimental apparatus was built such that the sum of the gravitational force, buoyancy force, and capillary forces could be measured using a force transducer as a function of cube position as it was lowered through the air-water interface. Measurements showed that the maximum capillary forces were always experienced for the face up orientation. However, when floatation was possible in the vertex up orientation, it was found to be the most stable cube orientation because it had the lowest center of gravity. A series of theoretical predictions were performed for the cubes floating in each of the three primary orientations to calculate the net force on the cube. The theoretical predictions were found to match the experimental measurements well. A cube stability diagram of cube orientation as a function of cube contact angle and size was prepared from the predictions of theory and found to match the experimental observations quite well. The assembly of cubes floating face up and vertex up were also studied for assemblies of two, three, and many cubes. Cubes floating face up were found to assemble face-to-face and form regular square lattice patterns with no free interface between cubes. Cubes floating vertex up were found to assemble in a variety of different arrangements

  13. Effect of contact angle on the orientation, stability, and assembly of dense floating cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniello, Robert; Khan, Kashan; Donnell, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of contact angle, density, and size on the orientation, stability, and assembly of floating cubes was investigated. All the cubes tested were more dense than water. Floatation occurred as a result of capillary stresses induced by deformation of the air-water interface. The advancing contact angle of the bare acrylic cubes was measured to be 85°. The contact angle of the cubes was increased by painting the cubes with a commercially available superhydrophobic paint to reach an advancing contact angle of 150°. Depending on their size, density, and contact angle, the cubes were observed to float in one of three primary orientations: edge up, vertex up, and face up. An experimental apparatus was built such that the sum of the gravitational force, buoyancy force, and capillary forces could be measured using a force transducer as a function of cube position as it was lowered through the air-water interface. Measurements showed that the maximum capillary forces were always experienced for the face up orientation. However, when floatation was possible in the vertex up orientation, it was found to be the most stable cube orientation because it had the lowest center of gravity. A series of theoretical predictions were performed for the cubes floating in each of the three primary orientations to calculate the net force on the cube. The theoretical predictions were found to match the experimental measurements well. A cube stability diagram of cube orientation as a function of cube contact angle and size was prepared from the predictions of theory and found to match the experimental observations quite well. The assembly of cubes floating face up and vertex up were also studied for assemblies of two, three, and many cubes. Cubes floating face up were found to assemble face-to-face and form regular square lattice patterns with no free interface between cubes. Cubes floating vertex up were found to assemble in a variety of different arrangements

  14. An analytical solution for a partially wetting puddle and the location of the static contact angle.

    PubMed

    Elena Diaz, M; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-08-01

    A model is formulated for a static puddle on a horizontal substrate taking account of capillarity, gravity and disjoining pressure arising from molecular interactions. There are three regions of interest--the molecular, transition and capillary regions with characteristic film thickness, hm, ht and hc. An analytical solution is presented for the shape of the vapour-liquid interface outside the molecular region where interfacial tension can be assumed constant. This solution is used to shed new light on the static contact angle and, specifically, it is shown that. (i) There is no point in the vapour-liquid interface where the angle of inclination, theta, is identically equal to the static contact angle, theta(o), but the angle at the point of null curvature is the closest with the difference of O(epsilon2) where epsilon2 = ht/hc is a small parameter. (ii) The liquid film is to O(epsilon) a wedge of angle theta(o) extending from a few nanometers to a few micrometers of the contact line. A second analytical solution for the shape of interface within the molecular region reveals that cos theta has a logarithmic variation with film thickness, cos theta=cos theta-ln[1-h2(m)/2h2]. The case, hm = 0, is of special significance since it refers to a unique configuration in which the effect of molecular interactions vanishes, disjoining pressure is everywhere zero and the vapour-liquid interface is now described exactly by the Young-Laplace equation and includes a wedge of angle, theta(o), extending down to the solid substrate. PMID:20466385

  15. Non-contact angle measurement based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Lian

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel precise angle measurement scheme based on parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry (PLFI), which outputs two parallel laser beams and thus their displacement difference reflects the angle variation of the target. Due to its ultrahigh sensitivity to the feedback light, PLFI realizes the direct non-contact measurement of non-cooperative targets. Experimental results show that PLFI has an accuracy of 8″ within a range of 1400″. The yaw of a guide is also measured and the experimental results agree with those of the dual-frequency laser interferometer Agilent 5529A.

  16. Contact Angle of Drops Measured on Nontransparent Surfaces and Capillary Flow Visualized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2003-01-01

    The spreading of a liquid on a solid surface is important for various practical processes, and contact-angle measurements provide an elegant method to characterize the interfacial properties of the liquid with the solid substrates. The complex physical processes occurring when a liquid contacts a solid play an important role in determining the performance of chemical processes and materials. Applications for these processes are in printing, coating, gluing, textile dyeing, and adhesives and in the pharmaceutical industry, biomedical research, adhesives, flat panel display manufacturing, surfactant chemistry, and thermal engineering.

  17. Wetting behaviour and contact angles anisotropy of nematic nanodroplets on flat surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vanzo, Davide; Ricci, Matteo; Berardi, Roberto; Zannoni, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the wetting behaviour of liquid crystal nanodroplets deposited on a planar surface, modelling the mesogens with Gay-Berne ellipsoids and the support surface with a slab of Lennard-Jones (LJ) spherical particles whose mesogen-surface affinity can be tuned. A crystalline and an amorphous planar surface, both showing planar anchoring, have been investigated: the first is the (001) facet of a LJ fcc crystal, the second is obtained from a disordered LJ glass. In both cases we find that the deposited nanodroplet is, in general, elongated and that the contact angle changes around its contour. Simulations for the crystalline substrate show that the angle of contact turns reversibly from anisotropic to isotropic when crossing the clearing transition. As far as we know this is a novel, not yet explored effect for thermotropic liquid crystals, that we hope will stimulate experimental investigations. PMID:26670582

  18. Contact angle measurements of a polyphenyl ether to 190 C on M-50 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Contact angle measurements were performed for a polyphenyl ether on steel in nitrogen. A tilting plate and a sessile drop apparatus were used. Surface tension was measured with a maximum bubble pressure apparatus. Critical surface energies of spreading were found to be 30.1 and 31.3 dynes/cm. It was concluded that the polyphenyl ether is inherently autophobic and will not spread on its own surface film.

  19. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily; deGroh, Kim; Banks, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment, spacecraft surfaces can be altered during atomic oxygen exposure through oxidation and erosion. There can be terrestrial benefits of such interactions, such as the modification of hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of polymers due to chemical modification and texturing. Such modification of the surface may be useful for biomedical applications. For example, atomic oxygen texturing may increase the hydrophilicity of polymers, such as chlorotrifluoroethylene (Aclar), thus allowing increased adhesion and spreading of cells on textured Petri dishes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after atomic oxygen exposure or changes with exposure, the contact angles between the polymer and a water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a radio frequency (RF) plasma asher. Atomic oxygen plasma treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Significant decreases in the water contact angle occurred with atomic oxygen exposure. Fluorinated polymers were found to be less sensitive to changes in hydrophilicity for equivalent atomic oxygen exposures, and two of the fluorinated polymers became more hydrophobic. The majority of change in water contact angle of the non-fluorinated polymers was found to occur with very low fluence exposures, indicating potential cell culturing benefit with short treatment time.

  20. Determination of the surface isoelectric point of oxide films on metals by contact angle titration

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Wightman, J.P.

    1997-10-15

    The surface isoelectric point for the native air-formed oxide films on aluminum, chromium, and tantalum has been determined by measurement of contact angles at the hexadecane/aqueous solution interface as a function of pH of the aqueous phase. Application of Young`s equation, the Gibbs equation, and surface equilibria conditions for hydroxylated oxide films leads to a mathematical expression which shows that the contact angle goes through a maximum at the isoelectric point of the oxide. The experimentally determined isoelectric point of oxide-covered chromium is 5.2 to 5.3, of oxide-covered aluminum is 9.5, and of oxide-covered tantalum is approximately {minus}0.7. These values for the oxide films are within one to three pH units of the reported isoelectric points for the corresponding bulk oxide powders. The oxide-covered metal surfaces were cleaned by argon plasma treatment prior to measurement of contact angles, in that XPS measurements showed this treatment to be effective in reducing the thickness of the carbon contamination layer. In addition, interfacial tensions were measured at the hexadecane/aqueous solution interface and were observed to have only a slight dependence on the pH of the aqueous phase.

  1. Spreading of liquid droplets on cylindrical surfaces: Accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, H. D.

    1990-02-01

    The characterization of the physicochemical nature of interfaces is a key problem in the field of advanced fibrous composites. The macroscopic regime contact angle, which reflects the energetics of wetting at the solid-liquid interface, is difficult to measure by usual methods in the case of very thin cylindrical fibers, but it may be calculated from the shape of a liquid droplet spread onto a cylindrical monofilament using a method developed by Yamaki and Katayama [J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 19, 2897 (1975)], and B. J. Carroll [J. Coll. Interf. Sci. 57, 488 (1976)]. Unfortunately, measurements of the contact angle based on this method are, so far, unable to provide an accuracy of better than about 5°. In the present article two simple extensions of the method of Yamaki and Katayama and Carroll, are presented, from which highly accurate values of the contact angle may be obtained. This is demonstrated experimentally from the spreading of glycerol droplets on carbon fibers and epoxy droplets on aramid fibers.

  2. Wettability transparency and the quasiuniversal relationship between hydrodynamic slip and contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    The universality of the scaling laws that correlate the hydrodynamic slip length and static contact angle was investigated by introducing the concept of the wettability transparency of graphene-coated surfaces. Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of droplet wettability for Si(111), Si(100), and graphene-coated silicon surfaces were performed to determine the conditions required to obtain similar contact angles between bare and graphene-coated surfaces (wettability transparency). The hydrodynamic slip length was determined by means of equilibrium calculations for silicon and graphene-coated silicon nanochannels. The results indicate that the slip-wettability scaling laws can be used to describe the slip behavior of the bare silicon nanochannels in general terms; however, clear departures from a general universal description were observed for hydrophobic conditions. In addition, a significant difference in the hydrodynamic slippage was observed under wettability transparency conditions. Alternatively, the hydrodynamic boundary condition for silicon and graphene-coated silicon nanochannels was more accurately predicted by observing the density depletion length, posing this parameter as a better alternative than the contact angle to correlate with the slip length.

  3. Changes in contact angle providing evidence for surface alteration in multi-component solid foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Svenja K.; Hauf, Katharina; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Chocolate blooming, one of the major problems in the confectionery industry, is the formation of visible white spots or a greyish haze on the surface of chocolate products due to large sugar or fat crystals on the surface. This leads to aesthetic changes and deterioration of taste and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry due to consumer complaints. Chocolate blooming is often related to migration of lipids or sugar molecules to the chocolate surface, where they recrystallize with an associated polymorphic change of crystal structure on the surface. The wetting behaviour from contact angle measurements gives further insight into surface properties and is needed to determine surface energies and to evaluate possible migration mechanisms and preferred pathways. Therefore, an equilibrium contact angle is needed which is not directly accessible and is influenced by surface texture and interaction between solid and test liquid. In this study, the surface of cocoa butter and conventional chocolates was characterized by measuring the contact angle with the sessile drop protocol. The influence of roughness, test liquid and pre-crystallization of the samples as well as the storage temperature were investigated. In case of no pre-crystallization, a change in surface properties due to storage at 20 °C was detected, whereas samples stored at 30 °C showed the same wetting behaviour as fresh samples. This is associated with polymorphic transformation from thermodynamically less stable crystals to more stable configurations.

  4. Study the friction behaviour of poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] brush with AFM probes in contact mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftari, Maryam; Zhang, Zhenyu; Leggett, Graham J.; Geoghegan, Mark

    2011-10-01

    We have studied the frictional behaviour of grafted poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) films using friction force microscopy (FFM). The films were prepared on native oxide-terminated silicon substrates using the technique of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). We show that single asperity contact mechanics (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts(JKR) and Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov(DMT)) as well as a linear (Amontons) relation between applied load and frictional load depending on the pH of the FFM probe. Measurements were made using functionalized and unfunctionalized silicon nitride triangular probes. Functionalized probes included gold-coated probes, and ones coated with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol (DDT). The frictional behaviour between PDMAEMA and all tips immersed in pH from 3 to 11 are corresponded to the DMT or JKR model and are linear in pH=1, 2, and 12. These results show that contact mechanics of polyelectrolytes in water is complex and strongly dependent on the environmental pH.

  5. Calculation of contact angles at triple phase boundary in solid oxide fuel cell anode using the level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaojun; Hasegawa, Yosuke; Kohno, Haruhiko; Jiao, Zhenjun; Hayakawa, Koji; Okita, Kohei; Shikazono, Naoki

    2014-10-15

    A level set method is applied to characterize the three dimensional structures of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases in solid oxide fuel cell anode reconstructed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope. A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the triple phase boundary based on interfacial normal vectors which can be calculated from the signed distance functions defined for each of the three phases. Furthermore, surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles by assuming the interfacial force balance at the triple phase boundary. The average contact angle values of nickel, yttria stabilized zirconia and pore are found to be 143°–156°, 83°–138° and 82°–123°, respectively. The mean contact angles remained nearly unchanged after 100 hour operation. However, the contact angles just after reduction are different for the cells with different sintering temperatures. In addition, standard deviations of the contact angles are very large especially for yttria stabilized zirconia and pore phases. The calculated surface tension forces from mean contact angles were close to the experimental values found in the literature. Slight increase of surface tensions of nickel/pore and nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia were observed after operation. Present data are expected to be used not only for the understanding of the degradation mechanism, but also for the quantitative prediction of the microstructural temporal evolution of solid oxide fuel cell anode. - Highlights: • A level set method is applied to characterize the 3D structures of SOFC anode. • A numerical algorithm is developed to evaluate the contact angles at the TPB. • Surface tension force is estimated from the contact angles. • The average contact angle values are found to be 143o-156o, 83o-138o and 82o-123o. • Present data are expected to understand degradation and predict evolution of SOFC.

  6. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, J; Billingham, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb. PMID:26871170

  7. Evaporation-induced flow in an inviscid liquid line at any contact angle.

    PubMed

    Petsi, A J; Burganos, V N

    2006-04-01

    The problem of potential flow inside an evaporating liquid line, shaped as an infinitely long cylindrical segment lying on a flat surface, is considered and an analytical solution is obtained for any contact angle in (0, pi). In this way, microflow details inside linear liquid bodies evaporating on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and strongly hydrophobic substrates can now be obtained. The mathematical formulation employs the velocity potential and stream function formulations in bipolar coordinates and the solution is obtained using the technique of Fourier transform. Both pinned and depinned contact lines are considered. The solution is applicable to any evaporation mechanism but for illustration purposes numerical results are presented here for the particular case of kinetically controlled evaporation. For hydrophilic substrates, the flow inside the evaporating liquid line is directed towards the edges for pinned contact lines, thus, promoting a coffee stain effect. The opposite flow direction is observed for depinned contact lines. However, for strongly hydrophobic substrates, flow is directed outwards for both pinned and depinned contact lines, but owing to its low magnitude compared to that on hydrophilic substrates, a craterlike colloidal deposit should be expected rather than a ringlike deposit, in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:16711786

  8. Pore-scale Analysis of the effects of Contact Angle Hysteresis on Blob Mobilization in a Pore Doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Glantz, Roland; Hilpert, Markus

    2011-11-01

    The mobilization of residual oil blobs in porous media is of major interest to the petroleum industry. We studied the Jamin effect, which hampers the blob mobilization, experimentally in a pore doublet model and explain the Jamin effect through contact angle hysteresis. A liquid blob was trapped in one of the tubes of the pore doublet model and then subjected to different pressure gradients. We measured the contact angles (in 2D and 3D) as well as the mean curvatures of the blob. Due to gravity effects and hysteresis, the contact angles of the blob were initially (zero pressure gradient) non-uniform and exhibited a pronounced altitude dependence. As the pressure gradient was increased, the contact angles became more uniform and the altitude dependence of the contact angle decreased. At the same time, the mean curvature of the drainage interface increased, and the mean curvature of the imbibition interface decreased. The pressure drops across the pore model, which we inferred with our theory from the measured contact angles and mean curvatures, were in line with the directly measured pressure data. We not only show that a trapped blob can sustain a finite pressure gradient but also develop methods to measure the contact angles and mean curvatures in 3D.

  9. A thermodynamic approach to predict apparent contact angles on microstructures using surface polygonal maps.

    PubMed

    Calvimontes, A

    2014-11-01

    The thermodynamic model of wetting developed and tested in this work allows the understanding and prediction of apparent contact angles on topographic maps of real and digitally-generated microstructures. The model considers the solid component as a set of finite areal elements in the form of a polygonal map. Liquid and gas components are instead evaluated as continuous and incompressible volumes. In this study, the concept of the wetting topographic spectrum (WTS) is proposed to simulate the changes in the liquid-solid contact areas and of the interfacial energies while wetting the microstructure from the top to the bottom of the topographic map, passing through various states of metastable equilibrium, to find a stable configuration. The model was successfully applied to predict the wetting apparent contact angles on randomly micro-structured polypropylene (PP) surfaces and on a superhydrophobic and superoleophobic transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microstructure previously presented as a communication in this journal by other authors. The method presented in this study can be used to design and predict the geometry of microstructures with special wetting characteristics. PMID:25192555

  10. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-01

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces. PMID:24070378

  11. Particle contact angles at fluid interfaces: pushing the boundary beyond hard uniform spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, Michele; Isa, Lucio

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces have been attracting increasing interest in the last few decades as building blocks for materials, as mechanical and structural probes for complex interfaces and as models for two-dimensional systems. The three-phase contact angle enters practically all aspects of the particle behavior at the interface: its thermodynamics (binding energy to the interface), dynamics (motion and drag at the interface) and interactions with the interface (adsorption and wetting). Moreover, many interactions among particles at the interface also strongly depend on the contact angle. These concepts have been extensively discussed for non-deformable, homogeneous and mostly spherical particles, but recent progress in particle synthesis and fabrication has instead moved in the direction of producing more complex micro and nanoscale objects, which can be responsive, deformable, heterogenous and/or anisotropic in shape, surface chemistry and material properties. These new particles have a much greater potential for applications and new science, and the study of their behavior at interfaces has only very recently started. In this paper, we critically review the current state of the art of the experimental methods available to measure the contact angle of micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces, indicating their strengths and limitations. We then comment on new particle systems that are currently attracting increasing interest in relation to their adsorption and assembly at fluid interfaces and discuss if and which ones of the current techniques are suited to investigate their properties at interfaces. Based on this discussion, we will finally try to indicate a direction in which new experimental methods should develop in the future to tackle the new challenges posed by the novel types of particles that more and more often are used at interfaces.

  12. Particle contact angles at fluid interfaces: pushing the boundary beyond hard uniform spherical colloids.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Michele; Isa, Lucio

    2016-08-10

    Micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces have been attracting increasing interest in the last few decades as building blocks for materials, as mechanical and structural probes for complex interfaces and as models for two-dimensional systems. The three-phase contact angle enters practically all aspects of the particle behavior at the interface: its thermodynamics (binding energy to the interface), dynamics (motion and drag at the interface) and interactions with the interface (adsorption and wetting). Moreover, many interactions among particles at the interface also strongly depend on the contact angle. These concepts have been extensively discussed for non-deformable, homogeneous and mostly spherical particles, but recent progress in particle synthesis and fabrication has instead moved in the direction of producing more complex micro and nanoscale objects, which can be responsive, deformable, heterogenous and/or anisotropic in shape, surface chemistry and material properties. These new particles have a much greater potential for applications and new science, and the study of their behavior at interfaces has only very recently started. In this paper, we critically review the current state of the art of the experimental methods available to measure the contact angle of micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces, indicating their strengths and limitations. We then comment on new particle systems that are currently attracting increasing interest in relation to their adsorption and assembly at fluid interfaces and discuss if and which ones of the current techniques are suited to investigate their properties at interfaces. Based on this discussion, we will finally try to indicate a direction in which new experimental methods should develop in the future to tackle the new challenges posed by the novel types of particles that more and more often are used at interfaces. PMID:27299800

  13. Enhancing Condensers for Geothermal Systems: the Effect of High Contact Angles on Dropwise Condensation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John M.; Kim, Sunwoo; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-10-06

    Phase change heat transfer is notorious for increasing the irreversibility of, and therefore decreasing the efficiency of, geothermal power plants. Its significant contribution to the overall irreversibility of the plant makes it the most important source of inefficiency in the process. Recent studies here have shown the promotion of drop wise condensation in the lab by means of increasing the surface energy density of a tube with nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology has allowed the creation of surface treatments which discourage water from wetting a tube surface during a static test. These surface treatments are unique in that they create high- contact angles on the condensing tube surfaces to promote drop wise condensation.

  14. Investigation of the surface of implanted silicon crystal by the contact angle

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, N.N.; Bakovets, V.V.; Sedymova, E.A.; Pridachin, N.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors study the dependence of the critical contact angle of silicon upon the dose of its irradiation by argon and boron ions. It is established that the system of immiscible liquids ether-water can be successfully used to study the influence of ion implantation of silicon on its wettability by water. The change in the wettability of implanted silicon is related to the increase in the level of the defect state of the layer surface. Wetting of implanted silicon by melts at high temperatures can be used for studying the kinetics and the annealing mechanism of defects.

  15. Formation of Surface Nanobubbles and the Universality of Their Contact Angles: A Molecular Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijs, Joost H.; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-03-01

    We study surface nanobubbles using molecular dynamics simulation of ternary (gas, liquid, solid) systems of Lennard-Jones fluids. They form for a sufficiently low gas solubility in the liquid, i.e., for a large relative gas concentration. For a strong enough gas-solid attraction, the surface nanobubble is sitting on a gas layer, which forms in between the liquid and the solid. This gas layer is the reason for the universality of the contact angle, which we calculate from the microscopic parameters. Under the present equilibrium conditions the nanobubbles dissolve within less of a microsecond, consistent with the view that the experimentally found nanobubbles are stabilized by a nonequilibrium mechanism.

  16. Surface acid-base characteristics of fiber materials by contact angle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Youan . Dept. of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry)

    1993-11-05

    Contact angle measurements were used to study the surface acid-base characteristics of treated and untreated carbon fibers, and of treated and untreated silicon carbide fibers. It has been shown that, when untreated the surfaces of these two fibers exhibits amphoteric, but the base character is dominant. After oxidization in a liquid phase, the surface acid character of the carbon fibers changes little, whereas the base character becomes much stronger. The treatment, with boiling-concentrated HNO[sub 3] for three hours and the sintering treatment in air at 500 C. for eight hours, has little effect on the surface acid-base characteristics of the silicon carbide fibers.

  17. The effect of friction and impact angle on the spermatozoa-oocyte local contact dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hedrih, Andjelka; Banić, Milan

    2016-03-21

    Although a large proportion of biomolecules involved in spermatozoa-oocyte interaction has been discovered so far, many details of fertilization mechanism remain unknown. Both biochemical and biomechanical components exist in the fertilization process. Mammalian sperm evolved a ZP (zona pelucida) thrust reduction penetration strategy probably in response to the ZP resilient elasticity. Using a biomechanical approach and FEM analysis, local contact stress, ZP deformations during impact and attempt of sperm head penetration relative to different sperm impact angles (SIA) were studied. The sperm-oocyte contact was defined as non-linear frictional contact. A transient structural analysis at 37°C revealed that, from the mechanical standpoint there are SIA that are more favorable for possible ZP penetration due to larger equivalent stress of ZP. An "slip-stick" resembling effect was identified for almost all examined SIA. The sperm head-ZP contact area increases as SIA decreases. Favorable ZP-stress state for sperm penetration regarding SIA are discussed. PMID:26780648

  18. Evaluation of touch-sensitive screen tablet terminal button size and spacing accounting for effect of fingertip contact angle.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Doi, K; Fujimoto, H

    2015-08-01

    Touch-sensitive screen terminals enabling intuitive operation are used as input interfaces in a wide range of fields. Tablet terminals are one of the most common devices with a touch-sensitive screen. They have a feature of good portability, enabling use under various conditions. On the other hand, they require a GUI designed to prevent decrease of usability under various conditions. For example, the angle of fingertip contact with the display changes according to finger posture during operation and how the case is held. When a human fingertip makes contact with an object, the contact area between the fingertip and contact object increases or decreases as the contact angle changes. A touch-sensitive screen detects positions using the change in capacitance of the area touched by the fingertip; hence, differences in contact area between the touch-sensitive screen and fingertip resulting from different forefinger angles during operation could possibly affect operability. However, this effect has never been studied. We therefore conducted an experiment to investigate the relationship between size/spacing and operability, while taking the effect of fingertip contact angle into account. As a result, we have been able to specify the button size and spacing conditions that enable accurate and fast operation regardless of the forefinger contact angle. PMID:26736469

  19. Contact angle and surface tension measurements of a five-ring polyphenyl ether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Contact angle measurements were performed for a five-ring polyphenyl ether isomeric mixture on M-50 steel in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Two different techniques were used: (1) a tilting plate apparatus, and (2) a sessile drop apparatus. Measurements were made for the temperature range 25 to 190 C. Surface tension was measured by a differential maximum bubble pressure technique over the range 23 to 220C in room air. The critical surface energy of spreading (gamma (sub c)) was determined for the polyphenyl ether by plotting the cosine of the contact angle (theta) versus the surface tension (gamma (sub LV)). The straight line intercept at cosine theta = 1 is defined as gamma (sub c). Gamma (sub c) was found to be 30.1 dyn/cm for the tilting plate technique and 31.3 dyn/cm for the sessile drop technique. These results indicate that the polyphenyl ether is inherently autophobic (i.e., it will not spread on its own surface film until its surface tension is less than gamma (sub c). This phenomenon is discussed in light of the wettability and wear problems encountered with this fluid.

  20. Apparent dynamic contact angle of an advancing gas--liquid meniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliadasis, S.; Chang, H. )

    1994-01-01

    The steady motion of an advancing meniscus in a gas-filled capillary tube involves a delicate balance of capillary, viscous, and intermolecular forces. The limit of small capillary numbers Ca (dimensionless speeds) is analyzed here with a matched asymptotic analysis that links the outer capillary region to the precursor film in front of the meniscus through a lubricating film. The meniscus shape in the outer region is constructed and the apparent dynamic contact angle [Theta] that the meniscus forms with the solid surface is derived as a function of the capillary number, the capillary radius, and the Hamaker's constant for intermolecular forces, under conditions of weak gas--solid interaction, which lead to fast spreading of the precursor film and weak intermolecular forces relative to viscous forces within the lubricating film. The dependence on intermolecular forces is very weak and the contact angle expression has a tight upper bound tan [Theta]=7.48 Ca[sup 1/3] for thick films, which is independent of the Hamaker constant. This upper bound is in very good agreement with existing experimental data for wetting fluids in any capillary and for partially wetting fluids in a prewetted capillary. Significant correction to the Ca[sup 1/3] dependence occurs only at very low Ca, where the intermolecular forces become more important and tan [Theta] diverges slightly from the above asymptotic behavior toward lower values.

  1. The variation of surface contact angles according to the diameter of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Chang; Choi, Won Seok; Hong, Byungyou

    2009-06-01

    The shape of CNTs is affected by various growth parameters such as reaction time, temperature, working power, and pressure as well as the type of catalytic layer and synthesis method. In this work, the thickness of Ni catalyst layer was varied to control the diameter of synthesized CNT. Ni catalyst layer was prepared using a DC magnetron sputtering method and the layer thickness was varied from 40 nm to 100 nm with the increment of 20 nm. And CNTs were grown on Ni catalyst layer using the hot-filament plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD) with ammonia (NH3) gas for pretreatment and acetylene (C2H2) gas for the synthesis. The shape of the resulting CNTs was analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The surface contact angle of well-aligned CNTs was correlated with the diameter of CNT. As determined by contact angle measurement, the surface of CNT forests became more hydrophilic as the diameter of CNT increased. PMID:19504923

  2. Investigation of energy dissipation due to contact angle hysteresis in capillary effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Iyer, Ram

    2016-06-01

    Capillary action or Capillarity is the ability of a liquid to flow in narrow spaces without the assistance of, and in opposition to, external forces like gravity. Three effects contribute to capillary action, namely, adhesion of the liquid to the walls of the confining solid; meniscus formation; and low Reynolds number fluid flow. We investigate the dissipation of energy during one cycle of capillary action, when the liquid volume inside a capillary tube first increases and subsequently decreases while assuming quasi-static motion. The quasi-static assumption allows us to focus on the wetting phenomenon of the solid wall by the liquid and the formation of the meniscus. It is well known that the motion of a liquid on an non-ideal surface involves the expenditure of energy due to contact angle hysteresis. In this paper, we derive the equations for the menisci and the flow rules for the change of the contact angles for a liquid column in a capillary tube at a constant temperature and volume by minimizing the Helmholtz free energy using calculus of variations. We describe the numerical solution of these equations and present results from computations for the case of a capillary tube with 1 mm diameter.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of contact angle and its hysteresis in two-phase flow with large viscosity difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Ju, Yaping; Wang, Ningning; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon omnipresent in nature and various industrial processes, but its effects are not considered in many existing multiphase flow simulations due to modeling complexity. In this work, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to simulate the contact-line dynamics with consideration of the contact angle hysteresis for a broad range of kinematic viscosity ratios. In this method, the immiscible two-phase flow is described by a color-fluid model, in which the multiple-relaxation-time collision operator is adopted to increase numerical stability and suppress unphysical spurious currents at the contact line. The contact angle hysteresis is introduced using the strategy proposed by Ding and Spelt [Ding and Spelt, J. Fluid Mech. 599, 341 (2008), 10.1017/S0022112008000190], and the geometrical wetting boundary condition is enforced to obtain the desired contact angle. This method is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process on ideal (smooth) surfaces. It is then used to simulate the dynamic behavior of a droplet on a nonideal (inhomogeneous) surface subject to a simple shear flow. When the droplet remains pinned on the surface due to hysteresis, the steady interface shapes of the droplet quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical results. Four typical motion modes of contact points, as observed in a recent study, are qualitatively reproduced with varying advancing and receding contact angles. The viscosity ratio is found to have a notable impact on the droplet deformation, breakup, and hysteresis behavior. Finally, this method is extended to simulate the droplet breakup in a microfluidic T junction, with one half of the wall surface ideal and the other half nonideal. Due to the contact angle hysteresis, the droplet asymmetrically breaks up into two daughter droplets with the smaller one in the nonideal branch channel, and the behavior of

  4. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of contact angle and its hysteresis in two-phase flow with large viscosity difference.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Ju, Yaping; Wang, Ningning; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon omnipresent in nature and various industrial processes, but its effects are not considered in many existing multiphase flow simulations due to modeling complexity. In this work, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to simulate the contact-line dynamics with consideration of the contact angle hysteresis for a broad range of kinematic viscosity ratios. In this method, the immiscible two-phase flow is described by a color-fluid model, in which the multiple-relaxation-time collision operator is adopted to increase numerical stability and suppress unphysical spurious currents at the contact line. The contact angle hysteresis is introduced using the strategy proposed by Ding and Spelt [Ding and Spelt, J. Fluid Mech. 599, 341 (2008)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S0022112008000190], and the geometrical wetting boundary condition is enforced to obtain the desired contact angle. This method is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process on ideal (smooth) surfaces. It is then used to simulate the dynamic behavior of a droplet on a nonideal (inhomogeneous) surface subject to a simple shear flow. When the droplet remains pinned on the surface due to hysteresis, the steady interface shapes of the droplet quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical results. Four typical motion modes of contact points, as observed in a recent study, are qualitatively reproduced with varying advancing and receding contact angles. The viscosity ratio is found to have a notable impact on the droplet deformation, breakup, and hysteresis behavior. Finally, this method is extended to simulate the droplet breakup in a microfluidic T junction, with one half of the wall surface ideal and the other half nonideal. Due to the contact angle hysteresis, the droplet asymmetrically breaks up into two daughter droplets with the smaller one in the nonideal branch channel, and the

  5. Is a Knowledge of Surface Topology and Contact Angles Enough to Define the Drop Impact Outcome?

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Ileana; Veronesi, Federico; Caldarelli, Aurora; Zani, Maurizio; Raimondo, Mariarosa; Marengo, Marco

    2016-06-28

    It is well known that a superhydrophobic surface may not be able to repel impacting droplets because of the so-called Cassie-to-Wenzel transition. It has been proven that a critical value of the receding contact angle (θR) exists for the complete rebound of water, recently experimentally measured to be 100° for a large range of impact velocities. On the contrary, in the present work, no rebound was observed when low-surface-tension liquids such as hexadecane (σ = 27.5 mN/m at 25 °C) are concerned, even for very low impact velocities and very high values of θR and low contact angle hysteresis. Therefore, the critical threshold of θR ≈ 100° does not sound acceptable for all liquids and for all hydrophobic surfaces. For the same Weber numbers, a Cassie-to-Wenzel state transition occurs after the impact as a result of the easier penetration of low-surface-tension fluids in the surface structure. Hence, a criterion for the drop rebound of low-surface-tension liquids must consider not only the contact angle values with surfaces but also their surface tension and viscosity. This suggests that, even if it is possible to produce surfaces with enhanced static repellence against oils and organics, generally the realization of synthetic materials with self-cleaning and antisticking abilities in dynamic phenomena, such as spray impact, remains an unsolved task. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the chemistry of the surface, the physicochemical interactions with the liquid drops, and the possible wettability gradient of the surface asperity also play important roles in determining the critical Weber number above which impalement occurs. Therefore, the classical numerical simulations of drop impact on dry surfaces are definitively not able to capture the final outcomes of the impact for all possible fluids if the surface topology and chemistry and/or the wettability gradient in the surface structure are not properly reflected. PMID:27228028

  6. Electric double-layer interactions in a wedge geometry: Change in contact angle for drops and bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Siddhartha; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we provide a theory to pinpoint the role of electric double layer (EDL) interactions in governing the contact angle of an electrolyte drop on a charged solid in air or a bubble on a charged surface within an electrolyte solution. The EDL interactions are analytically solved by representing the three phase contact line as a wedge edge, with the wedge being formed by the solid-liquid and the air-liquid interfaces, and calculating the corresponding Maxwell stresses. We demonstrate that the EDL effects induce an “electrowetting-like” behavior, resulting in a lowering of the contact angle. As a specific example, we use this model to analyze the effect of added salt on preformed surface nanobubbles, and find, in contrast to what has been reported earlier, that even for most moderate conditions, added salt may have remarkable effect in altering the contact angle in preformed surface nanobubbles.

  7. Calculating interface curvature and contact angle with NURBS for coating flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hyeyoung; Nam, Jaewook

    2016-03-01

    Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) has actively been used in various field such as modeling, rendering, production of animation and engineering analysis program, etc., because NURBS has many advantages. It can exactly describe curved surface like conics, sphere and even human body. Also, it is effective at computational calculation because storage to calculate NURBS is far less compared to the other method. Therefore, we use NURBS curve to represent interface from computational data and experiment data. By exactly describing free surface, we can obtain several physical properties for calculating coating condition and compare these results with experimental results. It leads to calculate more accurate coating condition. In this study, we make smooth curve to represent interface using NURBS curve with optimization. And we calculate curvature and contact angle with these results.

  8. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  9. Direct determination of contact angles of model soils in comparison with wettability characterization by capillary rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Flores, Juan Carlos; Bachmann, Jörg; Marmur, Abraham

    2010-03-01

    SummaryAn accurate method to determine contact angles (CA) of soils as a measure of water repellency is still missing. In the present research, we evaluated and compared different methods to determine the CA of dry soil samples. Experiments were made by using a set of porous materials (silt, sand and glass beads) with different levels of water repellency. The CAs were measured with the Capillary Rise Method ( θCRM; liquid penetration into a 3-d system), the Wilhelmy plate method ( θWPM; measurement of capillary forces acting on a plane sample) and the Sessile Drop Method ( θSDM; optical CA analysis of drop contour on a plane sample). Results were compared with the CAs calculated from capillary rise in long vertical columns ( θECR), where liquid profiles of the final capillary rise of water and ethanol, respectively, were used to derive the contact angle under the assumed equilibrium conditions. The results showed the overestimation of the CA by using the well established bi-liquid CRM technique for porous materials, in particular for material with a low degree of water repellency (CA < 40°) and for the finer textured materials. In contrast, a variant of the Wilhelmy plate method, i.e. the cosine-averaged advancing CA and receding CA ( θEWPM), as well as the Sessile Drop CA, θSDM, were close to the ones of θECR. We concluded that θEWPM and θSDM are apparent CA, but nevertheless able to predict the impact of wettability on the final capillary rise which is affected by pore topology as well as by wettability.

  10. Linking fractional wettability and contact angle dynamics in water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, Sarah; Smith, James

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic soil water repellency has become a highly documented soil phenomenon across a range of environmental conditions and investigated within a range of disciplines. With global climate change at the environmental science fore, there is growing concern and need for accurate quantification of fundamental soil hydraulic properties and model parameterization. In the presence of soil water repellency, however, substantial unknowns remain in terms of characterizing repellency and drawing linkages to fundamental hydraulic parameters. This is often related to the complexity of investigating soil water repellency, which is often a challenging environment because of its spatially and temporally variable nature. To help bridge this gap, this work reports on different approaches using various technologies to explore opportunities that yield greater quantification and parametrization of soil water repellency in natural hydrologic systems at different scales. These approaches include X-ray microtomography (μXCT), Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA), Drop Penetration tests (MED/WDPT), and Tension Infiltrometry. This work has shown the strength of conceptually linking contact angle dynamics and fractional wettability as a means to understand the nature of infiltration in water repellent soils and provide a mechanistic foundation upon which repellency can be quantified and related to fundamental hydraulic properties. Contact angle dynamics and fractional wettability are complimentary terminology that appear in the multiphase flow and soil physics literature, but have largely/essentially only been applied in synthetic systems. Their utility in natural environments is potentially significant and conceptually useful since they can readily incorporate existing characterizations while providing greater opportunity for articulating and defining specific behaviours in systems with high spatial and temporal heterogeneity.

  11. Caustics and Caustic-Interference in Measurements of Contact Angle and Flow Visualization Through Laser Shadowgraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Neng-Li

    2002-01-01

    As one of the basic elements of the shadowgraphy optical system, the image of the far field from the droplet implicates plentiful information on the droplet profile. An analysis of caustics by wave theory shows that a droplet with a cylindrically symmetric Gaussian-hill-type profile produces a circular directional caustic in far field, which arises from the singularities (inflection line on the surface). The sessile liquid droplets, which profiles are restricted by surface tension, usually have a 'protruding foot' where the surface inflects. Simple geometrical optics indicates that the circular caustic stemming from the surface inflection at the protruding-foot takes the shape of the outmost ring on the image of the far field. It is the diameter of the outmost ring that is used as one of the key parameters in the measurements of contact angle through the laser shadowgraphic method. Different surface characteristics of the droplets produce different type of caustics, and therefore, the shape of the caustics can be used to determine the surface property of the sessile droplets. The present paper describes the measurement method of contact angIe using the circular caustics and the estimation of the protruding-foot height through the caustic interference.

  12. Dynamic contact angle effects onto the maximum drop impact spreading on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadillo, D. C.; Soucemarianadin, A.; Delattre, C.; Roux, D. C. D.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports experimental investigations of drop impacts onto chemically treated surfaces with wettability from 5° to 160°. To follow in time the drop spreading, a high speed video camera was used, and it allows us to determine precisely the expansion of the drop and the profile of the free surface at the contact line. By changing the impact velocity, between less than 0.5 and 5 m/s, and the viscosity, from 1 to 100 mPa s, at constant surface tension, a broad range of Reynolds and Weber numbers is explored. This paper is divided into two parts. In the first part, the experimental drop evolution during spreading is directly reported and compared with previous works. Secondly, the emphasis is on the importance of the apparent dynamic contact angle for the prediction of the maximum spreading diameter. This achievement is manifested at low Reynolds numbers at which the matching between the experiment and the model is improved greatly.

  13. New procedure to measure simultaneously the surface tension and contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champmartin, S.; Ambari, A.; Le Pommelec, J. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new procedure to simultaneously measure the static contact angle and the surface tension of a liquid using a spherical geometry. Unlike the other existing methods, the knowledge of one of both previous parameters and the displacement of the sphere are not mandatory. The technique is based on the measurement of two simple physical quantities: the height of the meniscus formed on a sphere at the very contact with a liquid bath and the resulting vertical force exerted on this object at equilibrium. The meniscus height, whose exact value requires the numerical resolution of the Laplace equation, is often estimated with an approximate 2D model, valid only for very large spheres compared to the capillary length. We develop instead another simplified solution of the Young-Laplace equation based on the work of Ferguson for the meniscus on a cylinder and adapted for the spherical shape. This alternative model, which is less restrictive in terms of the sphere size, is successfully compared to numerical solutions of the complete Young-Laplace equation. It appears to be accurate for sphere radii larger than only two capillary lengths. Finally the feasibility of the method is experimentally tested and validated for three common liquids and two "small" steel spheres.

  14. New procedure to measure simultaneously the surface tension and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Champmartin, S; Ambari, A; Le Pommelec, J Y

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new procedure to simultaneously measure the static contact angle and the surface tension of a liquid using a spherical geometry. Unlike the other existing methods, the knowledge of one of both previous parameters and the displacement of the sphere are not mandatory. The technique is based on the measurement of two simple physical quantities: the height of the meniscus formed on a sphere at the very contact with a liquid bath and the resulting vertical force exerted on this object at equilibrium. The meniscus height, whose exact value requires the numerical resolution of the Laplace equation, is often estimated with an approximate 2D model, valid only for very large spheres compared to the capillary length. We develop instead another simplified solution of the Young-Laplace equation based on the work of Ferguson for the meniscus on a cylinder and adapted for the spherical shape. This alternative model, which is less restrictive in terms of the sphere size, is successfully compared to numerical solutions of the complete Young-Laplace equation. It appears to be accurate for sphere radii larger than only two capillary lengths. Finally the feasibility of the method is experimentally tested and validated for three common liquids and two "small" steel spheres. PMID:27250468

  15. Development of diffuse double layers in column-wicking experiments: implications for pH-dependent contact angles on quartz.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Stanjek, Helge

    2012-12-01

    The pH dependence of contact angles in quartz powder beds was studied by column wicking. The rate of capillary penetration was found to be highest at the isoelectric point of quartz which, by applying the classical Washburn equation, results in a minimum contact angle at the isoelectric point. Direct contact angle measurements however show that the contact angle is at a maximum at the point of zero charge (see e.g. [1-6]). By measuring the permeability of powder columns with aqueous solutions of varying pH, it is shown that the permeability reaches a maximum at the isoelectric point. This suggests that the rate of capillary penetration is influenced by the permeability of the powder columns towards respective aqueous solutions. The difference in permeability can be explained by the notion of an electroosmotic counter-pressure which was already recognized by Klinkenberg. An approach is presented that involves the calculation of capillary constants from permeability measurements of the corresponding aqueous solutions. An equation is derived that takes direct account for the electroosmotic counter-pressure. Application of this equation combined with capillary constants calculated from permeabilities of the corresponding aqueous solutions results in the expected contact angle-pH relationship. PMID:22939425

  16. The Influence of Long-Range Surface Forces on the Contact Angle of Nanometric Droplets and Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Antonio; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2015-11-01

    For a droplet or a bubble of dimensions below 100 nm, long-range surface forces such as long-range van der Waals forces can compete with capillarity, which leads to a size dependence of the contact angle. This is discussed in this work, where we also show that the effect cannot simply be described by a normalized line tension. We calculate interfacial profiles for typical values of van der Waals forces and discuss the role of long-range surface forces on the contact angle of nanobubbles and nanodrops. PMID:26451631

  17. Effect of high-frequency in-plane substrate vibration on a three-phase contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Pismen, Len M.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate analytically the contribution of high-frequency horizontal (in-plane) vibration of a solid substrate to the apparent contact angle of a liquid meniscus in the framework of the lubrication approximation. We show that oscillatory excitation invokes a drift of liquid within the meniscus resulting from nonlinear contributions from both the motion of the solid surface and acoustically induced capillary waves at the free surface of the liquid. Our analysis reveals that under this type of excitation, the relative increase of the steady apparent contact angle is proportional to the product of the capillary and Reynolds numbers.

  18. The effect of axial force and contact angle on the welded area of plastic tube welded by ultrasonic welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinvongpituk, C.; Bootwong, A.; Watanabe, Y.

    2010-03-01

    This study was aimed to apply the use of ultrasonic welding to weld round plastic tubes. The ultrasonic welding machine was designed to be able to work with a normal ultrasonic welding transducer by rotating the tube while it is being welded. The specimens used in this study were round plastic tubes (PMMA) with diameter of 35 mm and 2 mm thickness. End of each tube was machined to have angle of 2.8, 3.8 and 5.7 degree in order to create contact angle at the interface. The specimens were welded with frequency of 28 kHz and tube rotational speeds of 25 rpm, 45 rpm and 100 rpm. The axial force was applied to the tube in order to enhance the quality of joint. The experimental result revealed that the modified ultrasonic welding machine can generate the welded area around the circumference of tube. It was found that the axial force and contact angle have some effect to the quality of joint. The contact angle of 2.8/2.8 provided highest welded area compared to 3.8/3.8 and 5.7/5.7 degree of contact angle. In addition, the axial force between 80 N - 120 N provided high value of welded area. The pattern of welded area is also presented and discussed in the paper.

  19. The effect of axial force and contact angle on the welded area of plastic tube welded by ultrasonic welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinvongpituk, C.; Bootwong, A.; Watanabe, Y.

    2009-12-01

    This study was aimed to apply the use of ultrasonic welding to weld round plastic tubes. The ultrasonic welding machine was designed to be able to work with a normal ultrasonic welding transducer by rotating the tube while it is being welded. The specimens used in this study were round plastic tubes (PMMA) with diameter of 35 mm and 2 mm thickness. End of each tube was machined to have angle of 2.8, 3.8 and 5.7 degree in order to create contact angle at the interface. The specimens were welded with frequency of 28 kHz and tube rotational speeds of 25 rpm, 45 rpm and 100 rpm. The axial force was applied to the tube in order to enhance the quality of joint. The experimental result revealed that the modified ultrasonic welding machine can generate the welded area around the circumference of tube. It was found that the axial force and contact angle have some effect to the quality of joint. The contact angle of 2.8/2.8 provided highest welded area compared to 3.8/3.8 and 5.7/5.7 degree of contact angle. In addition, the axial force between 80 N - 120 N provided high value of welded area. The pattern of welded area is also presented and discussed in the paper.

  20. The estimation of dynamic contact angle of ultra-hydrophobic surfaces using inclined surface and impinging droplet methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Kotek, Michal

    2014-03-01

    The development of industrial technology also brings with optimized surface quality, particularly where there is contact with food. Application ultra-hydrophobic surface significantly reduces the growth of bacteria and facilitates cleaning processes. Testing and evaluation of surface quality are used two methods: impinging droplet and inclined surface method optimized with high speed shadowgraphy, which give information about dynamic contact angle. This article presents the results of research into new methods of measuring ultra-hydrophobic patented technology.

  1. Single-step process for the deposition of high water contact angle and high water sliding angle surfaces by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Verdier, Stéphane; Choquet, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Fluorine-free surfaces with high water contact angle (WCA) and high adhesion force to water are prepared by the atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) of hexamethyldisiloxane on cold rolled aluminum foil. Water droplets, which remained on the plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (ppHMDSO) surface with contact angle of 155°, do not slide even when the surface is tilted vertically or turned upside down. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy highlight the importance of the dual-scale roughness of the ppHMDSO surface. The "sticky" high WCA property is achieved only when the nanometer scale particles generated during the AP-DBD process are present at the surface of the film and combine to the micrometer scale rolling lines of the aluminum substrate. PMID:23339545

  2. A facile fabrication of superhydrophobic nanocomposite coating with contact angles approaching the theoretical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancer, Mehmet; Arkaz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    Although there are many viable approaches to induce hydrophobicity, a superhydrophobic surface could only be fabricated by combination of surface chemistry modification and roughness enhancement. In this study, surface roughness was obtained by 12 nm SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) which were chemically modified using a self-assembled monolayer of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane. The SiO2 NPs which were rendered hydrophobic, then successfully dispersed into a poly silicon (silsesquioxane) matrix at varying concentrations from 0.5 to 4%. The NPs dispersed polymer suspension was then spray coated on to glass and aluminum coupons in order to achieve polymer thin film nanocomposites. The results were revealed a superhydrophobic surface with a water contact angle exceeding 178° with low hysteresis and bouncing water droplet behavior. Furthermore the composite film reliability (hot-humid and ice build-up) was tested in an environmental control chamber by precisely adjusting both temperature (85 °C) and relative humidity (85 RH). Taber abrasion testing was applied in order to gain insights into the abrasion resistance of nanocomposite film. Finally, ice formation was simulated at -20 °C on the superhydrophobic nanocomposite film coated substrates.

  3. Exploring of protein - protein interactions at the solid - aqueous interface by means of contact angle measurements.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, I; Dehaen, W; Radecka, H; Radecki, J

    2016-05-01

    In this article we present the results of the studies on interactions between the VC1 domain of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) and its ligand, the S100B protein, performed by contact angle measurements. Histidine-tagged (His6) VC1-RAGE domain was covalently bonded to Cu(II) or Ni(II) complexes with dipyrromethene (DPM) self-assembled on gold surface. The method based on the theory of van Oss was used for the purpose of determining the Lifshitz-van der Waals (γ(LW)) component as well as the electron acceptor-electron donor (the Lewis acid-base, γ(+)-γ(-)) parameters of the VC1-RAGE-S100B complex. Moreover, the surface free energies of the interactions between the VC1 domain attached to the surface and the ligand present in the aqueous phase were determined. The specificity of the VC1- RAGE interactions with the ligand studied was also proved. PMID:26918510

  4. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Amama, Placidus B; Islam, Ahmad E; Saber, Sammy M; Huffman, Daniel R; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-02-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from "inactive" to "active" is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design. PMID:26781333

  5. Effects of Contact Angle Hysteresis on Ice Adhesion and Growth over Superhydrophobic Surfaces under Dynamic Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarshar, Mohammad Amin; Swarctz, Christopher; Hunter, Scott Robert; Simpson, John T; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the iceophobic properties of superhydrophobic surfaces are investigated under dynamic flow conditions by using a closed loop low-temperature wind tunnel. Superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared by coating the substrates of aluminum and steel plates with nano-structured hydrophobic particles. The superhydrophobic plates along with uncoated control ones were exposed to an air flow of 12 m/s and 20 F accompanying micron-sized water droplets in the icing wind tunnel and the ice formation and accretion were probed by high-resolution CCD cameras. Results show that the superhydrophobic coatings significantly delay the ice formation and accretion even under the dynamic flow condition of the highly energetic impingement of accelerated super-cooled water droplets. It is found that there is a time scale for this phenomenon (delay of the ice formation) which has a clear correlation with the contact angle hysteresis and the length scale of surface roughness of the superhydrophobic surface samples, being the highest for the plate with the lowest contact angle hysteresis and finer surface roughness. The results suggest that the key parameter for designing iceophobic surfaces is to retain a low contact angle hysteresis (dynamic property) and the non-wetting superhydrophobic state under the hydrodynamic pressure of impinging droplets, rather than to only have a high contact angle (static property), in order to result in efficient anti-icing properties under dynamic conditions such as forced flows.

  6. Capillary pressure overshoot for unstable wetting fronts is explained by Hoffman's velocity-dependent contact-angle relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baver, Christine E.; Parlange, J.-Yves; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; DiCarlo, David A.; Wallach, Rony; Durnford, Deanna S.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2014-06-01

    Pore velocity-dependent dynamic contact angles provide a mechanism for explaining the formation of fingers/columns in porous media. To study those dynamic contact angles when gravity is present, rectangular capillary tubes were used to facilitate observation of the complete interface without geometric distortion. Results show that the Hoffman (1975) relationship between dynamic contact angle and water velocity applies to gravity-affected flow fields, and that it (when adjusted for nonzero static contact angles) can be used to model dynamic capillary pressures for unstable wettings fronts in porous media by assuming that (1) pressure at the wetting front is discontinuous, (2) the flow field behind the fingertip is highly heterogeneous, and (3) the front line advances one or a few pores at the time. We demonstrate the utility of the Hoffman relationship for porous media with a published infiltration experiment by calculating the capillary pressure successfully at the unstable wetting front as a function of the flux of water in the finger and the grain size diameter.

  7. Wettability of supercritical carbon dioxide/water/quartz systems: simultaneous measurement of contact angle and interfacial tension at reservoir conditions.

    PubMed

    Saraji, Soheil; Goual, Lamia; Piri, Mohammad; Plancher, Henry

    2013-06-11

    Injection of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers is considered as a method of carbon sequestration. The efficiency of this process is dependent on the fluid-fluid and rock-fluid interactions inside the porous media. For instance, the final storage capacity and total amount of capillary-trapped CO2 inside an aquifer are affected by the interfacial tension between the fluids and the contact angle between the fluids and the rock mineral surface. A thorough study of these parameters and their variations with temperature and pressure will provide a better understanding of the carbon sequestration process and thus improve predictions of the sequestration efficiency. In this study, the controversial concept of wettability alteration of quartz surfaces in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. A novel apparatus for measuring interfacial tension and contact angle at high temperatures and pressures based on Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis with no-Apex (ADSA-NA) method was developed and validated with a simple system. Densities, interfacial tensions, and dynamic contact angles of CO2/water/quartz systems were determined for a wide range of pressures and temperatures relevant to geological sequestration of CO2 in the subcritical and supercritical states. Image analysis was performed with ADSA-NA method that allows the determination of both interfacial tensions and contact angles with high accuracy. The results show that supercritical CO2 alters the wettability of quartz surface toward less water-wet conditions compared to subcritical CO2. Also we observed an increase in the water advancing contact angles with increasing temperature indicating less water-wet quartz surfaces at higher temperatures. PMID:23627310

  8. Effect of dynamic contact angle in a volume of fluid (VOF) model for a microfluidic capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Ashish Saha, Auro; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2009-11-15

    We perform three-dimensional numerical and experimental study of the dynamic contact angle using volume of fluid (VOF) method applied to microfluidic channels with integrated pillars. Initially, we evaluated different dynamic contact angle models (hydrodynamic, molecular kinetic and empirical) for capillary filling of a two-dimensional microchannel using analytical formulation. Further, the models which require a minimum prescription of adjustable parameters are only used for the study of capillary filling of microchannels with integrated pillars using different working fluids such as DI water, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol. Different microchannel geometry with varying diameter/height/spacing were studied for circular pillars. Effect of square pillars and changing the overall number of pillars on the capillary phenomena were also simulated. Our study demonstrated that the dynamic contact angle models modifies the transient response of the meniscus displacement and also the observed trends are model specific for the various microchannel geometries and working fluids. However, the different models have minimal effect on the meniscus profile. Different inlet boundary conditions were applied to observe the effect of grid resolution selected for numerical study on the capillary filling time. A grid dependent dynamic contact angle model which incorporates effective slip in the model was also used to observe the grid convergence of the numerical results. The grid independence was shown to improve marginally by applying the grid dependent dynamic contact angle model. Further we did numerical experiments of capillary filling considering variable surface wettability on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel with alternate hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns. The meniscus front pinning was noticed for a high wetting contrast between the patterns. Non uniform streamline patterns indicated mixing of the fluid when using patterned walls. Such a microfluidic device with

  9. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-Ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amama, Placidus B.; Islam, Ahmad E.; Saber, Sammy M.; Huffman, Daniel R.; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-01-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from ``inactive'' to ``active'' is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design.There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the

  10. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  11. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Onderwaater, W. G.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Koehler, R.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  12. Asymptotic approach in the limit of small contact angles to sessile vapor bubble growth in a superheated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rednikov, Alexey; Hollander, Nicolas; Hernando Revilla, Marta; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    A model of nucleate pool boiling is considered, and more concretely the growth dynamics of a single spherical-cap vapor bubble on a flat superheated substrate in a large volume of an equally superheated liquid. An asymptotic scheme is developed valid in the limit of small contact angles. These are basically supposed to be the evaporation-induced ones and hence finite even in the case of a perfectly wetting liquid implied here. The consideration generally involves four regions: i) microregion, where the contact line singularities are resolved and the evaporation-induced contact angles are established, ii) Cox-Voinov region, iii) foot of the bubble, and iv) macroregion. It is only in the latter region, which remarkably appears to leading order in the form of the exterior of a sphere touching a planar surface in one point (hence a fixed geometry even for variable contact angles), that the full Navier-Stokes and heat equations are to be (numerically) resolved. ESA & BELSPO PRODEX, F.R.S.-FNRS.

  13. A novel methodology based on contact angle hysteresis approach for surface changes monitoring in model PMMA-Corega Tabs system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorzelski, Stanisław J.; Berezowski, Zdzisław; Rochowski, Paweł; Szurkowski, Janusz

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to propose a quantitative description of dental surface modifications, resulting from application of Corega and oral cavity liquids, with several surface parameters derived from liquid/solid contact angle measurements. In particular, to predict the long-term effectiveness of denture cleansers in prosthetics, it is necessary to determine surface wettability variations for model dental materials/probe liquid systems related to the contamination effect caused by substances found in the oral cavity. A novel simple low-cost methodology, based on liquid drop contact angle hysteresis CAH approach developed by Chibowski, was adopted to trace solid surface free energy changes in the model PMMA-Corega Tabs interfacial layer. Contact angle and its hysteresis were studied with a sessile drop-inclined plate method in contact with a cleanser (Corega Tabs) and model liquids found in the oral cavity. The apparent solid surface free energy, adsorptive film pressure, work of adhesion and spreading were derived from contact angle hysteresis data for both model solid surfaces (reference) and samples affected by different reactive liquids for a certain time. A time-dependent surface wettability changes of dentures were expressed quantitatively in terms of the corresponding variations of the surface energy parameters which turned out to be unequivocally related to the cleanser exposure time and polarity of the liquids applied to the dental material. The novel methodology appeared to be a useful tool for long term surface characterization of dental materials treated with surfactants-containing liquids capable of forming adhesive layers. The time of optimal use and effectiveness of cleansers are also reflected dynamically in the corresponding variations of the surface wettability parameters. Further studies on a large group of dental surface-probe liquid systems are required to specify the role played by other important factors (liquid polarity, pH and temperature).

  14. A New Approach to Measure Contact Angle and Evaporation Rate with Flow Visualization in a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The contact angle and the spreading process of sessile droplet are very crucial in many technological processes, such as painting and coating, material processing, film-cooling applications, lubrication, and boiling. Additionally, as it is well known that the surface free energy of polymers cannot be directly, measured for their elastic and viscous restraints. The measurements of liquid contact angle on the polymer surfaces become extremely important to evaluate the surface free energy of polymers through indirect methods linked with the contact angle data. Due to the occurrence of liquid evaporation is inevitable, the effects of evaporation on the contact angle and the spreading become very important for more complete understanding of these processes. It is of interest to note that evaporation can induce Marangoni-Benard convection in sessile drops. However, the impacts of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes are not clear. The experimental methods used by previous investigators cannot simultaneously measure the spreading process and visualize the convection inside. Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the present author, a very simple optical procedure has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, the evaporation rate, and to visualize inside convection of a sessile drop simultaneously. Two CCD cameras were used to synchronously record the real-time diameter of the sessile drop, which is essential for determination of both spreading speed and evaporation rate, and the shadowgraphic image magnified by the sessile drop acting as a thin plano-convex lens. From the shadowgraph, the inside convection of the drop can be observed if any and the image outer diameter, which linked to the drop profile, can be measured. Simple equations have been derived to calculate the drop profile, including the instantaneous contact angle, height, and volume of the sessile drop, as well as the evaporation rate. The influence of

  15. Analysis of different approaches for evaluation of surface energy of microbial cells by contact angle goniometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P K; Rao, K Hanumantha

    2002-08-01

    Microbial adhesion on solid substrate is important in various fields of science. Mineral-microbe interactions alter the surface chemistry of the minerals and the adhesion of the bacterial cells to mineral surface is a prerequisite in several biobeneficiation processes. Apart from the surface charge and hydrophobic or hydrophilic character of the bacterial cells, the surface energy is a very important parameter influencing their adhesion on solid surfaces. There were many thermodynamic approaches in the literature to evaluate the cells surface energy. Although contact angle measurements with different liquids with known surface tension forms the basis in the calculation of the value of surface energy of solids, the results are different depending on the approach followed. In the present study, the surface energy of 140 bacterial and seven yeast cell surfaces has been studied following Fowkes, Equation of state, Geometric mean and Lifshitz-van der Waals acid-base (LW-AB) approaches. Two independent issues were addressed separately in our analysis. At first, the surface energy and the different components of the surface energy for microbial cells surface are examined. Secondly, the different approaches are evaluated for their internal consistency, similarities and dissimilarities. The Lifshitz-van der Waals component of surface energy for most of the microbial cells is realised to be approximately 40 mJ/m2 +/-10%. Equation of state and Geometric mean approaches do not possess any internal consistency and yield different results. The internal consistency of the LW-AB approach could be checked only by varying the apolar liquid and it evaluates coherent surface energy parameters by doing so. The electron-donor surface energy component remains exactly the same with the change of apolar liquid. This parameter could differentiate between the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells. Gram-negative bacterial cells having higher electron-donor parameter had lower

  16. Asymmetric and speed-dependent contact angle hysteresis and relaxation of a suddenly stopped moving contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Dongshi; Wang, Yong Jian; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    We report direct atomic-force-microscope measurements of capillary force hysteresis and relaxation of a circular moving contact line (CL) formed on a long micron-sized hydrophobic fiber intersecting a water-air interface. The measured capillary force hysteresis and CL relaxation show a strong asymmetric speed dependence in the advancing and receding directions. A unified model based on force-assisted barrier-crossing is utilized to find the underlying energy barrier Eb and size λ associated with the defects on the fiber surface. The experiment demonstrates that the pinning (relaxation) and depinning dynamics of the CL can be described by a common microscopic frame-work, and the advancing and receding CLs are influenced by two different sets of relatively wetting and non-wetting defects on the fiber surface. Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  17. Contact-angle measurements as a means of probing the surface alignment characteristics of liquid crystal materials on photoalignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. L.; Didovets, O.; Saulnier, D.

    2014-10-01

    The exceptionally high 1054-nm laser-damage resistance of photoalignment materials (approaching that of fused silica) has made it possible to fabricate a wide variety of photoaligned liquid crystal (LC) devices for high-peak-power laser applications. Despite these advances, materials selection and photoalignment exposure conditions are still determined using costly and time-consuming "trial-and-error" methods. The contact angle of a fluid droplet on an alignment layer yields important information about LC-surface physicochemical interactions, and as such, it has potential as a rapid and convenient metric for optimizing photoaligned device quality. To this end, we report on efforts to correlate fluid contact angle with surface energy and azimuthal-anchoring energy to aid in the assessment of alignment quality in photoalignment materials systems.

  18. Meniscus behavior of metals and oxides in molten carbonate under oxidant and reducing atmospheres. 1: Contact angle and electrolyte displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Mugikura, Y.; Selman, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    The wetting of metals and oxides by molten carbonate is an important factor affecting the performance of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The distribution of the electrolyte among electrodes and matrix in the MCFC is dominated by the pore characteristics and wetting properties of these components. However, data on wetting, especially under load (current passage), are limited. In this study, the behavior of the meniscus at a metal is used to obtain information on wetting and electrochemical reactions. Meniscus height and current were measured under various atmospheres. The contact angle was calculated from the meniscus height. The electrolyte distribution in the MCFC was estimated using contact angles thus obtained in oxidant and reducing atmospheres. The results suggest that upon application of load the electrolyte moves from the anode to the cathode and that capillary effects can worsen the performance of a cell, especially if it is in an unbalanced state of electrolyte filling.

  19. Studies on interfacial tension and contact angle of synthesized surfactant and polymeric from castor oil for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Keshak; Pal, Nilanjan; Bera, Achinta; Saxena, V. K.; Mandal, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    New synthesized polymeric surfactants have immensely attracted the researchers for further development of chemical enhanced oil recovery method particularly in surfactant flooding. Contact angle and interfacial tension measurement tests are the effective ways to identify proper chemicals/surfactants for enhanced oil recovery by chemical/surfactant flooding. In the present study a new polymeric surfactant was synthesized from pre-synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate (surfactant) and acrylamide for application in chemical enhanced oil recovery. The synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant were used to measure interfacial tension between their aqueous phase and crude oil phase to investigate the efficiency of the surfactants in reduction of interfacial tension. The synthesized polymeric surfactant has also ability to control the mobility because of its viscous nature in aqueous solution. Contact angles of solid-crude oil-surfactant interface were also measured to study the effect of the synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant on wettability alteration mechanism. Synergistic effect was studied by using NaCl and synthesized surfactants on interfacial tension. Dynamic interfacial tensions of the surfactant and polymeric surfactant solutions with crude oil were measured at different NaCl concentrations. Interfacial tension was found to be lowered up to 10-2 to 10-3 mN/m which is effective for oil recovery. Measurement of contact angle indicates the wettability change of the quartz surface. Comparative studies on efficiencies of synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate surfactant and polymeric surfactant were also carried out with respect to interfacial tension reduction and contact angle change.

  20. Hysteretic memory in pH-response of water contact angle on poly(acrylic acid) brushes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek; Harkin, Adrienne V; Robertson, Megan L; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-04-13

    We investigated the pH-dependent response of flat polyacid brushes of varying length and dispersity in the extended brush regime. Our model system consisted of poly(acrylic acid) brushes, which change from hydrophobic and neutral at low pH to hydrophilic and negatively charged at high pH, synthesized on silicon substrates using a grafting-from approach at constant grafting density. We observed three trends in the pH-response: first, the dry brush thickness increased as the pH was increased for brushes above a critical length, and this effect was magnified as the dispersity increased; second, the water contact angle measured at low pH was larger for brushes of greater dispersity; and third, brushes of sufficient dispersity exhibited hysteretic memory behavior in the pH-dependence of the contact angle, in which the contact angle upon increasing and decreasing pH differed. As a consequence, the pKa of the brushes measured upon increasing pH was consistently higher than that measured upon decreasing pH. The observed pH response is consistent with proposed changes in the conformation and charge distribution of the polyelectrolyte brushes that depend on the direction of pH change and the dispersity of the brushes. PMID:26979270

  1. Comparison of contact angles and adhesion to hexadecane of urogenital, dairy, and poultry lactobacilli: effect of serial culture passages.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, G; Cuperus, P L; Bruce, A W; van der Mei, H C; Tomeczek, L; Khoury, A H; Busscher, H J

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the hydrophobicities of 23 urogenital, dairy, poultry, and American Type Culture Collection isolates of lactobacilli and to determine the effect on hydrophobicity of serially passaging the strains in liquid medium. To this end, strains were grown after isolation and identification and then serially passaged up to 20 times. Hydrophobicity was assessed through contact angle measurements on lawns of cells by using water, formamide, methylene iodide, 1-bromonaphthalene, and hexadecane as wetting agents and through measurement of their partitioning in a hexadecane-water system. The hydrophobicities of these strains varied widely, with Lactobacillus casei strains being predominantly hydrophilic and L. acidophilus strains being mostly hydrophobic. For some isolates, serial passaging was accompanied by a clear loss of hydrophobic surface properties, whereas for other strains, cultures became heterogeneous in that some cells had already lost their hydrophobic surface properties while others were still hydrophobic. Adhesion of this collection of lactobacilli to hexadecane droplets in microbial adhesion to hexadecane (MATH) tests was driven by their aversion to water rather than by their affinity for hexadecane, as concluded from the fact that hexadecane contact angles were zero for all strains. Furthermore, adhesion of the lactobacilli to hexadecane in MATH tests occurred only when the water contact angle on the cells was above 60 degrees. Images PMID:1622224

  2. Inclusion of fluid-solid interaction in Volume of Fluid to simulate spreading and dewetting for large contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2014-11-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) interaction between molecules is of fundamental importance in determining the behavior of three phase systems in fluid mechanics. This interaction gives rise to interfacial energies, and thus the contact angle for a droplet on a solid surface, and additionally leads to instability of very thin liquid films. We develop a hybrid method for including a Lennard-Jones type vdW interaction in a finite volume, Volume of Fluid (VoF) based solver for the full two-phase Navier-Stokes equations. This method includes the full interaction between each fluid phase and the solid substrate via a finite-volume approximation of the vdW body force. Our work is distinguished from conventional VoF based implementations in that the contact angle arises from simulation of the underlying physics, as well as successfully treating vdW induced film rupture. At the same time, it avoids the simplifications of calculations based on disjoining-pressure, where the vdW interaction is included as a pressure jump across the interface which is derived under the assumption of a flat film. This is especially relevant in the simulation of nanoscale film ruptures involving large contact angles, which have been studied recently in the context of bottom-up nanoparticle fabrication. This work is partially supported by the Grants NSF DMS-1320037 and CBET-1235710.

  3. Effect of an interactive surface on the equilibrium contact angles in bilayer polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Slep, D.; Asselta, J.; Rafailovich, M.H.; Sokolov, J.; Winesett, D.A.; Smith, A.P.; Ade, H.; Anders, S.

    2000-03-07

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) were used to obtain the three-dimensional concentration profiles and the late-stage morphology of liquid bilayer thin films of the two immiscible polymers polystyrene (PS) and (polybromostyrene) (PBr{sub x=0.79}S), where x+ fraction of monomers brominated as a function of the lower PS film thickness. The results could not be explained with existing models developed for bulk viscoelastic fluids. The authors found that, for the case of entangled polymers, other factors such as the interfacial energy with the substrate, the film thickness, and the molecular weights must be considered. A model which includes a restoring force characterizing the change in stiffness of the substrate layer due to surface interactions provided good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. A model for pattern deposition from an evaporating solution subject to contact angle hysteresis and finite solubility.

    PubMed

    Zigelman, Anna; Manor, Ofer

    2016-06-29

    We propose a model for the pattern deposition of the solute from an evaporating drop of a dilute solution on a horizontal substrate. In the model we take into account the three-phase contact angle hysteresis and the deposition of the solute whenever its concentration exceeds the solubility limit. The evaporating drop is governed by a film equation. We show that unless for a very small three-phase contact angle or a very rapid evaporation rate the film adopts a quasi-steady geometry, satisfying the Young-Laplace equation to leading order. The concentration profile is assumed to satisfy an advection diffusion equation subject to the standard Fick's law for the diffusive flux. We further use an integral boundary condition to describe the dynamics of the concentration in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line; we replace an exact geometric description of the vicinity of the contact line, which is usually assumed such that mathematical singularities are avoided, with general insights about the concentration and its flux. We use our model to explore the relationships between a variety of deposition patterns and the governing parameters, show that the model repeats previous findings, and suggest further insights. PMID:27279348

  5. Soil-water contact angle of some soils of the Russian Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykova, Galina; Tyugai, Zemfira; Milanovskiy, Evgeny; Shein, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Soil wettability affects the aggregate water resistance, the movement of moisture and dissolved substances, preferential flows, etc. There are many factors affecting the soil's wettability (the content of organic matter (OM), soil's mineralogical composition, particle size distribution), so it can reflect changes in the soil, including results of human impact. The quantitative characteristic of soil wettability is a contact angle (CA), its measurement is a new and difficult problem because of the complexity, heterogeneity and polydispersity of the object of investigation. The aim of this work is to study soil-water CA of some soils of the Russian Plane. MATERIALS AND METHODS The objects of study were sod-podzolic (Umbric Albeluvisols Abruptic, Eutric Podzoluvisols), grey forest non-podzolised (Greyic Phaeozems Albic, Haplic Greyzems), typical Chernozems (Voronic Chernozems pachic, Haplic Chernozems) - profiles under the forest and the arable land, and the chestnut (Haplic Kastanozems Chromic, Haplic Kastanozems) soils. The CA's determination was performed by a Drop Shape Analyzer DSA100 by the static sessile drop method. For all samples was determined the content of total and organic carbon (OC and TC) by dry combustion in oxygen flow. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION There is CA increasing from 85,1° (5 cm) to 40-45° (deeper, than 45 cm) in the sod-podzolic soil; OC content is changed at the same depths from 1,44 to 0.22%. We can see the similar picture in profiles of chernozems. In the forest profile the highest OC content and CA value are achieved on the surface of profile (6,41% and 78,1°), and by 90 cm these values are 1.9% and 50.2°. In the chernozem under the arable land the OC content is almost two times less and the profile is more wettable (from 50° to 19° at 5 and 100 cm). Corresponding with the OC content, the curve describing changes of CA in the profile of grey forest soil is S-shaped with peaks at 20 and 150 cm (81,3° and 70° respectively

  6. How Does a Liquid Wet a Solid? Hydrodynamics of Dynamic Contact Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique

    2001-01-01

    A contact line is defined at the intersection of a solid surface with the interface between two immiscible fluids. When one fluid displaces another immiscible fluid along a solid surface, the process is called dynamic wetting and a "moving" contact line (one whose position relative to the solid changes in time) often appears. The physics of dynamic wetting controls such natural and industrial processes as spraying of paints and insecticides, dishwashing, film formation and rupture in the eye and in the alveoli, application of coatings, printing, drying and imbibition of fibrous materials, oil recovery from porous rocks, and microfluidics.

  7. Contact angle anomalies indicate that surface-active eluates from silicone coatings inhibit the adhesive mechanisms of fouling organisms.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Anne; Baier, Robert; Wood, Christina Darkangelo; Stein, Judith; Truby, Kathryn; Holm, Eric; Montemarano, Jean; Kavanagh, Christopher; Nedved, Brian; Smith, Celia; Swain, Geoff; Wiebe, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Silicone coatings with critical surface tensions (CST) between 20 and 30 mN m-1 more easily release diverse types of biofouling than do materials of higher and lower CST. Oils added to these coatings selectively further diminish the attachment strengths of different marine fouling organisms, without significantly modifying the initial CST. In a search for the mechanisms of this improved biofouling resistance, the interfacial instabilities of four silicone coatings were characterised by comprehensive contact angle analyses, using up to 12 different diagnostic fluids selected to mimic the side chain chemistries of the common amino acids of bioadhesive proteins. The surfaces of painted steel test panels were characterised both before and after exposure to freshwater, brackish water, and seawater over periods ranging from 9 months to nearly 4 years. Contact angle measurements demonstrated significant surface activity of the oil-amended coatings both before and after long-term underwater exposure. The surface activity of the control (coating without oil) increased as a result of underwater exposure, consistent with mild surface chain scission and hydrolysis imparting a self-surfactancy to the coating and providing a weak boundary layer promoting continuing easy release of attaching foulants. Coatings with additives that most effectively reduced biofouling showed both initial and persistent contact angle anomalies for the test liquid, thiodiglycol, suggesting lower-shear biofouling release mechanisms based upon diminished bioadhesive crosslinking by interfering with hydrogen- and sulfhydryl bonds. Swelling of the silicone elastomeric coatings by hydrocarbon fluids was observed for all four coatings, before and after immersion. PMID:17178574

  8. The role of contact angle on unstable flow formation during infiltration and drainage in wettable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallach, Rony; Margolis, Michal; Graber, Ellen R.

    2013-10-01

    The impact of contact angle on 2-D spatial and temporal water-content distribution during infiltration and drainage was experimentally studied. The 0.3-0.5 mm fraction of a quartz dune sand was treated and turned subcritically repellent (contact angle of 33°, 48°, 56°, and 75° for S33, S48, S56, and S75, respectively). The media were packed uniformly in transparent flow chambers and water was supplied to the surface as a point source at different rates (1-20 ml/min). A sequence of gray-value images was taken by CCD camera during infiltration and subsequent drainage; gray values were converted to volumetric water content by water volume balance. Narrow and long plumes with water accumulation behind the downward moving wetting front (tip) and negative water gradient above it (tail) developed in the S56 and S75 media during infiltration at lower water application rates. The plumes became bulbous with spatially uniform water-content distribution as water application rates increased. All plumes in these media propagated downward at a constant rate during infiltration and did not change their shape during drainage. In contrast, regular plume shapes were observed in the S33 and S48 media at all flow rates, and drainage profiles were nonmonotonic with a transition plane at the depth that water reached during infiltration. Given that the studied media have similar pore-size distributions, the conclusion is that imbibition hindered by the nonzero contact angle induced pressure buildup at the wetting front (dynamic water-entry value) that controlled the plume shape and internal water-content distribution during infiltration and drainage.

  9. Spontaneous changes in contact angle of water and oil on novel flip-flop-type hydrophobic multilayer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Go; Ema, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hisatoshi; Wei, Xing; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-04-01

    Multilayer structures composed of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and Nafion were fabricated on glass substrates by layer-by-layer assembly. Some of the multilayers demonstrated spontaneous changes in contact angle of water and oil due to flip-flop movements of free sulfo groups in the Nafion layer, and the multilayers eventually possessed water repellency in air and oil repellency in water. The repellencies were enhanced by applying primer layers that were formed using SiO2 fine particles to increase surface roughness. Compared to typical hydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces, the multilayers showed practical levels for a use as soil release coatings.

  10. Low Angle Contact Between the Oaxaca and Juárez Terranes Deduced From Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzate-Flores, Jorge A.; Molina-Garza, Roberto; Corbo-Camargo, Fernando; Márquez-Ramírez, Víctor

    2016-04-01

    We present the electrical resistivity model along a profile perpendicular to the Middle America trench in southern Mexico that reveals previously unrecognized tectonic features at upper to mid-crustal depths. Our results support the hypotheses that the upper crust of the Oaxaca terrane is a residual ~20 km thick crust composed by an ~10 km thick faulted crustal upper layer and an ~10 km thick hydrated and/or mineralized layer. Oaxaca basement overthrust the younger Juárez (or Cuicateco) terrane. The electrical resistivity model supports the interpretation of a slab subducting at a low angle below Oaxaca. Uplift in the Oaxaca region appears to be related to fault reactivation induced by low angle subduction. In the Juárez terrane, isostatic forces may contribute to uplift because it is largely uncompensated. In the Sierra Madre del Sur, closer to the coast, uplift is facilitated by slab-dehydration driven buoyancy. Both gravity and resistivity models are consistent with a thinned upper crust in the northeast end of the profile.

  11. Thickness dependence of surface energy and contact angle of water droplets on ultrathin MoS2 films.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanhua; Wang, Zhengfei; Zhang, Lizhi; Shen, Xiaodong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We have performed a systematic density functional study of surface energy of MoS2 films as a function of thickness from one to twelve layers with the consideration of van der Waals (vdW) interactions using the vdW-DF and DFT-D2 methods. Both vdW schemes show that the surface energy will increase with the increase of the number of atomic layers and converge to a constant value at about six layers. Based on the calculated surface energies, we further analyze the surface contact angle of water droplets on the MoS2 film surface using Young's equation as a function of thickness in comparison with experiments, from which the water-MoS2 interfacial energy is derived to be independent of MoS2 thickness. Our calculations indicate that the vdW interactions between the MoS2 layers play an important role in determining surface energy, and results in the thickness dependence of the contact angle of water droplets on the MoS2 film surface. Our results explain well the recent wetting experiment [Nano Lett., 2014, 14(8), 4314], and will be useful for future studies of physical and chemical properties of ultrathin MoS2 films. PMID:27173479

  12. Evaluation of the surface properties of PTFE foam coating filter media using XPS and contact angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byung Hyun; Lee, Myong-Hwa; Kim, Sang Bum; Jo, Young Min

    2011-02-01

    A newly developed PTFE foam coating filter was developed which can be used for hot gas cleaning at temperatures up to 250 °C. The emulsion-type PTFE was coated onto a woven glass fiber using a foam coating method. The filter surface was closely examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. The XPS results were used to determine the binding force between the carbon and fluorine of PTFE, which imparts coating stability to the filter medium. More than 95% of the bonds of the PTFE foam coating filter were between carbon and fluorine, and this filter demonstrated excellent hydrophobic and good oleophobic properties at the same time. The contact angles of liquid droplets on the filter surface were used to predict the potential wetability of the filter against water or oil. In addition, the very low surface free energy of the filter medium, which was evaluated using the Owens-Wendt method, demonstrates a very stable surface and a high de-dusting quality.

  13. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions. PMID:17241003

  14. The comparison between two irrigation regimens on the dentine wettability for an epoxy resin based sealer by measuring its contact angle formed to the irrigated dentine

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rayapudi Phani; Pai, Annappa Raghavendra Vivekananda

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the influence of two irrigation regimens having ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid with cetrimide (EDTAC) as final irrigants, respectively, on the dentine wettability for AH Plus sealer by comparing its contact angle formed to the irrigated dentine. Materials and Methods: Study samples were divided into two groups (n = 10). The groups were irrigated with 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution followed by either 17% EDTA or 17% EDTAC solution. AH Plus was mixed, and controlled volume droplet (0.1 mL) of the sealer was placed on the dried samples. The contact angle was measured using a Dynamic Contact Angle Analyzer and results were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 and 2 sample t-test. Results: There was a significant difference in the contact angle of AH Plus formed to the dentine irrigated with the above two regimens. AH Plus showed significantly lower contact angle with the regimen having EDTAC as a final irrigant than the one with EDTA (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An irrigation regimen consisting of NaOCl with either EDTA or EDTAC solution as a final irrigant influences the dentine wettability and contact angle of a sealer. EDTAC as a final irrigant facilitates better dentin wettability than EDTA for AH Plus to promote its better flow and adhesion. PMID:26180409

  15. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  16. Photoinduced superhydrophilicity: a kinetic study of time dependent photoinduced contact angle changes on TiO2 surfaces.

    PubMed

    Foran, Philip S; Boxall, Colin; Denison, Kieth R

    2012-12-21

    Transparent TiO(2) thin films were prepared on quartz substrates via a reverse micelle, sol-gel, spin-coating technique. The time dependence of the TiO(2) film photoinduced superhydrophilicity (PISH) was measured by goniometric observation of the contact angle, θ, of sessile water drops at the film surfaces. In these measurements, the TiO(2) substrate was illuminated by 315 nm light and drops were sequentially applied at a range of illumination times. Using a model for the wetting of heterogeneous surfaces derived by Israelachvili and Gee, these measurements were used to calculate the time dependence of f(2), the fractional surface coverage of the TiO(2) surface by adventitious contaminating organics (Israelachvili, J. N.; Gee, M. L. Contact angles on chemically heterogeneous surfaces. Langmuir 1989, 5, 288). Extending this model to include a Langmuir-Hinshelwood based kinetic analysis of f(2) as a function of time allowed for calculation of an expected value for θ immediately prior to illumination, that is, at illumination time t = 0. Such expected values of θ at t = 0 were calculated using two possible values of θ(1), the contact angle on a pristine unilluminated homogeneous TiO(2) surface: (i) θ(1) = 4° as suggested by, inter alia, Zubkov et al. (Zubkov, T.; Stahl, D.; Thompson, T. L.; Panayotov, D.; Diwald, O.; Yates, J. T. Ultraviolet Light-Induced Hydrophilicity Effect on TiO(2)(110)(1 × 1). Dominant Role of the Photooxidation of Adsorbed Hydrocarbons Causing Wetting by Water Droplets. J. Phys. Chem. B2005, 109, 15454); and (ii) where θ(1) = 25°, as suggested by Fujishima et al., representative of a more hydrophobic homogeneous TiO(2) surface that reconstructs upon exposure to ultraband gap illumination into a hydrophilic surface where θ(1) → 0° (Fujishima, A.; Zhang, X.; Tryk, D. A. TiO(2) photocatalysis and related surface phenomena Surf. Sci. Rep.2008, 63, 515). Analysis of data from our experiments and from selected literature sources

  17. Evaluation of a bioluminescence method, contact angle measurements and topography for testing the cleanability of plastic surfaces under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Kuisma, R.; Ojala-Paloposki, T.; Hautala, M.; Sjöberg, A.-M.

    2007-04-01

    Detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by bioluminescence is used, for instance, in the food industry and in hospitals to assess the hygiene status of surfaces. The aim of this laboratory study was to investigate the feasibility of the ATP method for estimating the cleanability of resilient floor coverings from biological soil. The surfaces were worn using a Soiling and Wearing Drum Tester, and soiled and cleaned with an Erichsen Washability and Scrubbing Resistance Tester. In the laboratory test carried out with the bioluminescence method, most of the new and worn floor coverings that were biologically soiled were cleaned efficiently. According to this study, the semiquantitative ATP screening method can be used for hygiene monitoring of flooring materials. No correlation was found between cleanability and contact angles or surface topography measured using a profilometer. However, by revealing local irregularities and damage on surfaces, scanning electron micrographs appeared useful in explaining differences in cleanability.

  18. Cavitation on deterministically nanostructured surfaces in contact with an aqueous phase: a small-angle neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Melnichenko, Yuri B; Lavrik, N V; Popov, E; Bahadur, J; He, L; Kravchenko, I I; Smith, G; Pipich, V; Szekely, N K

    2014-08-26

    The structure of deterministically nanopatterned surfaces created using a combination of electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching was evaluated using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Samples exhibit 2D neutron scattering patterns that confirm the presence of ordered nanoscale cavities consistent with the targeted morphologies as well as with SEM data analysis. Comparison of SANS intensities obtained from samples in air and in contact with an aqueous phase (pure deuterium oxide, D2O, or a contrast matched mixture of D2O + H2O) reveals formation of stable gaseous nanobubbles trapped inside the cavities. The relative volume of nanobubbles depends strongly on the hydrophobicity of the cavity walls. In the case of hydrophobic surfaces, nanobubbles occupy up to 87% of the total cavity volume. The results demonstrate the high degree of sensitivity of SANS measurements for detecting and characterizing nano- and mesoscale bubbles with the volume fraction as low as ∼10(-6). PMID:25084807

  19. Determining Chiral Configuration of Diamines via Contact Angle Measurements on Enantioselective Alanine-Appended Benzene-Tricarboxamide Gelators.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Ho; Kim, Ka Young; Ahn, Ahreum; Choi, Myong Yong; Jaworski, Justyn; Jung, Jong Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic techniques exist that may discern between enantiomers and assess chiral purity. A nonspectroscopic approach that may be directly observed could provide numerous benefits. Using chiral alanine-appended benzene-tricarboxamide gelators, we reveal a methanol gel system that is capable of providing visual discrimination between enantiomers of various diamines. Specifically, gelation is induced by supramolecular nanofiber assembly resulting from interaction between a chiral gelator and a diamine of opposing chirality (i.e., a heterochiral system). Upon further implementing the chiral gelator in electrospun fibers as solid state films, we revealed enantioselective surface wetting properties that allowed for determining chirality through contact angle measurements. While these two approaches of observable gelation and surface wetting offer nonspectroscopic approaches, we also find that the supramolecular nanofiber assembly was able to enhance the induced circular dichroism signal resulting from addition of chiral diamines, allowing precise quantification of their enantiomeric purity. PMID:27187717

  20. Imaging of oil layers, curvature and contact angle in a mixed-wet and a water-wet carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of wettability of carbonate rocks on the morphologies of remaining oil after sequential oil and brine injection in a capillary-dominated flow regime at elevated pressure. The wettability of Ketton limestone was altered in situ using an oil phase doped with fatty acid which produced mixed-wet conditions (the contact angle where oil contacted the solid surface, measured directly from the images, θ=180°, while brine-filled regions remained water-wet), whereas the untreated rock (without doped oil) was weakly water-wet (θ=47 ± 9°). Using X-ray micro-tomography, we show that the brine displaces oil in larger pores during brine injection in the mixed-wet system, leaving oil layers in the pore corners or sandwiched between two brine interfaces. These oil layers, with an average thickness of 47 ± 17 µm, may provide a conductive flow path for slow oil drainage. In contrast, the oil fragments into isolated oil clusters/ganglia during brine injection under water-wet conditions. Although the remaining oil saturation in a water-wet system is about a factor of two larger than that obtained in the mixed-wet rock, the measured brine-oil interfacial area of the disconnected ganglia is a factor of three smaller than that of oil layers.

  1. Correlation of Oil-Water and Air-Water Contact Angles of Diverse Silanized Surfaces and Relationship to Fluid Interfacial Tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2012-02-24

    The use of air-water, {Theta}{sub wa}, or air-liquid contact angles is customary in surface science, while oil-water contact angles {Theta}{sub ow}, are of paramount importance in subsurface multiphase flow phenomena including petroleum reocovery, nonaqueous phase liquid fate and transport, and geological carbon sequestration. In this paper we determine both the air-water and oil-water contact angles of silica surfaces modified with a diverse selection of silanes, using hexadecane as the oil. The silanes included alkylsilanes, alkylarylsilanes, and silanes with alkyl or aryl groups that are functionalized with heteroatoms such as N, O, and S. These silanes yielded surfaces with wettabilities from water-wet to oil wet, including specific silanized surfaces functionalized with heteroatoms that yield intermediate wet surfaces. The oil-water contact angles for clean and silanized surfaces, excluding one partially fluorinated surface, correlate linearly with air-water contact angles with a slope of 1.41 (R = 0.981, n = 13). These data were used to examine a previously untested theoretical treatment relating air-water and oil-water contact angles in terms of fluid interfacial energies. Plotting the cosines of these contact angles against one another, we obtain a linear relationship in excellent agreement with the theoretical treatment; the data fit cos {Theta}{sub ow} = 0.667 cos {Theta}{sub ow} + 0.384 (R = 0.981, n = 13), intercepting cos {Theta}{sub ow} = -1 at -0.284. The theoretical slope, based on the fluid interfacial tensions {Theta}{sub wa}, {Theta}{sub ow}, and {Theta}{sub oa}, is 0.67. We also demonstrate how silanes can be used to alter the wettability of the interior of a pore network micromodel device constructed in silicon/silica with a glass cover plate. Such micromodels are used to study multiphase flow phenomena. The contact angle of the resulting interior was determined in situ. An intermediate wet micromodel gave a contact angle in excellent agreement

  2. An advanced AFM sensor for high-aspect ratio pattern profile in-line measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Baba, Shuichi; Nakata, Toshihiko; Kurenuma, Toru; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Hiroki, Takenori

    2006-03-01

    Design rule shrinkage and the wider adoption of new device structures such as STI, copper damascene interconnects, and deep trench structures have increased the necessity of in-line process monitoring of step heights and profiles of device structures. For monitoring active device patterns, not test patterns as in OCD, AFM is the only non-destructive 3D monitoring tool. The barriers to using AFM in-line monitoring are its slow throughput and the accuracy degradation associated with probe tip wear and spike noise caused by unwanted oscillation on the steep slopes of high-aspect-ratio patterns. Our proprietary AFM scanning method, Step in mode®, is the method best suited to measuring high-aspect-ratio pattern profiles. Because the probe is not dragged on the sample surface as in conventional AFM, the profile trace fidelity across steep slopes is excellent. Because the probe does not oscillate and hit the sample at a high frequency as in AC scanning mode, this mode is free from unwanted spurious noises on steep sample slopes and incurs extremely little probe tip wear. To fully take advantage of the above properties, we have developed an AFM sensor optimized for in-line use, which produces accurate profile data at high speeds. The control scheme we have developed for the AFM sensor, which we call "Smart Step-in", elaborately analyses the contact force signal, enabling efficient probe tip scanning and a low and stable contact force. The mechanism of the AFM sensor has been optimized for the higher scanning rate and has improved the accuracy, such as the scanning planarity, position and height accuracy, and slope angle accuracy. Our prototype AFM sensor can scan high-aspect-ratio patterns while stabilizing the contact force at 3 nN. The step height measurement repeatability was 0.8 nm (3σ). A STI-like test pattern was scanned, and the steep sidewalls with angles of 84° were measured with high fidelity and without spurious noises.

  3. Experimental studies of contact angle hysteresis phenomena on polymer surfaces – Toward the understanding and control of wettability for different applications.

    PubMed

    Grundke, K; Pöschel, K; Synytska, A; Frenzel, R; Drechsler, A; Nitschke, M; Cordeiro, A L; Uhlmann, P; Welzel, P B

    2015-08-01

    Contact angle hysteresis phenomena on polymer surfaces have been studied by contact angle measurements using sessile liquid droplets and captive air bubbles in conjunction with a drop shape method known as Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis - Profile (ADSA-P). In addition, commercially available sessile drop goniometer techniques were used. The polymer surfaces were characterized with respect to their surface structure (morphology, roughness, swelling) and surface chemistry (elemental surface composition, acid-base characteristics) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and streaming potential measurements. Heterogeneous polymer surfaces with controlled roughness and chemical composition were prepared by different routes using plasma etching and subsequent dip coating or grafting of polymer brushes, anodic oxidation of aluminium substrates coated with thin polymer films, deposition techniques to create regular patterned and rough fractal surfaces from core-shell particles, and block copolymers. To reveal the effects of swelling and reorientation at the solid/liquid interface contact angle hysteresis phenomena on polyimide surfaces, cellulose membranes, and thermo-responsive hydrogels have been studied. The effect of different solutes in the liquid (electrolytes, surfactants) and their impact on contact angle hysteresis were characterized for solid polymers without and with ionizable functional surface groups in aqueous electrolyte solutions of different ion concentrations and pH and for photoresist surfaces in cationic aqueous surfactant solutions. The work is an attempt toward the understanding of contact angle hysteresis phenomena on polymer surfaces aimed at the control of wettability for different applications. PMID:25488284

  4. Physical properties of cerebrospinal fluid of relevance to shunt function. 2: The effect of protein upon CSF surface tension and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Brydon, H L; Hayward, R; Harkness, W; Bayston, R

    1995-01-01

    CSF surface tension has received little study, and yet it will effect the pressure at which shunt valves operate, and by influencing the degree of hydrophobicity (contact angle) will alter the attraction between bacteria and neurosurgical prostheses. A study is therefore presented of the effect of protein content upon the surface tension of CSF and its contact angle to silicone rubber. Both of these quantities fell throughout the normal range of CSF protein, but above 1 g/l, additional protein had little effect, and the results obtained were similar to that reported for plasma. The effect of surface tension on the opening and closing pressures of hydrocephalus shunt valves and of contact angle in the adhesion of bacteria to neurosurgical implants is discussed. PMID:8561937

  5. High-precision drop shape analysis on inclining flat surfaces: Introduction and comparison of this special method with commercial contact angle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Michael; Heib, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Drop shape analysis is one of the most important and frequently used methods to characterise surfaces in the scientific and industrial communities. An especially large number of studies, which use contact angle measurements to analyse surfaces, are characterised by incorrect or misdirected conclusions such as the determination of surface energies from poorly performed contact angle determinations. In particular, the characterisation of surfaces, which leads to correlations between the contact angle and other effects, must be critically validated for some publications. A large number of works exist concerning the theoretical and thermodynamic aspects of two- and tri-phase boundaries. The linkage between theory and experiment is generally performed by an axisymmetric drop shape analysis, that is, simulations of the theoretical drop profiles by numerical integration onto a number of points of the drop meniscus (approximately 20). These methods work very well for axisymmetric profiles such as those obtained by pendant drop measurements, but in the case of a sessile drop onto real surfaces, additional unknown and misunderstood effects on the dependence of the surface must be considered. We present a special experimental and practical investigation as another way to transition from experiment to theory. This procedure was developed to be especially sensitive to small variations in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the surface; as a result, this procedure will allow the properties of the surface to be monitored with a higher precession and sensitivity. In this context, water drops onto a 111 silicon wafer are dynamically measured by video recording and by inclining the surface, which results in a sequence of non-axisymmetric drops. The drop profiles are analysed by commercial software and by the developed and presented high-precision drop shape analysis. In addition to the enhanced sensitivity for contact angle determination, this analysis technique, in

  6. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  7. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  8. Effects of various chair-side surface treatment methods on dental restorative materials with respect to contact angles and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Candida R C; Faber, Franz-Josef; Scheer, Martin; Rothamel, Daniel; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Available chair-side surface treatment methods may adversely affect prosthetic materials and promote plaque accumulation. This study investigated the effects of treatment procedures on three resin restorative materials, zirconium-dioxide and polyetheretherketone in terms of surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Treatments were grinding with silicon carbide paper or white Arkansas stone, blasting with prophylaxis powder and polishing with diamond paste. Surface roughness was assessed using confocal laser scanning. Hydrophobicity as measured by water contact angle was determined by computerized image analysis using the sessile drop technique. All of the specific surface treatments performed led to significant changes in contact angle values and surface roughness (Ra) values. Median contact angle values ranged from 51.6° to 114°. Ra values ranged from 0.008 µm to 2.917 µm. Air-polishing as well as other polishing procedures increased surface roughness values in all materials except zirconium dioxide. Polyetheretherketone displayed greatest change in contact angle values after air-polishing treatment. PMID:26632228

  9. The influence of mercury contact angle, surface tension, and retraction mechanism on the interpretation of mercury porosimetry data.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Sean P; Edler, Karen J

    2002-06-01

    The use of a semi-empirical alternative to the standard Washburn equation for the interpretation of raw mercury porosimetry data has been advocated. The alternative expression takes account of variations in both mercury contact angle and surface tension with pore size, for both advancing and retreating mercury meniscii. The semi-empirical equation presented was ultimately derived from electron microscopy data, obtained for controlled pore glasses by previous workers. It has been found that this equation is also suitable for the interpretation of raw data for sol-gel silica spheres. Interpretation of mercury porosimetry data using the alternative to the standard Washburn equation was found to give rise to pore sizes similar to those obtained from corresponding SAXS data. The interpretation of porosimetry data, for both whole and finely powdered silica spheres, using the alternative expression has demonstrated that the hysteresis and mercury entrapment observed for whole samples does not occur for fragmented samples. Therefore, for these materials, the structural hysteresis and overall level of mercury entrapment is caused by the macroscopic (> approximately 30 microm), and not the microscopic (< approximately 30 microm), properties of the porous medium. This finding suggested that mercury porosimetry may be used to obtain a statistical characterization of sample macroscopic structure similar to that obtained using MRI. In addition, from a comparison of the pore size distribution from porosimetry with that obtained using complementary nitrogen sorption data, it was found that, even in the absence of hysteresis and mercury entrapment, pore shielding effects were still present. This observation suggested that the mercury extrusion process does not occur by a piston-type retraction mechanism and, therefore, the usual method for the application of percolation concepts to mercury retraction is flawed. PMID:16290649

  10. To Investigate the Absorption, Dynamic Contact Angle and Printability Effects of Synthetic Zeolite Pigments in an Inkjet Receptive Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalindre, Swaraj Sunil

    Ink absorption performance in inkjet receptive coatings containing synthetic zeolite pigments was studied. Coating pigment pore and particle size distribution are the key parameters that influence in modifying media surface properties, thus affecting the rate of ink penetration and drying time (Scholkopf, et al. 2004). The primary objective of this study was: (1) to investigate the synthetic zeolite pigment effects on inkjet ink absorption, dynamic contact angle and printability, and (2) to evaluate these novel synthetic zeolite pigments in replacing the fumed silica pigments in conventional inkjet receptive coatings. In this research study, single pigment coating formulations (in equal P:B ratio) were prepared using microporous synthetic zeolite pigments (5A, Organophilic and 13X) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) binder. The laboratory-coated samples were characterized for absorption, air permeance, roughness, drying time, wettability and print fidelity. Based on the rheological data, it was found that the synthetic zeolite formulated coatings depicted a Newtonian flow behavior at low shear; while the industry accepted fumed silica based coatings displayed a characteristically high pseudoplastic flow behavior. Our coated samples generated using microporous synthetic zeolite pigments produced low absorption, reduced wettability and accelerated ink drying characteristics. These characteristics were caused due to the synthetic zeolite pigments, which resulted in relatively closed surface structure coated samples. The research suggested that no single selected synthetic zeolite coating performed better than the conventional fumed silica based coatings. Experimental data also showed that there was no apparent relationship between synthetic zeolite pigment pore sizes and inkjet ink absorption. For future research, above coated samples should be evaluated for pore size distribution using Mercury Porosimeter, which quantifies surface porosity of coated samples. This presented

  11. Experiments on the contact angle of n-propanol on differently prepared silver substrates at various temperatures and implications for the properties of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinterich, T.; Winkler, P. M.; Vrtala, A. E.; Wagner, P. E.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we present the results of contact angle measurements between n-propanol and silver substrates in the temperature range from -10 °C to 30 °C. The interest in a potential temperature dependence of contact angles originates from recent experiments by S. Schobesberger et al. (Schobesberger S., Strange temperature dependence observed for heterogeneous nucleation of n-propanol vapor on NaCl particles. Master's thesis, University of Vienna, 2008; Schobesberger S. et al., Experiments on the temperature dependence of heterogeneous nucleation on NaCl and Ag particles. In preparation.) investigating the temperature dependence for heterogeneous nucleation of n-propanol vapour on NaCl and on silver particles. We determined dynamic advancing θ a and receding θ r angles on variously prepared silver probes. The Dynamic Wilhelmy method (Wilhelmy L., Über die Abhängigkeit der Capillaritäts-Constanten des Alkohols von Substanz und Gestalt des benetzten festen Körpers. Ann. Phys. Chem., 199:177-217, 1863) was applied using a Krüss K12 Tensiometer, with a refrigerated double-walled glass top. With respect to its potential influence on heterogeneous nucleation mainly the advancing angle is of interest. The uniform probe geometry required was achieved by accurate cutting and by multiple polishing stages up to the accomplishment of a 0.04 μm grain size. The original probes consist of 925 sterling silver including a 7.5% copper content. Additional coating with silver pro Analysi (p.A.) was applied making use of pure silver powder evaporation process via Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD). Results show that a surface contamination by copper cannot be neglected for the specification of contact angles. It turned out that additional PVD coatings not only change the values of θa but also their temperature dependence. With increasing the number of coatings of a plate the contact angle decreases and its temperature dependence inverts. Since the contact angle hysteresis

  12. Determination of the solid surface critical exponent β1 from contact-angle variation on approach to a wetting transition: Cyclohexane/aniline/quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallas, Norman R.

    2016-03-01

    The three-phase contact angle (θ) for the system cyclohexane/aniline/quartz has been measured from drop shapes as a function of temperature on approach to the cyclohexane/aniline upper consolute solution temperature Tc. The experiments employed exacting criteria previously established for thermodynamic-quality measurements at fluid interfaces. A first-order wetting transition from partial wetting to complete wetting was observed at a temperature Tw, 2.12 K below Tc. The contact angle vanishes at Tw, scaling as cos θ ˜ |T - Tc|β1-μ for T < Tw and cos θ = 1.0 for Tw < T < Tc. The experimental results give a value for β1 = 0.74 ± 0.03, in agreement with theoretical calculations. The data clearly rule out higher order contributions to the change in the contact angle near the critical point for this system. These results are in marked contrast to previous measurements on this system from measurements of capillary rise and meniscus curvature.

  13. Modeling and experimental study of oil/water contact angle on biomimetic micro-parallel-patterned self-cleaning surfaces of selected alloys used in water industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, Simin; Moghadam, Afsaneh Dorri; Ferguson, J. B.; Rohatgi, Pradeep

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the wetting behavior of surfaces of various common metallic materials used in the water industry including C84400 brass, commercially pure aluminum (99.0% pure), Nickle-Molybdenum alloy (Hastelloy C22), and 316 Stainless Steel prepared by mechanical abrasion and contact angles of several materials after mechanical abrasion were measured. A model to estimate roughness factor, Rf, and fraction of solid/oil interface, ƒso, for surfaces prepared by mechanical abrasion is proposed based on the assumption that abrasive particles acting on a metallic surface would result in scratches parallel to each other and each scratch would have a semi-round cross-section. The model geometrically describes the relation between sandpaper particle size and water/oil contact angle predicted by both the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter contact type, which can then be used for comparison with experimental data to find which regime is active. Results show that brass and Hastelloy followed Cassie-Baxter behavior, aluminum followed Wenzel behavior and stainless steel exhibited a transition from Wenzel to Cassie-Baxter. Microstructural studies have also been done to rule out effects beyond the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter theories such as size of structural details.

  14. A numerical approach for the direct computation of flows including fluid-solid interaction: Modeling contact angle, film rupture, and dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, K.; Afkhami, S.; Kondic, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient method for including fluid-solid interactions into direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This method is found to be as powerful as our earlier formulation [K. Mahady et al., "A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries," J. Comput. Phys. 294, 243 (2015)], while outperforming the earlier method in terms of computational efficiency. The performance and efficacy of the presented method are demonstrated by computing contact angles of droplets at equilibrium. Furthermore, we study the instability of films due to destabilizing fluid-solid interactions, and discuss the influence of contact angle and inertial effects on film breakup. In particular, direct simulation results show an increase in the final characteristic length scales when compared to the predictions of a linear stability analysis, suggesting significant influence of nonlinear effects. Our results also show that emerging length scales differ, depending on a number of physical dimensions considered.

  15. AFM Studies of Conformational Changes in Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Sukthankar, Pinakin; Tomich, John; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present estimates of molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors for some examples of proteins and peptides. The results are obtained from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. To determine molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors we developed a model based on measuring several resonance frequencies of an AFM cantilever in contact with either single protein molecule or peptides adsorbed on arbitrary surface. We used compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio - a ratio of length to width - in air and in liquid, including biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium. Department of Physics.

  16. In-situ surface wettability parameters of submerged in brackish water surfaces derived from captive bubble contact angle studies as indicators of surface condition level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorzelski, S. J.; Mazurek, A. Z.; Szczepanska, A.

    2013-06-01

    The characterization of wetting properties (by contact angles) of several undersea artificial (glass plates,) and natural (stones, sand layers, soft-bottom structures, aquatic macrophytes, sediments, and seafloor communities) solid substrata in the Baltic Sea brackish water (Gulf of Gdansk). The studies were performed under laboratory and field conditions using a novel captive bubble air-pipette computer microscope system. A set of the surface wettability parameters: the apparent surface free energy γSV, adhesive layer film pressure Π, work of adhesion WA, and work of spreading WS were determined to quantify the wetting properties of model substrata using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approach. The useful technique to measure in situ the contact angle giving reproducible and accurate values of CA turned out to be a captive bubble method, for fully hydrated interfacial layers of highly hydrophilic and porous nature met at seabed (Rodrigues-Valverde et al., 2002). CA measurements revealed mostly hydrophilic nature of the studied solid material (CA < 90°) where the presence of adsorbed organic matter layer or crude oil film covering lead to surface hydrophobization (CA↑, γSV ↓,WA↓, WS more negative). The adhesion of biofouling was correlated both with CAH and the dispersive interaction term γSVd of the total γSV. Monitoring of the artificial substrata of the hydrophilic nature with a CA technique can be used to observe the development of the organisms community i.e., microfouling, and to carry out a comprehensive study of surfaces of the submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton lucens in particular). Since aquatic macrophytes can act as bio-indicators of water chemistry their surface wettability may reflect plant surface erosion and organic matter accumulation state being of particular value in biological assessment of ecosystems status.

  17. Model calculations on vertical common black equilibrium soap films: the relation of contact angle to Fresnel diffraction patterns from the film-border transition

    SciTech Connect

    Agterof, W.G.M.

    1982-04-01

    The surface tension of a thin liquid (soap) film is often different from that of the bulk solution from which the film is made. This is a consequence of the action of long-range interation forces in the film. In general, 2 forces are considered. The first is the electric double-layer repulsion which is a result of the overlap of the double-layer buildup in the central aqueous core of the film by the ionic detergent molecules at the surfaces. The second is the London-Van der Waals attraction due to the fact that a molecule in the film has a smaller number of other molecules in its interaction sphere than a molecule in the bulk solution. Both forces, which are functions of the thickness of the film, compose the disjoining pressure. From the profiles Fresnel diffraction patterns were calculated and the following conclusions were drawn: (1) they are not very sensitive for the details of the transition region, between a film and its meniscus; (2) for contact angles larger than 16 ft, the results of Princen and Frankel coincide within 5%; and (3) this optical method will not result in reliable contact angles when they are smaller than 10 ft. 22 references.

  18. The Effects of Void Geometry and Contact Angle on the Absorption of Liquids into Porous Calcium Carbonate Structures.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Cathy J.; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Matthews, G. Peter; Gane, Patrick A. C.; James, Philip W.

    2001-07-15

    The absorption (permeation) of alcohols into porous blocks of calcium carbonate has been studied experimentally and with a computer model. The experimental measurement was of change in apparent weight of a block with time after contact with liquid. The modeling used the previously developed 'Pore-Cor' model, based on unit cells of 1000 cubic pores connected by cylindrical throats. To gain some insight into absorption into voids of complex geometry, and to provide a representation of heterogeneities in surface interaction energy, the cylindrical throats were converted to double cones. Relative to cylinders, such geometries caused hold-ups of the percolation of nonwetting fluids with respect to increasing applied pressure, and a change in the rate of absorption of wetting fluids. Both the measured absorption of the alcohols and the simulated absorption of the alcohols and of water showed significant deviations from that predicted by an effective hydraulic radius approximation. The simulation demonstrated the development of a highly heterogeneous wetting front, and of preferred wetting pathways that were perturbed by inertial retardation. The findings are useful in the design of high-performance, low-waste pigments for paper coatings, and environmentally friendly printing inks, as well as in wider industrial, environmental, and geological contexts. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11427007

  19. Surface composition of biopolymer blends Biospan-SP/Phenoxy and Biospan-F/Phenoxy observed with SFG, XPS, and contact angle goniometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Eppler, A.S.; Shen, Y.R.; Somorjai, G.A.; Ward, R.; Tian, Y.

    1999-04-15

    The surface compositions of two biopolymer blends, Biospan-SP/Phenoxy (BSP/PHE) and Biospan-F/Phenoxy (BF/PHE), have been studied using sum frequency generation (SFG), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle goniometry. BSP and BF are polyurethanes capped with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and fluoroalkyl (-(-CF{sub 2}-){sub n}-) as end groups, respectively. With contact angle goniometry, the surface tensions of pure BSP, BF, and PHE were found to be 26, 16, and 45 dyne/cm. For each of the blends, the polymer component with a lower surface concentration of the surface-active component increases sharply as its bulk concentration increases. For BSP/PHE (and BF/PHE) in air, the surface of the polymer blend is fully covered by BSP (and BF) at a bulk concentration of 3.5 wt % (and 1 wt %). The contact angle measurements and the XPS studies yield compatible results. Comparison of results for BSP/PHE, BS/PHE (published before), and BF/PHE polymer blends shows that the lower the surface energy of the surface-active component (surface tension: BF < BS < BSP), the easier it is for the component to segregate to the surface (the minimum bulk concentration to saturate the surface is BF (1 wt %) < BS (1.7 wt %) < BSP (3.5 wt %)). After exposure to water, SFG spectra indicate that the surface layer of a polymer blend could be restructured. For BSP (3.5 wt %)/PHE, the hydrophobic end groups of BSP submerge while the hydrophilic polyurethane backbone emerges. For BF (1 wt %)/PHE, PHE emerges at the surface after exposure to water, but for BF (5 wt %)/PHE, the BF component dominates the surface in both air and water. Their results demonstrate the bifunctionality of polymer blends and show that the surface chemistry of polymer blends may be dominated by a minor component, while the mechanical stability of the polymer is controlled by the major component.

  20. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  1. The Effect of Contact Angles and Capillary Dimensions on the Burst Frequency of Super Hydrophilic and Hydrophilic Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms, a CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:24069169

  2. The effect of contact angles and capillary dimensions on the burst frequency of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms, a CFD study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:24069169

  3. Systematic Oxidation of Polystyrene by Ultraviolet-Ozone, Characterized by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Contact Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Klein,R.; Fischer, D.; Lenhart, J.

    2008-01-01

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double OC bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 {+-} 2, due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above Tg allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  4. Modeling the Interaction between AFM Tips and Pinned Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenjiang; Liu, Yawei; Xiao, Qianxiang; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Xianren

    2016-01-26

    Although the morphology of surface nanobubbles has been studied widely with different AFM modes, AFM images may not reflect the real shapes of the nanobubbles due to AFM tip-nanobubble interactions. In addition, the interplay between surface nanobubble deformation and induced capillary force has not been well understood in this context. In our work we used constraint lattice density functional theory to investigate the interaction between AFM tips and pinned surface nanobubbles systematically, especially concentrating on the effects of tip hydrophilicity and shape. For a hydrophilic tip contacting a nanobubble, its hydrophilic nature facilitates its departure from the bubble surface, displaying a weak and intermediate-range attraction. However, when the tip squeezes the nanobubble during the approach process, the nanobubble shows an elastic effect that prevents the tip from penetrating the bubble, leading to a strong nanobubble deformation and repulsive interactions. On the contrary, a hydrophobic tip can easily pierce the vapor-liquid interface of the nanobubble during the approach process, leading to the disappearance of the repulsive force. In the retraction process, however, the adhesion between the tip and the nanobubble leads to a much stronger lengthening effect on nanobubble deformation and a strong long-range attractive force. The trends of force evolution from our simulations agree qualitatively well with recent experimental AFM observations. This favorable agreement demonstrates that our model catches the main intergradient of tip-nanobubble interactions for pinned surface nanobubbles and may therefore provide important insight into how to design minimally invasive AFM experiments. PMID:26751634

  5. Characterization of the interaction between AFM tips and surface nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-06-24

    While the presence of gaseous enclosures observed at various solid-water interfaces, the so-called "surface nanobubles", has been confirmed by many groups in recent years, their formation, properties, and stability have not been convincingly and exhaustively explained. Here we report on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of argon nanobubbles on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) in water to elucidate the properties of nanobubble surfaces and the mechanism of AFM tip-nanobubble interaction. In particular, the deformation of the nanobubble-water interface by the AFM tip and the question whether the AFM tip penetrates the nanobubble during scanning were addressed by this combined intermittent contact (tapping) mode and force volume AFM study. We found that the stiffness of nanobubbles was smaller than the cantilever spring constant and comparable with the surface tension of water. The interaction with the AFM tip resulted in severe quasi-linear deformation of the bubbles; however, in the case of tip-bubble attraction, the interface deformed toward the tip. We tested two models of tip-bubble interaction, namely, the capillary force and the dynamic interaction model, and found, depending on the tip properties, good agreement with experimental data. The results showed that the tip-bubble interaction strength and the magnitude of the bubble deformation depend strongly on tip and bubble geometry and on tip and substrate material, and are very sensitive to the presence of contaminations that alter the interfacial tension. In particular, nanobubbles interacted differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic AFM tips, which resulted in qualitatively and quantitatively different force curves measured on the bubbles in the experiments. To minimize bubble deformation and obtain reliable AFM results, nanobubbles must be measured with a sharp hydrophilic tip and with a cantilever having a very low spring constant in a contamination-free system. PMID:24856074

  6. Recent advances in exchange bias of layered magnetic FM/AFM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ZhongYuan

    2013-01-01

    The exchange bias (EB) has been investigated in magnetic materials with the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) contacting interfaces for more than half a century. To date, the significant progress has been made in the layered magnetic FM/AFM thin film systems. EB mechanisms have shown substantive research advances. Here some of the new advances are introduced and discussed with the emphasis on the influence of AFM layer, the interlayer EB coupling across nonmagnetic spacer, and the interlayer coupling across AFM layer, as well as EB related to multiferrioc materials and electrical control.

  7. Angle dependence on the anisotropic magnetoresistance amplitude of a single-contacted Ni nanowire subjected to a thermo-mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melilli, G.; Madon, B.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Clochard, M.-C.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermoelastic and piezoelectric strain of an active track-etched β-PVDF polymer matrix on an electrodeposited single-contacted Ni nanowire (NW) are investigated at the nanoscale by measuring the change of magnetization (i.e. using the inverse magnetostriction effect). The magnetization state is measured locally by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). The ferromagnetic NW plays thus the role of a mechanical probe that allows the effects of mechanical strain to be characterized and described qualitatively and quantitatively. The inverse magnetostriction was found to be responsible for a quasi-disappearance of the AMR signal for a variation of the order of ΔT ≈ 10 K. In other terms, the variation of the magnetization due to the stress compensates the effect of external magnetic field applied on the NW resistance. The induced stress field in a single Ni NW was found 1000 time higher than the bulk stress field (due to thermal expansion measured on the PVDF). This amplification could be attributed to three nanoscopic effects: (1) a stress mismatch between the Ni NW and the membrane, (2) a non-negligible role of the surface tension on Ni NW Young modulus, and (3) the possibility of non-linear stress-strain law. We investigate here the role of these different contributions using track-etched polymer membranes irradiated at various angles (αirrad) leading to, after electrodeposition, embedded Ni NWs of different orientations.

  8. Increase in the water contact angle of composite film surfaces caused by the assembly of hydrophilic nanocellulose fibrils and nanoclay platelets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Nan; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Yang, Quanling; Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Isogai, Akira

    2014-08-13

    Controlling the assembly modes of different crystalline nanoparticles in composites is important for the expression of specific characteristics of the assembled structures. We report a unique procedure for increasing water contact angles (CAs) of composite film surfaces via the assembly of two different hydrophilic components, nanocellulose fibrils and nanoclay platelets. The nanocellulose fibrils and nanoclay platelets used have ionic groups on their surfaces in high densities (∼1 mmol g(-1)) and have no hydrophobic surface. The increase in the CA of the nanocellulose/nanoclay composite films was thus analyzed on the basis of the air area fractions of their nanostructured surfaces following Cassie's law. The air area fractions were geographically estimated from the atomic force microscopy height profiles of the composite film surfaces. The CAs of the composite film surfaces were found to be well described by Cassie's law. Interestingly, the composite films consisting of two hydrophilic nanoelements with different shapes exhibited CAs larger than those of the individual neat films. PMID:24977651

  9. Improvement in metrology on new 3D-AFM platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Ingo; Osborn, Marc; Hand, Sean; Chen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    According to the 2007 edition of the ITRS roadmap, the requirement for CD uniformity of isolated lines on a binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 2.1nm (3σ) in 2008 and requires improvement to1.3 nm (3σ) in 2010. In order to meet the increasing demand for CD uniformity on photo masks, improved CD metrology is required. A next generation AFM, InSightTM 3DAFM, has been developed to meet these increased requirements for advanced photo mask metrology. The new system achieves 2X improvement in CD and depth precision on advanced photo masks features over the previous generation 3D-AFM. This paper provides measurement data including depth, CD, and sidewall angle metrology. In addition the unique capabilities of damage-free defect inspection and Nanoimprint characterization by 3D AFM are presented.

  10. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  11. On the molecular interaction between albumin and ibuprofen: An AFM and QCM-D study.

    PubMed

    Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Etxebarria, Juan; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on surfaces often results in a change of their structural behavior and consequently, a loss of bioactivity. One experimental method to study interactions on a molecular level is single molecular force spectroscopy that permits to measure forces down to the pico-newton range. In this work, the binding force between human serum albumin (HSA), covalently immobilized on glutaraldehyde modified gold substrates, and ibuprofen sodium salt was studied by means of single molecular force spectroscopy. First of all, a protocol was established to functionalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips with ibuprofen. The immobilization protocol was additionally tested by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and contact angle measurements. AFM was used to characterize the adsorption of HSA on gold substrates, which lead to a packed monolayer of thickness slightly lower than the reported value in solution. Finally, single molecule spectroscopy results were used to characterize the binding force between albumin and ibuprofen and calculate the distance of the transition state (0.6 nm) and the dissociation rate constant (0.055 s(-1)). The results might indicate that part of the adsorbed protein still preserves its functionality upon adsorption. PMID:26218522

  12. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  13. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  14. Conductive supports for combined AFM SECM on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Chami, Mohamed; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Blackstock, Jason J.; Dooleweerdt, Karin; de Rooij, Nico F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Four different conductive supports are analysed regarding their suitability for combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) on biological membranes. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), MoS2, template stripped gold, and template stripped platinum are compared as supports for high resolution imaging of reconstituted membrane proteins or native membranes, and as electrodes for transferring electrons from or to a redox molecule. We demonstrate that high resolution topographs of the bacterial outer membrane protein F can be recorded by contact mode AFM on all four supports. Electrochemical feedback experiments with conductive cantilevers that feature nanometre-scale electrodes showed fast re-oxidation of the redox couple Ru(NH3)63+/2+ with the two metal supports after prolonged immersion in electrolyte. In contrast, the re-oxidation rates decayed quickly to unpractical levels with HOPG or MoS2 under physiological conditions. On HOPG we observed heterogeneity in the re-oxidation rate of the redox molecules with higher feedback currents at step edges. The latter results demonstrate the capability of conductive cantilevers with small electrodes to measure minor variations in an SECM signal and to relate them to nanometre-scale features in a simultaneously recorded AFM topography. Rapid decay of re-oxidation rate and surface heterogeneity make HOPG or MoS2 less attractive for combined AFM-SECM experiments on biological membranes than template stripped gold or platinum supports.

  15. Evaluation of the electrical contact area in contact-mode scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Celano, Umberto E-mail: u.celano@gmail.com; Chintala, Ravi Chandra; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Hantschel, Thomas; Giammaria, Guido; Conard, Thierry; Bender, Hugo

    2015-06-07

    The tunneling current through an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is used to evaluate the effective electrical contact area, which exists between tip and sample in contact-AFM electrical measurements. A simple procedure for the evaluation of the effective electrical contact area is described using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in combination with a thin dielectric. We characterize the electrical contact area for coated metal and doped-diamond tips operated at low force (<200 nN) in contact mode. In both cases, we observe that only a small fraction (<10 nm{sup 2}) of the physical contact (∼100 nm{sup 2}) is effectively contributing to the transport phenomena. Assuming this reduced area is confined to the central area of the physical contact, these results explain the sub-10 nm electrical resolution observed in C-AFM measurements.

  16. Evaluation of the electrical contact area in contact-mode scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, Umberto; Hantschel, Thomas; Giammaria, Guido; Chintala, Ravi Chandra; Conard, Thierry; Bender, Hugo; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2015-06-01

    The tunneling current through an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is used to evaluate the effective electrical contact area, which exists between tip and sample in contact-AFM electrical measurements. A simple procedure for the evaluation of the effective electrical contact area is described using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in combination with a thin dielectric. We characterize the electrical contact area for coated metal and doped-diamond tips operated at low force (<200 nN) in contact mode. In both cases, we observe that only a small fraction (<10 nm2) of the physical contact (˜100 nm2) is effectively contributing to the transport phenomena. Assuming this reduced area is confined to the central area of the physical contact, these results explain the sub-10 nm electrical resolution observed in C-AFM measurements.

  17. MOS-based nanocapacitor using C-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Daniel; Sadewasser, Sascha; Aymerich, Xavier

    2003-04-01

    This report details the attempts made to realise nanocapacitors for nanoscale MOS based integrated circuits by AFM anodic oxidation, and therefore isolation, of nano-sized squares of poly-silicon, titanium and aluminium on Si/SiO2. Conductive AFM (C-AFM) was used to perform topographical and electrical characterisation. The experiments were performed with contact mode C-AFM, in ambient air, using Pt-Ir, Co-Cr and Ti coated (20nm) n-type silicon cantilevers. Each sample consisted of a 3-5nm thick conductor deposited on 6nm of SiO2, which was thermally grown on Phosphorus doped (1019 cm-3) n-type Si(100) substrates. Standard cleaning and passivation processes were used. Poly-silicon was immediately found to be too rough to oxidise. Initial current-voltage measurements inside of the titanium-oxide squares suggest initial isolation followed by degradation through Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling. Measurement inconsistencies seen suggest charge storage on the surface or tip with the barrier height of the native titanium oxide thought to be responsible. Al has a thicker natural oxide. To overcome this we designed a series of structures consisting of a Ti finger on SiO2, that is connected to a Ti bond pad, allowing direct probing by a semiconductor parameter analyser. AFM anodic oxidation was performed upon these Ti fingers to reduce their in-plane dimensions towards the nanoscale. To confirm the existence of a nanocapacitor topographical and electrical measurements were then done on and around them.

  18. Molecular modeling of enzyme attachment on AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guedmiller S; Leite, Fabio L; Amarante, Adriano M; Franca, Eduardo F; Cunha, Richard A; Briggs, James M; Freitas, Luiz C G

    2013-09-01

    The immobilization of enzymes on atomic force microscope tip (AFM tip) surface is a crucial step in the development of nanobiosensors to be used in detection process. In this work, an atomistic modeling of the attachment of the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC enzyme) on a functionalized AFM tip surface is proposed. Using electrostatic considerations, suitable enzyme-surface orientations with the active sites of the ACC enzyme available for interactions with bulk molecules were found. A 50 ns molecular dynamics trajectory in aqueous solution was obtained and surface contact area, hydrogen bonding and protein stability were analyzed. The enzyme-surface model proposed here with minor adjustment can be applied to study antigen-antibody interactions as well as enzyme immobilization on silica for chromatography applications. PMID:24029365

  19. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  20. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility. PMID:25627159

  1. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  2. Surface energy approach and AFM verification of the (CF)n treated surface effect and its correlation with adhesion reduction in microvalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeahyeong; Yeom, Junghoon; Mensing, Glennys; Joe, Daniel; Masel, Richard I.; Shannon, Mark A.

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline an approach that will determine the optimal surface pairs to use in a MEMS device with demonstrated stiction problems. The approach uses the contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) pull-off measurements to predict adhesion at the solid-solid interface. The results are compared to microvalves that have been fabricated with different surfaces at the seat/membrane interface. For microfabricated mechanical devices with surfaces that touch or have a small gap distance, stiction can occur during fabrication or during use. Fabricating multiple devices with different surfaces to determine the lowest stiction can be costly and time consuming. Identifying the surface pair with the least amount of surface adhesion before fabrication can lead to a reduction in device failure due to stiction, and/or time it takes to find the lowest energy surfaces via trial and error. Surface energies are obtained using the van Oss equation based on the contact angle measurements, and surface energy can be used to show the relative adhesions between two surface pairs. An AFM pull-off test is performed using nano- and micro-sized tips to quantify the effect of the different surfaces on adhesion between the solid-solid surface pairs, including SiO2/PI, CFn/PI, CFn/SiO2 and CFn/CFn. The work of adhesion of the surface pairs is obtained using the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporotov (DMT) and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theories. The surfaces treated with a C4F8/Ar plasma to form a CFn coating showed the least amount of surface adhesion. The CFn surface treatment effects on adhesion are quantified and correlated with the reduction in the opening pressure of the microvalve whose interfaces are coated with a CFn film. The AFM pull-off test was more closely related to adhesive forces between the surfaces of the valves as seen in the opening pressure data. The adhesion calculation based on the contact angle measurements predicts the adhesion force with a similar

  3. AFM forces between mica and polystyrene surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solutions with and without gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jorge H; Acuña, Sergio M; Toledo, Pedro G

    2013-11-15

    Force curves between a flat mica substrate and a polystyrene microsphere were measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) in carefully degassed water and aqueous NaCl, CaCl2, and AlCl3 solutions. The pH of the water used does not change significantly with degassing treatment, and its value remains close to 6. Electrolyte concentration ranges from 10-4 to 10-2M and pH from 4.7 to 5.1. We have found that the repulsive long-range electrostatic force between mica and polystyrene is attenuated by the presence of electrolytes and counterbalanced by a long-range attractive force, which we referred to as a hydrophobic force, which is longer-ranged than the ever present attractive van der Waals force. This force, which includes the adhesive bridging of residual air bubbles and newborn vapor cavities, and any other unknown forces, is reasonably well represented by a unique exponential law. Prefactor and decaying length are not very sensitive to electrolyte type, concentration, and pH, suggesting that any new force included in the law, in addition to adhesive bridges, should obey a non-classical electrostatic mechanism. However, we also know that liquid/solid contact angle and liquid/vapor surface tension increase with electrolyte concentration and valence increasing the stability of bubbles and cavities which in turn increase the bridging force. Clearly, these effects are hidden in the empirical force law. PMID:23998373

  4. The Apparent Contact Angle and Wetted Area of Active Alloys on Silicon Carbide as a Function of the Temperature and the Surface Roughness: A Multivariate Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Pfeiffer, Jan; Wojarski, Lukas

    2015-08-01

    Despite the broad field of applications for active filler alloys for brazing ceramics, as well as intense research work on the wetting and spreading behavior of these alloys on ceramic surfaces within the last decades, the manufactured joints still exhibit significant variations in their properties due to the high sensitivity of the alloys to changing brazing conditions. This increases the need for investigations of the wetting and spreading behavior of filler alloys with regard to the dominating influences combined with their interdependencies, instead of solely focusing on single parameter investigations. In this regard, measurements of the wetting angle and area were conducted at solidified AgCuTi and CuSnTi alloys on SiC substrates. Based on these measurements, a regression model was generated, illustrating the influence of the brazing temperature, the roughness of the faying surfaces, the furnace atmosphere, and their interdependencies on the wetting and spreading behavior of the filler alloys. It was revealed that the behavior of the melts was significantly influenced by the varied brazing parameters, as well as by their interdependencies. This result was also predicted by the developed model and showed a high accuracy.

  5. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  6. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  7. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  8. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 103 cm‑1). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions.

  9. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 103 cm−1). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions. PMID:27033154

  10. A partly-contacted epitaxial lateral overgrowth method applied to GaN material.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Zhang, Jincheng; Duan, Xiaoling; Shan, Hengsheng; Yu, Ting; Ning, Jing; Hao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We have discussed a new crystal epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) method, partly-contacted ELO (PC-ELO) method, of which the overgrowth layer partly-contacts with underlying seed layer. The passage also illustrates special mask structures with and without lithography and provides three essential conditions to achieve the PC-ELO method. What is remarkable in PC-ELO method is that the tilt angle of overgrowth stripes could be eliminated by contacting with seed layer. Moreover, we report an improved monolayer microsphere mask method without lithography of PC-ELO method, which was used to grow GaN. From the results of scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope (AFM), overgrowth layer shows no tilt angle relative to the seed layer and high quality coalescence front (with average linear dislocation density <6.4 × 10(3) cm(-1)). Wing stripes peak splitting of the XRD rocking curve due to tilt is no longer detectable. After coalescence, surface steps of AFM show rare discontinuities due to the low misorientation of the overgrowth regions. PMID:27033154

  11. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  12. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Miyake, Mikio; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell's. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  13. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  14. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-10-03

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis.

  15. Direct measurement of friction of a fluctuating contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuo; Gao, Min; Xiong, Xiaomin; Wang, Yong Jian; Wang, Xiaoping; Sheng, Ping; Tong, Penger

    2013-03-01

    What happens at a moving contact line, where one fluid displaces another (immiscible) fluid over a solid surface, is a fundamental issue in fluid dynamics. In this presentation, we report a direct measurement of the friction coefficient in the immediate vicinity of a fluctuating contact line using a micron-sized vertical glass fiber with one end glued to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beam and the other end touching a liquid-air interface. By measuring the broadening of the resonance peak of the cantilever system with varying liquid viscosity η, we obtain the friction coefficient ξc associated with the contact line fluctuations on the glass fiber of diameter d and find it has the universal form, ξc = 0 . 8 πdη , independent of the contact angle. The result is further confirmed by using a soap film system whose bulk effect is negligibly small. This is the first time that the friction coefficient of a fluctuating contact line is measured. *Work supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  16. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  17. Physical properties of polyacrylamide gels probed by AFM and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidine, Yara; Laurent, Valérie M.; Michel, Richard; Duperray, Alain; Iulian Palade, Liviu; Verdier, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Polymer gels have been shown to behave as viscoelastic materials but only a small amount of data is usually provided in the glass transition. In this paper, the dynamic moduli G\\prime and G\\prime\\prime of polyacrylamide hydrogels are investigated using both an AFM in contact force modulation mode and a classical rheometer. The validity is shown by the matching of the two techniques. Measurements are carried out on gels of increasing polymer concentration in a wide frequency range. A model based on fractional derivatives is successfully used, covering the whole frequency range. G\\text{N}0 , the plateau modulus, as well as several other parameters are obtained at low frequencies. The model also predicts the slope a of both moduli in the glass transition, and a transition frequency f\\text{T} is introduced to separate the gel-like behavior with the glassy state. Its variation with polymer content c gives a dependence f\\text{T}∼ c1.6 , in good agreement with previous theories. Therefore, the AFM data provides new information on the physics of polymer gels.

  18. Dual AFM probes alignment based on vision guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-kun; Gao, Si-tian; Lu, Ming-zhen; Wang, Long-long

    2013-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) with dual probes that operate together can measure both side walls excellently at the same time, which virtually eliminates the prevalent effect of probe width that contributes a large component of uncertainty in measurement results and finally obtains the critical dimension (CD)(e.g. the linewidth) through data synthesis. In calibration process, the dual probes must contact each other in advance, which realizes the alignment in the three dimensions, to establish a zero reference point and ensure the accuracy of measurement. Because nowadays the optical resolution of advanced lens have exceeded micrometer range, and the size of probes is within micro level, it is possible to acquire dual probes images in both horizontal and vertical directions, through which the movement of the probes can be controlled in time. In order to further enhance the alignment precision, sub-pixel edge detection method based on Zernike orthogonal moment is used to obtain relative position between these two probes, which helps the tips alignment attains sub-micron range. Piezoelectric nanopositioning stages calibrated by laser interferometer are used to implement fine movement of the probes to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. To simplify the system, novel self-sensing and self-actuating probe based on a quartz tuning fork combined with a micromachined cantilever is used for dynamic mode AFM. In this case, an external optical detection system is not needed, so the system is simple and small.

  19. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  20. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  1. A Batch Fabricated SECM-AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. S.; Macpherson, J. V.; Holder, M.; Weaver, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A scheme for the fabrication of combined Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy — Atomic Force Microscopy (SECM-AFM) probes is presented for both silicon nitride and silicon cantilevers. The advantages over exsisting methods used for their production is explained. The process flow is described and initial results from electrodeposition of silver are presented.

  2. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  3. Nanoscale crystallization of phase change Ge2Sb2Te5 film with AFM lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, JunHo

    2010-01-01

    We have made nanoindents on Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5)(GST) films using electric field-assisted atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. GST shows increase of material density and electric conductivity as it changes from amorphous to crystalline phases. By applying electric field between AFM probe-tip and GST surface, nanoscale crystallization could be induced on tip contact area. As the crystallized GST exhibits increase of material density, that is to say depression of volume, nanoindented surface with crystallization is created on host amorphous GST (a-GST) film. For the AFM lithography, a highly conductive tip, which showed voltage-switching characteristics in current-voltage spectroscopy of GST film, was found to be very suitable for recording and sensing crystallized nanoindents on the GST film. By varying sample bias voltages, we performed nanoscale crystallization, and measured the nanostructured film in AFM conductance-image (C-image) mode and topography-image (T-image) mode, simultaneously. Two types of crystallized wires were fabricated on (a-GST) film. Type-I was sensed in only C-image, whereas Type-II was sensed in both C-image and T-image. These nanowires are discussed in terms of crystallization of GST and sensitivity of current (or topography) sensing. By repeated lithography, larger size of nanoindented wires were also produced, which indicates line-dimension controllability of AFM lithography. PMID:20853405

  4. What's Your Angle on Angles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Christine A.; Garza-Kling, Gina; Sundling, Elizabeth Hill

    2007-01-01

    Although the nature of the research varies, as do concepts of angle, research in general supports the supposition that angle is a complex idea, best understood from a variety of perspectives. In fact, the concept of angle tends to be threefold, consisting of: (1) the traditional, static notion of two rays meeting at a common vertex; (2) the idea…

  5. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  6. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  7. Controlled nanodot fabrication by rippling polycarbonate surface using an AFM diamond tip

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The single scratching test of polymer polycarbonate (PC) sample surface using an atomic force microscope (AFM) diamond tip for fabricating ripple patterns has been studied with the focus on the evaluation of the effect of the tip scratching angle on the pattern formation. The experimental results indicated that the different oriented ripples can be easily machined by controlling the scratching angles of the AFM. And, the effects of the normal load and the feed on the ripples formation and their periods were also studied. Based on the ripple pattern formation, we firstly proposed a two-step scratching method to fabricate controllable and oriented complex three-dimensional (3D) nanodot arrays. These typical ripple formations can be described via a stick-slip and crack formation process. PMID:25114660

  8. Calibration of AFM cantilever stiffness: a microfabricated array of reflective springs.

    PubMed

    Cumpson, P J Peter J; Zhdan, Peter; Hedley, John

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference standard for this calibration. The new artifact consists of an array of 12 dual spiral-cantilever springs, each supporting a mirrored polycrystalline silicon disc of 160 microm in diameter. These devices were fabricated by a three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining method, including a reflective layer of gold on chromium. We call such an array a Microfabricated Array of Reference Springs (MARS). These devices have a number of advantages. Cantilever calibration using this device is straightforward and rapid. The devices have very small inertia, and are therefore resistant to shock and vibration. This means they need no careful treatment except reasonably clean laboratory conditions. The array spans the range of spring constant from around 0.16 to 11 N/m important in AFM, allowing almost all contact-mode AFM cantilevers to be calibrated easily and rapidly. Each device incorporates its own discrete gold mirror to improve reflectivity. The incorporation of a gold mirror both simplifies calibration of the devices themselves (via Doppler velocimetry) and allows interferometric calibration of the AFM z-axis using the apparent periodicity in the force-distance curve before contact. Therefore, from a single force-distance curve, taking about one second to acquire, one can calibrate the cantilever spring constant and, optionally, the z-axis scale. These are all the data one needs to make accurate and reliable force measurements. PMID:15231316

  9. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  10. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  12. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang Wang, Tian

    2015-02-15

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  13. An advanced AFM sensor: its profile accuracy and low probe wear property for high aspect ratio patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Baba, Shuichi; Nakata, Toshihiko; Kurenuma, Toru; Kunitomo, Yuichi; Edamura, Manabu

    2007-03-01

    Design rule shrinkage and wider adoption of new device structures such as STI, copper damascene interconnects, and deep trench structures have made the need for in-line process monitoring of step heights and profiles of device structures more urgent. To monitor active device patterns, as opposed to test patterns as in OCD, AFM is the only non-destructive 3D monitoring tool. The barriers to using AFM in-line monitoring are its slow throughput and the accuracy degradation associated with probe tip wear and spike noise caused by unwanted oscillation on the steep slopes of high-aspect-ratio patterns. Our proprietary AFM scanning method, StepIn TM mode, is the method best suited to measuring high-aspect-ratio pattern profiles. Because the probe is not dragged on the sample surface as in conventional AFM, the profile trace fidelity across steep slopes is excellent. Because the probe does not oscillate and hit the sample at a high frequency, as in AC scanning mode, this mode is free from unwanted spurious noises on steep sample slopes and incurs extremely little probe tip wear. To take full advantage of the above properties, we have developed an AFM sensor that is optimized for in-line use and produces accurate profile data at high speeds and incurs little probe tip wear. The control scheme we have developed for the AFM sensor, which we call "Advanced StepIn TM", elaborately analyses the contact force signal, enabling efficient probe tip scanning and a low and stable contact force. With a developed AFM sensor that realizes this concept, we conducted an intensive evaluation on the effect of low and stable contact force scan. Probes with HDC (high density carbon) tips were used for the evaluation. The experiment proves that low contact force enhances the measured profile fidelity by preventing probe tip slip on steep slopes. Dynamics simulation of these phenomena was also conducted, and its results agreed well with the experimental results. The low contact force scan also

  14. Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Contact dermatitis Overview Contact dermatitis: Many health care workers ... to touching her face while wearing latex gloves. Contact dermatitis: Overview Almost everyone gets this type of ...

  15. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    light scattering. Likewise, SEM cannot be used effectively for post-inspection defect review and classification of these very shallow types of defects. To verify and obtain accurate shape and three-dimensional information of those defects, automatic defect review AFM (ADR AFM) is utilized for accurate locating and imaging of DOI. In ADR AFM, non-contact mode imaging is used for non-destructive characterization and preserving tip sharpness for data repeatability and reproducibility. Locating DOI and imaging are performed automatically with a throughput of many defects per hour. Topography images of DOI has been collected and compared with SEM images. The ADR AFM has been shown as a non-destructive metrology tool for defect review and obtaining three-dimensional topography information.

  16. Charge Measurement of Atoms and Atomic Resolution of Molecules with Noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo

    2010-03-01

    Individual gold and silver adatoms [1] and pentacene molecules [2] on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) were investigated using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 Kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the sub-ångstrom regime. Charging a gold adatom by one electron charge increased the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Employing Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) we also measured the local contact potential difference (LCPD). We observed that the LCPD is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. To image pentacene molecules we modified AFM tips by means of vertical manipulation techniques, i.e. deliberately picking up known atoms and molecules, such as Au, Ag, Cl, CO, and pentacene. Using a CO terminated tip we resolved all individual atoms and bonds within a pentacene molecule. Three dimensional force maps showing the site specific distance dependence above the molecule were extracted. We compared our experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain insight on the physical origin of AFM contrast formation. We found that atomic resolution is only obtained due to repulsive force contributions originating from the Pauli exclusion principle. [4pt] [1] L. Gross, F. Mohn, P. Liljeroth, J. Repp, F. J. Giessibl, G. Meyer, Science 324, 1428 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Gross, F. Mohn, N. Moll, P. Liljeroth, G. Meyer, Science 325, 1110 (2009).

  17. First-principles AFM image simulation with frozen density embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    We present efficient first-principles method of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Ordinary nc-AFM simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) require exhaustive computational cost because it involves thousands of total energy calculations. Regarding the sample as a fixed external potential can reduce the computational cost, and we adopt frozen density embedding theory (FDET) for this purpose. Simulated nc-AFM images with FDET using a carbon monoxide tip well reproduces the full DFT images of benzene, pentacene, and graphene, although optimized tip-sample distances and interaction energies in FDET are underestimated and overestimated, respectively. The FDET-based simulation method is promising for AFM image simulation of surfaces and two-dimensional materials. This work was supported by U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46286 and Award No. DE-SC0008877, and by Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources are provided by NERSC and TACC.

  18. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  19. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  20. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  2. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  4. Charge Redistribution and Transport in Molecular Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, Martina; Ondráček, Martin; Lotze, Christian; Hapala, Prokop; Franke, Katharina J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Pascual, J. Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    The forces between two single molecules brought into contact, and their connection with charge transport through the molecular junction, are studied here using non contact AFM, STM, and density functional theory simulations. A carbon monoxide molecule approaching an acetylene molecule (C2 H2 ) initially feels weak attractive electrostatic forces, partly arising from charge reorganization in the presence of molecular . We find that the molecular contact is chemically passive, and protects the electron tunneling barrier from collapsing, even in the limit of repulsive forces. However, we find subtle conductance and force variations at different contacting sites along the C2 H2 molecule attributed to a weak overlap of their respective frontier orbitals.

  5. AFM method to detect differences in adhesion of silica bids to cancer and normal epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Gaikwad, Ravi; Woodworth, Craig

    2009-03-01

    To date, the methods of detection of cancer cells have been mostly based on traditional techniques used in biology, such as visual identification of malignant changes, cell growth analysis, specific ligand-receptor labeling, or genetic tests. Despite being well developed, these methods are either insufficiently accurate or require a lengthy complicated analysis. A search for alternative methods for the detection of cancer cells may be a fruitful approach. Here we describe an AFM study that may result in a new method for detection of cancer cells in vitro. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study adhesion of single silica beads to malignant and normal cells cultured from human cervix. We found that adhesion depends on the time of contact, and can be statistically different for malignant and normal cells. Using these data, one could develop an optical method of cancer detection based on adhesion of various silica beads.

  6. Conservative and dissipative tip-sample interaction forces probed with dynamic AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsmann, B.; Seidel, C.; Anczykowski, B.; Fuchs, H.

    1999-10-01

    The conservative and dissipative forces between tip and sample of a dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) were investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experimental AFM data obtained by the frequency modulation technique. In this way it became possible to reconstruct complete force versus distance curves and damping coefficient versus distance curves from experimental data without using fit parameters for the interaction force and without using analytical interaction models. A comparison with analytical approaches is given and a way to determine a damping coefficient curve from experimental data is proposed. The results include the determination of the first point of repulsive contact of a vibrating tip when approaching a sample. The capability of quantifying the tip-sample interaction is demonstrated using experimental data obtained with a silicon tip and a mica sample in UHV.

  7. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  8. Characterization of Local Mechanical Properties of Polymer Thin Films and Polymer Nanocomposites via AFM indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu

    AFM indentation has become a tool with great potential in the characterization of nano-mechanical properties of materials. Thanks to the nanometer sized probes, AFM indentation is capable of capturing the changes of multiple properties within the range of tens of nanometers, such task would otherwise be difficult by using other experiment instruments. Despite the great potentials of AFM indentation, it operates based on a simple mechanism: driving the delicate AFM probe to indent the sample surface, and recording the force-displacement response. With limited information provided by AFM indentation, efforts are still required for any practice to successfully extract the desired nano-scale properties from specific materials. In this thesis, we focus on the mechanical properties of interphase between polymer and inorganic materials. It is known that in nanocomposites, a region of polymer exist around nanoparticles with altered molecular structures and improved properties, which is named as interphase polymer. The system with polymer thin films and inorganic material substrates is widely used to simulate the interphase effect in nanocomposites. In this thesis, we developed an efficient and reliable method to process film/substrate samples and characterize the changes of local mechanical properties inside the interphase region with ultra-high resolution AFM mechanical mapping technique. Applying this newly developed method, the interphase of several film/substrate pairs were examined and compared. The local mechanical properties on the other side of the polymer thin film, the free surface side, was also investigated using AFM indentation equipped with surface modified probes. In order to extract the full spectrum of local elastic modulus inside the surface region in the range of only tens of nanometers, the different contact mechanics models were studied and compared, and a Finite Element model was also established. Though the film/substrate system has been wide used as

  9. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  10. Particle deformation induced by AFM tapping under different setpoint voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John A.; He, Bo-Ching; Fu, Wei-En

    2014-09-01

    The measured height of polystyrene nanoparticles varies with setpoint voltage during atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping-mode imaging. Nanoparticle height was strongly influenced by the magnitude of the deformation caused by the AFM tapping forces, which was determined by the setpoint voltage. This influence quantity was studied by controlling the operational AFM setpoint voltage. A test sample consisting of well-dispersed 60-nm polystyrene and gold nanoparticles co-adsorbed on poly-l-lysine-coated mica was studied in this research. Gold nanoparticles have not only better mechanical property than polystyrene nanoparticles, but also obvious facets in AFM phase image. By using this sample of mixed nanoparticles, it allows us to confirm that the deformation resulted from the effect of setpoint voltage, not noise. In tapping mode, the deformation of polystyrene nanoparticles increased with decreasing setpoint voltage. Similar behavior was observed with both open loop and closed loop AFM instruments.

  11. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  12. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  13. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. AFM study of mineral wettability with reservoir oils.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Dao, E; Mohanty, K K

    2005-09-01

    Wettability plays a key role in determining fluid distributions and consequently the multiphase flow and transport in petroleum reservoirs. Many crude oils have polar organic components that collect at oil-water interfaces and can adsorb onto the mineral surface if the brine film breaks, rendering the medium oil-wet or mixed-wet. Mica and silica surfaces have been aged with brine and crude oils to induce oil component adsorption. Bulk oil is eventually replaced by water in these experiments by washing with common solvents without ever drying the mineral surface. The organic deposit on the mineral surface is studied by atomic force microscopy in the tapping mode under water. Drying the surface during the removal of bulk oil induces artifacts; it is essential to keep the surface wet at all times before atomic force microscopy or contact angle measurement. As the mean thickness of the organic deposit increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The organic deposits left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion with a probe sphere for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil. The force of adhesion for the minerals aged with just the resin fraction is the highest of all SARA (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes) fractions. PMID:16009229

  15. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  16. Telocyte's contacts.

    PubMed

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TC) are an interstitial cell type located in the connective tissue of many organs of humans and laboratory mammals. By means of homocellular contacts, TC build a scaffold whose meshes integrity and continuity are guaranteed by those contacts having a mechanical function; those contacts acting as sites of intercellular communication allow exchanging information and spreading signals. Heterocellular contacts between TC and a great variety of cell types give origin to mixed networks. TC, by means of all these types of contacts, their interaction with the extracellular matrix and their vicinity to nerve endings, are part of an integrated system playing tissue/organ-specific roles. PMID:26826524

  17. Hydrophobic recovery of UV/ozone treated poly(dimethylsiloxane): adhesion studies by contact mechanics and mechanism of surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, Attila; Hillborg, Henrik; Vancso, G. Julius

    2005-01-01

    Silicone elastomers (Sylgard 184 and 170), based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), were surface treated by a combined exposure to UV and ozone. The effects of the treatments were analyzed as a function of time elapsed after stopping the treatments using different standard surface characterization techniques, such as water contact angle measurements, XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, the primary focus of this study was to apply the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics approach to investigate PDMS samples prior to and following UV/ozone surface treatment. A gradual formation of a hydrophilic, silica-like surface layer with increasing modulus was observed with increasing UV/ozone exposure. A subsequent hydrophobic recovery after UV/ozone exposure was observed, as indicated by increasing contact angles. This supports the hypothesis that the hydrophobic recovery is mainly caused by the gradual coverage of a permanent silica-like structure with free siloxanes and/or reorientation of polar groups. PDMS containing a homogenously dispersed filler (Sylgard 184), exhibited a decreasing surface roughness (by AFM) when the oxidized surface region "collapsed" into a smooth SiO x layer (final surface roughness <2 nm). PDMS containing heterogeneously distributed, aggregated filler particles (Sylgard 170), exhibited an increasing surface roughness with treatment dose, which was attributed to the "collapse" of the oxidized surface region thus exposing the contours of the underlying filler aggregates (final surface roughness ˜140 nm). A dedicated device was designed and built to study the contact mechanics behavior of PDMS prior to, and following surface treatment. The value of the combined elastic modulus obtained for PDMS lens and semi-infinite flat surface system showed an increase in full agreement with the formation of a silica-like layer exhibiting a high elastic modulus (compared with untreated PDMS). The work of adhesion observed in JKR experiments

  18. Immunological Identification of Fibrinogen in Dual-Component Protein Films by AFM Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Rice, Zachary; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The success of long-term blood-contacting implanted devices is largely dependent upon the interaction of the blood components with the device biomaterial surface. The ability to study these interactions has been hindered by a lack of methods to measure single-molecule interactions in complex multi-protein environments similar to the environment found in-vivo. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with gold nanolabels to detect the protein fibrinogen under aqueous conditions without the topographical clues usually necessary for high resolution visualization. BSA was patterned onto both muscovite mica and plasma-treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and these test substrates were subsequently backfilled with fibrinogen to yield a featureless protein layer. The fibrinogen in this dual protein layer was detected using high resolution AFM imaging following infusion of anti-fibrinogen conjugated with nanogold particles. This AFM immuno-detection technique will potentially be applicable to complex multi-component protein films adsorbed on clinically-relevant polymers used in medical devices. PMID:18294855

  19. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  20. Critical rolling angle of microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzi, Bahman; Vallabh, Chaitanya K. P.; Stephens, James D.; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    At the micrometer-scale and below, particle adhesion becomes particularly relevant as van der Waals force often dominates volume and surface proportional forces. The rolling resistance of microparticles and their critical rolling angles prior to the initiation of free-rolling and/or complete detachment are critical in numerous industrial processes and natural phenomenon involving particle adhesion and granular dynamics. The current work describes a non-contact measurement approach for determining the critical rolling angle of a single microparticle under the influence of a contact-point base-excitation generated by a transient displacement field of a prescribed surface acoustic wave pulse and reports the critical rolling angle data for a set of polystyrene latex microparticles.

  1. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  2. Dynamics of the nanoneedle probe in trolling mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ahmad; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Keramati, Ramtin; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-05-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as an indispensable tool for nanoscale characterization, presents major drawbacks for operation in a liquid environment arising from the large hydrodynamic drag on the vibrating cantilever. The newly introduced 'Trolling mode' (TR-mode) AFM resolves this complication by using a specialized nanoneedle cantilever that keeps the cantilever outside of the liquid. Herein, a mechanical model with a lumped mass was developed to capture the dynamics of such a cantilever with a nanoneedle tip. This new developed model was applied to investigate the effects of the needle-liquid interface on the performance of the AFM, including the imaging capability in liquid. PMID:25915451

  3. AFM imaging of natural optical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallaeva, Dinara; Tománek, Pavel; Prokopyeva, Elena; Kaspar, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír.; Škarvada, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The colors of some living organisms assosiated with the surface structure. Irridesence butterfly wings is an example of such coloration. Optical effects such as interference, diffraction, polarization are responsible for physical colors appearance. Alongside with amazing beauty this structure represent interest for design of optical devices. Here we report the results of morphology investigation by atomic force microscopy. The difference in surface structure of black and blue wings areas is clearly observed. It explains the angle dependence of the wing blue color, since these micrometer and sub-micrometer quasiperiodical structures could control the light propagation, absorption and reflection.

  4. DNA-coated AFM cantilevers for the investigation of cell adhesion and the patterning of live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Sonny C.; Crow, Ailey K.; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of receptor adhesion strength requires the precise manipulation of single cells on a contact surface. To attach live cells to a moveable probe, DNA sequences complementary to strands displayed on the plasma membrane are introduced onto AFM cantilevers (see picture, bp=base pairs). The strength of the resulting linkages can be tuned by varying the length of DNA strands, allowing for controlled transport of the cells.

  5. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  6. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  7. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  8. The Conductance of Nanotubes Deformed by the AFM Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anantram, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The conductance drop under AFM-tip deformation can be explained by stretching of the tube length. NT sensors can be built utilizing uniform stretching. Single sp3 bond cross section cannot block electrons, because another conducting path may exist. AFM tip which forms sp3 bonds with the tube will decrease conductance. In the "table experiment" a conductance drop of 2 orders of magnitude happened only after some bonds were broken.

  9. XRD and AFM characterization of epitaxial Nb films before and after hydrogen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Monica; Heuser, Brent; Durfee, Curtis

    2001-03-01

    Epitaxial Nb films have been characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after hydrogenation at 100 C and 760 Torr. Two 1000 Angstrom epitaxial Nb films were grown on a-plane sapphire with two different miscut angles, 0.08 and 1.4 degrees. Both Nb films were capped with a 100 Angstrom thick Pd layer to facilitate molecular hydrogen dissociation. While the as-grow film mosaic did not depend on miscut angle, the surface morphology was significantly different. In particular, the high miscut film exhibited a fingered topography that was absent in the low miscut film. Hydrogen absorption under the conditions stated above induce a complete conversion of Nb to the alpha prime hydride phase. The Nb hydride phase transformation process is known to create dislocations as incoherent phase boundaries pass through the lattice. The surface morphology and lattice mosaic from post-hydrogen AFM and XRD measurements, respectively, show the extreme effect of the phase transformation process. Discussion will focus on the lattice mosaic broadening, residual strain, and surface features after hydrogen exposure.

  10. Changes in collagen fibril pattern and adhesion force with collagenase-induced injury in rat Achilles tendon observed via AFM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Choi, Samjin; Chon, Jinmann; Yoo, Seungdon; Cho, Ilsung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The Achilles tendon consists mainly of type I collagen fibers that contain collagen fibrils. When the Achilles tendon is injured, it is inflamed. The collagenase-induced model has been widely used to study tendinitis. The major advantages of atomic force microscopy (AFM) over conventional optical and electron microscopy for bio-imaging include its non-requirement of a special coating and vacuum, and its capability to perform imaging in all environments. AFM force-distance measurements have become a fundamental tool in the fields of surface chemistry, biochemistry and materials science. Therefore, the changes in the ultrastructure and adhesion force of the collagen fibrils on the Achilles tendons of rats with Achilles tendinitis were observed using AFM. The changes in the structure of the Achilles tendons were evaluated based on the diameter and D-banding of the collagen fibrils. Collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis was induced with the injection of 30 microl crude collagenase into 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were each sacrificed on the first, second, third, fifth and seventh day after the collagenase injection. The normal and injured Achilles tendons were fixed in 4% buffered formalin and dehydrated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. AFM was performed using the non-contact mode at the resolution of 512 x 512 pixels, with a scan speed of 0.8 line/sec. The adhesion force was measured via the force-distance curve that resulted from the interactions between the AFM tip and the collagen fibril sample using the contact mode. The diameter of the collagen fibrils in the Achilles tendons significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after the collagenase injection, and the pattern of the D-banding of the collagen fibrils was similar to that of the diameter changes. The adhesion force decreased until the fifth day after the collagenase injection, but increased on the seventh day after the collagenase injection (p < 0.0001). PMID:21446543

  11. Simulation of the observability of atomic defects by atomic force microscopy in contact and non-contact modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. Yu.; Henderson, G. S.

    2002-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans of a crystal surface containing an atomic defect were simulated in both contact and non-contact regimes. When scanning in contact mode near a defect, the tip-sample force interaction experiences bifurcation of the lines of constant force. When the load force is small, the bifurcation causes the tip to be "pushed" out of the defect. However, if scan force is higher than some critical value (dependent upon the composition of the tip and sample) the AFM tip becomes "trapped" in the vicinity of defect. The trapped tip remains at the level of the vacancy and consequently crashes into the sample, as the scan continues. This results in either the tip apex being destroyed, or disruption of the crystal lattice around the defect. Both effects result in the "disappearance" of the defect from the scan images. The trap is intrinsic and cannot be avoided. For the case of non-contact mode, the tip position is driven by the scan force gradient rather than the force. Simulations show that for this case the trap does not exist and atomic defects will not be destroyed. This explains why atomic defects are generally not observed when using contact mode AFM, but are observed in non-contact AFM.

  12. Lattice-resolution imaging of the sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface in air by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yang; Wanless, Erica J.; Franks, George V.

    2007-02-01

    Lattice-resolution images of single-crystal α-alumina (sapphire) (0 0 0 1) surfaces have been obtained using contact-mode AFM under ambient conditions. It was found that the hexagonal surface lattice has a periodicity of 0.47 ± 0.11 nm, which is identical to that reported previously when the same surface was imaged in water. Large lattice corrugations (as high as 1 nm) were observed, but were concluded to be imaging artifacts because of the strong friction which causes additional deflection of the cantilever. The additional deflection of the cantilever is registered by the detector of the optical beam-deflection AFM resulting in an overestimation of the height at each lattice point. Abrupt changes were also resolved in the topography including honeycomb patterns and a transition from 2D lattices to 1D parallel stripes, with scanning direction. These phenomena can be explained by the commensurate sliding between the tip and sapphire surface due to the strong contact force.

  13. Spontaneous aggregation of humic acid observed with AFM at different pH.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Claudio; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Cho, Hyen Goo; Francioso, Ornella; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella

    2015-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy in contact (AFM-C) mode was used to investigate the molecular dynamics of leonardite humic acid (HA) aggregate formed at different pH values. HA nanoparticles dispersed at pH values ranging from 2 to 12 were observed on a mica surface under dry conditions. The most clearly resolved and well-resulted AFM images of single particle were obtained at pH 5, where HA appeared as supramolecular particles with a conic shape and a hole in the centre. Those observations suggested that HA formed under these conditions exhibited a pseudo-amphiphilic nature, with secluded hydrophobic domains and polar subunits in direct contact with hydrophilic mica surface. Based on molecular simulation methods, a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) model was proposed to explain the HA ring-like morphology. The LCC model optimized the parameters of β-O-4 linkages between 14 units of 1-4 phenyl propanoid, and resulted in an optimized structure comprising 45-50 linear helical molecules looped spirally around a central cavity. Those results added new insights on the adsorption mechanism of HA on polar surfaces as a function of pH, which was relevant from the point of view of natural aggregation in soil environment. PMID:26295541

  14. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.

    2013-10-01

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2-20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  15. Automated AFM force curve analysis for determining elastic modulus of biomaterials and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yow-Ren; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Garland, Shaun P; Morgan, Joshua T; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    The analysis of atomic force microscopy (AFM) force data requires the selection of a contact point (CP) and is often time consuming and subjective due to influence from intermolecular forces and low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). In this report, we present an automated algorithm for the selection of CPs in AFM force data and the evaluation of elastic moduli. We propose that CP may be algorithmically easier to detect by identifying a linear elastic indentation region of data (high SNR) rather than the contact point itself (low SNR). Utilizing Hertzian mechanics, the data are fitted for the CP. We first detail the algorithm and then evaluate it on sample polymeric and biological materials. As a demonstration of automation, 64 × 64 force maps were analyzed to yield spatially varying topographical and mechanical information of cells. Finally, we compared manually selected CPs to automatically identified CPs and demonstrated that our automated approach is both accurate (< 10nm difference between manual and automatic) and precise for non-interacting polymeric materials. Our data show that the algorithm is useful for analysis of both biomaterials and biological samples. PMID:24951927

  16. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever-tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip-surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  17. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  18. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  19. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  20. Direct determination of three-phase contact line properties on nearly molecular scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Bauer, P. S.; Rentenberger, C.; Wagner, P. E.

    2016-05-01

    Wetting phenomena in multi-phase systems govern the shape of the contact line which separates the different phases. For liquids in contact with solid surfaces wetting is typically described in terms of contact angle. While in macroscopic systems the contact angle can be determined experimentally, on the molecular scale contact angles are hardly accessible. Here we report the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature on a scale of the order of 1nm. For water nucleating heterogeneously on Ag nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the corresponding macroscopically measured equilibrium angle. The obtained microscopic contact angles can be attributed to negative line tension in the order of ‑10‑10 J/m that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects.

  1. Direct determination of three-phase contact line properties on nearly molecular scale.

    PubMed

    Winkler, P M; McGraw, R L; Bauer, P S; Rentenberger, C; Wagner, P E

    2016-01-01

    Wetting phenomena in multi-phase systems govern the shape of the contact line which separates the different phases. For liquids in contact with solid surfaces wetting is typically described in terms of contact angle. While in macroscopic systems the contact angle can be determined experimentally, on the molecular scale contact angles are hardly accessible. Here we report the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature on a scale of the order of 1nm. For water nucleating heterogeneously on Ag nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the corresponding macroscopically measured equilibrium angle. The obtained microscopic contact angles can be attributed to negative line tension in the order of -10(-10) J/m that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects. PMID:27183880

  2. Direct determination of three-phase contact line properties on nearly molecular scale

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, P. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Bauer, P. S.; Rentenberger, C.; Wagner, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Wetting phenomena in multi-phase systems govern the shape of the contact line which separates the different phases. For liquids in contact with solid surfaces wetting is typically described in terms of contact angle. While in macroscopic systems the contact angle can be determined experimentally, on the molecular scale contact angles are hardly accessible. Here we report the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature on a scale of the order of 1nm. For water nucleating heterogeneously on Ag nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to 90 degrees for the corresponding macroscopically measured equilibrium angle. The obtained microscopic contact angles can be attributed to negative line tension in the order of −10−10 J/m that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects. PMID:27183880

  3. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R; Barth, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. PMID:26617348

  4. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  5. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  6. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  7. Surface Morphological Studies on Nerve Cells by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-03-01

    Surface morphological properties of fixed and living nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis have been studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Identified, individual neurons were removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis and plated into poly-L-lysine coated glass cover-slips. The growth of the nerve cells was stopped and fixed with 0.1% Glutaraldehyde and 4% Formaldehyde solution after extension of growth cones at the tip of the axons. Topography and softness of growth cone filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) were probed by AFM. Information obtained from AFM's amplitude and phase channels have been used for determination of softness of the region probed. The results of structural studies on the cells are linked to their mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution.

  8. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R.; Barth, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system.We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04541J

  9. Characterization of Pebax angioplasty balloon surfaces with AFM, SEM, TEM, and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob A; Forsyth, Bruce; Zhou, Fang; Myers, Jason; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In the medical device industry, angioplasty balloons have been widely used in the less invasive treatment of heart disease by expanding and relieving clogged structures in various arterial segments. However, new applications using thin coatings on the balloon surface have been explored to enhance therapeutic value in the delivery of pharmaceuticals (drug-elution) or control thermal energy output (RF ablation). In this study, angioplasty balloon materials comprised of poly(ether-block-amide) (Pebax) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize physical properties at the balloon surface that may affect coating adhesion. The soft segment of this Pebax 1074 material is polyethylene oxide (PEO) and the hard segment is nylon-12. The morphology of the hard segments of this block co-polymer are found via AFM stiffness measurements to be (40 ± 20) nm by (300 ± 150) nm and are oriented parallel to the surface of the balloon. SAXS measurements found the lamellar spacing to be (18.5 ± 0.5) nm, and demonstrate a preferential orientation in agreement with TEM and AFM measurements. Fixation of this balloon in resin, followed by cryo-sectioning is shown to provide a novel manner in which to investigate surface characteristics on the balloon such as material or coating thickness as well as uniformity in comparison to the bulk structure. These outputs were deemed critical to improve overall balloon processing such as molding and surface treatment options for robust designs toward better procedural outcomes targeting new therapeutic areas. PMID:25891789

  10. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  11. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  12. In situ Stiffness Adjustment of AFM Probes by Two Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, Marcel Lambertus Cornelis; Pérez Garza, Héctor Hugo; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The choice on which type of cantilever to use for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) depends on the type of the experiment being done. Typically, the cantilever has to be exchanged when a different stiffness is required and the entire alignment has to be repeated. In the present work, a method to adjust the stiffness in situ of a commercial AFM cantilever is developed. The adjustment is achieved by changing the effective length of the cantilever by electrostatic pull-in. By applying a voltage between the cantilever and an electrode (with an insulating layer at the point of contact), the cantilever snaps to the electrode, reducing the cantilever’s effective length. An analytical model was developed to find the pull-in voltage of the system. Subsequently, a finite element model was developed to study the pull-in behavior. The working principle of this concept is demonstrated with a proof-of-concept experiment. The electrode was positioned close to the cantilever by using a robotic nanomanipulator. To confirm the change in stiffness, the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever was measured for varying electrode positions. The results match with the theoretical expectations. The stiffness was adjusted in situ in the range of 0.2 N/m to 27 N/m, covering two orders of magnitude in one single cantilever. This proof-of-concept is the first step towards a micro fabricated prototype, that integrates the electrode positioning system and cantilever that can be used for actual AFM experiments. PMID:27077863

  13. Inline sidewall angle monitoring of memory capacitor profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Ben M.; Bushman, Scott G.; Celii, Francis G.; Ayres, Stephen F.; Kris, Roman

    2005-05-01

    The integration of embedded ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) into a standard CMOS flow requires significant control and characterization of the patterned capacitor sidewall angle. The electrical functionality of the FRAM capacitor is highly dependent on the post-etch sidewall characteristics of the TiAlN hardmask and Ir/PZT/Ir capacitor film stack. In this study, we explored various options for determining the sidewall profile of these capacitors including scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scatterometry. A series of capacitor samples with ranges of sidewall slopes from 60 degrees to 80 degrees was generated to test each measuring technique's robustness. All of the techniques demonstrated relatively accurate sidewall angle measurements of the high-angle capacitor profiles relative to cross-section SEMs. However, the CD SEM had difficulty identifying the top edge of the low-angle capacitor samples due to the large amount of profile roughness, which induced a large measurement error range. Additional optimization is required to improve the CD SEM's precision, before it would be a viable in-line monitor for the FRAM process. The AFM provided good accuracy and precision on the high-angle capacitor profiles, but the tip size limited the measurements to spaces larger than 120 nm. Furthermore, the AFM had a long move-acquire-measure (MAM) time of 5 minutes/site, which limited its throughput as an inline monitor. The scatterometer predicted bottom-stack sidewall angle measurements (2 trapezoid model) that were consistent with the cross-section SEMs, and it produced the lowest across wafer sidewall angle range. It also had the fastest MAM time of 5 seconds/site compared to the other techniques. However, it was difficult to generate an accurate scatterometry model due to the complex optical film stack that incorporated low surface reflectivity and higher surface roughness. While each technique had limitations, scatterometry

  14. Charge Redistribution and Transport in Molecular Contacts.

    PubMed

    Corso, Martina; Ondráček, Martin; Lotze, Christian; Hapala, Prokop; Franke, Katharina J; Jelínek, Pavel; Pascual, J Ignacio

    2015-09-25

    The forces between two single molecules brought into contact, and their connection with charge transport through the molecular junction, are studied here using non contact AFM, STM, and density functional theory simulations. A carbon monoxide molecule approaching an acetylene molecule (C_{2}H_{2}) initially feels weak attractive electrostatic forces, partly arising from charge reorganization in the presence of molecular . We find that the molecular contact is chemically passive, and protects the electron tunneling barrier from collapsing, even in the limit of repulsive forces. However, we find subtle conductance and force variations at different contacting sites along the C_{2}H_{2} molecule attributed to a weak overlap of their respective frontier orbitals. PMID:26451568

  15. XPS and AFM analysis of antifouling PEG interfaces for microfabricated silicon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sadhana; Johnson, Robert W; Desai, Tejal A

    2004-09-15

    In the past two decades, the biological and medical fields have seen great advances in the development of biosensors capable of quantifying biomolecules. Many of these biosensors have micro- and nano-scale features, are fabricated using biochip technology, and use silicon as a base material. The creation of antifouling sensor interfaces is critical to avoid serious consequences that arise due to their contact with biological fluids. To this end, we have created thin PEG interfaces of various grafting densities on silicon using a single-step PEG-silane coupling reaction scheme. Initial PEG concentration (5-50 mM) and coupling time (0.5-24 h) were varied to attain different grafting densities, and different PEG interfaces so created were analyzed using XPS and AFM. Furthermore, all the PEG interfaces were evaluated using XPS and AFM for their antifouling abilities using fibrinogen as the model protein. Results indicated that PEG interfaces created in this investigation are appropriate for biosensors with micro- and nano-scale features, and are efficient in controlling protein fouling. PMID:15308226

  16. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-10-15

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  17. Single Dimer E-Cadherin Interaction Forces Characterized Using Modified AFM Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnitsky, Robert; Drees, Frauke; Nelson, W. James; Kenny, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In tissue monolayers, adhesion between cells is accomplished chiefly through the action of [Ca++] dependent cadherin proteins. E-cadherin molecules coalesce into large plaques on contacting membranes of adjacent cells. Using specialized AFM cantilevers functionalized with tethered E-cadherin proteins, we studied the interaction forces of trans dimers from the single bond level through to the higher surface densities found in plaques, with pico-Newton force resolution. The measurements demonstrated the dependence of E-cadherin homoassociation on surface protein density. Previous in-vivo studies established the role of Ca++ in E-cadherin adhesion in whole cells. Advances in AFM force spectroscopy allowed us to characterize the unbinding process under force loads, and to differentiate single and multiple molecular binding events. The data correlates the dependence of E-cadherin adhesion at a molecular level to [Ca++], revealing interaction details that cannot be observed using whole-cell studies. This work is supported by NSF (XYZ on a Chip Program) CMS-9980838, NIH (GMB5227), and the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation.

  18. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  19. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  20. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  2. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  3. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  4. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  5. Solid State Microstructure of Poly(L-lactide-co-meso-lactide) Copolymers by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanasopa, M.; Manias, E.; Runt, J.

    2002-03-01

    The focus in the present study is on characterization of the lamellar morphology of poly(L-lactide) and two L-lactide/meso-lactide random copolymers containing 3 and 6 the same (Mn = 65,000, PDI = 2) and crystallization behavior is therefore controlled by comonomer content. Degrees of crystallinity and crystallization rates decrease substantially with increasing meso-lactide content in the copolymers. Tapping mode AFM experiments on the surfaces of films, previously isothermally crystallized at selected temperatures, were conducted. Similar experiments were also performed on cross-sections, microtomed from the crystallized films. Tapping force plays an important role in all experiments, particularly for low crystallinity samples. Mean lamellar thicknesses derived from analysis of height images agree well with those determined previously from small-angle x-ray scattering experiments.

  6. Dewetting films with inclined contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Li, Lei; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2015-02-01

    A partially wetting plate withdrawn from a liquid reservoir causes the deposition of a liquid film that is characterized by inclined contact lines. It has been experimentally indicated that the normal component of the contact-line velocity relative to the plate remains constant and is independent of the inclination angles, a fact that has never theoretically been justified. We demonstrate, in the framework of lubrication theory, that the speed-angle independence is only approximate and the normal velocity actually exhibits a weak decrease with the inclination angle of the contact line. This correlation is attributed to the variation of the effective separation of microscopic and macroscopic length scales. In addition, the inclination of the contact line results in a tangential flux of the liquid, which is confined in the vicinity of the contact line. Simple scaling relations are provided for both the normal velocity and the tangential flux.

  7. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  8. Obtaining reliable friction data at the nanoscale by tuning AFM parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Suenne

    2015-03-01

    Carefully devised experimental study of friction at the nanoscale in dry system is desired for proper mathematical modeling or for quantitative research. Experimentally, contact mode atomic force microscope (AFM) which is able to perform lateral force microscopy (LFM) can be used for acquiring frictional data. To obtain reliable LFM information, we have investigated the effect of scanning parameters, especially gain and scanning rate, on the LFM measurements. Depending on the parameters selected, the relative ratio of the friction force obtained from graphene to that of SiO2 varies greatly from about 1 to 0.1. We will discuss, here, firstly how to understand this behavior and secondly the parameter-optimization procedure for the LFM imaging, which is different from the height imaging, eventually to aid quantitative LFM studies. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through NRF of Korea funded by the ministry of Education (2014R1A1A2056555).

  9. Minimising the effect of nanoparticle deformation in intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Bakir; Lawn, Malcolm A.; Coleman, Victoria A.; Jämting, Åsa K.; Herrmann, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The results of systematic height measurements of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles using intermittent contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (IC-AM-AFM) are presented. The experimental findings demonstrate that PS nanoparticles deform during AFM imaging, as indicated by a reduction in the measured particle height. This deformation depends on the IC-AM-AFM imaging parameters, material composition, and dimensional properties of the nanoparticles. A model for nanoparticle deformation occurring during IC-AM-AFM imaging is developed as a function of the peak force which can be calculated for a particular set of experimental conditions. The undeformed nanoparticle height can be estimated from the model by extrapolation to zero peak force. A procedure is proposed to quantify and minimise nanoparticle deformation during IC-AM-AFM imaging, based on appropriate adjustments of the experimental control parameters.

  10. Effect of the molecular weight on deformation states of the polystyrene film by AFM single scanning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Yan, Yongda; Liang, Yingchun; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen; Sun, Tao; Dong, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Nanobundles patterns can be formed on the surface of most thermoplastic polymers when the atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanomechanical machining method is employed to scratch their surfaces. Such patterns are reviewed as three-dimensional sine-wave structures. In the present study, the single-line scratch test is used firstly to study different removal states of the polystyrene (PS) polymer with different molecular weights (MWs). Effects of the scratching direction and the scratching velocity on deformation of the PS film and the state of the removed materials are also investigated. Single-wear box test is then employed to study the possibility of forming bundle structures on PS films with different MWs. The experimental results show that the state between the tip and the sample plays a key role in the nano machining process. If the contact radius between the AFM tip and the polymer surface is larger than the chain end-to-end distance, it is designated as the "cutting" state that means the area of both side ridges is less than the area of the groove and materials are removed. If the contact radius is less than the chain end-to-end distance, it is designated as the "plowing" state that means the area of both side ridges is larger than the area of the groove and no materials are removed at all. For the perfect bundles formation on the PS film, the plowing state is ideal condition for the larger MW polymers because of the chains' entanglement. PMID:23229843

  11. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Stack, Andrew G; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-02-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) and corundum (α-Al(2)O(3)) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3±0.7nN to 0.8±0.4nN as hematite NPs increased from 26nm to 98nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed. PMID:20932723

  12. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  13. Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy Images of Crystal Originated "Particles" on (100) Silicon Wafer through its Side Wall Angle Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. P.; Yow, H. K.; Tou, T. Y.

    2001-04-01

    Crystal originated "particle" (COP) on (100) silicon wafer surface was analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The AFM analyzed COP was pyramidal pit mostly originated from twin octahedral voids surrounded by side walls in {111} planes. The appearance of COP on the (100) polished silicon wafer surface could be either single, separated or joined twin type and square in shape depends which portion of octahedral voids had been cut across during watering processes. As a result, the measured COP image by AFM might not reflect the shape of the COP or in the worst case, the AFM tip shape is misinterpreted as the COP shape. Hence, the side wall angle of COP image obtained by AFM is used to differentiate between actual COP or tip shape. If the side wall angle is comparable to the maximum measurable slope angle of tip, the tip shape is obtained instead of true COP shape. However, if the side wall angle is 55° or below with respect to (100) plane, the AFM image reflect the true COP shape.

  14. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  15. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  16. Driven drops with contact line damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A water droplet placed on a hydrophobic plate is driven by plate-normal oscillations. Resulting droplet motions are largely inviscid, having Reynolds number >100 (Ohnesorge 0.002). We are interested in isolating the effective damping, sometimes called Davis dissipation, owing to a moving contact line that is not completely mobile. In this talk, we report energy budgets as influenced by contact angle - contact line speed relationships for variously prepared surfaces.

  17. Wedged AFM-cantilevers for parallel plate cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Hodel, Adrian W; Spielhofer, Andreas; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Helenius, Jonne

    2013-04-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy has gained popularity for mechanical analysis of living cells. In particular, recent AFM-based assays featuring tipless cantilevers and whole-cell deformation have yielded insights into cellular function, structure, and dynamics. However, in these assays the standard ≈10° tilt of the cantilever prevents uniaxial loading, which complicates assessment of cellular geometry and can cause cell sliding or loss of loosely adherent cells. Here, we describe an approach to modify tipless cantilevers with wedges and, thereby, achieve proper parallel plate mechanics. We provide guidance on material selection, the wedge production process, property and geometry assessment, and the calibration of wedged cantilevers. Furthermore, we demonstrate their ability to simplify the assessment of cell shape, prevent lateral displacement of round cells during compression, and improve the assessment of cell mechanical properties. PMID:23473778

  18. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Neugirg, Benedikt R; Koebley, Sean R; Schniepp, Hannes C; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-28

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches-AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation-proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field. PMID:27055900

  19. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation. PMID:26694687

  20. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  1. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugirg, Benedikt R.; Koebley, Sean R.; Schniepp, Hannes C.; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches--AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation--proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field.

  2. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  4. AFM and SThM Characterization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Christopher; Sidorov, Anton; Chen, Xunchi; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report on detailed characterization of epitaxial grown graphene on SiC and chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu foil using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). We focus on the electronic and thermal properties of graphene grain boundaries, and thus providing valuable feedback to materials growth. Specifically, we perform thermal conductivity contrast mapping and surface potential mapping of graphene, and compare with that obtained on the Au electrodes and the substrate.

  5. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  6. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  7. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  8. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  9. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  10. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  11. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  12. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Liashkovich, I.; Neves, V.; Danzberger, J.; Heister, E.; Rangl, M.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Flahaut, E.; Gruber, H. J.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Kienberger, F.; Ebner, A.

    2009-10-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  13. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  14. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes. PMID:21858377

  15. Effects of Mask and Necking Deformation on Bowing and Twisting in High-Aspect-Ratio Contact Hole Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Masatoshi; Negishi, Nobuyuki; Izawa, Masaru; Yokogawa, Ken'etsu; Oyama, Masatoshi; Kanekiyo, Tadamitsu

    2009-08-01

    The effects of mask characteristics on high-aspect-ratio contact hole (HARC) etching profiles were investigated. The evaluation of etching profiles produced with different taper angle masks confirmed that the bowing amount and mask selectivity worsened with decreasing mask taper angle. The relationship between mask taper angle and distribution of scattered ion flux on the sidewall of a tapered mask was calculated. The scattered ion flux was heavily concentrated in the upper part of the sidewall in the case of a tapered mask, and this was considered to be the main cause of the bowing formation. Direct observation of an etched sidewall by atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the roughness of the necking was strongly related to the roughness of the bottom part of the etched sidewall. To evaluate the dependence of twisting on nonuniform necking, the incident ion flux in a circular hole was calculated. As a result, in the case of nonaxisymmetric necking, an imbalance of ion flux in the bottom of the hole appeared and broke the etching symmetry in the bottom part of the hole, causing twisting. In addition, the probability of twisting was found to increase with increasing necking growth rate irrespective of mask electrification. Therefore, mask deformation and nonuniform necking in the upper part of the sidewall during HARC etching are considered the main factors causing bottom degradation. Accordingly, a vertical and nondeformed mask is very important for a smaller critical dimension (CD) and HARC etching.

  16. Size effect study of thin film hardness using AFM nano-indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Linyan; Qian, Shuangbei; Li, Juan; Liu, Congcong; Guo, Shijia; Huang, Di; Wu, Sen; Hu, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    With nano-level spatial and force resolution, atomic force microscope (AFM) becomes an indispensable nanoindentation measurement instrument for thin films and soft films. To do the research of size effect of the hardness property of thin films, indentation experiments have been done on a gold film with 200 nm thickness and a silicon nitride film with 110 nm thickness. It is possible to change the maximum load forces to get discrete residual depths on the film samples. The contact depths of the gold film are 15.91 nm and 26.67 nm respectively, while the contact depths of the silicon nitride film are 7.82 nm and 10.25 nm respectively. A group of nanoindentation force curves are recorded for the transformation into force-depth curves. Subsequently, a 3D image of the residual indentation can be obtained by in-situ scanning immediately after nanoindentation. The topography data is imported into a Matlab program to estimate the contact area of the indentation. For the gold film, the hardness parameters of 3.31 GPa and 2.57 GPa are calculated under the above two contact depths. And for silicon nitride film, the corresponding results are 6.51GPa and 3.58 GPa. The experimental results illustrate a strong size effect for thin film hardness. The correction of the residual indentation image of the gold film is also done as an initial study. Blind tip reconstruction (BTR) algorithm is introduced to calibrate the tip shape, and more reliable hardness values of 1.15 GPa and 0.94 GPa are estimated.

  17. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  18. Perception of Perspective Angles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  19. Charge transport and contact effects in nanoscale electrical junctions formed via conducting probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, Jeremy Matthew

    This thesis describes the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale molecular junctions using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). This technique involves using a metal-coated AFM tip to contact a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of an organic molecule tethered to a metal surface. This is one of several strategies for the formation of nanoscale electrical junctions designed to probe the current-voltage characteristics of very small numbers of organic molecules. The general goals of this research are to gain a better understanding of the nature of charge transport through molecules, and to begin to pave the way for their use in commercial electronic devices. Important concerns in molecular electronic research can be broken into two general categories, those being the metal contacts and the molecules themselves. In the contact subcategory, issues such as metal work function, electrode roughness, and electrode cleanliness are all important in determining the resistance of a given junction. The physical details of monolayer formation, such as surface coverage, tilt angle, and surface functionality combine with the electronic structure of the molecules to dictate how a given molecule performs in a junction. Included in this thesis is the first direct evidence that resistance in molecular junctions comprised of alkyl repeat units depends on the work function of the metal electrodes. Because an increase in metal work function corresponds to a smaller offset between the molecular HOMO and the junction Fermi level, this dependence also suggests that transport in these aliphatic systems occurs chiefly via hole tunneling. Also included is an analysis of the contribution to junction resistance that arises from each metal-molecule contact, and across the molecule in alkanethiol and alkanedithiol junctions. The aromatic phenylene and acene systems are examined briefly, and phenylenes are shown to be more efficient conduits for charge transport, contrary to

  20. Photoconductivity, High-resolution AFM, and Scanning Conductance Microscopy of Porphyrin Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Alexander D.; Smith, Deirdre E.; Hone, James

    2005-03-01

    We have shown^1 that the diacid form of the porphyrin tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphine (TPPS4) self assembles into nanorods with well-defined height and width. Upon illumination, their conductivity grows over hundreds of seconds. They also produce a zero-bias photocurrent with trainable polarity.^2 We present measurements as a function of illumination wavelength and intensity, which support a model of charge hopping along paths of previously photoionized porphyrin molecules. We also give results from Scanning Conductance Microscopy experiments; these are designed to clarify the role of the contacts in the DC measurements. Our high-resolution AFM images support the model of a hollow tube^3, which collapses on contact with the substrate. ^1A.D. Schwab et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 107, 11339 (2003). ^2A.D. Schwab et al., Nano Letters 4, 1261 (2004). ^3S.C.M. Gandini, E.L. Gelamo, R. Itri, and M. Tabak, Biophys. J. 85, 1259 (2003).

  1. Combined quantitative ultrasonic and time-resolved interaction force AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Z.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-01-15

    The authors describe a method where quantitative ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) is achieved during time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) imaging in intermittent contact mode. The method uses a calibration procedure for quantitative UAFM. It improves elasticity measurements of stiff regions of surfaces while retaining the capabilities of the TRIF mode for topography, adhesion, dissipation, and elasticity measurements on soft regions of sample surfaces. This combination is especially advantageous when measuring and imaging samples with broad stiffness range in a nondestructive manner. The experiments utilize an active AFM probe with high bandwidth and the UAFM calibration is performed by measuring the magnitude of the time-resolved UAFM signal at a judiciously chosen frequency for different contact stiffness values during individual taps. Improved sensitivity to stiff surface elasticity is demonstrated on a special sample. The results show that combining UAFM with TRIF provides 2.5 GPa (5%) standard deviation on the silicon surface reduced Young's modulus, representing 5x improvement over using only TRIF mode imaging.

  2. A Model for Step Height, Edge Slope and Linewidth Measurements Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Fu, Joseph; Song, John; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2003-09-01

    Nano-scale linewidth measurements are performed in semiconductor manufacturing and in the data storage industry and will become increasingly important in micro-mechanical engineering. With the development of manufacturing technology in recent years, the sizes of linewidths are steadily shrinking and are in the range of hundreds of nanometers. As a result, it is difficult to achieve accurate measurement results for nanometer scale linewidth, primarily because of the interaction volume of electrons in materials for an SEM probe or the tip size of an AFM probe. However, another source of methods divergence is the mathematical model of the line itself. In order to reduce the methods divergences caused by different measurement methods and instruments for an accurate determination of nanometer scale linewidth parameters, a metrological model and algorithm are proposed for linewidth measurements with AFM. The line profile is divided into 5 parts with 19 sections and 20 key derived points. Each section is fitted by a least squares straight line, so that the profile can be represented by a set of straight lines and 6 special points, or by a 20×2 matrix of fitted points and a 6×2 matrix of starter points. According to the algorithm, WT and WTF, WM and WMF, WB and WBF represent the widths at the top, the middle and the bottom of the line profile before and after the least squares fitting, respectively. AL and AR represent the left and right sidewall angles, and H represents the step height of the line profile. Based on this algorithm, software has been developed using MATLAB for the calculation of width and height parameters of the line profile. A NIST nanometer scale linewidth artifact developed at NIST's Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory (EEEL) was measured using a commercial AFM with nanotube tips. The measured linewidth profiles are analyzed using our model, algorithm and software. The model developed in this paper is straightforward to understand, and

  3. Circuitry for Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R.; Kissel, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Angle resolver pulsed and read under microprocessor control. Pulse generator excites resolver windings with dual slope pulse. System sequentially reads sine and cosine windings. Microprocessor determines angle through which resolver shaft turned from reference angle. Suitable applications include rate tables, antenna direction controllers, and machine tools.

  4. Phenomena resulting from hypergolic contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forness, Jordan M.

    Understanding hypergolic ignition is critical for the safe and successful operation of hypergolic engines. The complex coupling of physical and chemical processes during hypergolic ignition complicates analysis of the event. Presently, hypergolic ignition models cannot simulate liquid contact and mixing or liquid-phase chemical reactions, and rely on experimental results for validation. In some cases, chemical kinetics of hypergolic propellants and fluid dynamics of droplet collisions couple to produce unexpected phenomena. This research investigates contact between droplets and pools of liquid hypergolic propellants under various conditions in order to investigate these liquid-phase reactions and categorize the resulting interaction. During this experiment, 142 drop tests were performed to investigate phenomena associated with hypergolic contact of various propellants. A drop of fuel impacted a semi-ellipsoidal pool of oxidizer at varying impact velocities and impact geometries. The temperature, pressure, ambient atmosphere, and propellant quality were all controlled during the experiment, as these factors have been shown to influence hypergolic ignition delay. Three distinct types of impacts were identified: explosions, bounces, and splashes. The impact type was found to depend on the impact Weber number and impact angle. Splashes occurred above a critical Weber number of 250, regardless of impact angle. Explosions occurred for Weber numbers less than 250, and for impact angles less than seven degrees. If the impact angle was greater than seven degrees then the test resulted in a bounce. Literature related to explosions induced by hypergolic contact was reviewed. Explosions were observed to occur inconsistently, a feature that has never been addressed. Literature related to non-reactive splashing, bouncing, and coalescence was reviewed for insight into the explosion phenomenon. I propose that the dependence of impact angle on the transition between explosion and

  5. Comments related to my paper ``The contact angle in capillarity''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Robert

    2008-10-01

    In Phys. Fluids 19, 118105 (2007), I. Lunati disputes my earlier paper [Phys. Fluids 18, 047102 (2006)], in which I pointed out an anomaly arising from Thomas Young's concept of solid/fluid surface tension. The present article examines Lunati's reasoning and concludes that my earlier paper is correct.

  6. Contact Angle Influence on Geysering Jets in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquid-free vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must be used to contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher-order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity.

  7. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pea, M.; Maiolo, L.; Giovine, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Araneo, R.; Notargiacomo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  8. Roughness of glancing angle deposited titanium thin films: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Backholm, Matilda; Foss, Morten; Nordlund, Kai

    2012-09-28

    The characterization of roughness at the nanoscale by the means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) was performed on high aspect ratio glancing angle deposited titanium thin films. With the use of scanning electron microscopy as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was shown that the AFM measurements gave rise to incorrect roughness values for the films consisting of the highest aspect ratio structures. By correcting for this experimental artefact, the difference between the saturated roughness value of a film grown with conventional physical vapour deposition and films grown with a glancing angle of deposition was shown to behave as a power law function of the deposition angle, with a saturated roughness exponent of κ = 7.1 ± 0.2. This power law scaling was confirmed by three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations of glancing angle deposition, where the saturated roughness exponent was calculated to κ = 6.7 ± 0.4. PMID:22948111

  9. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  10. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  11. EDITORIAL: Close contact Close contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The development of scanning probe techniques, such as scanning tunnelling microscopy [1], has often been touted as the catalyst for the surge in activity and progress in nanoscale science and technology. Images of nanoscale structural detail have served as an invaluable investigative resource and continue to fascinate with the fantastical reality of an intricate nether world existing all around us, but hidden from view of the naked eye by a disparity in scale. As is so often the case, the invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope heralded far more than just a useful new apparatus, it demonstrated the scope for exploiting the subtleties of electronic contact. The shrinking of electronic devices has been a driving force for research into molecular electronics, in which an understanding of the nature of electronic contact at junctions is crucial. In response, the number of experimental techniques in molecular electronics has increased rapidly in recent years. Scanning tunnelling microscopes have been used to study electron transfer through molecular films on a conducting substrate, and the need to monitor the contact force of scanning tunnelling electrodes led to the use of atomic force microscopy probes coated in a conducting layer as studied by Cui and colleagues in Arizona [2]. In this issue a collaboration of researchers at Delft University and Leiden University in the Netherlands report a new device architecture for the independent mechanical and electrostatic tuning of nanoscale charge transport, which will enable thorough studies of molecular transport in the future [3]. Scanning probes can also be used to pattern surfaces, such as through spatially-localized Suzuki and Heck reactions in chemical scanning probe lithography. Mechanistic aspects of spatially confined Suzuki and Heck chemistry are also reported in this issue by researchers in Oxford [4]. All these developments in molecular electronics fabrication and characterization provide alternative

  12. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  13. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  14. Comparison of dynamic lever STM and noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Bammerlin, M.; Lüthi, R.; Loppacher, C.; Battiston, F.; Lü, J.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    We investigate interaction effects which occur in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by performing local force spectroscopy with an oscillating tip while imaging Si(111)7×7 terraces in the dynamic lever STM mode (constant time-averaged current). It is found that true atomic resolution is achieved close to the minimum of the resonance frequency vs. distance curve and even closer to the sample. On the other hand true atomic resolution in noncontact AFM (constant frequency shift) is expected several nm away from this minimum, in the range where the frequency shift becomes more negative with decreasing distance.

  15. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2013-11-15

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (∼300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup.

  16. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Torello, D; Degertekin, F Levent

    2013-11-01

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (~300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup. PMID:24289402

  17. Silicone Brushes: Omniphobic Surfaces with Low Sliding Angles.

    PubMed

    Wooh, Sanghyuk; Vollmer, Doris

    2016-06-01

    Losing contact: Omniphobic surfaces can be readily produced by acid-catalyzed graft polycondensation of dimethyldimethoxysilane (PDMS). Droplets show a very small contact angle hysteresis as well as a low sliding angle of only a few degrees. The nm-thick PDMS layer is neither easily washed away nor depleted. This method offers a novel approach towards the preparation of super-liquid-repelling surfaces. PMID:27159802

  18. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  19. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  20. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  1. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  2. Diffuse interface simulation of ternary fluids in contact with solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Yu; Ding, Hang; Gao, Peng; Wu, Yan-Ling

    2016-03-01

    In this article we developed a geometrical wetting condition for diffuse-interface simulation of ternary fluid flows with moving contact lines. The wettability of the substrate in the presence of ternary fluid flows is represented by multiple contact angles, corresponding to the different material properties between the respective fluid and the substrate. Displacement of ternary fluid flows on the substrate leads to the occurrence of moving contact point, at which three moving contact lines meet. We proposed a weighted contact angle model, to replace the jump in contact angle at the contact point by a relatively smooth transition of contact angle over a region of 'diffuse contact point' of finite size. Based on this model, we extended the geometrical formulation of wetting condition for two-phase flows with moving contact lines to ternary flows with moving contact lines. Combining this wetting condition, a Navier-Stokes solver and a ternary-fluid model, we simulated two-dimensional spreading of a compound droplet on a substrate, and validated the numerical results of the drop shape at equilibrium by comparing against the analytical solution. We also checked the convergence rate of the simulation by investigating the axisymmetric drop spreading in a capillary tube. Finally, we applied the model to a variety of applications of practical importance, including impact of a circular cylinder into a pool of two layers of different fluids and sliding of a three-dimensional compound droplet in shear flows.

  3. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  4. Salt deposition at particle contact points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Evitts, Richard W.; Besant, Robert W.; Kennell, Glyn F.

    2015-09-01

    Caking may occur when granular potash fertilizer with a moisture content greater than 0.25 % (w/w) undergoes drying. Since cake strength is proportional to the mass of crystal deposited per unit volume near contact points (and other factors) the modelling of mass deposition near contact points is important. The Young-Laplace equation for the air-salt-solution interface is used to determine the geometry of a 2-D planar saline film between two cubic potash particles. A 2-D theoretical model is developed and applied for ion diffusion and deposition near the contact point during drying. The numerical predictions of ion diffusion in an initially saturated salt illustrate the transient spatial distribution of new KCl deposits along the solid surfaces near the contact line. These results indicate the average salt deposition commences at the air-liquid-solid intersection, where the liquid film is thinnest, and moves toward the particle contact point with increasing area averaged KCl deposits, causing the formation of crystal deposits and bridges near contact points. It is concluded that the average salt deposit height increases inversely with distance from the contact point and decreases with initial contact angle of the contact region, but the deposition is nearly independent of the evaporation or drying rate near each contact region. Caking strength depends on, among other parameters, the amount of salt deposition near contact points.

  5. Solar angle reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sibson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The introduction is the only text in the volume; the rest of the book contains easy-to-use graphical methods for building design and construction using solar energy. Isogonic charts and solar angle diagrams are included. Isogonic charts. Solar angle diagrams.

  6. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  7. AFM surface investigation of polyethylene modified by ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Arenholz, E.; Hnatowicz, V.; Rybka, V.; Öchsner, R.; Ryssel, H.

    1998-07-01

    Polyethylene (PE) was irradiated with 63 keV Ar + and 155 keV Xe + ions to fluences of 1 × 10 13 to 3 × 10 15 cm -2 with ion energies being chosen in order to achieve approximately the same penetration depth for both species. The PE surface morphology was examined by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereas the concentration of free radicals and conjugated double bonds, both created by the ion irradiation, were determined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-VIS spectroscopy, respectively. As expected, the degradation of PE was higher after irradiation with heavier Xe + ions but the changes in the PE surface morphology were more pronounced for Ar + ions. This newly observed effect can be explained by stronger compaction of the PE surface layer in the case of the Xe + irradiation, connected with a reduction of free volume available.

  8. FM-AFM crossover in vanadium oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demishev, S. V.; Chernobrovkin, A. L.; Glushkov, V. V.; Grigorieva, A. V.; Goodilin, E. A.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Samarin, N. A.; Semeno, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic properties of nanomaterials based on vanadium oxide (multiwall nanotubes, nanorods, and nanolayers) have been investigated in the temperature range of 1.8-220 K by high-frequency (60-GHz) EPR. A transition from a ferromagnetic temperature dependence to an antiferromagnetic temperature dependence has been observed in nanorods and nanotubes with a decrease in the temperature. The FM-AFM crossover observed near T C ˜ 110 K is accompanied by a low-temperature increase in the Curie constant by a factor of 2.7-7. The comparison of the experimental data for various VO x nanoparticles indicates that the most probable cause of the change in the type of magnetic interaction is a change in the concentration of V4+ magnetic ions.

  9. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. PMID:22472512

  10. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  12. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  13. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  14. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  15. Piezoviscosity In Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Developments in theory of lubrication. Analysis of piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication of two ellipsoidal contacts. Begins with Reynolds equation for point contact. Equation nondimensionalized using Roelands empirical formula and Dowson and Higginson formula. Equation solved numerically. Solutions obtained for full spectrum of conditions to find effects of dimensionless load, speed, parameters of lubricated and lubricating materials, and angle between direction of rolling and direction of entrainment of lubricant.

  16. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions. PMID:26586109

  17. An Assessment of Critical Dimension Small Angle X-ray Scattering Metrology for Advanced Semiconductor Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles M.

    Simultaneous migration of planar transistors to FinFET architectures, the introduction of a plurality of materials to ensure suitable electrical characteristics, and the establishment of reliable multiple patterning lithography schemes to pattern sub-10 nm feature sizes imposes formidable challenges to current in-line dimensional metrologies. Because the shape of a FinFET channel cross-section immediately influences the electrical characteristics, the evaluation of 3D device structures requires measurement of parameters beyond traditional critical dimension (CD), including their sidewall angles, top corner rounding and footing, roughness, recesses and undercuts at single nanometer dimensions; thus, metrologies require sub-nm and approaching atomic level measurement uncertainty. Synchrotron critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) has unique capabilities to non-destructively monitor the cross-section shape of surface structures with single nanometer uncertainty and can perform overlay metrology to sub-nm uncertainty. In this dissertation, we perform a systematic experimental investigation using CD-SAXS metrology on a hierarchy of semiconductor 3D device architectures including, high-aspect-ratio contact holes, H 2 annealed Si fins, and a series of grating type samples at multiple points along a FinFET fabrication process increasing in structural intricacy and ending with fully fabricated FinFET. Comparative studies between CD-SAXS metrology and other relevant semiconductor dimensional metrologies, particularly CD-SEM, CD-AFM and TEM are used to determine physical limits of CD-SAXS approach for advanced semiconductor samples. CD-SAXS experimental tradeoffs, advice for model-dependent analysis and thoughts on the compatibility with a semiconductor manufacturing environment are discussed.

  18. Irritant Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Irritant Contact Dermatitis Information for adults A A A This ... severe involvement in the patient's armpit. Overview Irritant contact dermatitis is an inflammatory rash caused by direct ...

  19. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Contact Lens Risks Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... redness blurred vision swelling pain Serious Hazards of Contact Lenses Symptoms of eye irritation can indicate a ...

  20. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  1. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  2. Phase-Imaging with a Sharpened Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube AFM Tip: Investigation of Low-k Dielectric Polymer Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, M.; Volksen, Willi; Miller, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Phase shift tapping mode scanning force microscopy (TMSFM) has evolved into a very powerful technique for the nanoscale surface characterization of compositional variations in heterogeneous samples. Phase shift signal measures the difference between the phase angle of the excitation signal and the phase angle of the cantilever response. The signal correlates to the tip-sample inelastic interactions, identifying the different chemical and/or physical property of surfaces. In general, the resolution and quality of scanning probe microscopic images are highly dependent on the size of the scanning probe tip. In improving AFM tip technology, we recently developed a technique for sharpening the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip, reducing the radius of curvature of the CNT tip to less than 5 nm while still maintaining the inherent stability of multi-walled CNT tips. Herein we report the use of sharpened (CNT) AFM tips for phase-imaging of polymer hybrids, a precursor for generating nanoporous low-k dielectrics for on-chip interconnect applications. Using sharpened CNT tips, we obtained phase-contrast images having domains less than 10 nm. In contrast, conventional Si tips and unsharpened CNT tips (radius greater than 15 nm) were not able to resolve the nanoscale domains in the polymer hybrid films. C1early, the size of the CNT tip contributes significantly to the resolution of phase-contrast imaging. In addition, a study on the nonlinear tapping dynamics of the multi-walled CNT tip indicates that the multi-walled CNT tip is immune to conventional imaging instabilities related to the coexistence of attractive and repulsive tapping regimes. This factor may also contribute to the phase-contrast image quality of multi-walled CNT AFM tips. This presentation will also offer data in support of the stability of the CNT tip for phase shift TMSFM.

  3. Ultra-small oscillation amplitude nc-AFM/STM imaging, force and dissipation spectroscopy of Si(100)(2×1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgür Özer, H.; Atabak, Mehrdad; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-12-01

    Si(100)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new nc-AFM (non-contact atomic force microscopy)/STM with sub-Ångstrom oscillation amplitudes using stiff hand-made tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance and dissipation-distance curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long-range force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM. We also observed an increase in the dissipation as the tip is approached closer to the surface, followed by an unexpected decrease as we pass the inflection point in the energy-distance curve.

  4. Experimental evidence of ultrathin polymer film stratification by AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Nicolas; Chebil, Mohamed Souheib; Vignaud, Guillaume; Le Houerou, Vincent; Bardeau, Jean-François; Busselez, Rémi; Gibaud, Alain; Grohens, Yves

    2015-06-01

    By performing Atomic Force Microscopy measurements of pull-off force as a function of the temperature, we were able to probe the dynamic of supported thin polystyrene (PS) films. Thermal transitions induce modifications in the surface energy, roughness and surface modulus that are clearly detected by AFM and related to PS chain relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrated the existence of three transition temperatures that can be associated to the relaxation of polymer chains located at different depth regions within the polymer film. Independently of the film thickness, we have confirmed the presence of a region of high mobility for the polymer chains at the free interface. The thickness of this region is estimated to be above 7nm. The detection of a transition only present for film thicker than the gyration radius Rg is linked to the dynamics of polymer chains in a bulk conformation (i.e. not in contact with the free interface). We claim here that our results demonstrate, in agreement with other techniques, the stratification of thin polymer film depth profile in terms of relaxation behavior. PMID:26087914

  5. Improvement of the surface wettability of silicone hydrogel contact lenses via layer-by-layer self-assembly technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hong; Cho, Hsien-Lung; Yeh, Yi-Hsing; Yang, Ming-Chien

    2015-12-01

    The surface wettability and anti-protein adsorption of a silicone-based hydrogel that was synthesized by a block copolymer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was improved via polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) immobilization. Polysaccharide PEMs of chitosan (CS, as a positive-charged agent) and hyaluronic acid (HA, as a negative-charged and anti-adhesive agent) were successfully assembled on the PDMS-PU-PEGMA silicone hydrogel in a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly manner. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dyeing data verified the progressive buildup of the PEM silicone hydrogel. The results showed that the contact angle of the silicone hydrogel decreased with an increase in the number of PEM grafting layers. Furthermore, after immobilizing five layers of CS/HA, the protein adsorption decreased from 78 ± 11 to 26 ± 4 μg/cm(2) for HSA and from 55 ± 10 to 20 ± 4 μg/cm(2) for lysozymes. This indicates that CS/HA PEM-immobilized silicone hydrogels can resist protein adsorption. Furthermore, these hydrogels were non-cytotoxic according to an in vitro L929 fibroblast assay. Overall, the results demonstrated that the modified silicone hydrogels exhibited hydrophilicity and anti-protein adsorption, as well as relatively high oxygen permeability and optical transparency. Therefore, they would be applicable as a contact lens material. PMID:26519935

  6. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  7. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Ryan C. Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-14

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  8. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  9. Germ direct observation by AFM under crystallization of self-organized assemblies of mono-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udal'tsov, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    Assemblies consisting of mono-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers and water have been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy in solution and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in thin layers. These assemblies self-organized into domains produce microcrystals in thin layer. Morphology of the microcrystals and characteristic features of crystallization germ on the top found by contact AFM indicate that surface tension of an aqueous layer on the domain generates the crystallization process. Estimations of the pressure producing the germ and bulk modulus (Bm) of microcrystals give 26.3±2.6 MPa and 3.72 GPa and Bm=12.7 GPa obtained for dried thin films. The former modulus is comparable with bulk modulus of water (2.174 GPa) that implies liquid crystals formation. Absorptions of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with ћωLO=0.3761 and 0.3577 eV, which are arisen because of hole polaron moving through water, are found in the electronic spectra of the assemblies. The crystallization is suggested to occur due to Zundel cation (H5O2+) operation like the water-porphyrin matrix self-organization found earlier.

  10. Characterization of microscale wear in a ploysilicon-based MEMS device using AFM and PEEM-NEXAFS spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, D. S.; Konicek, A. R.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Sumant, A. V.; de Boer, M. P.; Corwin, A. D.; Carpick, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of microscale wear in silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are elucidated by studying a polysilicon nanotractor, a device specifically designed to conduct friction and wear tests under controlled conditions. Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) was combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantitatively probe chemical changes and structural modification, respectively, in the wear track of the nanotractor. The ability of PEEM-NEXAFS to spatially map chemical variations in the near-surface region of samples at high lateral spatial resolution is unparalleled and therefore ideally suited for this study. The results show that it is possible to detect microscopic chemical changes using PEEM-NEXAFS, specifically, oxidation at the sliding interface of a MEMS device. We observe that wear induces oxidation of the polysilicon at the immediate contact interface, and the spectra are consistent with those from amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The oxidation is correlated with gouging and debris build-up in the wear track, as measured by AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  11. Unravelling the potential of nitric acid as a surface modifier for improving the hemocompatibility of metallocene polyethylene for blood contacting devices

    PubMed Central

    Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Muhamad, Ida Idayu

    2016-01-01

    Design of blood compatible surfaces is obligatory to minimize platelet surface interactions and improve the thromboresistance of foreign surfaces when they are utilized as biomaterials particularly for blood contacting devices. Pure metallocene polyethylene (mPE) and nitric acid (HNO3) treated mPE antithrombogenicity and hydrophilicity were investigated. The contact angle of the mPE treated with HNO3 decreased. Surface of mPE and HNO3 treated mPE investigated with FTIR revealed no major changes in its functional groups. 3D Hirox digital microscopy, SEM and AFM images show increased porosity and surface roughness. Blood coagulation assays prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were delayed significantly (P < 0.05) for HNO3 treated mPE. Hemolysis assay and platelet adhesion of the treated surface resulted in the lysis of red blood cells and platelet adherence, respectively indicating improved hemocompatibility of HNO3 treated mPE. To determine that HNO3 does not deteriorate elastic modulus of mPE, the elastic modulus of mPE and HNO3 treated mPE was compared and the result shows no significant difference. Hence, the overall observation suggests that the novel HNO3 treated mPE may hold great promises to be exploited for blood contacting devices like grafts, catheters, and etc. PMID:26819837

  12. Unravelling the potential of nitric acid as a surface modifier for improving the hemocompatibility of metallocene polyethylene for blood contacting devices.

    PubMed

    Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Muhamad, Ida Idayu

    2016-01-01

    Design of blood compatible surfaces is obligatory to minimize platelet surface interactions and improve the thromboresistance of foreign surfaces when they are utilized as biomaterials particularly for blood contacting devices. Pure metallocene polyethylene (mPE) and nitric acid (HNO3) treated mPE antithrombogenicity and hydrophilicity were investigated. The contact angle of the mPE treated with HNO3 decreased. Surface of mPE and HNO3 treated mPE investigated with FTIR revealed no major changes in its functional groups. 3D Hirox digital microscopy, SEM and AFM images show increased porosity and surface roughness. Blood coagulation assays prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were delayed significantly (P < 0.05) for HNO3 treated mPE. Hemolysis assay and platelet adhesion of the treated surface resulted in the lysis of red blood cells and platelet adherence, respectively indicating improved hemocompatibility of HNO3 treated mPE. To determine that HNO3 does not deteriorate elastic modulus of mPE, the elastic modulus of mPE and HNO3 treated mPE was compared and the result shows no significant difference. Hence, the overall observation suggests that the novel HNO3 treated mPE may hold great promises to be exploited for blood contacting devices like grafts, catheters, and etc. PMID:26819837

  13. Reading Angles in Maps

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15–53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare 2D to 3D angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to 2D and 3D displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  14. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  15. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  16. Primary angle-closure glaucoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Wright, Carrie; Tawfik, Mohammed A; Waisbourd, Michael; Katz, Leslie J

    2016-05-01

    Primary angle-closure glaucoma is potentially a devastating disease, responsible for half of glaucoma-related blindness worldwide. Angle closure is characterized by appositional approximation or contact between the iris and trabecular meshwork. It tends to develop in eyes with shallow anterior chambers, anteriorly positioned or pushed lenses, and angle crowding. Risk of primary angle-closure glaucoma is high among women, the elderly and the hyperopic, and it is most prevalent in Asia. Investigation into genetic mechanisms of glaucoma inheritance is underway. Diagnosis relies on gonioscopy and may be aided by anterior segment optical coherence tomography and ultrasound biomicroscopy. Treatment is designed to control intraocular pressure while monitoring changes to the angle and optic nerve head. Treatment typically begins with medical management through pressure-reducing topical medications. Peripheral iridotomy is often performed to alleviate pupillary block, while laser iridoplasty has been found effective for mechanisms of closure other than pupillary block, such as plateau iris syndrome. Phacoemulsification, with or without goniosynechialysis, both in eyes with existing cataracts and in those with clear lenses, is thus far a viable treatment alternative. Long-term research currently underway will examine its efficacy in cases of angle closure in early stages of the disease. Endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation is another treatment option, which can be combined with cataract surgery. Trabeculectomy remains effective therapy for more advanced cases. PMID:26119516

  17. Dynamics of the Molten Contact Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonin, Ain A.; Schiaffino, Stefano

    1996-01-01

    In contrast to the ordinary contact line problem, virtually no information is available on the similar problem associated with a molten material spreading on a solid which is below the melt's fusion point. The latter is a more complex problem which heat transfer and solidification take place simultaneously with spreading, and requires answers not only for the hot melt's advance speed over the cold solid as a function of contact angle, but also for how one is to predict the point of the molten contact line's arrest by freezing. This issues are of importance in evolving methods of materials processing. The purpose of our work is to develop, based on both experiments and theory, an understanding of the dynamic processes that occur when a molten droplet touches a subcooled solid, spreads partly over it by capillary action, and freezes. We seek answers to the following basic questions. First, what is the relationship between the melt's contact line speed and the apparent (dynamic) contact angle? Secondly, at what point will the contact line modon be arrested by freezing? The talk will describe three components of our work: (1) deposition experiments with small molten droplets; (2) investigation of the dynamics of the molten contact line by means of a novel forced spreading method; and (3) an attempt to provide a theoretical framework for answering the basic questions posed above.

  18. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  19. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  20. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  1. Barrier/Cu contact resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A.; Angyal, M.S.; Lilienfeld, D.; Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Smith, P.M.

    1995-10-17

    The specific contact resistivity of Cu with ({alpha} + {beta})-Ta, TiN, {alpha}-W, and amorphous-Ta{sub 36}Si{sub 14}N{sub 50} barrier films is measured using a novel four-point-probe approach. Geometrically, the test structures consist of colinear sets of W-plugs to act as current and voltage probes that contact the bottom of a planar Cu/barrier/Cu stack. Underlying Al interconnects link the plugs to the current source and voltmeter. The center-to-center distance of the probes ranges from 3 to 200 {micro}m. Using a relation developed by Vu et al., a contact resistivity of roughly 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} is obtained for all tested barrier/Cu combinations. By reflective-mode small-angle X-ray scattering, the similarity in contact resistivity among the barrier films may be related to interfacial impurities absorbed from the deposition process.

  2. High speed AFM studies of 193 nm immersion photoresists during TMAH development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngunjiri, Johnpeter; Meyers, Greg; Cameron, Jim; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Jeon, Hyun; Lee, Dave; Choi, Kwang Mo; Kim, Jung Woo; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Lim, Hae-Jin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report on our studies of the dynamic process of resist development in real time. Using High Speed - Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM) in dilute developer solution, changes in morphology and nanomechanical properties of patterned resist were monitored. The Bruker Dimension FastScan AFMTM was applied to analyze 193 nm acrylic-based immersion resists in developer. HS-AFM operated in Peak Force mapping mode allowed for concurrent measurements of image topography resist stiffness, adhesion to AFM probe and deformation during development. In our studies we focused on HS-AFM topography data as it readily revealed detailed information about initial resist morphology, followed by a resist swelling process and eventual dissolution of the exposed resist areas. HS-AFM showed potential for tracking and understanding development of patterned resist films and can be useful in evaluating the dissolution properties of different resist designs.

  3. Position-sensitive photodetector for rotation-angle transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, N. T.; Novikov, S. G.; Korneev, I. V.; Shtan'ko, A. A.; Rodionov, V. A.

    2011-03-01

    A new position-sensitive photodetector (PSPD) for photoelectric transducers of rotation angle is described, which is based on a three-layer ring sector structure. The output voltage of the PSPD is a linear function of the angle of rotation of a light-emitting diode relative to the PSPD contacts. The proposed device is highly reliable and ensures angle determination to within 7 min of arc. Rotation-angle transducers based on this PSPD are compatible with any measuring, matching, and processing equipment.

  4. Dynamics of the Molten Contact Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonin, Ain A.; Duthaler, Gregg; Liu, Michael; Torresola, Javier; Qiu, Taiqing

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a basic understanding of how a molten material front spreads over a solid that is below its melting point, arrests, and freezes. Our hope is that the work will contribute toward a scientific knowledge base for certain new applications involving molten droplet deposition, including the "printing" of arbitrary three-dimensional objects by precise deposition of individual molten microdrops that solidify after impact. Little information is available at this time on the capillarity-driven motion and arrest of molten contact line regions. Schiaffino and Sonin investigated the arrest of the contact line of a molten microcrystalline wax spreading over a subcooled solid "target" of the same material. They found that contact line arrest takes place at an apparent liquid contact angle that depends primarily on the Stefan number S=c(T(sub f) -T(sub t)/L based on the temperature difference between the fusion point and the target temperature, and proposed that contact line arrest occurs when the liquid's dynamic contact angle approaches the angle of attack of the solidification front just behind the contact line. They also showed, however, that the conventional continuum equations and boundary conditions have no meaningful solution for this angle. The solidification front angle is determined by the heat flux just behind the contact line, and the heat flux is singular at that point. By comparing experiments with numerical computations, Schiaffino and Sonin estimated that the conventional solidification model must break down within a distance of order 0.1 - 1 microns of the contact line. The physical mechanism for this breakdown is as yet undetermined, and no first-principles theory exists for the contact angle at arrest. Schiaffino and Sonin also presented a framework for understanding how to moderate Weber number molten droplet deposition in terms of similarity laws and experimentation. The study is based on experiments with three molten

  5. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  8. Liquid-bridge breakup in contact-drop dispensing: Liquid-bridge stability with a free contact line.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-08-01

    The static stability of weightless liquid bridges with a free contact line with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is studied. Constant-volume and constant-pressure stability regions are constructed in slenderness versus cylindrical volume diagrams for fixed contact angles. Bifurcations along the stability-region boundaries are characterized by the structure of axisymmetric bridge branches and families of equilibria. A wave-number definition is presented based on the pieces-of-sphere states at branch terminal points to classify equilibrium branches and identify branch connections. Compared with liquid bridges pinned at two equal disks, the free contact line breaks the equatorial and reflective symmetries, affecting the lower boundary of the constant-volume stability region where axisymmetric perturbations are critical. Stability is lost at transcritical bifurcations and turning points along this boundary. Our results furnish the maximum-slenderness stability limit for drop deposition on real surfaces when the contact angle approaches the receding contact angle. PMID:26382413

  9. Liquid-bridge breakup in contact-drop dispensing: Liquid-bridge stability with a free contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J.; van de Ven, Theo G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The static stability of weightless liquid bridges with a free contact line with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is studied. Constant-volume and constant-pressure stability regions are constructed in slenderness versus cylindrical volume diagrams for fixed contact angles. Bifurcations along the stability-region boundaries are characterized by the structure of axisymmetric bridge branches and families of equilibria. A wave-number definition is presented based on the pieces-of-sphere states at branch terminal points to classify equilibrium branches and identify branch connections. Compared with liquid bridges pinned at two equal disks, the free contact line breaks the equatorial and reflective symmetries, affecting the lower boundary of the constant-volume stability region where axisymmetric perturbations are critical. Stability is lost at transcritical bifurcations and turning points along this boundary. Our results furnish the maximum-slenderness stability limit for drop deposition on real surfaces when the contact angle approaches the receding contact angle.

  10. A new wetting mechanism based upon triple contact line pinning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianlin; Mei, Yue; Xia, Re

    2011-01-01

    The classical Wenzel and Cassie models fail to give a physical explanation of such phenomenon as the macroscopic contact angle actually being equal to the Young's contact angle if there is a spot (surface defect) inside the droplet. Here, we derive the expression of the macroscopic contact angle for this special substrate in use of the principle of least potential energy, and our analytical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Our findings also suggest that it is the triple contact line (TCL) rather than the contact area that dominates the contact angle. Therefore a new model based upon the TCL pinning is developed to explain the different wetting properties of the Wenzel and Cassie models for hydrophilic and hydrophobic cases. Moreover, the new model predicts the macroscopic contact angle in a broader range accurately, which is consistent with the existing experimental findings. This study revisits the fundamentals of wetting on rough substrates. The new model derived will help to design better superhydrophobic materials and provide the prediction required to engineer novel microfluidic devices. PMID:21117687

  11. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  12. Study of the sensitivity and resonant frequency of the torsional modes of an AFM cantilever with a sidewall probe based on a nonlocal elasticity theory.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mohammad; Karami Mohammadi, Ardeshir

    2015-05-01

    A relationship based on a nonlocal elasticity theory is developed to investigate the torsional sensitivity and resonant frequency of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with assembled cantilever probe (ACP). This ACP comprises a horizontal cantilever and a vertical extension, and a tip located at the free end of the extension, which makes the AFM capable of topography at sidewalls of microstructures. First, the governing differential equations of motion and boundary conditions for dynamic analysis are obtained by a combination of the basic equations of nonlocal elasticity theory and Hamilton's principle. Afterward, a closed-form expression for the sensitivity of vibration modes has been obtained using the relationship between the resonant frequency and contact stiffness of cantilever and sample. These analysis accounts for a better representation of the torsional behavior of an AFM with sidewall probe where the small-scale effect are significant. The results of the proposed model are compared with those of classical beam theory. The results show that the sensitivities and resonant frequencies of ACP predicted by the nonlocal elasticity theory are smaller than those obtained by the classical beam theory. PMID:25755027

  13. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  14. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  15. The Rainbow Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, B.

    1978-01-01

    Two articles in the "Scientific American" form the background of this note. The rainbow angle for the primary bow of a monochromatic Cartesian rainbow is calculated. Special projects for senior high school students could be patterned after this quantitative study. (MP)

  16. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  17. Yaw Angle Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) is a 5 degree-of -freedom repulsive force magnetic suspension system designed to study the control of objects over large magnetic gaps. A digital control algorithm uses 6 sets of laser-sheet sensors and 5 control coils to position a cylinder 3' above the plane of electromagnetics

  18. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  19. Tuning the resonance of a photonic crystal microcavity with an AFM probe.

    PubMed

    Märki, Iwan; Salt, Martin; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2006-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results on switching and tuning of a two-dimensional photonic crystal resonant microcavity by means of a silicon AFM tip, probing the highly localized optical field in the vicinity of the cavity. On-off switching and modulation of the transmission signal in the kHz range is achieved by bringing an AFM tip onto the center of the microcavity, inducing a damping effect on the transmission resonance. Tuning of the resonant wavelength in the order of several nanometers becomes possible by inserting the AFM tip into one of the holes of the Bragg mirror forming the microcavity in the propagation direction. PMID:19516436

  20. Development of portable experimental set-up for AFM to work at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, D. H.; Bhatt, P. M.; Pathan, A. M.; Patel, Hitarthi; Joshi, U. S.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the designing aspects and fabrication of low temperature atomic force microscope (AFM) to study the surface structures of nanomaterials. Several key features of design including liquid nitrogen reservoir, vacuum chamber, vibration isolation table etc. have been presented. The whole set up was assembled in-house at a fairly low cost to be used with any commercial AFM system. The surface morphology of important oxide (In0.94Sn0.04)2O3 (ITO) thin film nanostructures has been investigated using the cryogenic AFM set up.

  1. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  2. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses Without a Prescription Sep. 26, 2013 It ... she first put in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had " ...

  3. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of allergic contact dermatitis include nickel, chromates, rubber chemicals, and topical antibiotic ointments and creams. Frequent ... construction workers who are in contact with cement. Rubber chemicals are found in gloves, balloons, elastic in ...

  4. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  5. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A Text Size What's ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  6. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  7. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  8. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  9. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  10. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  11. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  12. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  13. Angle states in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A. C.; Iguain, J. L.

    1998-12-01

    Angle states and angle operators are defined for a system with arbitrary angular momentum. They provide a reasonable formalization of the concept of angle provided that we accept that the angular orientation is quantized. The angle operator is the generator of boosts in angular momentum and is, almost everywhere, linearly related to the logarithm of the shift operator. Angle states for fermions and bosons behave differently under parity transformation.

  14. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  15. Effect of contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Chuen-Huei; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1992-01-01

    A computer simulation is presented which shows how the gear contact ratio affects the dynamic load on a spur gear transmission. The contact ratio can be affected by the tooth addendum, the pressure angle, the tooth size (diametral pitch), and the center distance. The analysis presented was performed using the NASA gear dynamics code, DANST. In the analysis, the contact ratio was varied over the range 1.20 to 2.40 by changing the length of the tooth addendum. In order to simplify the analysis, other parameters related to contact ratio were held constant. The contact ratio was found to have a significant influence on gear dynamics. Over a wide range of operating speeds, a contact ratio close to 2.0 minimized dynamic load. For low contact ratio gears (contact ratio less than 2.0), increasing the contact ratio reduced the gear dynamic load. For high contact ratio gears (contact ratio = or greater than 2.0), the selection of contact ratio should take into consideration the intended operating speeds. In general, high contact ratio gears minimized dynamic load better than low contact ratio gears.

  16. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  17. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  18. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  19. Modeling Thermal Contact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One difficulty in using cryocoolers is making good thermal contact between the cooler and the instrument being cooled. The connection is often made through a bolted joint. The temperature drop associated with this joint has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. The low temperature behavior of dry joints have shown some anomalous dependence on the surface condition of the mating parts. There is also some doubts on how well one can extrapolate from the test samples to predicting the performance of a real system. Both finite element and analytic models of a simple contact system have been developed. The model assumes (a) the contact is dry (contact limited to a small portion of the total available area and the spaces in-between the actual contact patches are perfect insulators), (b) contacts are clean (conductivity of the actual contact is the same as the bulk), (c) small temperature gradients (the bulk conductance may be assumed to be temperature independent), (d) the absolute temperature is low (thermal radiation effects are ignored), and (e) the dimensions of the nominal contact area are small compared to the thickness of the bulk material (the contact effects are localized near the contact). The models show that in the limit of actual contact area much less than the nominal area (a much less than A), that the excess temperature drop due to a single point of contact scales as a(exp -1/2). This disturbance only extends a distance approx. A(exp 1/2) into the bulk material. A group of identical contacts will result in an excess temperature drop that scales as n(exp -1/2), where n is the number of contacts and n dot a is constant. This implies that flat rough surfaces will have a lower excess temperature drop than flat polished surfaces.

  20. AFM/CLSM data visualization and comparison using an open-source toolkit.

    PubMed

    Rajwa, Bartek; McNally, Helen A; Varadharajan, Padma; Sturgis, Jennifer; Robinson, J Paul

    2004-06-01

    There is a vast difference in the traditional presentation of AFM data and confocal data. AFM data are presented as surface contours while confocal data are usually visualized using either surface- or volume-rendering techniques. Finding a common meaningful visualization platform is not an easy task. AFM and CLSM technologies are complementary and are more frequently being used to image common biological systems. In order to provide a presentation method that would assist us in evaluating cellular morphology, we propose a simple visualization strategy that is comparative, intuitive, and operates within an open-source environment of ImageJ, SurfaceJ, and VolumeJ applications. In order to find some common ground for AFM-CLSM image comparison, we have developed a plug-in for ImageJ, which allows us to import proprietary image data sets into this application. We propose to represent both AFM and CLSM image data sets as shaded elevation maps with color-coded height. This simple technique utilizes the open source VolumeJ and SurfaceJ plug-ins. To provide an example of this visualization technique, we evaluated the three-dimensional architecture of living chick dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia measured independently with AFM and CLSM. PMID:15352089