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Sample records for afm cyclic voltammetry

  1. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  2. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  3. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  4. Cyclic voltammetry of supported BLMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgasova, Renata; Sabo, Jan; Ottova, Angelica L.; Tien, H. T.

    1996-06-01

    The transfer of an electron across a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) is one of the BLMs most exciting processes. A number of well known electron mediators have been investigated using the method of cyclic voltammetry on a Teflon coated platinum wire, the tip of which has been modified by a self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (s-BLM). The electrical capacitance of the s-BLM system was measured as a function of frequency. The results are discussed in terms of electron transfer and redox reactions.

  5. Steady state oxygen reduction and cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Karlberg, Gustav S; Jaramillo, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens K

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Pt and Pt3Ni for the oxygen reduction reaction is investigated by applying a Sabatier model based on density functional calculations. We investigate the role of adsorbed OH on the activity, by comparing cyclic voltammetry obtained from theory with previously published experimental results with and without molecular oxygen present. We find that the simple Sabatier model predicts both the potential dependence of the OH coverage and the measured current densities seen in experiments, and that it offers an understanding of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the atomic level. To investigate kinetic effects we develop a simple kinetic model for ORR. Whereas kinetic corrections only matter close to the volcano top, an interesting outcome of the kinetic model is a first order dependence on the oxygen pressure. Importantly, the conclusion obtained from the simple Sabatier model still persists: an intermediate binding of OH corresponds to the highest catalytic activity, i.e. Pt is limited by a too strong OH binding and Pt3Ni is limited by a too weak OH binding.

  6. A Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Richard P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for experiments that illustrate the nature of cyclic voltammetry and its application in the characterization of organic electrode processes. The experiments also demonstrate the concepts of electrochemical reversibility and diffusion-controlled mass transfer. (JN)

  7. Voltage Biasing, Cyclic Voltammetry, & Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Seth J.; Richner, Tom J.; Brodnick, Sarah K.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Williams, Justin C.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measure properties of the electrode-tissue interface without additional invasive procedures, and can be used to monitor electrode performance over the long term. EIS measures electrical impedance at multiple frequencies, and increases in impedance indicate increased glial scar formation around the device, while cyclic voltammetry measures the charge carrying capacity of the electrode, and indicates how charge is transferred at different voltage levels. As implanted electrodes age, EIS and CV data change, and electrode sites that previously recorded spiking neurons often exhibit significantly lower efficacy for neural recording. The application of a brief voltage pulse to implanted electrode arrays, known as rejuvenation, can bring back spiking activity on otherwise silent electrode sites for a period of time. Rejuvenation alters EIS and CV, and can be monitored by these complementary methods. Typically, EIS is measured daily as an indication of the tissue response at the electrode site. If spikes are absent in a channel that previously had spikes, then CV is used to determine the charge carrying capacity of the electrode site, and rejuvenation can be applied to improve the interface efficacy. CV and EIS are then repeated to check the changes at the electrode-tissue interface, and neural recordings are collected. The overall goal of rejuvenation is to extend the functional lifetime of implanted arrays. PMID:22395095

  8. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: Simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-02-27

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd–Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites that is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. As a result, the method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.

  9. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: Simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-02-27

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd–Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites thatmore » is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. As a result, the method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.« less

  10. Cyclic voltammetry of apple fruits: Memristors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Tuckett, Clayton; Blockmon, Avery L; Reedus, Jada; Volkova, Maya I

    2016-12-01

    A memristor is a resistor with memory that exhibits a pinched hysteretic relationship in cyclic voltammetry. Recently, we have found memristors in the electrical circuitry of plants and seeds. There are no publications in literature about the possible existence of memristors and electrical differentiators in fruits. Here we found that the electrostimulation of Golden Delicious or Arkansas Black apple fruits by bipolar periodic waves induces hysteresis loops with pinched points in cyclic voltammograms at low frequencies between 0.1MHz and 1MHz. At high frequencies of 1kHz, the pinched hysteresis loop transforms to a non-pinched hysteresis loop instead of a single line I=V/R for ideal memristors because the amplitude of electrical current depends on capacitance of a fruit's tissue and electrodes, frequency and direction of scanning. Electrostimulation of electrical circuits in apple fruits by periodic voltage waves also induces electrotonic potential propagation due to cell-to-cell electrical coupling with electrical differentiators. A differentiator is an electrical circuit in which the output of the circuit is approximately directly proportional to the rate of change of the input. The information gained from electrostimulation can be used to elucidate and to observe electrochemical and electrophysiological properties of electrical circuits in fruits. PMID:27398978

  11. Fully printed flexible and disposable wireless cyclic voltammetry tag

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younsu; Park, Hyejin; Park, Jin-Ah; Noh, Jinsoo; Choi, Yunchang; Jung, Minhoon; Jung, Kyunghwan; Pyo, Myungho; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    A disposable cyclic voltammetry (CV) tag is printed on a plastic film by integrating wireless power transmitter, polarized triangle wave generator, electrochemical cell and signage through a scalable gravure printing method. By proximity of 13.56 MHz RF reader, the printed CV tag generates 320 mHz of triangular sweep wave from +500 mV to −500 mV which enable to scan a printed electrochemical cell in the CV tag. By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag. Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader. This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health. PMID:25630250

  12. Fast Selective Detection of Pyocyanin Using Cyclic Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Alatraktchi, Fatima AlZahra’a; Breum Andersen, Sandra; Krogh Johansen, Helle; Molin, Søren; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2016-01-01

    Pyocyanin is a virulence factor uniquely produced by the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The fast and selective detection of pyocyanin in clinical samples can reveal important information about the presence of this microorganism in patients. Electrochemical sensing of the redox-active pyocyanin is a route to directly quantify pyocyanin in real time and in situ in hospitals and clinics. The selective quantification of pyocyanin is, however, limited by other redox-active compounds existing in human fluids and by other metabolites produced by pathogenic bacteria. Here we present a direct selective method to detect pyocyanin in a complex electroactive environment using commercially available electrodes. It is shown that cyclic voltammetry measurements between −1.0 V to 1.0 V reveal a potential detection window of pyocyanin of 0.58–0.82 V that is unaffected by other redox-active interferents. The linear quantification of pyocyanin has an R2 value of 0.991 across the clinically relevant concentration range of 2–100 µM. The proposed method was tested on human saliva showing a standard deviation of 2.5% ± 1% (n = 5) from the known added pyocyanin concentration to the samples. This inexpensive procedure is suggested for clinical use in monitoring the presence and state of P. aeruginosa infection in patients. PMID:27007376

  13. Cyclic voltammetry and RBS study of paint components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Lynn; Spencer, Dirk; Muntele, Claudiu; Muntele, Iulia; Ila, D.

    2007-08-01

    Heavy metals and metalloid ions are found in environmental matrices. The most toxic are lead, cadmium and mercury. These three heavy metals have no biological function and are toxic at all concentrations. Lead is one of the most insidious heavy metals and is introduced into the environment by many different means. It persists in both urban and rural settings, being found in paint chips, pottery, crystal and pharmaceutical and nutritional products. The analysis of heavy elements such as lead in soil is of particular importance [W.T. Sturges, R.M. Harrison, Sci. Total Environ. 44 (3) (1985) 225; M.L. Lepow, L. Bruckman, M. Gillette, S. Markowitz, R. Robino, J. Kapish, Environ. Res. 10 (3) (1975) 415; A.E. Daniels, J.R. Kominsky, P.J. Clark, J. Hazard. Mater. B 87 (2001) 117; G. Hutter, D. Moshman, J. Hazard. Mater. 40 (1995) 1]. In preparing the methods for lead detection in paint, we have used Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in order to study the type and amount of heavy metal content in paint samples collected at various sites in the historic campus at A&M University (AAMU). We will show the results of our study with emphasis on comparison of what we learned about presence of lead in paints using our ion beam methods compared with the analysis of lead in paints using cyclic voltammetry.

  14. Fully printed flexible and disposable wireless cyclic voltammetry tag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Younsu; Park, Hyejin; Park, Jin-Ah; Noh, Jinsoo; Choi, Yunchang; Jung, Minhoon; Jung, Kyunghwan; Pyo, Myungho; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    A disposable cyclic voltammetry (CV) tag is printed on a plastic film by integrating wireless power transmitter, polarized triangle wave generator, electrochemical cell and signage through a scalable gravure printing method. By proximity of 13.56 MHz RF reader, the printed CV tag generates 320 mHz of triangular sweep wave from +500 mV to -500 mV which enable to scan a printed electrochemical cell in the CV tag. By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag. Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader. This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

  15. Fully printed flexible and disposable wireless cyclic voltammetry tag.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younsu; Park, Hyejin; Park, Jin-Ah; Noh, Jinsoo; Choi, Yunchang; Jung, Minhoon; Jung, Kyunghwan; Pyo, Myungho; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-29

    A disposable cyclic voltammetry (CV) tag is printed on a plastic film by integrating wireless power transmitter, polarized triangle wave generator, electrochemical cell and signage through a scalable gravure printing method. By proximity of 13.56 MHz RF reader, the printed CV tag generates 320 mHz of triangular sweep wave from +500 mV to -500 mV which enable to scan a printed electrochemical cell in the CV tag. By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag. Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader. This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

  16. Higher Sensitivity Dopamine Measurements with Faster-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Keithley, Richard B.; Takmakov, Pavel; Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Belle, Anna M.; Owesson-White, Catarina A.; Park, Jinwoo; Wightman, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with carbon-fiber microelectrodes has been successfully used to detect catecholamine release in vivo. Generally, waveforms with anodic voltage limits of 1.0 V or 1.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) are used for detection. The 1.0 V excursion provides good temporal resolution, but suffers from a lack of sensitivity. The 1.3 V excursion increases sensitivity, but also increases response time which can blur the detection of neurochemical events. Here, the scan rate was increased to improve the sensitivity of the 1.0 V excursion while maintaining the rapid temporal response. However, increasing scan rate increases both the desired faradaic current response and the already large charging current associated with the voltage sweep. Analog background subtraction was used to prevent the analog-to-digital converter from saturating from the high currents generated with increasing scan rate by neutralizing some of the charging current. In vitro results with the 1.0 V waveform showed approximately a four-fold increase in signal to noise ratio with maintenance of the desired faster response time by increasing scan rate up to 2400 V/s. In vivo, stable stimulated release was detected with an approximate four-fold increase in peak current. The scan rate of the 1.3 V waveform was also increased, but the signal was unstable with time in vitro and in vivo. Adapting the 1.3 V triangular wave into a sawhorse design prevented signal decay and increased the faradaic response. The use of the 1.3 V sawhorse waveform decreased the detection limit of dopamine with FSCV to 0.96 ± 0.08 nM in vitro and showed improved performance in vivo without affecting the neuronal environment. Electron microscopy showed dopamine sensitivity is in a quasi-steady state with carbon-fiber microelectrodes scanned to potentials above 1.0 V. PMID:21473572

  17. Detection of gamma-irradiation effect on DNA and protein using magnetic sensor and cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Park, Duck-Gun; Song, Hoon; Kishore, M B; Vértesy, G; Lee, Duk-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a magnetic sensor utilizing Planar Hall Resistance (PHR) and cyclic Voltammetry (CV) for detecting the radiation effect was fabricated. Specifically, we applied in parallel a PHR sensor and CV device to monitor the irradiation effect on DNA and protein respectively. Through parallel measurements, we demonstrated that the PHR sensor and CV are sensitive enough to measure irradiation effect. The PHR voltage decreased by magnetic nanobead labeled DNA was slightly recovered after gamma ray irradiation. The behavior of cdk inhibitor protein p21 having a sandwich structure of Au/protein G/Ab/Ag/Ab was checked by monitoring the cyclic Voltammetry signal in analyzing the gamma ray irradiation effect.

  18. Development and Use of a Cyclic Voltammetry Simulator to Introduce Undergraduate Students to Electrochemical Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a popular technique for the study of electrochemical mechanisms because the method can provide useful information on the redox couple. The technique involves the application of a potential ramp on an unstirred solution while the current is monitored, and then the ramp is reversed for a return sweep. CV is sometimes…

  19. Cyclic Voltammetry Simulations with DigiSim Software: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messersmith, Stephania J.

    2014-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate chemistry experiment is described which utilizes DigiSim software to simulate cyclic voltammetry (CV). Four mechanisms were studied: a reversible electron transfer with no subsequent or proceeding chemical reactions, a reversible electron transfer followed by a reversible chemical reaction, a reversible chemical…

  20. Ozonization and cyclic voltammetry as efficient methods for the regeneration of gelatin-coated SPR chips.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, Sandra; De Wael, Karolien; Buschop, Hans; Adriaens, Annemie; Schacht, Etienne; Dubruel, Peter

    2008-12-01

    The application of ozonization and cyclic voltammetry for the regeneration of gold chips containing a chemisorbed gelatin layer is reported. The efficiency of the regeneration process was analyzed using various surface analysis techniques indicating a complete removal of the biopolymer layer. The current findings open up perspectives for regeneration and multiple application of gold chips for SPR measurements.

  1. Boron doped diamond sensor for sensitive determination of metronidazole: Mechanistic and analytical study by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Hafedh Belhadj; Brahim, Mabrouk Ben; Abdelhédi, Ridha; Samet, Youssef

    2016-02-01

    The performance of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode for the detection of metronidazole (MTZ) as the most important drug of the group of 5-nitroimidazole was proven using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) techniques. A comparison study between BDD, glassy carbon and silver electrodes on the electrochemical response was carried out. The process is pH-dependent. In neutral and alkaline media, one irreversible reduction peak related to the hydroxylamine derivative formation was registered, involving a total of four electrons. In acidic medium, a prepeak appears probably related to the adsorption affinity of hydroxylamine at the electrode surface. The BDD electrode showed higher sensitivity and reproducibility analytical response, compared with the other electrodes. The higher reduction peak current was registered at pH11. Under optimal conditions, a linear analytical curve was obtained for the MTZ concentration in the range of 0.2-4.2μmolL(-1), with a detection limit of 0.065μmolL(-1).

  2. Hairy carbon electrodes studied by cyclic voltammetry and battery discharge testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Deborah D. L.; Shui, Xiaoping; Frysz, Christine A.

    1993-01-01

    Hairy carbon is a new material developed by growing submicron carbon filaments on conventional carbon substrates. Typical substrate materials include carbon black, graphite powder, carbon fibers, and glassy carbon. A catalyst is used to initiate hair growth with carbonaceous gases serving as the carbon source. To study the electrochemical behavior of hairy carbons, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and discharge testing were conducted. In both cases, hairy carbon results surpassed those of the substrate material alone.

  3. Assessing principal component regression prediction of neurochemicals detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R Mark

    2011-06-01

    Principal component regression is a multivariate data analysis approach routinely used to predict neurochemical concentrations from in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry measurements. This mathematical procedure can rapidly be employed with present day computer programming languages. Here, we evaluate several methods that can be used to evaluate and improve multivariate concentration determination. The cyclic voltammetric representation of the calculated regression vector is shown to be a valuable tool in determining whether the calculated multivariate model is chemically appropriate. The use of Cook's distance successfully identified outliers contained within in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry training sets. This work also presents the first direct interpretation of a residual color plot and demonstrated the effect of peak shifts on predicted dopamine concentrations. Finally, separate analyses of smaller increments of a single continuous measurement could not be concatenated without substantial error in the predicted neurochemical concentrations due to electrode drift. Taken together, these tools allow for the construction of more robust multivariate calibration models and provide the first approach to assess the predictive ability of a procedure that is inherently impossible to validate because of the lack of in vivo standards. PMID:21966586

  4. Sampling phasic dopamine signaling with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in awake behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, SM; Cone, JJ; Ng-Evans, S; McCutcheon, JE; Roitman, MF

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique which permits the in vivo measurement of extracellular fluctuations in multiple chemical species. The technique is frequently utilized to sample sub-second (phasic) concentration changes of the neurotransmitter dopamine in awake and behaving rats. Phasic dopamine signaling is implicated in reinforcement, goal-directed behavior, and locomotion and FSCV has been used to investigate how rapid changes in striatal dopamine concentration contribute to these and other behaviors. This unit describes the instrumentation and construction, implantation, and use of necessary components required to sample and analyze dopamine concentration changes in awake rats with FSCV. PMID:25559005

  5. Electrochemical Fabrication of ZnO Nanowires in Anodized Aluminum Template Using Cyclic Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koney, Shalini Katyayani

    This thesis work studies in detail the fabrication ZnO in Anodic Aluminum Template using Cyclic Voltammetry which is one of the electrochemical deposition methods. In this current work the Aluminum is anodized in Oxalic and Sulphuric acids for different timings with constant current density of 10mA/cm 2. The hexagonal pores were observed after the anodization process. The pores are filled with Zinc using the Cyclic Voltammetry Method of Electrochemical deposition. The samples are then oxidized at 300°C to form the Zinc oxide nanowires. The presence of Zinc is tested using various techniques like Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy which shows the presence of Zinc in the pores. To analytically prove the presence of Zinc Optical Spectroscopy is used. The absorption and reflection spectrums are studied to determine the presence of Zinc Oxide. The Zinc Oxide film was found to have strong absorbance at 0.50 at 340 nm. The thickness of the oxide layer is determined as 354.3 nm. The band gap of the Zinc oxide was found to be at 3.23eV.

  6. A Flexible Software Platform for Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data Acquisition and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Brooks, Kenneth; Verber, Matthew D.; Keithley, Richard B.; Owesson-White, Catarina; Carroll, Susan; Takmakov, Pavel; McKinney, Collin J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has proved to be a valuable analytical tool for the real-time measurement of neurotransmitter dynamics in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, FSCV has found application in a wide variety of disciplines including electrochemistry, neurobiology and behavioral psychology. The maturation of FSCV as an in vivo technique led users to pose increasingly complex questions that require a more sophisticated experimental design. To accommodate recent and future advances in FSCV application, our lab has developed High Definition Cyclic Voltammetry (HDCV). HDCV is an electrochemical software suite, and includes data acquisition and analysis programs. The data collection program delivers greater experimental flexibility and better user feedback through live displays. It supports experiments involving multiple electrodes with customized waveforms. It is compatible with TTL-based systems that are used for monitoring animal behavior and it enables simultaneous recording of electrochemical and electrophysiological data. HDCV analysis streamlines data processing with superior filtering options, seamlessly manages behavioral events, and integrates chemometric processing. Furthermore, analysis is capable of handling single files collected over extended periods of time, allowing the user to consider biological events on both sub-second and multi-minute time scales. Here we describe and demonstrate the utility of HDCV for in vivo experiments. PMID:24083898

  7. Flexible software platform for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry data acquisition and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Elizabeth S; Brooks, Kenneth; Verber, Matthew D; Keithley, Richard B; Owesson-White, Catarina; Carroll, Susan; Takmakov, Pavel; McKinney, Collin J; Wightman, R Mark

    2013-11-01

    Over the last several decades, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has proved to be a valuable analytical tool for the real-time measurement of neurotransmitter dynamics in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, FSCV has found application in a wide variety of disciplines including electrochemistry, neurobiology, and behavioral psychology. The maturation of FSCV as an in vivo technique led users to pose increasingly complex questions that require a more sophisticated experimental design. To accommodate recent and future advances in FSCV application, our lab has developed High Definition Cyclic Voltammetry (HDCV). HDCV is an electrochemical software suite that includes data acquisition and analysis programs. The data collection program delivers greater experimental flexibility and better user feedback through live displays. It supports experiments involving multiple electrodes with customized waveforms. It is compatible with transistor-transistor logic-based systems that are used for monitoring animal behavior, and it enables simultaneous recording of electrochemical and electrophysiological data. HDCV analysis streamlines data processing with superior filtering options, seamlessly manages behavioral events, and integrates chemometric processing. Furthermore, analysis is capable of handling single files collected over extended periods of time, allowing the user to consider biological events on both subsecond and multiminute time scales. Here we describe and demonstrate the utility of HDCV for in vivo experiments. PMID:24083898

  8. Electrooxidation of morin hydrate at a Pt electrode studied by cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Masek, Anna; Chrzescijanska, Ewa; Zaborski, Marian

    2014-04-01

    The process and the kinetics of the electrochemical oxidation of morin in an anhydrous electrolyte have been investigated using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The oxidation mechanism proceeds in sequential steps related to the hydroxyl groups in the three aromatic rings. The oxidation of the 2',4'dihydroxy moiety at the B ring of morin occurs first, at very low positive potentials, and is a one-electron, one-proton irreversible reaction. The rate constant, electron transfer coefficient and diffusion coefficients involved in the electrochemical oxidation of morin were determined. The influence of the deprotonation of the ring B hydroxyl moiety is related to the electron/proton donating capacity of morin and to its radical scavenging antioxidant activity.

  9. Electrode Calibration with a Microfluidic Flow Cell for Fast-scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Sinkala, Elly; McCutcheon, James E.; Schuck, Matt; Schmidt, Eric; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Eddington, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is a common analytical electrochemistry tool used to measure chemical species. It has recently been adapted for measurement of neurotransmitters such as dopamine in awake and behaving animals (in vivo). Electrode calibration is an essential step in FSCV to relate observed current to concentration of a chemical species. However, existing methods require multiple components, which reduce the ease of calibrations. To this end, a microfluidic flow cell (µFC) was developed as a simple device to switch between buffer and buffer with a known concentration of the analyte of interest – in this case dopamine - in a microfluidic Y-channel. The ability to quickly switch solutions yielded electrode calibrations with faster rise times and that were more stable at peak current values. The µFC reduced the number of external electrical components and produced linear calibrations over a range of concentrations. To demonstrate this, an electrode calibrated with the µFC was used in FSCV recordings from a rat during the delivery of food reward – a stimulus that reliably evokes a brief increase in current due to the oxidation of dopamine. Using the linear calibration, dopamine concentrations were determined from the current responses evoked during the behavioral task. The µFC is able to easily and quickly calibrate FSCV electrode responses to chemical species for both in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:22522908

  10. Failure of Standard Training Sets in the Analysis of Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin A; Rodeberg, Nathan T; Wightman, R Mark

    2016-03-16

    The use of principal component regression, a multivariate calibration method, in the analysis of in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry data allows for separation of overlapping signal contributions, permitting evaluation of the temporal dynamics of multiple neurotransmitters simultaneously. To accomplish this, the technique relies on information about current-concentration relationships across the scan-potential window gained from analysis of training sets. The ability of the constructed models to resolve analytes depends critically on the quality of these data. Recently, the use of standard training sets obtained under conditions other than those of the experimental data collection (e.g., with different electrodes, animals, or equipment) has been reported. This study evaluates the analyte resolution capabilities of models constructed using this approach from both a theoretical and experimental viewpoint. A detailed discussion of the theory of principal component regression is provided to inform this discussion. The findings demonstrate that the use of standard training sets leads to misassignment of the current-concentration relationships across the scan-potential window. This directly results in poor analyte resolution and, consequently, inaccurate quantitation, which may lead to erroneous conclusions being drawn from experimental data. Thus, it is strongly advocated that training sets be obtained under the experimental conditions to allow for accurate data analysis.

  11. Application of Carbon Nanotubes as Working Electrodes for Cyclic Voltammetry & Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Joseph; Cabral, Murilo; Carrilho, Emanuel; Garcia, Carlos; Ayon, Arturo

    2010-10-01

    Research conducted focuses on applications of Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) serving as working electrodes for cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy. Expectations of increased electrochemical properties of the working electrodes were confirmed and the analysis of CNTs electrical properties was obtained. Conditions for the MWCNTs are as follows: after acidic functionalization, MWCNTs bonded with N-hydroxysuccinimide, and MWCNTs bonded with the AChE protein. Iron cyanide was chosen as the optimal analyte solution. Concentration of MWCNTs on the working electrode was also investigated. With CV an increase in capacitance, sensitivity, and sensibility was noticed. When compared to the unmodified graphite carbon electrode the modified electrode yielded lower resistivity, and higher capacitance. When compared to NHS and the AChE protein, the functionalized CNTs yielded a higher capacitance, increased sensitivity and sensibility with decrease in surface roughness. Through FTIR analysis the presence of increased carboxyl groups, enzymes, and N-hydroxysuccinimide on the walls of the MWCNTs was confirmed. In conclusion the addition of MWCNTs improved the electrodes sensitivity and sensibility for CV.

  12. Evaluation of PEMFC System Contaminants on the Performance of Pt Catalyst via Cyclic Voltammetry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Macomber, C.; Dinh, H. N.

    2012-07-01

    Using electrochemical cyclic voltammetry as a quick ex-situ screening tool, the impact of the extracted solution and the individual leachable constituents from prospective BOP component materials on the performance and recoverability of the platinum catalyst were evaluated. Taking an extract from Zytel{trademark} HTN51G35HSLR (PPA) as an example, the major leachable organic components are caprolactam and 1,6 hexanediol. While these organic compounds by themselves do poison the Pt catalyst to some extent, such influence is mostly recoverable by means of potential holding and potential cycling. The extracted solution, however, shows a more drastic poisoning effect and it was not recoverable. Therefore the non-recoverable poisoning effect observed for the extracted solution is not from the two organic species studied. This demonstrates the complexity of such a contaminant study. Inorganic compounds that are known poisons like sulfur even in very low concentrations, may have a more dominant effect on the Pt catalyst and the recoverability.

  13. Diamond microelectrodes and CMOS microelectronics for wireless transmission of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Roham, Masoud; Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B; Chiel, Hillel J; Mohseni, Pedram

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on technology development at the sensor and circuit levels for wireless transmission of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) in neurochemical detection. Heavily conductive, boron-doped diamond is selectively deposited onto the polished tip of a tungsten microelectrode to fabricate versatile, implantable, micro-needle microprobes capable of neurochemical sensing in the brain. In addition, an integrated circuit is fabricated in a 0.5-microm CMOS technology for processing and wireless transmission of the electrochemical signals corresponding to extracellular concentration changes of various neurotransmitters. The chip consists of a current-based, second-order, front-end SigmaDelta ADC and an on-chip, RF-FSK transmitter at the back-end. The ADC core and the transmitter consume 22microA and 400microA, respectively, from a 2.6-V power supply. Major electroactive neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine in micromolar concentration have been wirelessly recorded at 433MHz using 300-V/s FSCV in flow injection analysis experiments.

  14. Investigations of drug-DNA interactions using molecular docking, cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perveen, Fouzia; Qureshi, Rumana; Ansari, Farzana Latif; Kalsoom, Saima; Ahmed, Safeer

    2011-10-01

    Molecular docking and QSAR studies were carried out for the investigation of interactions between 11 antitumor drugs and double stranded DNA. Quantitative structure activity relationship was established using MOE software package showing good correlation of binding strength with various physicochemical parameters e.g., hydrophobic surface area ( Vsurf), EHOMO, EHUMO, partition coefficient (log P) and molar refractivity ( M R) of the drugs . The most important parameter obtained from the docking studies was the formation constant ( K f) which is an indicative of the binding strength of the drug with DNA. This parameter was also calculated using the experimental techniques namely cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Variation in electrochemical characteristics (shift in peak potential and peak current decrease) and spectral profile of these drugs on the addition of DNA were used to determine the values of formation constant. The docking studies were used to predict the mode of interaction of the drug with DNA. It was observed that as far as binding strength was concerned the computational results complemented the experimental results. The order of magnitude of experimental and theoretical K f was same. The high value of K f implied that the respective drugs bind to DNA most efficiently.

  15. Fast-scan Cyclic Voltammetry for the Characterization of Rapid Adenosine Release

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Michael D.; Venton, B. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a signaling molecule and downstream product of ATP that acts as a neuromodulator. Adenosine regulates physiological processes, such as neurotransmission and blood flow, on a time scale of minutes to hours. Recent developments in electrochemical techniques, including fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), have allowed direct detection of adenosine with sub-second temporal resolution. FSCV studies have revealed a novel mode of rapid signaling that lasts only a few seconds. This rapid release of adenosine can be evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulations or it can be observed spontaneously without stimulation. Adenosine signaling on this time scale is activity dependent; however, the mode of release is not fully understood. Rapid adenosine release modulates oxygen levels and evoked dopamine release, indicating that adenosine may have a rapid modulatory role. In this review, we outline how FSCV can be used to detect adenosine release, compare FSCV with other techniques used to measure adenosine, and present an overview of adenosine signaling that has been characterized using FSCV. These studies point to a rapid mode of adenosine modulation, whose mechanism and function will continue to be characterized in the future. PMID:26900429

  16. Anodic passivation of tin by alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers examined by cyclic voltammetry and coulometry.

    PubMed

    Worley, Barrett C; Ricks, William A; Prendergast, Michael P; Gregory, Brian W; Collins, Ross; Cassimus, John J; Thompson, Raymond G

    2013-10-22

    The self-assembly of medium chain length alkanethiol monolayers on polycrystalline Sn electrodes has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and coulometry. These studies have been performed in order to ascertain the conditions under which their oxidative deposition can be achieved directly on the oxide-free Sn surface, and the extent to which these electrochemically prepared self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) act as barriers to surface oxide growth. This work has shown that the potentials for their oxidative deposition are more cathodic (by 100-200 mV) than those for Sn surface oxidation and that the passivating abilities of these SAMs improve with increasing film thickness (or chain length). Oxidative desorption potentials for these films have been observed to shift more positively, and in a highly linear fashion, with increasing film thickness (~75 mV/CH2). Although reductive desorption potentials for the SAMs are in close proximity to those for reduction of the surface oxide (SnOx), little or no SnOx formation occurs unless the potential is made sufficiently anodic that the monolayers start to be removed oxidatively. Our coulometric data indicate that the charge involved with alkanethiol reductive desorption or oxidative deposition is consistent with the formation of a close-packed monolayer, given uncertainties attributable to surface roughness and heterogeneity phenomena. These experiments also reveal that the quantity of charge passed during oxidative desorption is significantly larger than what would be predicted for simple alkylsulfinate or alkylsulfonate formation, suggesting that oxidative removal involves a more complex oxidation mechanism. Analogous chronocoulometric experiments for short-chain alkanethiols on polycrystalline Au electrodes have evidenced similar oxidative charge densities. This implies that the mechanism for oxidative desorption on both surfaces may be very similar, despite the significant differences in the inherent dissolution

  17. Detection and classification of gaseous sulfur compounds by solid electrolyte cyclic voltammetry of cermet sensor array.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Kirsten E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L; Hammond, Mark H; Tillett, Duane; Streckert, Holger H

    2007-02-12

    Electrochemical sensors composed of a ceramic-metallic (cermet) solid electrolyte are used for the detection of gaseous sulfur compounds SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2) in a study involving 11 toxic industrial chemical (TIC) compounds. The study examines a sensor array containing four cermet sensors varying in electrode-electrolyte composition, designed to offer selectivity for multiple compounds. The sensors are driven by cyclic voltammetry to produce a current-voltage profile for each analyte. Raw voltammograms are processed by background subtraction of clean air, and the four sensor signals are concatenated to form one vector of points. The high-resolution signal is compressed by wavelet transformation and a probabilistic neural network is used for classification. In this study, training data from one sensor array was used to formulate models which were validated with data from a second sensor array. Of the 11 gases studied, 3 that contained sulfur produced the strongest responses and were successfully analyzed when the remaining compounds were treated as interferents. Analytes were measured from 10 to 200% of their threshold-limited value (TLV) according to the 8-h time weighted average (TWA) exposure limits defined by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). True positive classification rates of 93.3, 96.7, and 76.7% for SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2), respectively, were achieved for prediction of one sensor unit when a second sensor was used for modeling. True positive rates of 83.3, 90.0, and 90.0% for SO(2), H(2)S, and CS(2), respectively, were achieved for the second sensor unit when the first sensor unit was used for modeling. Most of the misclassifications were for low concentration levels (such 10-25% TLV) in which case the compound was classified as clean air. Between the two sensors, the false positive rates were 2.2% or lower for the three sulfur compounds, 0.9% or lower for the interferents (eight remaining analytes), and 5.8% or lower for

  18. Functioning of antimony film electrode in acid media under cyclic and anodic stripping voltammetry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sebez, Bine; Ogorevc, Bozidar; Hocevar, Samo B; Veber, Marjan

    2013-06-27

    New insights into the functioning, i.e. electrochemical behaviour and analytical performance, of in situ prepared antimony film electrodes (SbFEs) under square-wave anodic stripping (SW-ASV) and cyclic (CV) voltammetry conditions are presented by studying several key operational parameters using Pb(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) as model analyte ions. Five different carbon- and metal-based substrate transducer electrodes revealed a clear advantage of the former ones while the concentration of the precursor Sb(III) ion exhibited a distinct influence on the ASV functioning of the SbFE. Among six acids examined as potential supporting electrolytes the HNO3 was demonstrated to yield nearly identical results in conducting ASV experiments with SbFE as so far almost exclusively used HCl. This is extremely important as HNO3 is commonly employed acidifying agent in trace metal analysis, especially in elemental mass spectrometry measurements. By carrying out a systematic CV and ASV investigation using a medium exchange protocol, we confirmed the formation of poorly soluble oxidized Sb species at the substrate electrode surface at the end of each stripping step, i.e. at the potentials beyond the anodic dissolution of the antimony film. Hence, the significance of the cleaning and initializing the surface of a substrate electrode after accomplishing a stripping step was thoroughly studied in order to find conditions for a complete removal of the adhered Sb-oxides and thus to assure a memory-free functioning of the in situ prepared SbFE. Finally, the practical analytical application of the proposed ASV method was successfully tested and evaluated by measuring the three metal analytes in ground (tap) and surface (river) water samples acidified with HNO3. Our results approved the appropriateness of the SbFE and the proposed method for measuring low μg L(-1) levels of some toxic metals, particularly taking into account the possibility of on-field testing and the use of low cost

  19. Instrumentation for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry combined with electrophysiology for behavioral experiments in freely moving animals

    PubMed Central

    Takmakov, Pavel; McKinney, Collin J.; Carelli, Regina M.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a unique technique for sampling dopamine concentration in the brain of rodents in vivo in real time. The combination of in vivo voltammetry with single-unit electrophysiological recording from the same microelectrode has proved to be useful in studying the relationship between animal behavior, dopamine release and unit activity. The instrumentation for these experiments described here has two unique features. First, a 2-electrode arrangement implemented for voltammetric measurements with the grounded reference electrode allows compatibility with electrophysiological measurements, iontophoresis, and multielectrode measurements. Second, we use miniaturized electronic components in the design of a small headstage that can be fixed on the rat's head and used in freely moving animals. PMID:21806203

  20. Comparison of the stem-loop and linear probe-based electrochemical DNA sensors by alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiwei; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2011-12-01

    Here we systematically characterized the sensor performance of the stem-loop probe (SLP) and linear probe (LP) electrochemical DNA sensors using alternating current voltammetry (ACV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), with the goal of generating the set of operational criteria that best suits each sensor architecture, in addition to elucidating the signaling mechanism behind these sensors. Although the LP sensor shows slightly better % signal suppression (SS) upon hybridization with the perfect match target at 10 Hz, our frequency-dependent study suggests that it shows optimal % SS only in a very limited AC frequency range. Similar results are observed in CV studies in which the LP sensor, when compared to the SLP sensor, displays a narrower range of voltammetric scan rates where the optimal % SS can be achieved. More importantly, the difference between the two sensors' performance is particularly pronounced if the change in integrated charge (Q) upon target hybridization, rather than the peak current (I), is measured in CV. The temperature-dependent study further highlights the differences between the two sensors, where the LP sensor, owing to the flexible linear probe architecture, is more readily perturbed by temperature changes. Both SLP and LP sensors, however, show a loss of % SS when operated at elevated temperatures, despite the significant improvement in the hybridization kinetics. In conjunction with the ACV, CV, and temperature-dependent studies, the electron-transfer kinetics study provides further evidence in support of the proposed signaling mechanism of these two sensors, in which the SLP sensor's signaling efficiency and sensor performance is directly linked to the hybridization-induced conformational change in the redox-labeled probe, whereas the performance of the LP sensor relies on the hybridization-induced change in probe dynamics.

  1. Development and Characterization of Carbon-Fiber Microbiosensors for Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Morales, Leyda Zoraida

    Electrochemistry has been shown to be a robust tool in neuroscience. The use of carbon-fiber microelectrodes coupled with background-subtracted fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offers high sensitivity, selectivity, as well as the spatial and temporal resolution necessary for monitoring rapid fluctuations of electroactive molecules in live brain tissue. Dopamine (DA) is a neurotransmitter playing a key role in the regulation of reward and motivated behavior. FSCV has been used to understand DA dynamics and how these underlie discrete aspects of brain function. The methodological aspects of real-time DA detection at carbon-fiber microelectrodes using FSCV in anesthetized and awake animals are presented. Furthermore, the combination of FSCV with other neuroanalytical techniques is also explained. The advantages of FSCV and carbon-fiber microelectrodes can be expanded to the detection of non-electroactive analytes. This broadens the scope of FSCV such that it can be used to investigate how changes in non-electroactive chemicals underlie disease, cognition, and behavior. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes can be modified with an enzyme to monitor non-electroactive molecules, generating an electroactive product (usually hydrogen peroxide, H2O2). The first voltammetric detection of H2O 2 at bare carbon-fiber microelectrodes using FSCV has recently been reported. Thus, an avenue exists to utilize FSCV at enzyme-modified microelectrodes to voltammetrically identify and quantify non-electroactive analytes in real-time. Such an approach will overcome many limitations associated with the traditional amperometric detection scheme, which lacks electrochemical selectivity. Electrodeposition of the biopolymer chitosan with glucose oxidase (GOx) at the carbon surface yields a stable, sensitive, and selective glucose microbiosensor that has been utilized to detect glucose fluctuations in vivo with unprecedented speed. This new method has revealed the first rapid glucose fluctuations in

  2. Development and Characterization of Carbon-Fiber Microbiosensors for Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Morales, Leyda Zoraida

    Electrochemistry has been shown to be a robust tool in neuroscience. The use of carbon-fiber microelectrodes coupled with background-subtracted fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offers high sensitivity, selectivity, as well as the spatial and temporal resolution necessary for monitoring rapid fluctuations of electroactive molecules in live brain tissue. Dopamine (DA) is a neurotransmitter playing a key role in the regulation of reward and motivated behavior. FSCV has been used to understand DA dynamics and how these underlie discrete aspects of brain function. The methodological aspects of real-time DA detection at carbon-fiber microelectrodes using FSCV in anesthetized and awake animals are presented. Furthermore, the combination of FSCV with other neuroanalytical techniques is also explained. The advantages of FSCV and carbon-fiber microelectrodes can be expanded to the detection of non-electroactive analytes. This broadens the scope of FSCV such that it can be used to investigate how changes in non-electroactive chemicals underlie disease, cognition, and behavior. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes can be modified with an enzyme to monitor non-electroactive molecules, generating an electroactive product (usually hydrogen peroxide, H2O2). The first voltammetric detection of H2O 2 at bare carbon-fiber microelectrodes using FSCV has recently been reported. Thus, an avenue exists to utilize FSCV at enzyme-modified microelectrodes to voltammetrically identify and quantify non-electroactive analytes in real-time. Such an approach will overcome many limitations associated with the traditional amperometric detection scheme, which lacks electrochemical selectivity. Electrodeposition of the biopolymer chitosan with glucose oxidase (GOx) at the carbon surface yields a stable, sensitive, and selective glucose microbiosensor that has been utilized to detect glucose fluctuations in vivo with unprecedented speed. This new method has revealed the first rapid glucose fluctuations in

  3. Diagnostic Criteria for the Characterization of Electrode Reactions with Chemically Coupled Reactions Preceding the Electron Transfer by Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Helfrick, John C; Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2016-08-18

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of electrode reactions with chemical reactions preceding the electron transfer is presented. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure reaction kinetics. PMID:27443581

  4. LBM for cyclic voltammetry of electrochemically mediated enzyme reactions and Rayleigh-Bénard convection in electrochemical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya-Ventura, G. A.; Rodríguez-Romo, S.

    2012-02-01

    A few of the applications of the Lattice Boltzmann Method have been used to model the complex bioelectrochemical phenomena presented here; cyclic voltammetry of electrically assisted enzyme reactions for one instance, and complex chemical reactions with simultaneous momentum, heat and mass transfer as another example. In the first case, we reproduce experimental data and predict new results (not feasible of being obtained by other numerical methods); the evolution of the diffusion boundary layer, which is important information from the numerical viewpoint to design reactors. As second, our model of non isothermal electrochemical enzyme reactor with a complex chemical-thermohydrodynamics involves an enzyme reaction taking place over two parallel rectangular enzyme immobilized electrodes, within a Rayleigh-Bénard convection system, a multifaceted subject not yet studied simultaneously. Realistic velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles as well as the corresponding Faradaic currents for different geometries and heating settings are provided, showing the goodness of our approach.

  5. Real-time processing of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) data using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

    PubMed

    Bozorgzadeh, Bardia; Covey, Daniel P; Heidenreich, Byron A; Garris, Paul A; Mohseni, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the hardware implementation of a digital signal processing (DSP) unit for real-time processing of data obtained by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM), an electrochemical transduction technique for high-resolution monitoring of brain neurochemistry. Implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), the DSP unit comprises a decimation filter and an embedded processor to process the oversampled FSCV data and obtain in real time a temporal profile of concentration variation along with a chemical signature to identify the target neurotransmitter. Interfaced with an integrated, FSCV-sensing front-end, the DSP unit can successfully process FSCV data obtained by bolus injection of dopamine in a flow cell as well as electrically evoked, transient dopamine release in the dorsal striatum of an anesthetized rat. PMID:25570384

  6. Real-time processing of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) data using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

    PubMed

    Bozorgzadeh, Bardia; Covey, Daniel P; Heidenreich, Byron A; Garris, Paul A; Mohseni, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the hardware implementation of a digital signal processing (DSP) unit for real-time processing of data obtained by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM), an electrochemical transduction technique for high-resolution monitoring of brain neurochemistry. Implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), the DSP unit comprises a decimation filter and an embedded processor to process the oversampled FSCV data and obtain in real time a temporal profile of concentration variation along with a chemical signature to identify the target neurotransmitter. Interfaced with an integrated, FSCV-sensing front-end, the DSP unit can successfully process FSCV data obtained by bolus injection of dopamine in a flow cell as well as electrically evoked, transient dopamine release in the dorsal striatum of an anesthetized rat.

  7. Cyclic voltammetry on sputter-deposited films of electrochromic Ni oxide: Power-law decay of the charge density exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Rui-Tao Granqvist, Claes G.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2014-10-20

    Ni-oxide-based thin films were produced by reactive direct-current magnetron sputtering and were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Intercalation of Li{sup +} ions was accomplished by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in an electrolyte of LiClO{sub 4} in propylene carbonate, and electrochromism was documented by spectrophotometry. The charge density exchange, and hence the optical modulation span, decayed gradually upon repeated cycling. This phenomenon was accurately described by an empirical power law, which was valid for at least 10{sup 4} cycles when the applied voltage was limited to 4.1 V vs Li/Li{sup +}. Our results allow lifetime assessments for one of the essential components in an electrochromic device such as a “smart window” for energy-efficient buildings.

  8. Cyclic voltammetry on sputter-deposited films of electrochromic Ni oxide: Power-law decay of the charge density exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Granqvist, Claes G.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2014-10-01

    Ni-oxide-based thin films were produced by reactive direct-current magnetron sputtering and were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Intercalation of Li+ ions was accomplished by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in an electrolyte of LiClO4 in propylene carbonate, and electrochromism was documented by spectrophotometry. The charge density exchange, and hence the optical modulation span, decayed gradually upon repeated cycling. This phenomenon was accurately described by an empirical power law, which was valid for at least 104 cycles when the applied voltage was limited to 4.1 V vs Li/Li+. Our results allow lifetime assessments for one of the essential components in an electrochromic device such as a "smart window" for energy-efficient buildings.

  9. Characterization of Local pH Changes in Brain Using Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry with Carbon Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Takmakov, Pavel; Zachek, Matthew K.; Keithley, Richard B.; Bucher, Elizabeth; McCarty, Gregory S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Transient local pH changes in the brain are important markers of neural activity that can be used to follow metabolic processes that underlie the biological basis of behavior, learning and memory. There are few methods that can measure pH fluctuations with sufficient time resolution in freely moving animals. Previously, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used for the measurement of such pH transients. However, the origin of the potential dependent current in the cyclic voltammograms for pH changes recorded in vivo was unclear. The current work explored the nature of these peaks and established the origin for some of them. A peak relating to the capacitive nature of the pH CV was identified. Adsorption of electrochemically inert species, such as aromatic amines and calcium could suppress this peak, and is the origin for inconsistencies regarding in vivo and in vitro data. Also, we identified an extra peak in the in vivo pH CV relating to the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyacetic acid (DOPAC) in the brain extracellular fluid. To evaluate the in vivo performance of the carbon-fiber sensor, carbon dioxide inhalation by an anesthetized rat was used to induce brain acidosis induced by hypercapnia. Hypercapnia is demonstrated to be a useful tool to induce robust in vivo pH changes, allowing confirmation of the pH signal observed with FSCV. PMID:21047096

  10. Analytical solutions of the planar cyclic voltammetry process for two soluble species with equal diffusivities and fast electron transfer using the method of eigenfunction expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Samin, Adib; Lahti, Erik; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2015-08-15

    Cyclic voltammetry is a powerful tool that is used for characterizing electrochemical processes. Models of cyclic voltammetry take into account the mass transport of species and the kinetics at the electrode surface. Analytical solutions of these models are not well-known due to the complexity of the boundary conditions. In this study we present closed form analytical solutions of the planar voltammetry model for two soluble species with fast electron transfer and equal diffusivities using the eigenfunction expansion method. Our solution methodology does not incorporate Laplace transforms and yields good agreement with the numerical solution. This solution method can be extended to cases that are more general and may be useful for benchmarking purposes.

  11. Electrochemical behaviour of iron in a third-generation ionic liquid: cyclic voltammetry and micromachining investigations.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Essam M; Mann, Olivier; Fürbeth, Wolfram; Schuster, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of Fe in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim](+)Ntf2(-)) and mixtures with Cl(-) is studied with the aim of investigating the applicability of ionic liquids (IL) for the electrochemical machining of iron. Whereas in pure IL iron could not be significantly dissolved, the addition of Cl(-) enables the active dissolution with anodic current densities up to several mA cm(-2). Although several anodic peaks appear in the cyclic voltammograms (CV), the distinct assignment of those electrochemical processes remain difficult. In particular no proof for the formation of FeCl(x) (2-x) complexes during Fe dissolution are deduced from the CV, although such complexes are shown to be stable in the employed electrolyte. In addition, we present electrochemical drilling experiments with short potential pulses, which demonstrate that electrochemical machining of Fe is, in principle, possible in IL based electrolytes, even though hampered by slow machining speed.

  12. Electrochemical behaviour of iron in a third-generation ionic liquid: cyclic voltammetry and micromachining investigations.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Essam M; Mann, Olivier; Fürbeth, Wolfram; Schuster, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of Fe in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Emim](+)Ntf2(-)) and mixtures with Cl(-) is studied with the aim of investigating the applicability of ionic liquids (IL) for the electrochemical machining of iron. Whereas in pure IL iron could not be significantly dissolved, the addition of Cl(-) enables the active dissolution with anodic current densities up to several mA cm(-2). Although several anodic peaks appear in the cyclic voltammograms (CV), the distinct assignment of those electrochemical processes remain difficult. In particular no proof for the formation of FeCl(x) (2-x) complexes during Fe dissolution are deduced from the CV, although such complexes are shown to be stable in the employed electrolyte. In addition, we present electrochemical drilling experiments with short potential pulses, which demonstrate that electrochemical machining of Fe is, in principle, possible in IL based electrolytes, even though hampered by slow machining speed. PMID:19760696

  13. Real-time monitoring of electrically evoked catecholamine signals in the songbird striatum using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda R.; Garris, Paul A.; Casto, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a powerful technique for monitoring rapid changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels in the brain. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has been used extensively in mammalian models to characterize dopamine signals in both anesthetized and awake preparations, but has yet to be applied to a non-mammalian vertebrate. The goal of this study was to establish in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a songbird, the European starling, to facilitate real-time measurements of extracellular catecholamine levels in the avian striatum. In urethane-anesthetized starlings, changes in catecholamine levels were evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and measured at carbon-fiber microelectrodes positioned in the medial and lateral striata. Catecholamines were elicited by different stimulations, including trains related to phasic dopamine signaling in the rat, and were analyzed to quantify presynaptic mechanisms governing exocytotic release and neuronal uptake. Evoked extracellular catecholamine dynamics, maximal amplitude of the evoked catecholamine signal, and parameters for catecholamine release and uptake did not differ between striatal regions and were similar to those determined for dopamine in the rat dorsomedial striatum under similar conditions. Chemical identification of measured catecholamine by its voltammogram was consistent with the presence of both dopamine and norepinephrine in striatal tissue content. However, the high ratio of dopamine to norepinephrine in tissue content and the greater sensitivity of the carbon-fiber microelectrode to dopamine compared to norepinephrine favored the measurement of dopamine. Thus, converging evidence suggests that dopamine was the predominate analyte of the electrically evoked catecholamine signal measured in the striatum by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Overall, comparisons between the characteristics of these evoked signals suggested a similar presynaptic regulation of

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidative response evaluation by cyclic voltammetry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Castro, Cristiana C; Gunning, Caitriona; Oliveira, Carla M; Couto, José A; Teixeira, José A; Martins, Rui C; Ferreira, António C Silva

    2012-07-25

    This study is focused on the evaluation of the impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in the profile of compounds with antioxidant capacity in a synthetic wine during fermentation. A bioanalytical pipeline, which allows for biological systems fingerprinting and sample classification by combining electrochemical features with biochemical background, is proposed. To achieve this objective, alcoholic fermentations of a minimal medium supplemented with phenolic acids were evaluated daily during 11 days, for electrochemical profile, phenolic acids, and the volatile fermentation fraction, using cyclic voltametry, high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection, and headspace/solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (target and nontarget approaches), respectively. It was found that acetic acid, 2-phenylethanol, and isoamyl acetate are compounds with a significative contribution for samples metabolic variability, and the electrochemical features demonstrated redox-potential changes throughout the alcoholic fermentations, showing at the end a similar pattern to normal wines. Moreover, S. cerevisiae had the capacity of producing chlorogenic acid in the supplemented medium fermentation from simple precursors present in the minimal medium. PMID:22746983

  15. Impulse radio ultra wideband wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Ebrazeh, Ali; Bozorgzadeh, Bardia; Mohseni, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing impulse radio ultra wideband (IR-UWB) signaling technique for reliable, wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to address the problem of elevated data rates in high-channel-count neurochemical monitoring. Utilizing an FSCV-sensing chip fabricated in AMS 0.35μm 2P/4M CMOS, a 3-5-GHz, IR-UWB transceiver (TRX) chip fabricated in TSMC 90nm 1P/9M RF CMOS, and two off-chip, miniature, UWB antennae, wireless transfer of pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) data at 50Mbps over a distance of <;1m is first shown with bit-error rates (BER) <; 10(-3). Further, IR-UWB wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels prerecorded with FSCV at a CFM during flow injection analysis (FIA) is also demonstrated with transmitter (TX) power dissipation of only ~4.4μW from 1.2V, representing two orders of magnitude reduction in TX power consumption compared to that of a conventional frequency-shift-keyed (FSK) link operating at ~433MHz. PMID:26737929

  16. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data. PMID:27018734

  17. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy versus cyclic voltammetry for the electroanalytical sensing of capsaicin utilising screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Randviir, Edward P; Metters, Jonathan P; Stainton, John; Banks, Craig E

    2013-05-21

    Screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes (SPEs) are explored as electroanalytical sensing platforms for the detection of capsaicin in both synthetic capsaicin solutions and capsaicin extracted from chillies and chilli sauces utilising both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It is found that the technique which is most applicable to the electroanalytical detection of capsaicin depends upon the analyte concentration: for the case of low capsaicin concentrations, CV is a more appropriate method as capsaicin exhibits characteristic voltammetric waves of peak heights relevant to the capsaicin concentration; but for the case of high capsaicin concentrations where the voltammetric waves merge and migrate out of the potential window, EIS is shown to be a more appropriate technique, owing to the observed linear increases in R(ct) with increasing concentration. Furthermore, we explore different types of screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes, namely single- and multi- walled carbon nanotubes, finding that they are technique-specific: for the case of low capsaicin concentrations, single-walled carbon nanotube SPEs are preferable (SW-SPE); yet for the case of EIS at high capsaicin concentrations, multi-walled carbon nanotube SPEs (MW-SPE) are preferred, based upon analytical responses. The analytical performance of CV and EIS is applied to the sensing of capsaicin in grown chillies and chilli sauces and is critically compared to 'gold standard' HPLC analysis.

  18. Estimation of the composition of intermetallic compounds in LiCl-KCl molten salt by cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya L; Liu, Kui; Yuan, Li Y; Chai, Zhi F; Shi, Wei Q

    2016-08-15

    In this work, the compositions of Ce-Al, Er-Al and La-Bi intermetallic compounds were estimated by the cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique. At first, CV measurements were carried out at different reverse potentials to study the co-reduction processes of Ce-Al, Er-Al and La-Bi systems. The CV curves obtained were then re-plotted with the current as a function of time, and the coulomb number of each peak was calculated. By comparing the coulomb number of the related peaks, the compositions of the Ce-Al, Er-Al and La-Bi intermetallic compounds formed in the co-reduction process could be estimated. The results showed that Al11Ce3, Al3Ce, Al2Ce and AlCe could be formed by the co-reduction of Ce(iii) and Al(iii). For the co-reduction of Er(iii) and Al(iii), Al3Er2, Al2Er and AlEr were formed. In a La(iii) and Bi(iii) co-existing system in LiCl-KCl melts, LaBi2, LaBi and Li3Bi were the major products as a result of co-reduction.

  19. Wireless transmission of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at a carbon-fiber microelectrode: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Garris, Paul A; Ensman, Robert; Poehlman, John; Alexander, Andy; Langley, Paul E; Sandberg, Stefan G; Greco, Phillip G; Wightman, R Mark; Rebec, George V

    2004-12-30

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) provides exquisite temporal and spatial resolution for monitoring brain chemistry. The utility of this approach has recently been demonstrated by measuring sub-second dopamine changes associated with behavior. However, one drawback is the cable link between animal and recording equipment that restricts behavior and precludes monitoring in complex environments. As a first step towards developing new instrumentation to overcome this technical limitation, the goal of the present study was to establish proof of principle for the wireless transmission of FSCV at a CFM. Proof of principle was evaluated in terms of measurement stability, fidelity, and susceptibility to ambient electrical noise. Bluetooth digital telemetry provided bi-directional communication between remote and home-base units and stable, high-fidelity data transfer comparable to conventional, wired systems when tested using a dummy cell (i.e., a resistor and capacitor in series simulating electrical properties of a CFM), and dopamine measurements with flow injection analysis and in the anesthetized rat with electrical stimulation. The wireless system was also less susceptible to interference from ambient electrical noise. Taken together, the present findings establish proof of principle for the wireless transmission of FSCV at a CFM.

  20. Expanding neurochemical investigations with multi-modal recording: simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, iontophoresis, and patch clamp measurements.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, D C; McKinney, C J; Manis, P B; Wightman, R M

    2016-08-01

    Multi-modal recording describes the simultaneous collection of information across distinct domains. Compared to isolated measurements, such studies can more easily determine relationships between varieties of phenomena. This is useful for neurochemical investigations which examine cellular activity in response to changes in the local chemical environment. In this study, we demonstrate a method to perform simultaneous patch clamp measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using optically isolated instrumentation. A model circuit simulating concurrent measurements was used to predict the electrical interference between instruments. No significant impact was anticipated between methods, and predictions were largely confirmed experimentally. One exception was due to capacitive coupling of the FSCV potential waveform into the patch clamp amplifier. However, capacitive transients measured in whole-cell current clamp recordings were well below the level of biological signals, which allowed the activity of cells to be easily determined. Next, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) was examined in the presence of an FSCV electrode to determine how the exogenous potential impacted nearby cells. The activities of both resting and active MSNs were unaffected by the FSCV waveform. Additionally, application of an iontophoretic current, used to locally deliver drugs and other neurochemicals, did not affect neighboring cells. Finally, MSN activity was monitored during iontophoretic delivery of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Membrane depolarization and cell firing were observed concurrently with chemical changes around the cell resulting from delivery. In all, we show how combined electrophysiological and electrochemical measurements can relate information between domains and increase the power of neurochemical investigations.

  1. Expanding neurochemical investigations with multi-modal recording: simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, iontophoresis, and patch clamp measurements.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, D C; McKinney, C J; Manis, P B; Wightman, R M

    2016-08-01

    Multi-modal recording describes the simultaneous collection of information across distinct domains. Compared to isolated measurements, such studies can more easily determine relationships between varieties of phenomena. This is useful for neurochemical investigations which examine cellular activity in response to changes in the local chemical environment. In this study, we demonstrate a method to perform simultaneous patch clamp measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using optically isolated instrumentation. A model circuit simulating concurrent measurements was used to predict the electrical interference between instruments. No significant impact was anticipated between methods, and predictions were largely confirmed experimentally. One exception was due to capacitive coupling of the FSCV potential waveform into the patch clamp amplifier. However, capacitive transients measured in whole-cell current clamp recordings were well below the level of biological signals, which allowed the activity of cells to be easily determined. Next, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) was examined in the presence of an FSCV electrode to determine how the exogenous potential impacted nearby cells. The activities of both resting and active MSNs were unaffected by the FSCV waveform. Additionally, application of an iontophoretic current, used to locally deliver drugs and other neurochemicals, did not affect neighboring cells. Finally, MSN activity was monitored during iontophoretic delivery of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Membrane depolarization and cell firing were observed concurrently with chemical changes around the cell resulting from delivery. In all, we show how combined electrophysiological and electrochemical measurements can relate information between domains and increase the power of neurochemical investigations. PMID:27314130

  2. Determination of reduction potential of an engineered Cu(A) azurin by cyclic voltammetry and spectrochemical titrations.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hee Jung; Ang, Majorie; Lu, Yi

    2004-06-01

    The reduction potentials of an engineered CuA azurin in its native and thermally denatured states have been determined using cyclic voltammetry and spectrochemical titrations. Using a 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide modified gold electrode, the reduction potentials of native and thermally denatured CuA azurin are the same within the experimental error (422 +/- 5 and 425 +/- 5 mV vs. NHE, respectively, in 50 mM ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5.1, 300 mM NaCl, 25 degrees C), indicating that the potential is that of a nonnative state. In contrast, using a didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) film-pyrolytic graphite edge (PGE) electrode, the reduction potentials of native and thermally denatured CuA azurin have been determined to be 271 +/- 7 mV (50 mM ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5.1, 4 degrees C) and 420 +/- 1 mV (50 mM ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5.1, 25 degrees C), respectively. Spectroscopic redox titration using [Ru(NH3)5Py]2+ resulted in a reduction potential (254+/-4 mV) (50 mM ammonium acetate buffer, pH 5.1, 4 degrees C) similar to the value obtained using the DDAB film-PGE electrochemical method. Complete reoxidation of [Ru(NH3)5Py]2+-reduced CuA azurin is also consistent with the conclusion that this spectrochemical titration method using [Ru(NH3)5Py]2+ measures the reduction potential of native CuA azurin.

  3. WINCS-BASED WIRELESS ELECTROCHEMICAL MONITORING OF SEROTONIN (5-HT) USING FAST-SCAN CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY: PROOF OF PRINCIPLE

    PubMed Central

    Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Chang, Su-Youne; Tye, Susannah J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Object We previously reported the development of a Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for measuring dopamine and suggested that this technology may be useful for evaluating deep brain stimulation (DBS)-related neuromodulatory effects on neurotransmitter systems. WINCS supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially resolved neurotransmitter measurements. The FSCV parameters used to establish WINCS dopamine measurements are not suitable for serotonin, a neurotransmitter implicated in depression, because they lead to CFM fouling and a loss of sensitivity. Here, we incorporate into WINCS a previously described N-shaped waveform applied at a high scan rate to establish wireless serotonin monitoring. Methods FSCV optimized for the detection of serotonin consisted of an N-shaped waveform scanned linearly from a resting potential of, in V, +0.2 to +1.0, then to −0.1 and back to +0.2 at a rate of 1000 V/s. Proof of principle tests included flow injection analysis and electrically evoked serotonin release in the dorsal raphe nucleus of rat brain slices. Results Flow cell injection analysis demonstrated that the N waveform applied at a scan rate of 1000 V/s significantly reduced serotonin fouling of the CFM, relative to that observed with FSCV parameters for dopamine. In brain slices, WINCS reliably detected sub-second serotonin release in the dorsal raphe nucleus evoked by local high-frequency stimulation. Conclusion WINCS supported high-fidelity wireless serotonin monitoring by FSCV at a CFM. In the future such measurements of serotonin in large animal models and in humans may help to establish the mechanism of DBS for psychiatric disease. PMID:20415521

  4. Simulations of Cyclic Voltammetry for Electric Double Layers in Asymmetric Electrolytes: A Generalized Modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hainan; Thiele, Alexander; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-11-15

    This paper presents a generalized modified Poisson–Nernst–Planck (MPNP) model derived from first principles based on excess chemical potential and Langmuir activity coefficient to simulate electric double-layer dynamics in asymmetric electrolytes. The model accounts simultaneously for (1) asymmetric electrolytes with (2) multiple ion species, (3) finite ion sizes, and (4) Stern and diffuse layers along with Ohmic potential drop in the electrode. It was used to simulate cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements for binary asymmetric electrolytes. The results demonstrated that the current density increased significantly with decreasing ion diameter and/or increasing valency |zi| of either ion species. By contrast, the ion diffusion coefficients affected the CV curves and capacitance only at large scan rates. Dimensional analysis was also performed, and 11 dimensionless numbers were identified to govern the CV measurements of the electric double layer in binary asymmetric electrolytes between two identical planar electrodes of finite thickness. A self-similar behavior was identified for the electric double-layer integral capacitance estimated from CV measurement simulations. Two regimes were identified by comparing the half cycle period τCV and the “RC time scale” τRC corresponding to the characteristic time of ions’ electrodiffusion. For τRC ← τCV, quasi-equilibrium conditions prevailed and the capacitance was diffusion-independent while for τRC → τCV, the capacitance was diffusion-limited. The effect of the electrode was captured by the dimensionless electrode electrical conductivity representing the ratio of characteristic times associated with charge transport in the electrolyte and that in the electrode. The model developed here will be useful for simulating and designing various practical electrochemical, colloidal, and biological systems for a wide range of applications.

  5. Measurement of the ground-state distributions in bistable mechanically interlocked molecules using slow scan rate cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Benítez, Diego; Basuray, Ashish N.; Fang, Lei; Sue, Chi-Hau; Barin, Gokhan; Dey, Sanjeev K.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    In donor–acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules that exhibit bistability, the relative populations of the translational isomers—present, for example, in a bistable [2]rotaxane, as well as in a couple of bistable [2]catenanes of the donor–acceptor vintage—can be elucidated by slow scan rate cyclic voltammetry. The practice of transitioning from a fast scan rate regime to a slow one permits the measurement of an intermediate redox couple that is a function of the equilibrium that exists between the two translational isomers in the case of all three mechanically interlocked molecules investigated. These intermediate redox potentials can be used to calculate the ground-state distribution constants, K. Whereas, (i) in the case of the bistable [2]rotaxane, composed of a dumbbell component containing π-electron-rich tetrathiafulvalene and dioxynaphthalene recognition sites for the ring component (namely, a tetracationic cyclophane, containing two π-electron-deficient bipyridinium units), a value for K of 10 ± 2 is calculated, (ii) in the case of the two bistable [2]catenanes—one containing a crown ether with tetrathiafulvalene and dioxynaphthalene recognition sites for the tetracationic cyclophane, and the other, tetrathiafulvalene and butadiyne recognition sites—the values for K are orders (one and three, respectively) of magnitude greater. This observation, which has also been probed by theoretical calculations, supports the hypothesis that the extra stability of one translational isomer over the other is because of the influence of the enforced side-on donor–acceptor interactions brought about by both π-electron-rich recognition sites being part of a macrocyclic polyether. PMID:22135467

  6. Cyclic voltammetry: a tool to quantify 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in aqueous samples from cork planks boiling industrial process.

    PubMed

    Peres, António M; Freitas, Patrícia; Dias, Luís G; Sousa, Mara E B C; Castro, Luís M; Veloso, Ana C A

    2013-12-15

    Chloroanisoles, namely 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, are pointed out as the primary responsible of the development of musty off-flavours in bottled wine, due to their migration from cork stoppers, which results in huge economical losses for wine industry. A prevention step is the detection of these compounds in cork planks before stoppers are produced. Mass spectrometry gas chromatography is the reference method used although it is far beyond economical possibilities of the majority of cork stoppers producers. In this work, a portable cyclic voltammetry approach was used to detect 2,4,6-trichloroanisole extracted from natural cork planks to the aqueous phase during the cork boiling industrial treatment process. Analyses were carried out under ambient conditions, in less than 15 min with a low use of solvent and without any sample pre-treatment. The proposed technique had detection (0.31±0.01 ng/L) and quantification (0.95±0.05 ng/L) limits lower than the human threshold detection level. For blank solutions, without 2,4,6-trichloroanisole addition, a concentration in the order of the quantification limit was estimated (1.0±0.2 ng/L), which confirms the satisfactory performance of the proposed methodology. For aqueous samples from the industrial cork planks boiling procedure, intra-day repeatabilities were lower than 3%, respectively. Also, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole contents in the aqueous samples determined by this novel approach were in good agreement with those obtained by GC-MS (correlation coefficient equal to 0.98), confirming the satisfactory accuracy of the proposed methodology. So, since this novel approach is a fast, low-cost, portable and user-friendly method, it can be an alternative and helpful tool for in-situ industrial applications, allowing accurate detection of releasable 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in an earlier phase of cork stoppers production, which may allow implementing more effective cork treatments to reduce or avoid future 2,4,6-trichloroanisole

  7. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Covey, Daniel P.; Blaha, Charles D.; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M.; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Garris, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Object Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. Methods The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between −0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 μm) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ~ 100 μm. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. Results The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer

  8. Effect of zinc and iron ions on the electrochemistry of nickel oxide electrode: Slow cyclic voltammetry. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krejci, I.; Vanysek, P.

    1993-04-07

    Porous sintered nickel oxide electrodes were prepared by cathodic electroprecipitation from metal nitrate solutions and characterized by slow (0.1 mV/s) voltammetry in 6 mol/l KOH. Presence of iron or zinc ions resulted in decrease of electrode charging ability and similar changes in voltammograms were observed for both ions. Removal of iron or zinc ions and introduction of lithium ions partially restored the electrode and corresponding voltammogram to original conditions. Presence of cobalt in the electrode material diminished substantially the influence of zinc ions on the electrode properties.... Storage batteries, Power sources, Membrane transport, Ion transport, Nafion.

  9. Enzyme-modified carbon-fiber microelectrode for the quantification of dynamic fluctuations of nonelectroactive analytes using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Morales, Leyda Z; Loziuk, Philip L; Corder, Amanda K; Toups, J Vincent; Roberts, James G; McCaffrey, Katherine A; Sombers, Leslie A

    2013-09-17

    Neurotransmission occurs on a millisecond time scale, but conventional methods for monitoring nonelectroactive neurochemicals are limited by slow sampling rates. Despite a significant global market, a sensor capable of measuring the dynamics of rapidly fluctuating, nonelectroactive molecules at a single recording site with high sensitivity, electrochemical selectivity, and a subsecond response time is still lacking. To address this need, we have enabled the real-time detection of dynamic glucose fluctuations in live brain tissue using background-subtracted, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. The novel microbiosensor consists of a simple carbon fiber surface modified with an electrodeposited chitosan hydrogel encapsulating glucose oxidase. The selectivity afforded by voltammetry enables quantitative and qualitative measurements of enzymatically generated H2O2 without the need for additional strategies to eliminate interfering agents. The microbiosensors possess a sensitivity and limit of detection for glucose of 19.4 ± 0.2 nA mM(-1) and 13.1 ± 0.7 μM, respectively. They are stable, even under deviations from physiological normoxic conditions, and show minimal interference from endogenous electroactive substances. Using this approach, we have quantitatively and selectively monitored pharmacologically evoked glucose fluctuations with unprecedented chemical and spatial resolution. Furthermore, this novel biosensing strategy is widely applicable to the immobilization of any H2O2 producing enzyme, enabling rapid monitoring of many nonelectroactive enzyme substrates.

  10. Finite-element simulations of the influence of pore wall adsorption on cyclic voltammetry of ion transfer across a liquid-liquid interface formed at a micropore.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jonathan S; Strutwolf, Jörg; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2012-02-21

    Adsorption onto the walls of micropores was explored by computational simulations involving cyclic voltammetry of ion transfer across an interface between aqueous and organic phases located at the micropore. Micro-interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (micro-ITIES) have been of particular research interest in recent years and show promise for biosensor and biomedical applications. The simulation model combines diffusion to and within the micropore, Butler-Volmer kinetics for ion transfer at the liquid-liquid interface, and Langmuir-style adsorption on the pore wall. Effects due to pore radius, adsorption and desorption rates, surface adsorption site density, and scan rates were examined. It was found that the magnitude of the reverse peak current decreased due to adsorption of the transferring ion on the pore wall; this decrease was more marked as the scan rate was increased. There was also a shift in the half-wave potential to lower values following adsorption, consistent with a wall adsorption process which provides a further driving force to transfer ions across the ITIES. Of particular interest was the disappearance of the reverse peak from the cyclic voltammogram at higher scan rates, compared to the increase in the reverse peak size in the absence of wall adsorption. This occurred for scan rates of 50 mV s(-1) and above and may be useful in biosensor applications using micropore-based ITIES.

  11. Observation of the cation radicals of pyrrole and of some substituted pyrroles in fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Standard potentials and lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrieux, C.P.; Audebert, P.; Hapiot, P.; Saveant, J. )

    1990-03-14

    Polypyrroles and polysubstituted pyrroles have attracted considerable and increasing attention over the past 10 years in view of their remarkable conducting and electrocatalytic properties. Oxidative electropolymerization of pyrrolic monomers is a convenient and attractive route to polypyrrole electrode coatings and free-standing films. Although valuable information has been gained about the nucleation processes following the initial generation of dimeric and polymeric species, the mechanism by which these dimers are formed has not been ascertained. Likewise, the standard potentials at which the cation radicals are formed as well as their lifetimes are not known. The reason for this lack of information concerning the reactivity of the electrochemically generated pyrrole cation radical is that the measurement times employed in the experimental studies carried out by potential-step and cyclic voltammetric techniques were too long to allow the observation of the cation radical by means of its rereduction current. In the present preliminary report, they show that it is possible to overcome these difficulties by use of recently developed ultramicroelectrode techniques and thus to observe the pyrrolic cation radicals through their rereduction wave in fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

  12. Probing the conformation and 2D-distribution of pyrene-terminated redox-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) chains end-adsorbed on HOPG using cyclic voltammetry and atomic force electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Taofifenua, Cécilia

    2014-03-14

    The present paper aims at illustrating how end-attachment of water-soluble flexible chains bearing a terminal functional group onto graphene-like surfaces has to be carefully tuned to ensure the proper positioning of the functional moiety with respect to the anchoring surface. The model experimental system considered here consists of a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, bearing an adsorbing pyrene foot and a ferrocene (Fc) redox functional head, self-assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Cyclic voltammetry is used to accurately measure the chain coverage and gain insights into the microenvironment experienced by the Fc heads. Molecule-touching atomic force electrochemical microscopy (Mt/AFM-SECM) is used to simultaneously probe the chain conformation and the position of the Fc heads within the layer, and also to map the 2D-distribution of the chains over the surface. This multiscale electrochemical approach allows us to show that whereas Fc-PEG-pyrene readily self-assembles to form extremely homogeneous layers, the strongly hydrophobic nature of graphite planes results in a complex coverage-dependent structure of the PEG layer due to the interaction of the ferrocene label with the HOPG surface. It is shown that, even though pyrene is known to adsorb particularly strongly onto HOPG, the more weakly adsorbing terminal ferrocene can also act as the chain anchoring moiety especially at low coverage. However we show that beyond a critical coverage value the Fc-PEG-pyrene chains adopt an ideal "foot-on" end-attached conformation allowing the Fc head to explore a volume away from the surface solely limited by the PEG chain elasticity.

  13. CZTS x Se1-x nanocrystals: Composition dependent method of preparation, morphological characterization and cyclic voltammetry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Yogesh A; Thakur, Pragati R; Haram, Santosh K

    2016-09-01

    In this article, synthesis procedures of preparation of copper zinc tin sulpho-selenide (CZTS x Se1-x ) alloy nanocrystals and the data acquired for the material characterization are presented. This data article is related to the research article doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.solmat.2016.06.030 (Jadhav et al., 2016) [1]. FTIR data have been presented which helped in confirmation of adsorption of oleylamine on CZTS x Se1-x . Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data have been presented which have been used to reveal the morphological details of the nanocrystals. The Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) based elemental mapping data has been presented to confirm the elemental composition of nanocrystals. Procedure for the preparation of CZTS x Se1-x based working electrode for the CV measurements have been given. The summary table for the optical, electrochemical band gaps, valance and conduction band edges as a function of composition are listed for the ready reference. PMID:27508267

  14. CZTS x Se1-x nanocrystals: Composition dependent method of preparation, morphological characterization and cyclic voltammetry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Yogesh A; Thakur, Pragati R; Haram, Santosh K

    2016-09-01

    In this article, synthesis procedures of preparation of copper zinc tin sulpho-selenide (CZTS x Se1-x ) alloy nanocrystals and the data acquired for the material characterization are presented. This data article is related to the research article doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.solmat.2016.06.030 (Jadhav et al., 2016) [1]. FTIR data have been presented which helped in confirmation of adsorption of oleylamine on CZTS x Se1-x . Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data have been presented which have been used to reveal the morphological details of the nanocrystals. The Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) based elemental mapping data has been presented to confirm the elemental composition of nanocrystals. Procedure for the preparation of CZTS x Se1-x based working electrode for the CV measurements have been given. The summary table for the optical, electrochemical band gaps, valance and conduction band edges as a function of composition are listed for the ready reference.

  15. Part I. Carbon and mercury-carbon optically transparent electrodes. Part II. Investigation of redox properties of technetium by cyclic voltammetry and thin layer spectroelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon optically transparent electrode (C OTE) has been prepared by vapor-deposithing a thin carbon film (150 to 310 A thick) on glass and quartz. Optical transparency is good throughout the ultraviolet-visible region. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical measurements were made with ferricyanide and o-tolidine respectively. The C OTE serves as a good substrate for deposition of a thin mercury film to form a mercury film transparent electrode (Hg-C OTE). The Hg-C OTE exhibits electrochemical properties of conventional mercury film electrodes as evidenced by Pb/sup 2 +/ cyclic voltammograms. The Hg-C OTE exhibits electrochemical properties of conventional mercury film electrodes as evidenced by Pb/sup 2 -/ cyclic VOHammograms. The Hg-C OTE enabled the spectrochemical characterization of cysteine oxidation, which was shown to involve the oxidation of mercury to form mercurous cysteinate. An 8080 based microcomputer has been interfaced with a Harrick oscillating mirror rapid scanning uv-visible spectrophotometer. Two different approaches are compared for controlling the galvanometer. The first utilizes the digital hardware on the Harrick processing module to derive the mirror drive waveform, while the second creates the waveform under direct software control. A potentiostat is also interfaced and the system is demonstrated by the spectroelectrochemical determination of the redox potential of o-tolidine. Redox potentials are also determined for a series of technetium complexes by the spectropotentiostatic technique. These include hexahalogens, ditertiary arsine, and 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino) ethane complexes of technetium. Transient hexavalent technetium is produced, detected, and characterized in aqueous alkaline media by pulse radiolysis and very fast scan cyclic voltammetry. The lifetime is of the order of milliseconds. This species is potentially useful in the preparation of technetium radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Integrated wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recording and electrical stimulation for reward-predictive learning in awake, freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Ting; Wickens, Jeffery R.; Huang, Yi-Ling; Pan, Wynn H. T.; Chen, Fu-Yu Beverly; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is commonly used to monitor phasic dopamine release, which is usually performed using tethered recording and for limited types of animal behavior. It is necessary to design a wireless dopamine sensing system for animal behavior experiments. Approach. This study integrates a wireless FSCV system for monitoring the dopamine signal in the ventral striatum with an electrical stimulator that induces biphasic current to excite dopaminergic neurons in awake freely moving rats. The measured dopamine signals are unidirectionally transmitted from the wireless FSCV module to the host unit. To reduce electrical artifacts, an optocoupler and a separate power are applied to isolate the FSCV system and electrical stimulator, which can be activated by an infrared controller. Main results. In the validation test, the wireless backpack system has similar performance in comparison with a conventional wired system and it does not significantly affect the locomotor activity of the rat. In the cocaine administration test, the maximum electrically elicited dopamine signals increased to around 230% of the initial value 20 min after the injection of 10 mg kg-1 cocaine. In a classical conditioning test, the dopamine signal in response to a cue increased to around 60 nM over 50 successive trials while the electrically evoked dopamine concentration decreased from about 90 to 50 nM in the maintenance phase. In contrast, the cue-evoked dopamine concentration progressively decreased and the electrically evoked dopamine was eliminated during the extinction phase. In the histological evaluation, there was little damage to brain tissue after five months chronic implantation of the stimulating electrode. Significance. We have developed an integrated wireless voltammetry system for measuring dopamine concentration and providing electrical stimulation. The developed wireless FSCV system is proven to be a useful experimental tool for the continuous

  17. Characterization of smart microwave window materials based on conducting polymer composites: coaxial line, waveguide, and cyclic voltammetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alan; Wright, Peter V.; Despotakis, Anthony; Lees, K.; Chambers, Barry

    1998-07-01

    Discs of polyaniline-silver-polymer electrolyte composites exhibit rapid and reversible changes in their microwave impedance when small electric fields are applied across then in a resonant coaxial line test set. The experimental data show that the initial conductivity of the materials is dependent on the concentration of silver metal and suggests that changes in resistance due to chemical switching take plane, at least in part, in the manufacture of the composites. The experimental data show that changes in the gradient of the cyclic voltammograms coincide with large changes in microwave reflectivity consistent with increasing conductivity of the composite when fields are applied. The reverse change occurs when the fields are removed. Measurements of the switching speed have shown that the composites are able to switch between the different states at in times of less than a second for more than one million switching operations with no depreciation of the material. Large area films have also been studied in the front of waveguide devices and measured in a microwave transmission mode. The results show that large changes in microwave impedance occur with the application of small electric fields (~ 15 V cm-1).

  18. An experimental comparison of the Marcus-Hush and Butler-Volmer descriptions of electrode kinetics applied to cyclic voltammetry. The one electron reductions of europium (III) and 2-methyl-2-nitropropane studied at a mercury microhemisphere electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstridge, Martin C.; Wang, Yijun; Limon-Petersen, Juan G.; Laborda, Eduardo; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-11-01

    We present a comparative experimental evaluation of the Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush models using cyclic voltammetry at a microelectrode. Numerical simulations are used to fit experimental voltammetry of the one electron reductions of europium (III) and 2-methyl-2-nitropropane, in water and acetonitrile, respectively, at a mercury microhemisphere electrode. For Eu (III) very accurate fits to experiment were obtained over a wide range of scan rates using Butler-Volmer kinetics, whereas the Marcus-Hush model was less accurate. The reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane was well simulated by both models, however Marcus-Hush required a reorganisation energy lower than expected.

  19. Quantitation of Hydrogen Peroxide Fluctuations and Their Modulation of Dopamine Dynamics in the Rat Dorsal Striatum Using Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) projection from the substantia nigra to the dorsal striatum become dysfunctional and slowly degenerate in Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts more than one million Americans. There is no specific known cause for idiopathic Parkinson’s disease; however, multiple lines of evidence implicate oxidative stress as an underlying factor in both the initiation and progression of the disease. This involves the enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), whose role in complex biological processes is not well understood. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at bare carbon-fiber microelectrodes, we have simultaneously monitored and quantified H2O2 and DA fluctuations in intact striatal tissue under basal conditions and in response to the initiation of oxidative stress. Furthermore, we have assessed the effect of acute increases in local H2O2 concentration on both electrically evoked DA release and basal DA levels. Increases in endogenous H2O2 in the dorsal striatum attenuated electrically evoked DA release, and also decreased basal DA levels in this brain region. These novel results will help to disambiguate the chemical mechanisms underlying the progression of neurodegenerative disease states, such as Parkinson’s disease, that involve oxidative stress. PMID:23556461

  20. Insight into the template effect of vesicles on the laccase-catalyzed oligomerization of N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine from Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Ležaić, Aleksandra Janoševic; Luginbühl, Sandra; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Pašti, Igor; Kissner, Reinhard; Rakvin, Boris; Walde, Peter; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    We report about the first Raman spectroscopy study of a vesicle-assisted enzyme-catalyzed oligomerization reaction. The aniline dimer N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (= p-aminodiphenylamine, PADPA) was oxidized and oligomerized with Trametes versicolor laccase and dissolved O2 in the presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) vesicles (80-100 nm diameter) as templates. The conversion of PADPA into oligomeric products, poly(PADPA), was monitored during the reaction by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained are compared with UV/vis/NIR and EPR measurements. All three complementary methods indicate that at least some of the poly(PADPA) products, formed in the presence of AOT vesicles, resemble the conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI-ES). The Raman measurements also show that structural units different from those of "ordinary" PANI-ES are present too. Without vesicles PANI-ES-like products are not obtained. For the first time, the as-prepared stable poly(PADPA)-AOT vesicle suspension was used directly to coat electrodes (without product isolation) for investigating redox activities of poly(PADPA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV showed that poly(PADPA) produced with vesicles is redox active not only at pH 1.1-as expected for PANI-ES-but also at pH 6.0, unlike PANI-ES and poly(PADPA) synthesized without vesicles. This extended pH range of the redox activity of poly(PADPA) is important for applications. PMID:27561552

  1. Insight into the template effect of vesicles on the laccase-catalyzed oligomerization of N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine from Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ležaić, Aleksandra Janoševic; Luginbühl, Sandra; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Pašti, Igor; Kissner, Reinhard; Rakvin, Boris; Walde, Peter; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2016-08-01

    We report about the first Raman spectroscopy study of a vesicle-assisted enzyme-catalyzed oligomerization reaction. The aniline dimer N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (= p-aminodiphenylamine, PADPA) was oxidized and oligomerized with Trametes versicolor laccase and dissolved O2 in the presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) vesicles (80–100 nm diameter) as templates. The conversion of PADPA into oligomeric products, poly(PADPA), was monitored during the reaction by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained are compared with UV/vis/NIR and EPR measurements. All three complementary methods indicate that at least some of the poly(PADPA) products, formed in the presence of AOT vesicles, resemble the conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI-ES). The Raman measurements also show that structural units different from those of “ordinary” PANI-ES are present too. Without vesicles PANI-ES-like products are not obtained. For the first time, the as-prepared stable poly(PADPA)-AOT vesicle suspension was used directly to coat electrodes (without product isolation) for investigating redox activities of poly(PADPA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV showed that poly(PADPA) produced with vesicles is redox active not only at pH 1.1–as expected for PANI-ES–but also at pH 6.0, unlike PANI-ES and poly(PADPA) synthesized without vesicles. This extended pH range of the redox activity of poly(PADPA) is important for applications.

  2. Insight into the template effect of vesicles on the laccase-catalyzed oligomerization of N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine from Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Ležaić, Aleksandra Janoševic; Luginbühl, Sandra; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Pašti, Igor; Kissner, Reinhard; Rakvin, Boris; Walde, Peter; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2016-08-26

    We report about the first Raman spectroscopy study of a vesicle-assisted enzyme-catalyzed oligomerization reaction. The aniline dimer N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (= p-aminodiphenylamine, PADPA) was oxidized and oligomerized with Trametes versicolor laccase and dissolved O2 in the presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) vesicles (80-100 nm diameter) as templates. The conversion of PADPA into oligomeric products, poly(PADPA), was monitored during the reaction by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained are compared with UV/vis/NIR and EPR measurements. All three complementary methods indicate that at least some of the poly(PADPA) products, formed in the presence of AOT vesicles, resemble the conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI-ES). The Raman measurements also show that structural units different from those of "ordinary" PANI-ES are present too. Without vesicles PANI-ES-like products are not obtained. For the first time, the as-prepared stable poly(PADPA)-AOT vesicle suspension was used directly to coat electrodes (without product isolation) for investigating redox activities of poly(PADPA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV showed that poly(PADPA) produced with vesicles is redox active not only at pH 1.1-as expected for PANI-ES-but also at pH 6.0, unlike PANI-ES and poly(PADPA) synthesized without vesicles. This extended pH range of the redox activity of poly(PADPA) is important for applications.

  3. Insight into the template effect of vesicles on the laccase-catalyzed oligomerization of N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine from Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ležaić, Aleksandra Janoševic; Luginbühl, Sandra; Bajuk-Bogdanović, Danica; Pašti, Igor; Kissner, Reinhard; Rakvin, Boris; Walde, Peter; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    We report about the first Raman spectroscopy study of a vesicle-assisted enzyme-catalyzed oligomerization reaction. The aniline dimer N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (= p-aminodiphenylamine, PADPA) was oxidized and oligomerized with Trametes versicolor laccase and dissolved O2 in the presence of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) vesicles (80–100 nm diameter) as templates. The conversion of PADPA into oligomeric products, poly(PADPA), was monitored during the reaction by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained are compared with UV/vis/NIR and EPR measurements. All three complementary methods indicate that at least some of the poly(PADPA) products, formed in the presence of AOT vesicles, resemble the conductive emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI-ES). The Raman measurements also show that structural units different from those of “ordinary” PANI-ES are present too. Without vesicles PANI-ES-like products are not obtained. For the first time, the as-prepared stable poly(PADPA)-AOT vesicle suspension was used directly to coat electrodes (without product isolation) for investigating redox activities of poly(PADPA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV showed that poly(PADPA) produced with vesicles is redox active not only at pH 1.1–as expected for PANI-ES–but also at pH 6.0, unlike PANI-ES and poly(PADPA) synthesized without vesicles. This extended pH range of the redox activity of poly(PADPA) is important for applications. PMID:27561552

  4. Determination of the relative contribution of quercetin and its glucosides to the antioxidant capacity of onion by cyclic voltammetry and spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Danuta; Wiczkowski, Wieslaw; Piskula, Mariusz Konrad

    2008-05-28

    This paper describes the use of cyclic voltammetry (CV), spectrophotometric methods [Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), peroxyl radical trapping capacity (PRTC), DPPH radical scavenging activity (RSA), and Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (FCR) reducing capacity], and photochemiluminescence (PCL) for the measurement of the antioxidant capacity of onion var. Sochaczewska and var. Szalotka. The antioxidant and reducing activity of the dominant onion flavonoids quercetin (Q), quercetin-3- O-beta-glucoside (Q3G), quercetin-4'- O-beta-glucoside (Q4'G), and quercetin-3,4'-di- O-beta-glucoside (Q3,4'G) were determined by spectrophotometric (TEAC and PRTC) and CV methods, respectively. The contribution of quercetin and its glucosides to the antioxidant capacity of onion was calculated in consequence of the qualitative and quantitative analysis of onion flavonoids by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-mass spectrometry. The dominant forms of quercetin in the onion var. Sochaczewska and Szalotka included Q4'G (61 and 54%), Q3,4'G (37 and 44%), Q3G (1.4 and 1.1%), and free quercetin (1.1 and 0.7%), respectively. The CV experiment showed the highest reducing activity of Q while Q3G, Q4'G, and Q3,4'G exhibited about 68, 51, and 30% of the reducing power noted for Q. The order of the reducing activity of onion flavonoids was confirmed by their free radical scavenging activity and evaluated by TEAC and PRTC assays as follows: Q > Q3G > Q4'G > Q3,4'G. The Q4'G and Q3,4'G showed poor antioxidant activity under both applied spectrophotometric assays but still exhibited reducing activity based on CV experiments. The reducing capacity of onions determined by CV method was twice higher than the antioxidant capacity formed by water-soluble compounds (ACW) evaluated by PCL, and it was about 50% higher than PRTC and DPPH RSA results and the converted FCR reducing capacity. In contrast, the reducing capacity of onions determined by the CV method was 3-fold and about four

  5. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  6. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  7. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  8. Spectroscopic techniques and cyclic voltammetry with synthesis: Manganese(II) coordination stability and its ligand field parameters effect on macrocyclic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Chandra, Sulekh

    2007-05-01

    Manganese(II) macrocyclic complexes are prepared with different macrocyclic ligands, containing cyclic skeleton bearing organic components which have different chromospheres like N, O and S donor atoms and stereochemistry. Thus, six macrocyclic ligands, were prepared and their capacity to retain the manganese(II) ion in solid as well as in aqueous solution was determined and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, 1H NMR, IR, electronic spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies. The electronic spectrum of this system showed a dependence that may be consistent with the formation of stable complexes and coordination behaviour of the ions. ESR spectra of all the complexes are recorded in solid as well as solution, which show the oxidation state of the manganese(II). Spin Hamiltonian manganese(II), which can be defined as the magnetic field vector (ℋ): ℋ=gβHS+DSz2-{35}/{12}+E[Sz2-Sy2]+ASI+ 1/6 a Sx4+Sy4+Sz4-{707}/{16}+ 1/180 F{35Sz2-475}/{2Sz2+3255/10} Significant distortion of the manganese(II) ion in observed geometry is evident from the angle subtended by the different membered chelate rings and the angles spanned by trans donor atoms octahedral geometry. Cyclic voltammetric studies indicate that complexes with all ligands undergoes one electron oxidation from manganese(II) to manganese(III) followed by a further oxidation to manganese(IV) at a significantly more positive potential.

  9. Estimation of key physical properties for LaCl3 in molten eutectic LiCl-KCl by fitting cyclic voltammetry data to a BET-based electrode reaction kinetics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, Adib; Wang, Zhonghang; Lahti, Erik; Simpson, Michael; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the electrochemical properties of rare earth elements is important for developing efficient techniques for separating rare earth elements from actinides recovered during the electrodeposition process. In this study the cyclic voltammetry for lanthanum in molten LiClKCl eutectic was recorded at 773 K for different scan rates and different bulk concentrations. A model accounting for mass transport, kinetics and adsorption was applied to analyze the experimental data via performing a nonlinear least squares fit. The results of the simulation are compared against the results of a conventional analysis of the cyclic voltammograms and against the existing literature. At the scan rates used, the reduction/oxidation process is quasi-reversible. The values of diffusivities derived from simulation were larger than the ones derived commonly using equations for diffusion-limited processes. However, those equations were derived based on an assumption of reversibility. This simulation-based approach may provide a more accurate option for analyzing systems that do not exhibit reversibility.

  10. Comparison of current reversal chronopotentiometry (CRC) and small amplitude cyclic voltammetry (SACV) method to determine the long-term corrosion tendency of copper-nickel alloys in polluted and unpolluted seawater under jet-impingement conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, M.R.; Alhajji, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    The cyclic current reversal chronopotentiometry (CRC) technique is utilized to determine the long-term corrosion tendency of UNS C70600 and UNS C71500 copper-nickel alloys in sulfide polluted and unpolluted seawater. The CRC results were compared with the corrosion tendency obtained by the modified linear polarization method small amplitude cyclic voltammetry (SACV) over a long exposure time and the results are in agreement for both C70600 and C71500 alloys. This contradicts the conclusions on the effects of sulfide on copper-nickel alloys by many previous investigators who misinterpreted the sharp active shift in potential as an indication of increase in corrosion rate. For an active/passive alloy such as C71500 a higher amplitude current per cycle is required (e.g., 100 {micro}A/20 seconds) in the CRC method and under jet-impingement conditions, while a lower amplitude current per cycle (e.g., 1{micro}A/20 seconds) is required for an alloy that does not exhibit active/passive behavior. The CRC technique was found to be unsuccessful in screening out the long-term corrosion tendency of copper alloys in polluted and unpolluted sea water and under stagnant or stirred conditions (i.e., non-jet-impingement conditions).

  11. Use of cyclic current reversal polarization voltammetry for investigating the relationship between corrosion resistance and heat-treatment induced variations in microstructures of 400 C martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Software for running a cyclic current reversal polarization voltammagram has been developed for use with a EG&G Princeton Applied Research Model 273 potentiostat/galvanostat system. The program, which controls the magnitude, direction and duration of an impressed galvanostatic current, will produce data in ASCII spreadsheets (Lotus, Quattro) for graphical representation of CCRPV voltammograms. The program was used to determine differences in corrosion resistance of 440 C martenstic stainless steel produced as a result of changes in microstructure effected by tempering. It was determined that tempering at all temperatures above 400 F resulted in increased polarizability of the material, with the increased likelihood that pitting would be initiated upon exposure to marine environments. These results will be used in development of remedial procedures for lowering the susceptibility of these alloys toward the stress corrosion cracking experienced in bearings used in high pressure oxygen turbopumps used in the main engines of space shuttle orbiters.

  12. Spectroscopic studies, cyclic voltammetry and synthesis of nickel(II) complexes with N 4, N 2O 2 and N 4S 2 donor macrocyclic ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-11-01

    Nickel(II) complexes of the general composition Ni(L)X 2 (where X = SCN, NO 3 and 1/2SO 4 and ligands = L 1 L 2 and L 3) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and electronic spectral studies. Nickel(II) ions, such as nitrates, thiocyantes and sulphates were found to act as templates for the cyclic condensations [1 + 1] and [2 + 2] of NH 2sbnd C 6H 4sbnd O sbnd CH 2sbnd CH 2sbnd O sbnd C 6H 4sbnd NH 2, NH 2sbnd (CH 2) 2sbnd NH 2 and NH 2sbnd CH(CH 3) sbnd CH 2sbnd NH 2 with C 6H 5sbnd CO sbnd CO sbnd C 6H 5, C 6H 5sbnd CO sbnd CH 2sbnd CO sbnd C 6H 5 and (COOH sbnd CH 2sbnd CH 2) 2S. All the complexes show magnetic moments corresponding to two unpaired electrons except [Ni(L 1)](NO 3) 2 and [Ni(L 2)](NO 3) 2 complexes which are diamagnetic. Electronic spectroscopy was used to analyse the differences between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic forms. Electrochemical properties have been studied extensively for Ni(III/II) and Ni(II/I) couples. The equilibrium between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic forms and the nickel(III/II) couple are strongly dependent on the electrolyte. It has been observed that the sulphate group coordinated selectively on the apical position of the nickel(II) centers of the compounds. The structural and electrochemical studies suggest that cooperative effects, involving coordination of sulphate to one nickel center, is responsible for the recognition of this anion. Various ligand field parameters have been calculated and discussed.

  13. AFM study of oxygen reduction products on HOPG in the LiPF6-DMSO electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Santiago E; Tesio, Alvaro Y; Clarenc, Romain; Calvo, Ernesto J

    2014-06-01

    Ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the morphology of oxygen reduction products in the LiPF6-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) electrolyte, i.e. Li2O2 on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Both cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry have shown that at low cathodic polarization the initial deposits decorate the edge steps of HOPG. At higher overpotentials a massive deposit covers the terraces. Upon charging the battery cathode Li2O2 oxidation and dissolution do not take place until high overpotentials are reached at which solvent decomposition has been demonstrated by in situ FTIR studies.

  14. Ionic, XRD, dielectric and cyclic voltammetry studies on PVdF-co-HFP / MMT clay intercalated LiN(C2F5SO2)2 based composite electrolyte for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickraman, P.; Purushothaman, K.; SankaraSubramanian, N.

    2014-04-01

    The composition dependence of plasticizer, (EC/DMC)(70-x(wt%)) and LiBETIx(wt%) salt for fixed contents on PVdF-co-HFP(25wt%)/surface modified(SM)-octadecylamine MMT(ODA-MMT) nanoclay(5wt%) host matrix by varying its compositions x=1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 wt% prepared via solution casting technique has been investigated by A.C. Impedance, Dielectric, XRD, and cyclic voltammetry(CV) studies. The enhanced conductivity 2.1×10-5 S/cm at 300C is observed for (EC/DMC)(70-6)wt%/LiBETI(x=6)wt%. The XRD at 2θ=20.9° confirms β-phase formation, and CV studies on membranes show cyclability and reversibility. The dielectric studies show increase in dielectric constant and dielectric loss with decrease in frequency is attributed to high contribution of charge accumulation at the electrode-electrolyte interface.

  15. New group 6 metal carbonyl complexes with 4,5-dimethyl-N,N-bis(pyridine-2-yl-methylene)benzene-1,2-diimine Schiff base: Synthesis, spectral, cyclic voltammetry and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Rania G.; Elantabli, Fatma M.; Helal, Nadia H.; El-Medani, Samir M.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal reaction of M(CO)6 (M = Cr, Mo or W) with a Schiff base (DMPA) derived from the condensation of 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylenediamine and pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde in THF in absence and presence of a secondary ligand; 2-aminobenzimidazole (Abz), thiourea (Tu) or 2-(2‧-pyridyl)benzimidazole (pybz) were studied. The reaction of Cr(CO)6 gave the four complexes Cr2(CO)2(DMPA)2; 1, Cr(DMPA)2(Abz)2; 2, Cr2(CO)4(DMPA)2(Tu)2; 3 and Cr(DMPA)2(Pybz); 4, while the thermal reaction of Mo(CO)6 resulted in the formation of the two complexes Mo2(O)6(DMPA)2; 5, and Mo2(O)2(CO)2(DMPA)2(Tu)2; 6. Thermal reaction of W(CO)6 and the Schiff base DMPA gave the complex W(O)2(DMPA)2; 7. The ligand DMPA and its metal complexes have been reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, magnetic measurements, and thermal analysis. Cyclic voltammetry and biological activity were also investigated.

  16. Reversible sequential transfer of two electrons at the same potential in bis(1,3,5-triketonato)dicopper(II) complexes and their diamine Schiff bases. Effect of Na/sup +/ and similar ions on the cyclic voltammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lintvedt, R.L.; Kramer, L.S.

    1983-03-02

    The cyclic voltammetry of four binuclear Cu(II) 1,3,5-triketonates and their diamine Schiff-base derivatives has been investigated in DMF with (C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/ as the supporting electrolyte. Addition of simple cations such as Na/sup +/ to these solutions has a profound effect on the reduction potentials of the Cu(II) ions and on the stability of the reduced product. In the presence of a sufficient concentration of Na/sup +/ ions, the complexes exhibit one CV wave due to the coppers with peak separations of 42-44 mV and cathodic half-peak widths of 42-44 mV also. These results may be obtaned with no instrumental iR compensation, providing a high concentration of the supporting electrolyte is present. The process is reversible with use of the criteria of scan rate dependence of the cathodic peak current and width and the equivalence of the cathodic and anodic peak heights. Controlled-potential electrolysis results prove that the process involves the transfer of two electrons. All of the experimental facts may be explained by the reversible, sequential transfer of two electrons at the same potential. Although the two Cu(II) ions in the diamine Schiff bases are in much different coordination environments within the same molecule, they give rise to the same CV wave shapes as the triketonates; i,e., ..delta..E/sub p/ and E/sub pc/ - E/sub p///sub 2/ both are very nearly 42 mV. Thus, they also undergo two-electron transfer at the same potential. The only significant difference between the simpler binuclear Cu(II) triketonates and the diamine Schiff-base derivatives is that E/sub 1///sub 2/ values for the Schiff bases are about 0.1V more negative than for their triketonate analogues.

  17. Surface area and pore size characteristics of nanoporous gold subjected to thermal, mechanical, or surface modification studied using gas adsorption isotherms, cyclic voltammetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yih Horng; Davis, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ganesh, N. Vijaya; Demchenko, Alexei V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms are used to investigate the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution of physically modified, thermally annealed, and octadecanethiol functionalized np-Au monoliths. We present the full adsorption-desorption isotherms for N2 gas on np-Au, and observe type IV isotherms and type H1 hysteresis loops. The evolution of the np-Au under various thermal annealing treatments was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both the exterior and interior of the thermally annealed np-Au show that the porosity of all free standing np-Au structures decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases. The modification of the np-Au surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of C18-SH (coverage of 2.94 × 1014 molecules cm−2 based from the decomposition of the C18-SH using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), was found to reduce the strength of the interaction of nitrogen gas with the np-Au surface, as reflected by a decrease in the ‘C’ parameter of the BET equation. From cyclic voltammetry studies, we found that the surface area of the np-Au monoliths annealed at elevated temperatures followed the same trend with annealing temperature as found in the BET surface area study and SEM morphology characterization. The study highlights the ability to control free-standing nanoporous gold monoliths with high surface area, and well-defined, tunable pore morphology. PMID:22822294

  18. Recent Advances in Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler–Volmer and Marcus–Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of ‘nano-impacts’. PMID:26246984

  19. Recent Advances in Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'. PMID:26246984

  20. Voltammetry under a Controlled Temperature Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Krejci, Jan; Sajdlova, Zuzana; Krejci, Jan; Marvanek, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical measurements are generally done under isothermal conditions. Here we report on the application of a controlled temperature gradient between the working electrode surface and the solution. Using electrochemical sensors prepared on ceramic materials with extremely high specific heat conductivity, the temperature gradient between the electrode and solution was applied here as a second driving force. This application of the Soret phenomenon increases the mass transfer in the Nernst layer and enables more accurate control of the electrode response enhancement by a combination of diffusion and thermal diffusion. We have thus studied the effect of Soret phenomenon by cyclic voltammetry measurements in ferro/ferricyanide. The time dependence of sensor response disappears when applying the Soret phenomenon, and the complicated shape of the cyclic voltammogram is replaced by a simple exponential curve. We have derived the Cotrell-Soret equation describing the steady-state response with an applied temperature difference. PMID:22163578

  1. In situ AFM study of interlayer spacing during anion intercalation into HOPG in aqueous electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Alliata, D.; Koetz, R.; Haas, O.; Siegenthaler, H.

    1999-11-23

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was studied as a model in aqueous electrolytes to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation into graphite. The local time-dependent dimensional changes of the host material occurring during the electrochemical intercalation processes were investigated on the nanometer scale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, was used as an in situ analytical tool during the intercalation of perchlorate and hydrogen sulfate ions into and their expulsion from the HOPG electrodes. For the first time, a reproducible, quantitative estimate of the interlayer spacing in HOPG with intercalated perchlorate and hydrogen sulfate ions could be obtained by in situ AFM measurements. The experimental values are in agreement with theoretical expectations, only for relatively low stacks of graphene layers. After formation of stage IV, HOPG expansion upon intercalation typically amounts to 32% when tens of layers are involved but to only 14% when thousands of layers are involved. Blister formation and more dramatic changes in morphology were observed, depending on the kind of electrolyte used, at higher levels of anion intercalation.

  2. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  3. Determination of secnidazole in urine by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Radi, A E; Hassanein, A

    2000-05-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used to explore the adsorption behavior of secnidazole on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The effects of various operational parameters on the accumulation behavior of the adsorbed species were tested. Thus, a sensitive stripping voltammetry procedure for the determination of secnidazole with an adsorptive accumulation on the surface of HMDE has been developed. Measurements were taken by differential-pulse voltammetry after determination of the optimum conditions. The linear concentration range was 1 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-7) s when using a 120 s preconcentration at -0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl in acetate buffer of pH 4.0. The detection limit of secnidazole was 5 x 10(-9) M. The precision, expressed by the coefficient of variation, was 2.5% (n = 10) at a concentration of 1 x 10(-7) m. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of secnidazole in urine. PMID:10823692

  4. Myoglobin immobilization on electrodeposited nanometer-scale nickel oxide particles and direct voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ahadi, Sara; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2008-04-01

    Prosperity of information on the reactions of redox-active sites in proteins can be attained by voltammetric studies in which the protein sample is located on a suitable surface. This work reports the presentation of myoglobin/nickel oxide nanoparticles/glassy carbon (Mb/NiO NPs/GC) electrode, ready by electrochemical deposition of the NiO NPs on glassy carbon electrode and myoglobin immobilization on their surfaces by the potential cycling method. Images of electrodeposited NiO NPs on the surface of glassy carbon electrode were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A pair of well-defined redox peaks for Mb(Fe(III)-Fe(II)) was obtained at the prepared electrode by direct electron transfer between the protein and nanoparticles. Electrochemical parameters of immobilized myoglobin such as formal potential (E(0')), charge transfer coefficient (alpha) and apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) were estimated by cyclic voltammetry and nonlinear regression analysis. Biocatalytic activity was exemplified at the prepared electrode for reduction of hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Voltammetry and coulometry with immersed thin layer electrodes. Part 2: Practical considerations and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, A. S.; Pons, S.; Cassidy, J.

    1984-11-01

    We have shown that geometrical considerations in the design of immersed thin layer electrochemical cells are important in the satisfactory performance of voltammetric experiments in solutions of high specific resistivity. In this paper, practical cell design and experimental results for a variety of systems are considered. In summary, we feel that reasonable care in the design of thin layer cells leads to the quantitative use of voltammetry and coulometry in systems with high specific resistivities. In the end, the effort is not much more than that required for conventional cyclic voltammetry, whereas the advantages of analysis using thin layer techniques are greater than those in conventional voltammetry.

  6. Characterization of carbon nanotubes decorated with NiFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles as a novel electrochemical sensor: application for highly selective determination of sotalol using voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Allafchian, Ali R; Rezaei, B; Mohammadzadeh, R

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic nano-composite of multiwall carbon nanotube, decorated with NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, was synthesized with citrate sol-gel method. The multiwall carbon nanotubes decorated with NiFe2O4 nanoparticles (NiFe2O4-MWCNTs) were characterized with different methods such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The new nano-composite acts as a suitable electrocatalyst for the oxidation of sotalol at a potential of 500 mV at the surface of the modified electrode. Linear sweep voltammetry exhibited two wide linear dynamic ranges of 0.5-1000 μmol L(-1) sotalol with a detection limit of 0.09 μmol L(-1). The modified electrode was used as a novel electrochemical sensor for the determination of sotalol in real samples such as pharmaceutical, patient and safe human urine.

  7. Scaling in nonstationary voltammetry representations.

    PubMed

    Anastassiou, Costas A; Parker, Kim H; O'Hare, Danny

    2007-12-20

    Despite the widespread use of voltammetry for a range of chemical, biological, environmental, and industrial applications, there is still a lack of understanding regarding the functionality between the applied voltage and the resulting patterns in the current response. This is due to the highly nonlinear relation between the applied voltage and the nonstationary current response, which casts a direct association nonintuitive. In this Article, we focus on large-amplitude/high-frequency ac voltammetry, a technique that has shown to offer increased voltammetric detail compared to alternative methods, to study heterogeneous electrochemical reaction-diffusion cases using a nonstationary time-series analysis, the Hilbert transform, and symmetry considerations. We show that application of this signal processing technique minimizes the significant capacitance contribution associated with rapid voltammetric measurements. From a series of numerical simulations conducted for different voltage excitation parameters as well as kinetic, thermodynamic, and mass transport parameters, a number of scaling laws arise that are related to the underlying parameters/dynamics of the process. Under certain conditions, these observations allow the determination of all underlying parameters very rapidly, experiment duration typically

  8. Voltammetry as a Tool for Characterization of CdTe Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Sobrova, Pavlina; Ryvolova, Marketa; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of quantum dots (QDs) has already been used in numerous applications. However, QDs have not been well characterized using voltammetry, with respect to their characterization and quantification. Therefore, the main aim was to characterize CdTe QDs using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. The obtained peaks were identified and the detection limit (3 S/N) was estimated down to 100 fg/mL. Based on the convincing results, a new method for how to study stability and quantify the dots was suggested. Thus, the approach was further utilized for the testing of QDs stability. PMID:23807507

  9. How many molecules are required to measure a cyclic voltammogram?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutress, Ian J.; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-05-01

    The stochastic limit at which fully-reversible cyclic voltammetry can accurately be measured is investigated. Specifically, Monte Carlo GPU simulation is used to study low concentration cyclic voltammetry at a microdisk electrode over a range of scan rates and concentrations, and the results compared to the statistical limit as predicted by finite difference simulation based on Fick's Laws of Diffusion. Both Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush electrode kinetics are considered, simulated via random-walk methods, and shown to give identical results in the fast kinetic limit.

  10. AFM and electroanalytical studies of synthetic oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chiorcea Paquim, A-M; Diculescu, V C; Oretskaya, T S; Oliveira Brett, A M

    2004-11-15

    The first and most important step in the development and manufacture of a sensitive DNA-biosensor for hybridization detection is the immobilization procedure of the nucleic acid probe on the transducer surface, maintaining its mobility and conformational flexibility. MAC Mode AFM images were used to demonstrate that oligonucleotide (ODN) molecules adsorb spontaneously at the electrode surface. After adsorption, the ODN layers were formed by molecules with restricted mobility, as well as by superposed molecules, which can lead to reduced hybridization efficiency. The images also showed the existence of pores in the adsorbed ODN film that revealed large parts of the electrode surface, and enabled non-specific adsorption of other ODNs on the uncovered areas. Electrostatic immobilization onto a clean glassy carbon electrode surface was followed by hybridization with complementary sequences and by control experiments with non-complementary sequences, studied using differential pulse voltammetry. The data obtained showed that non-specific adsorption strongly influenced the results, which depended on the sequence of the ODNs. In order to reduce the contribution of non-specific adsorbed ODNs during hybridization experiments, the carbon electrode surface was modified. After modification, the AFM images showed an electrode completely covered by the ODN probe film, which prevented the undesirable binding of target ODN molecules to the electrode surface. The changes of interfacial capacitance that took place after hybridization or control experiments showed the formation of a mixed multilayer that strongly depended on the local environment of the immobilized ODN.

  11. Determination of Bosentan in Pharmaceutical Preparations by Linear Sweep, Square Wave and Differential Pulse Voltammetry Methods

    PubMed Central

    Atila, Alptug; Yilmaz, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, simple, fast and reliable cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) methods were developed and validated for determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods were based on electrochemical oxidation of bosentan at platinum electrode in acetonitrile solution containing 0.1 M TBACIO4. The well-defined oxidation peak was observed at 1.21 V. The calibration curves were linear for bosentan at the concentration range of 5-40 µg/mL for LSV and 5-35 µg/mL for SWV and DPV methods, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precision values for bosentan were less than 4.92, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 6.29%. The mean recovery of bosentan was 100.7% for pharmaceutical preparations. No interference was found from two tablet excipients at the selected assay conditions. Developed methods in this study are accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Tracleer and Diamond tablets as pharmaceutical preparation. PMID:25901151

  12. Determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations by linear sweep, square wave and differential pulse voltammetry methods.

    PubMed

    Atila, Alptug; Yilmaz, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, simple, fast and reliable cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), square wave voltammetry (SWV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) methods were developed and validated for determination of bosentan in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods were based on electrochemical oxidation of bosentan at platinum electrode in acetonitrile solution containing 0.1 M TBACIO4. The well-defined oxidation peak was observed at 1.21 V. The calibration curves were linear for bosentan at the concentration range of 5-40 µg/mL for LSV and 5-35 µg/mL for SWV and DPV methods, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precision values for bosentan were less than 4.92, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 6.29%. The mean recovery of bosentan was 100.7% for pharmaceutical preparations. No interference was found from two tablet excipients at the selected assay conditions. Developed methods in this study are accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Tracleer and Diamond tablets as pharmaceutical preparation.

  13. Applications of convolution voltammetry in electroanalytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Cameron L; Bond, Alan M; Hollenkamp, Anthony F; Mahon, Peter J; Zhang, Jie

    2014-02-18

    The robustness of convolution voltammetry for determining accurate values of the diffusivity (D), bulk concentration (C(b)), and stoichiometric number of electrons (n) has been demonstrated by applying the technique to a series of electrode reactions in molecular solvents and room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). In acetonitrile, the relatively minor contribution of nonfaradaic current facilitates analysis with macrodisk electrodes, thus moderate scan rates can be used without the need to perform background subtraction to quantify the diffusivity of iodide [D = 1.75 (±0.02) × 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1)] in this solvent. In the RTIL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, background subtraction is necessary at a macrodisk electrode but can be avoided at a microdisk electrode, thereby simplifying the analytical procedure and allowing the diffusivity of iodide [D = 2.70 (±0.03) × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1)] to be quantified. Use of a convolutive procedure which simultaneously allows D and nC(b) values to be determined is also demonstrated. Three conditions under which a technique of this kind may be applied are explored and are related to electroactive species which display slow dissolution kinetics, undergo a single multielectron transfer step, or contain multiple noninteracting redox centers using ferrocene in an RTIL, 1,4-dinitro-2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzene, and an alkynylruthenium trimer, respectively, as examples. The results highlight the advantages of convolution voltammetry over steady-state techniques such as rotating disk electrode voltammetry and microdisk electrode voltammetry, as it is not restricted by the mode of diffusion (planar or radial), hence removing limitations on solvent viscosity, electrode geometry, and voltammetric scan rate.

  14. Voltammetry at the Thin-Film Mercury Electrode (TFME).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomeroy, R. S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed is the use of the Thin-Film Mercury Electrode for anodic stripping voltammetry, simple voltammetry of solution cations and cathodic stripping voltammetry for the determination of an environmentally important molecule, thiourea. The construction of a simple potentiostat and applications for student laboratory courses are included. (CW)

  15. Microchannel Voltammetry in the Presence of Large External Voltages and Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Zaino, Lawrence P; Wichert, William R A; Crouch, Garrison M; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-04-19

    The ability to perform electrochemistry in the presence of large voltages and electric field magnitudes without concern for the local potential has many possible applications in micro/nanofluidic assays and in capillary electrophoresis. Traditionally, electrochemistry in the presence of significant external electric fields has been dominated by end-channel detection for capillary and microchip electrophoresis detection. We describe novel instrumentation for potentiostatically controlled voltammetry that can be applied in the presence of high external voltages and electric fields. Cyclic voltammetry is demonstrated without significant shifts in the half-wave potential at working electrodes at local potentials of up to ∼1500 V and field strengths of up to 3000 V/cm, using a standard Ag/AgCl reference electrode. PMID:27045936

  16. Electrochemistry in Media of Exceptionally Low Polarity: Voltammetry with a Fluorous Solvent.

    PubMed

    Olson, Eric J; Boswell, Paul G; Givot, Bradley L; Yao, Letitia J; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2010-02-15

    This work demonstrates the first cyclic voltammetry in a perfluorocarbon solvent without use of a cosolvent. The novel electrolyte tetrabutylammonium tetrakis[3,5-bis(perfluorohexyl)phenyl]borate (NBu(4)BArF(104); 80 mM) allows for voltammetry of ferrocene in perfluoro(methylcyclohexane) by lowering the specific resistance to Ω268 k cm at 20.8 °C. Despite significant solution resistance, the resulting voltammograms can be fitted quantitatively without difficulty. The thus determined standard electron transfer rate constant, k°, for the oxidation of ferrocene in perfluoro(methylcyclohexane) is somewhat smaller than for many solvents commonly used in electrochemistry, but can be explained readily as the result of the viscosity and size of the solvent using Marcus theory. Dielectric dispersion spectroscopy verifies that addition of NBu(4)BArF(104) does not significantly raise the overall polarity of the solution over that of neat perfluoro(methylcyclohexane). PMID:20212920

  17. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pariona, Moises Meza; Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela; Riva, Rudimar

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  18. Voltammetry of redox analytes at trace concentrations with nanoelectrode ensembles.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Ligia Maria; Pepe, Niki; Ugo, Paolo

    2004-04-19

    Gold nanoelectrodes ensembles (NEEs) have been prepared by electroless plating of Au nanoelectrode elements within the pores of a microporous polycarbonate template membrane. Cyclic voltammograms recorded in (ferrocenylmethyl) trimethylammonium hexafluorophosphate (FA(+) PF(6)(-)) solutions showed that these NEEs operate in the "total-overlap" response regime, giving well resolved peak shaped voltammograms. Experimental results show that the faradaic/background currents ratios at the NEE are independent on the total geometric area of the ensemble, so that NEE can be enlarged or miniaturized at pleasure without influencing the very favorable signal/noise ratio. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at the NEE is optimized for direct determinations at trace levels. DPV at NEE allowed the determination (with no preconcentration) of trace amounts of FA(+), with a detection limit of 0.02muM. The use of NEE and DPV in cytochrome c (cyt c) solutions showed the possibility to observe the direct electrochemistry of submicromolar concentration of the protein, even without the need of adding any promoter or mediator.

  19. Voltammetry of redox analytes at trace concentrations with nanoelectrode ensembles.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Ligia Maria; Pepe, Niki; Ugo, Paolo

    2004-04-19

    Gold nanoelectrodes ensembles (NEEs) have been prepared by electroless plating of Au nanoelectrode elements within the pores of a microporous polycarbonate template membrane. Cyclic voltammograms recorded in (ferrocenylmethyl) trimethylammonium hexafluorophosphate (FA(+) PF(6)(-)) solutions showed that these NEEs operate in the "total-overlap" response regime, giving well resolved peak shaped voltammograms. Experimental results show that the faradaic/background currents ratios at the NEE are independent on the total geometric area of the ensemble, so that NEE can be enlarged or miniaturized at pleasure without influencing the very favorable signal/noise ratio. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at the NEE is optimized for direct determinations at trace levels. DPV at NEE allowed the determination (with no preconcentration) of trace amounts of FA(+), with a detection limit of 0.02muM. The use of NEE and DPV in cytochrome c (cyt c) solutions showed the possibility to observe the direct electrochemistry of submicromolar concentration of the protein, even without the need of adding any promoter or mediator. PMID:18969398

  20. In vivo histamine voltammetry in the mouse premammillary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2015-06-01

    Histamine plays a major role in the mediation of allergic reactions such as peripheral inflammation. This classical monoamine is also a neurotransmitter involved in the central nervous system but its role in this context is poorly understood. Studying histamine neurotransmission is important due to its implications in many neurological disorders. The sensitivity, selectivity and high temporal resolution of fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offer many advantages for studying electroactive neurotransmitters. Histamine has previously been studied with FSCV; however, the lack of a robust Faradaic electrochemical signal makes it difficult to selectively identify histamine in complex media, as found in vivo. In this work, we optimize an electrochemical waveform that provides a stimulation-locked and unique electrochemical signal towards histamine. We describe in vitro waveform optimization and a novel in vivo physiological model for stimulating histamine release in the mouse premammillary nucleus via stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. We demonstrate that a robust signal can be used to effectively identify histamine and characterize its in vivo kinetics.

  1. New chemical insights using weakly supported voltammetry: the reductive cleavage of Aryl-Br bonds is reversible.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijun; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G

    2012-10-22

    Cyclic voltammetry carried out at a wide range of supporting electrolyte concentrations and compositions can elucidate additional kinetic and mechanistic details of the electrochemical reduction of aryl halides. The cleavage of the C-Br bond is reversible, driven by H abstraction and the second electron transfer. This is a new chemical insight, as the cleavage of such bonds has usually been regarded as irreversible.

  2. Cyclic multiverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  3. Asymmetric Marcus-Hush theory for voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Eduardo; Henstridge, Martin C; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2013-06-21

    The current state-of-the-art in modeling the rate of electron transfer between an electroactive species and an electrode is reviewed. Experimental studies show that neither the ubiquitous Butler-Volmer model nor the more modern symmetric Marcus-Hush model are able to satisfactorily reproduce the experimental voltammetry for both solution-phase and surface-bound redox couples. These experimental deviations indicate the need for revision of the simplifying approximations used in the above models. Within this context, models encompassing asymmetry are considered which include different vibrational and solvation force constants for the electroactive species. The assumption of non-adiabatic electron transfer is also examined. These refinements have provided more satisfactory models of the electron transfer process and they enable us to gain more information about the microscopic characteristics of the system by means of simple electrochemical measurements.

  4. Toward an in situ phosphate sensor in seawater using Square Wave Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Barus, C; Romanytsia, I; Striebig, N; Garçon, V

    2016-11-01

    A Square Wave Voltammetry electrochemical method is proposed to measure phosphate in seawater as pulse techniques offer a higher sensitivity as compared to classical cyclic voltammetry. Chronoamperometry cannot be either adapted for an in situ sensor since this method requires to have controlled convection which will be impossible in a miniaturised sensor. Tests and validation of Square Wave Voltammetry parameters have been performed using an open cell and for the first time with a small volume (<400µL) laboratory prototypes. Two designs of prototypes have been compared. Using high frequency (f=250Hz) allows to obtain a linear behaviour between 0.1 and 1µmolL(-1) with a very low limit of detection of 0.05 µmolL(-1) after 60min of complexation waiting time. In order to obtain a linear regression for a larger concentration range i.e. 0.25-4µmolL(-1), a lower frequency of 2.5Hz is needed. A limit of detection of 0.1µmolL(-1) is obtained in this case after 30min of complexation waiting time for the peak measured at E=0.12V. Changing the position of the molybdenum electrode for the complexation step and moving the detection into another electrochemical cell allow to decrease the reaction time down to 5min. PMID:27591632

  5. Toward an in situ phosphate sensor in seawater using Square Wave Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Barus, C; Romanytsia, I; Striebig, N; Garçon, V

    2016-11-01

    A Square Wave Voltammetry electrochemical method is proposed to measure phosphate in seawater as pulse techniques offer a higher sensitivity as compared to classical cyclic voltammetry. Chronoamperometry cannot be either adapted for an in situ sensor since this method requires to have controlled convection which will be impossible in a miniaturised sensor. Tests and validation of Square Wave Voltammetry parameters have been performed using an open cell and for the first time with a small volume (<400µL) laboratory prototypes. Two designs of prototypes have been compared. Using high frequency (f=250Hz) allows to obtain a linear behaviour between 0.1 and 1µmolL(-1) with a very low limit of detection of 0.05 µmolL(-1) after 60min of complexation waiting time. In order to obtain a linear regression for a larger concentration range i.e. 0.25-4µmolL(-1), a lower frequency of 2.5Hz is needed. A limit of detection of 0.1µmolL(-1) is obtained in this case after 30min of complexation waiting time for the peak measured at E=0.12V. Changing the position of the molybdenum electrode for the complexation step and moving the detection into another electrochemical cell allow to decrease the reaction time down to 5min.

  6. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  7. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  8. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  9. A Simple and Inexpensive Function Generator and a Four-Electrode Cell for Cyclic Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albahadily, F. N.; Mottola, Horacio A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes construction and operation of an inexpensive signal generator and a four-electrode electrochemical cell for use in voltammetric experiments. Also describes construction and operation of a four-electrode electrochemical cell used to illustrate elimination (or minimization) of background currents due to electrochemical reactions by species…

  10. Discrimination of Inner- and Outer-Sphere Electrode Reactions by Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanimoto, Sachiko; Ichimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate students who are studying homogeneous and heterogeneous electron-transfer reactions is described. Heterogeneous or electrode reaction kinetics can be examined by using the electrochemical reduction of three Fe[superscript III]/Fe[superscript II] redox couples at platinum and glassy carbon disk electrodes.…

  11. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  12. Cyclic voltammetric study of Co-Ni-Fe alloys electrodeposition in sulfate medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hanafi, I.; Daud, A. R.; Radiman, S.

    2013-11-27

    Electrochemical technique has been used to study the electrodeposition of cobalt, nickel, iron and Co-Ni-Fe alloy on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate. To obtain the nucleation mechanism, cyclic voltammetry is used to characterize the Co-Ni-Fe system. The scanning rate effect on the deposition process was investigated. Deposition of single metal occurs at potential values more positive than that estimated stability potential. Based on the cyclic voltammetry results, the electrodeposition of cobalt, nickel, iron and Co-Ni-Fe alloy clearly show that the process of diffusion occurs is controlled by the typical nucleation mechanism.

  13. Stoichiometry and Formation Constant Determination by Linear Sweep Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Franklin A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is described in which the equilibrium constants necessary for determining the composition and distribution of lead (II)-oxalate species may be measured by linear sweep voltammetry. (Author/BB)

  14. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  15. Enhancing selectivity in stripping voltammetry by different adsorption behaviors: the use of nanostructured Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides to detect Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Xia; Yu, Xin-Yao; Gao, Chao; Liu, Jin-Huai; Compton, Richard G; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2013-03-21

    We report the use of nanostructured layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for the highly selective and sensitive detection of Cd(2+) using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In particular, the modification of a glassy carbon electrode promotes the sensitivity and selectivity towards Cd(2+) in the presence of Pb(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The electrochemical characterization and anodic stripping voltammetric performance of Cd(2+) were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) analysis. Operational parameters, including supporting electrolytes, pH value, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized. In addition, the selectivity, interference and stability were also investigated under the optimized conditions. The results showed that the fabricated electrode possessed good selectivity, stability and reproducibility. The proposed electrochemical sensing strategy is thus expected to open new opportunities to broaden the use of ASV in analysis for detecting heavy metal ions in the environment.

  16. Electrochemical characterization of gelatinized starch dispersions: voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on platinum surface.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Jaimes, C; Lobato-Calleros, C; Sosa, E; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-06-25

    The electrochemical properties of gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD; 5% w/w) from different botanical sources were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests over a platinum surface. The phenomenological modelling of EIS data using equivalent circuits indicated that after gelatinization the electrical resistance was determined mainly by the resistance of insoluble material (i.e., ghosts). Sonication of the GSD disrupted the ghost microstructure, and produced an increase in electrical conductivity by reducing the resistance of the insoluble material. The CV data showed three oxidation peaks at potentials where glucose solutions displayed oxidation waves. It is postulated that hydrolysis at the bulk and electrocatalyzed oxidation on the Pt-surface are reactions involved in the starch transformation. Starches peak intensity increased with the amylose content, suggesting that the amylose-rich matrix played an important role in the charge transfer in the electrolytic system.

  17. Dithiophosphinate-pyrite interaction: voltammetry and DRIFT spectroscopy investigations at oxidizing potentials.

    PubMed

    Güler, Taki

    2005-08-15

    The electrochemistry of dithiophosphinate (DTPI) adsorption on pyrite was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transformation (DRIFT) spectroscopy at oxidizing potentials under acid, neutral, and alkaline conditions. CV study showed that the mineral surface was covered by porous ferric oxyhydroxide species. Irreversible DTPI adsorption on the pyrite surface and inhibition of electron transfer to some extent were also observed from electrochemical work. Major collector species were determined from DRIFT spectroscopy study as adsorbed collector compound, DTPI degrees , and dimer of dithiophosphinate, (DTPI)2. Maximum adsorption density of DTPI was obtained in acid solution. It decreased sharply under neutral and alkaline conditions due to heavy surface oxidation at higher pH.

  18. Electrochemical cells for voltammetry, coulometry, and protein activity assays of small-volume biological samples.

    PubMed

    Feldman, B J; Gheller, S F; Bailey, G F; Newton, W E; Schultz, F A

    1990-02-15

    Cell designs, experimental protocols, and results for electrochemical investigation of small quantitites of biological materials under anaerobic conditions are reported. Three types of electrochemical experiments are considered: (i) cyclic voltammetry of 20- to 100-microliters samples; (ii) direct coulometry of 0.5- to 1.5-ml samples; and (iii) an electrochemically initiated protein activity assay which includes provision for analysis of gaseous reaction products and correlation with electron flux. The first two procedures are illustrated by measurement of the formal electrode potential (E0') and number of electrons transferred (n) in redox reactions of small quantities of biological and inorganic materials. The third procedure is illustrated by assaying the activity of the MoFe protein plus Fe protein complex from Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase for reduction of C2H2 to C2H4.

  19. Square wave voltammetry with multivariate calibration tools for determination of eugenol, carvacrol and thymol in honey.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Natalia; Moressi, Marcela Beatriz; Robledo, Sebastián Noel; D'Eramo, Fabiana; Marioli, Juan Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The simultaneous determination of eugenol (EU), thymol (Ty) and carvacrol (CA) in honey samples, employing square wave voltammetry (SWV) and chemometrics tools, is informed for the first time. For this purpose, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as working electrode. The operating conditions and influencing parameters (involving several chemical and instrumental parameters) were first optimized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Thus, the effects of the scan rate, pH and analyte concentration on the electrochemical response of the above mentioned molecules were studied. The results show that the electrochemical responses of the three compounds are very similar and that the voltammetric traces present a high degree of overlap under all the experimental conditions used in this study. Therefore, two chemometric tools were tested to obtain the multivariate calibration model. One method was the partial least squares regression (PLS-1), which assumes a linear behaviour. The other nonlinear method was an artificial neural network (ANN). In this last case we used a supervised, feed-forward network with Levenberg-Marquardt back propagation training. From the accuracies and precisions analysis between nominal and estimated concentrations calculated by using both methods, it was inferred that the ANN method was a good model to quantify EU, Ty and CA in honey samples. Recovery percentages were between 87% and 104%, except for two samples whose values were 136% and 72%. The analytical methodology was simple, fast and accurate.

  20. Square wave voltammetry with multivariate calibration tools for determination of eugenol, carvacrol and thymol in honey.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Natalia; Moressi, Marcela Beatriz; Robledo, Sebastián Noel; D'Eramo, Fabiana; Marioli, Juan Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The simultaneous determination of eugenol (EU), thymol (Ty) and carvacrol (CA) in honey samples, employing square wave voltammetry (SWV) and chemometrics tools, is informed for the first time. For this purpose, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as working electrode. The operating conditions and influencing parameters (involving several chemical and instrumental parameters) were first optimized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Thus, the effects of the scan rate, pH and analyte concentration on the electrochemical response of the above mentioned molecules were studied. The results show that the electrochemical responses of the three compounds are very similar and that the voltammetric traces present a high degree of overlap under all the experimental conditions used in this study. Therefore, two chemometric tools were tested to obtain the multivariate calibration model. One method was the partial least squares regression (PLS-1), which assumes a linear behaviour. The other nonlinear method was an artificial neural network (ANN). In this last case we used a supervised, feed-forward network with Levenberg-Marquardt back propagation training. From the accuracies and precisions analysis between nominal and estimated concentrations calculated by using both methods, it was inferred that the ANN method was a good model to quantify EU, Ty and CA in honey samples. Recovery percentages were between 87% and 104%, except for two samples whose values were 136% and 72%. The analytical methodology was simple, fast and accurate. PMID:27343610

  1. Direct voltammetry and electrocatalytic properties of catalase incorporated in polyacrylamide hydrogel films.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haiyun; Li, Zhen; Hu, Naifei

    2003-07-01

    The direct voltammetry and electrocatalytic properties of catalase (Cat) in polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel films cast on pyrolytic graphite (PG) electrodes were investigated. Cat-PAM film electrodes showed a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible cyclic voltammetry peaks for Cat Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couples at approximately -0.46 V vs. SCE in pH 7.0 buffers. The electron transfer between catalase and PG electrodes was greatly facilitated in the microenvironment of PAM films. The apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) and formal potential (E degrees ') were estimated by fitting square wave voltammograms with non-linear regression analysis. The formal potential of Cat Fe(III)/Fe(II) couples in PAM films had a linear relationship with pH between pH 4.0 and 9.0 with a slope of -56 mV pH(-1), suggesting that one proton is coupled with single-electron transfer for each heme group of catalase in the electrode reaction. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy demonstrated that catalase retained a near native conformation in PAM films at medium pH. The embedded catalase in PAM films showed the electrocatalytic activity toward dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. Possible mechanism of catalytic reduction of H(2)O(2) at Cat-PAM film electrodes was proposed. PMID:12914908

  2. AFM nanoindentations of diatom biosilica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Losic, Dusan; Short, Ken; Mitchell, James G; Lal, Ratnesh; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2007-04-24

    Diatoms have intricately and uniquely nanopatterned silica exoskeletons (frustules) and are a common target of biomimetic investigations. A better understanding of the diatom frustule structure and function at the nanoscale could provide new insights for the biomimetic fabrication of nanostructured ceramic materials and lightweight, yet strong, scaffold architectures. Here, we have mapped the nanoscale mechanical properties of Coscinodiscus sp. diatoms using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation. Mechanical properties were correlated with the frustule structures obtained from high-resolution AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Significant differences in the micromechanical properties for the different frustule layers were observed. A comparative study of other related inorganic material including porous silicon films and free-standing membranes as well as porous alumina was also undertaken.

  3. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  4. AFM cantilever vibration detection with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; Wagner, Ryan; Keller, Robert; Killgore, Jason

    Cantilever oscillations for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are conventionally measured with an optical lever system. The speed of AFM cantilevers can be increased by decreasing the size of the cantilever; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the current optical lever approach. Here we demonstrate an electron detection scheme in an SEM for detecting AFM cantilever oscillations. An oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to the propagation direction of a stationary ~ 1 nm diameter electron probe, and the oscillatory change in electron scattering resulting from the changing thickness of the electron irradiated area of the AFM tip is detected with a transmitted electron detector positioned below the AFM tip. We perform frequency sweep and ring-down experiments to determine the first resonant frequency and Q factor of an AFM cantilever.

  5. Square wave voltammetry at the dropping mercury electrode: Theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Turner, J.A.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of square wave voltammetry at the dropping mercury electrode are presented. The technique involves scanning the entire potential range of interest on a single drop of a DME. Asymmetries in the waveform as well as variations in current measurement parameters are discussed. Indications are that previous uses of the waveform may not have utilized all its capabilities.

  6. Saddle-Shaped Cyclic Indole Tetramers: 3D Electroactive Molecules.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Constanza; Monge, Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Navarrete, Juan T López; Ruiz Delgado, M Carmen; Gómez-Lor, Berta

    2016-07-18

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study of a series of cyclic indole tetramers aimed at understanding the fundamental electronic properties of this 3D platform and evaluating its potential in the construction of new semiconductors. To this end, we combined absorption and Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and spectroelectrochemistry with DFT calculations. Our results suggest that this platform can be easily and reversibly oxidized. Additionally, it has a HOMO that matches very well with the workfunction of gold, therefore charge injection from a gold electrode is expected to occur without significant barriers. Interestingly, the cyclic tetraindoles allow for good electron delocalization in spite of their saddle-shaped structures. The steric constraints introduced by N-substitution significantly inhibits ring inversion of the central cyclooctatetraene unit, whereas it only barely affects the optical and electrochemical properties (a slightly higher oxidation potential and a blueshifted absorption upon alkylation are observed). PMID:27320301

  7. Saddle-Shaped Cyclic Indole Tetramers: 3D Electroactive Molecules.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Constanza; Monge, Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Navarrete, Juan T López; Ruiz Delgado, M Carmen; Gómez-Lor, Berta

    2016-07-18

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study of a series of cyclic indole tetramers aimed at understanding the fundamental electronic properties of this 3D platform and evaluating its potential in the construction of new semiconductors. To this end, we combined absorption and Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and spectroelectrochemistry with DFT calculations. Our results suggest that this platform can be easily and reversibly oxidized. Additionally, it has a HOMO that matches very well with the workfunction of gold, therefore charge injection from a gold electrode is expected to occur without significant barriers. Interestingly, the cyclic tetraindoles allow for good electron delocalization in spite of their saddle-shaped structures. The steric constraints introduced by N-substitution significantly inhibits ring inversion of the central cyclooctatetraene unit, whereas it only barely affects the optical and electrochemical properties (a slightly higher oxidation potential and a blueshifted absorption upon alkylation are observed).

  8. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. Cyclic phosphonium ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Mukhlall, Joshua A; Romeo, Alicia R; Gohdo, Masao; Ramati, Sharon; Berman, Marc; Suarez, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating cyclic phosphonium cations are a novel category of materials. We report here on the synthesis and characterization of four new cyclic phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ILs with aliphatic and aromatic pendant groups. In addition to the syntheses of these novel materials, we report on a comparison of their properties with their ammonium congeners. These exemplars are slightly less conductive and have slightly smaller self-diffusion coefficients than their cyclic ammonium congeners. PMID:24605146

  10. Cells mechanics with AFM: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia

    2012-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to study mechanics of cells. Cell is far from being a homogeneous medium. This creates a number of problems which will be discussed as well as the ways to solve them. We will focus on the following problems: 1. Cellular surface brush (microvilli, glycocalyx..) surrounds cells. A simple model to separate the brush and cell deformation will be overviewed. 2. Problem of nonlinearity of stress-strain relation. Although unsolved, this may indirectly tested: the rigidity modulus should be reasonably independent of penetration. We will show that it can be achieved when using relatively dull AFM probes (the radii of microns) only. 3. Heterogeneity of cell surface. Cells are not homogeneous over the surface. We will discuss the question how many points is enough to characterize the cell. We will exemplify the above with human cervical epithelial cells. We will demonstrate that without proper consideration of the above problems, the error in defining the modulus of rigidity can easily reach an order of magnitude.

  11. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    PubMed

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  12. Rapid Screening Method for Detecting Ethinyl Estradiol in Natural Water Employing Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    17α-Ethinyl estradiol (EE2), which is used worldwide in the treatment of some cancers and as a contraceptive, is often found in aquatic systems and is considered a pharmaceutically active compound (PhACs) in the environment. Current methods for the determination of this compound, such as chromatography, are expensive and lengthy and require large amounts of toxic organic solvents. In this work, a voltammetric procedure is developed and validated as a screening tool for detecting EE2 in water samples without prior extraction, clean-up, or derivatization steps. Application of the method we elaborate here to EE2 analysis is unprecedented. EE2 detection was carried out using differential pulse adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (DP AdCSV) with a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) in pH 7.0 Britton-Robinson buffer. The electrochemical process of EE2 reduction was investigated by cyclic voltammetry at different scan rates. Electroreduction of the hormone on a mercury electrode exhibited a peak at −1.16 ± 0.02 V versus Ag/AgCl. The experimental parameters were as follows: −0.7 V accumulation potential, 150 s accumulation time, and 60 mV s−1 scan rate. The limit of detection was 0.49 μg L−1 for a preconcentration time of 150 s. Relative standard deviations were less than 13%. The method was applied to the detection of EE2 in water samples with recoveries ranging from 93.7 to 102.5%. PMID:27738548

  13. Are Math Grades Cyclical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gerald J.; Dial, Micah

    1998-01-01

    The cyclical nature of mathematics grades was studied for a cohort of elementary school students from a large metropolitan school district in Texas over six years (average cohort size of 8495). The study used an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Results indicate that grades do exhibit a significant cyclical pattern. (SLD)

  14. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  15. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell.

  16. Electrochemical oxidation of the chalcopyrite surface: an XPS and AFM study in solution at pH 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, Morag L.; Wincott, Paul L.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Vaughan, David J.

    2003-09-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) has been studied at pH 4 using voltammetry, coulometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and both ex situ and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Between 500 and 650 mV an anodic oxidation peak is observed, prior to the onset of the main decomposition reactions. Chalcopyrite electrodes in contact with electrolyte show some release of Cu into solution even without an applied potential. At 500 and 650 mV, the loss of Cu from the surface increases by a factor of 2 and 6, respectively. Oxidation at 500 mV results in the formation of a mixed oxide or hydroxide of iron, coincident with islands (<0.15 μm wide) of reaction products observed on the surface using AFM. The surface coverage of these islands increases with amount of charge passed. Oxidation at 650 mV shows similar processes have occurred, but with a greater island surface coverage and a more deeply altered surface. XPS depth profiling suggests iron oxide or hydroxide is now a major phase in the top ˜40 Å, with significant sulphate also formed. Observation of islands (alteration products) using in situ AFM under potential control shows that these features are not an artefact of the preparation methods.

  17. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  20. Method of evaluation of electron transfer kinetics of a surface-confined redox system by means of Fourier transformed square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinjian; Wang, Lishi; Liao, Shijun

    2008-07-15

    A new form of Fourier transformed square wave voltammetry (FT-SWV) is proposed to simplify and accelerate the electron transfer kinetics evaluation procedures for surface-confined redox systems. Even harmonic frequencies, which are derived from the nonlinear Faradaic response, will arise in the power spectrum after Fourier transformation of the current response of FT-SWV. The profile of the even harmonic power spectra is bell-shaped and shows a maximum at a certain frequency. The electrode kinetics-dependent maximum and the corresponding frequency are equivalent to the so-called "quasi-reversible maximum" and "critical frequency" (fmax) in traditional SWV, respectively. The critical frequency can be regarded as a frequency that is synchronized to the electron transfer rate constant (k(0)). As a result, it can serve as a probe of k(0) by means of a very simple equation, k(0) = kmax fmax. Compared with traditional cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, alternating current voltammetry, and several other voltammetric techniques, this method exhibits great advantages for its simplicity, rapidity, and sensitivity.

  1. Conductivity and voltammetry in liquid and supercritical halogenated solvents.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S A; Tallman, D E

    1996-07-01

    A previous study of the voltammetry of ferrocene in liquid and supercritical chlorodifluoromethane revealed electrochemically reversible behavior. However, shifts in the half-wave potential as a function of fluid conditions were observed which were tentatively attributed to ohmic distortion due to changes in fluid resistance. To more completely understand the voltammetry in this fluid, conductivity measurements have been made for a range of fluid conditions. Additionally, a second reference couple, cobaltocenium hexafluorophosphate, has been introduced, and the difference in half-wave potentials between the two redox couples has been examined as a function of fluid conditions. In the liquid, the difference in the half-wave potentials of the two couples corrected for ohmic distortion decreases as the fluid temperature increases (25-85 °C) at constant pressure (5.2 MPa). In the supercritical fluid at constant temperature (115 °C), the difference in the half-wave potentials corrected for ohmic distortion is constant at 1.276 ± 0.005 V over a considerable range of fluid pressure (10-30 MPa). Ion aggregation in the supercritical fluid is indicated both by the conductivity measurements and by the rather large hydrodynamic radius of cobaltocenium computed from the voltammograms. Preliminary voltammetry in supercritical trifluoromethane is also presented.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cyclic neutropenia cyclic neutropenia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  3. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  4. Structural and Mechanical Mechanisms of Ocular Tissues Probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Rico, Felix; Moy, Vincent T.

    In recent years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become an important tool in ophthalmic research. It has gained popularity largely because AFM is not restricted by the diffraction limits of light microscopy and can be applied to resolve images with molecular resolution. AFM is a minimally invasive technique and can be used to visualize molecular structures under near-physiological conditions. In addition, the AFM can be employed as a force apparatus to characterize the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials on the micron level and at the level of individual proteins. In this article, we summarize recent AFM studies of ocular tissues, while highlighting the great potential of AFM technology in ophthalmic research. Previous research demonstrates the versatility of the AFM as high resolution imaging technique and as a sensitive force apparatus for probing the mechanical properties of ocular tissues. The structural and mechanical properties of ocular tissues are of major importance to the understanding of the optomechanical functions of the human eye. In addition, AFM has played an important role in the development and characterization of ocular biomaterials, such as contact lenses and intraocular lenses. Studying ocular tissues using Atomic Force Microscopy has enabled several advances in ophthalmic research.

  5. Cyclic steps on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, M.; Izumi, N.; Naito, K.; Parker, G.; Yamada, T.; Greve, R.

    2016-05-01

    Boundary waves often form at the interface between ice and fluid flowing adjacent to it, such as ripples under river ice covers, and steps on the bed of supraglacial meltwater channels. They may also be formed by wind, such as the megadunes on the Antarctic ice sheet. Spiral troughs on the polar ice caps of Mars have been interpreted to be cyclic steps formed by katabatic wind blowing over ice. Cyclic steps are relatives of upstream-migrating antidunes. Cyclic step formation on ice is not only a mechanical but also a thermodynamic process. There have been very few studies on the formation of either cyclic steps or upstream-migrating antidunes on ice. In this study, we performed flume experiments to reproduce cyclic steps on ice by flowing water, and found that trains of steps form when the Froude number is larger than unity. The features of those steps allow them to be identified as ice-bed analogs of cyclic steps in alluvial and bedrock rivers. We performed a linear stability analysis and obtained a physical explanation of the formation of upstream-migrating antidunes, i.e., precursors of cyclic steps. We compared the results of experiments with the predictions of the analysis and found the observed steps fall in the range where the analysis predicts interfacial instability. We also found that short antidune-like undulations formed as a precursor to the appearance of well-defined steps. This fact suggests that such antidune-like undulations correspond to the instability predicted by the analysis and are precursors of cyclic steps.

  6. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  7. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer. PMID:27442285

  8. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  9. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. Determination of oleuropein using multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode by adsorptive stripping square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Cittan, Mustafa; Koçak, Süleyman; Çelik, Ali; Dost, Kenan

    2016-10-01

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode was used to prepare an electrochemical sensing platform for the determination of oleuropein. Results showed that, the accumulation of oleuropein on the prepared electrode takes place with the adsorption process. Electrochemical behavior of oleuropein was studied by using cyclic voltammetry. Compared to the bare GCE, the oxidation peak current of oleuropein increased about 340 times at MWCNT/GCE. Voltammetric determination of oleuropein on the surface of prepared electrode was studied using square wave voltammetry where the oxidation peak current of oleuropein was measured as an analytical signal. A calibration curve of oleuropein was performed between 0.01 and 0.70µM and a good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.9984. Detection and quantification limits of the method were obtained as 2.73 and 9.09nM, respectively. In addition, intra-day and inter-day precision studies indicated that the voltammetric method was sufficiently repeatable. Finally, the proposed electrochemical sensor was successfully applied to the determination of oleuropein in an olive leaf extract. Microwave-assisted extraction of oleuropein had good recovery values between 92% and 98%. The results obtained with the proposed electrochemical sensor were compared with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis.

  11. Application of power spectra patterns in Fourier transform square wave voltammetry to evaluate electrode kinetics of surface-confined proteins.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Barry D; Barlow, Nicola L; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes an application of Fourier transform (FT) voltammetry that provides a quantitative evaluation of the electron-transfer kinetics of protein molecules attached to electrode surfaces. The potential waveform applied in these experiments consists of a large-amplitude square wave of frequency f superimposed onto the traditional triangular voltage used in dc cyclic voltammetry. The resultant current-time response, when Fourier transformed into the frequency domain, provides patterns of data at the even harmonic frequencies that arise from nonlinearity in the Faradaic response. These even harmonic contributions are ideally suited for kinetic evaluation of electron-transfer processes because they are highly selective to quasi-reversible behavior (insensitive to reversible or irreversible processes) and almost devoid of background charging current. Inverse FT methods can then be used to provide the wave shapes of the dc as well as the ac voltammetric components and other characteristics employed to detect the level of nonideality present relative to theoretical models based upon noninteracting surface-confined molecules. The new form of data evaluation has been applied to the electron-transfer properties of a typical biological electron carrier, the blue copper protein azurin, immobilized on polycrystalline gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers of different length alkanethiols. Details of the electrode kinetics (rates of electron transfer, dispersion, and charge-transfer coefficients) as a function of alkanethiol, apparent surface coverage, and capacitance are all deduced from the square wave (FT-inverse FT) protocol, and the implications of these findings are considered.

  12. Fast voltammetry of metals at carbon-fiber microelectrodes: copper adsorption onto activated carbon aids rapid electrochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pathirathna, Pavithra; Samaranayake, Srimal; Atcherley, Christopher W; Parent, Kate L; Heien, Michael L; McElmurry, Shawn P; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-09-21

    Rapid, in situ trace metal analysis is essential for understanding many biological and environmental processes. For example, trace metals are thought to act as chemical messengers in the brain. In the environment, some of the most damaging pollution occurs when metals are rapidly mobilized and transported during hydrologic events (storms). Electrochemistry is attractive for in situ analysis, primarily because electrodes are compact, cheap and portable. Electrochemical techniques, however, do not traditionally report trace metals in real-time. In this work, we investigated the fundamental mechanisms of a novel method, based on fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), that reports trace metals with sub-second temporal resolution at carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMs). Electrochemical methods and geochemical models were employed to find that activated CFMs rapidly adsorb copper, a phenomenon that greatly advances the temporal capabilities of electrochemistry. We established the thermodynamics of surface copper adsorption and the electrochemical nature of copper deposition onto CFMs and hence identified a unique adsorption-controlled electrochemical mechanism for ultra-fast trace metal analysis. This knowledge can be exploited in the future to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of CFMs for fast voltammetry of trace metals in a variety of biological and environmental models.

  13. Voltammetry of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82}

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.R.; Dorn, H.C.; Stevenson, S.; Burbank, P.M.; Gibson, J.R.

    1997-01-15

    This paper describes the first electrochemical data for a polymetallic endohedral metallofullerene. The voltammetric behavior of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82} resembles that for La@C{sub 82} and Y@C{sub 82}, indicating that the identity of the metal does not influence dramatically the energies of the metallofullerene molecular orbitals. The three Sc atoms, however, transfer more electrons from the encapsulated metals to the cage than the monometallic counterparts, accounting for the differences in the voltammetry for Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82}. The similarity of the voltammetry of Sc{sub 3}@C{sub 82} with that of the monometallic fullerenes suggests that Sc{sub 3}{sup +4}@C{sub 82}{sup 4-} may describe the formal charges on the Sc trimer and the C{sub 82} cage of these species. Metallofullerene electronic structure and physical properties should be better understood as more metallofullerenes become available for investigation. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Introducing absorptive stripping voltammetry: wide concentration range voltammetric phenol detection.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Rita; Compton, Richard G

    2014-11-21

    Carbon paste electrodes are developed for the detection of phenols via a procedure in which the phenols are allowed to accumulate in the paste via transfer from an aqueous solution prior to electro-oxidation. Importantly, the use of such paste electrodes is shown to substantially overcome the "self-passivating" behaviour of the phenol oxidation which usually constrains the electrode process to low concentrations and single-shot experiments. In this paper, 4-phenoxyphenol could be detected in the range from 2.5 to 40 μM, phenol from 2.5 μM to 60 mM and 4-methoxyphenol from 5.0 to 40 μM. The electrodes were re-usable without surface renewal for concentrations up to 1.0 mM. The use of a bulk phenol solution for pre-concentration via absorptive uptake into a bulk phase followed by electrochemical quantification represents a new form of electroanalysis, namely "absorptive stripping voltammetry" complementary to "adsorptive stripping voltammetry" where accumulation occurs via adsorption on an electrode surface.

  15. Chemical phenomena in solid-state voltammetry in polymer solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, L.; Reed, R.A.; Kim, M.H.; Wooster, T.T.; Oliver, B.N.; Egekeze, J.; Kennedy, R.T.; Jorgenson, J.W.; Parcher, J.F.; Murray, R.W.

    1989-03-01

    This paper, aimed at delineating significant chemical effects in solid-state voltammetry, describes electrochemical oxidations and reductions of electroactive monomer solutes dissolved in and diffusing through rigid and semirigid polymer electrolyte solvents. Sorption of organic monomer vapors into poly(ethylene oxide) films yields polymer solvents whose chemistry is dominated by that of the sorbed monomer as shown by coordination and precipitation effects. The dynamics of plasticization-induced changes in transport rates are quite rapid. Physical diffusion in the polymer solvent in slow enough that electron hopping reactions measurably enhance charge transport rates; the effect was used to estimate a lower limit for the (Co(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2+/+/ self-exchange rate constant of 2 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/ s/sup /minus/1/. It is possible to erect polymeric film transport barriers at the electrode/polymer solvent interface and to measure the rate of permeation of monomer complexes from the polymer solvent into the polymer transport barrier film. Polymeric films of Os and Ru polypyridine complexes can be electropolymerized from polymer solutions of the corresponding monomers. Solid-state voltammetry can be extended to other polymer solvents including sulfonated polystyrene, poly(vinyl chloride), Nafion, and poly(acrylamide) gel.

  16. Arsenic speciation in natural waters by cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2010-03-01

    Contamination of groundwater with arsenic (As) is a major health risk through contamination of drinking and irrigation water supplies. In geochemically reducing conditions As is mostly present as As(III), its most toxic species. Various methods exist to determine As in water but these are not suitable for monitoring arsenic speciation at its original pH and without preparation. We present a method that uses cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) to determine reactive As(III) at a vibrating, gold, microwire electrode. The As(III) is detected after adsorptive deposition of As(OH)(3)(0), followed by a potential scan to measure the reduction current from As(III) to As(0). The method is suitable for waters of pH 7-12, has an analytical range of 1 nM to 100 microM As (0.07-7500 ppb) and a limit of detection of 0.5 nM with a 60 s deposition time. The As speciation protocol involves measuring reactive As(III) by CSV at the original pH and acidification to pH 1 to determine inorganic As(III)+As(V) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) using the same electrode. Total dissolved As is determined by ASV after UV-digestion at pH 1. The method was successfully tested on various raw groundwater samples from boreholes in the UK and West Bengal.

  17. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  18. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  19. Random cyclic matrices.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sudhir R; Srivastava, Shashi C L

    2008-09-01

    We present a Gaussian ensemble of random cyclic matrices on the real field and study their spectral fluctuations. These cyclic matrices are shown to be pseudosymmetric with respect to generalized parity. We calculate the joint probability distribution function of eigenvalues and the spacing distributions analytically and numerically. For small spacings, the level spacing distribution exhibits either a Gaussian or a linear form. Furthermore, for the general case of two arbitrary complex eigenvalues, leaving out the spacings among real eigenvalues, and, among complex conjugate pairs, we find that the spacing distribution agrees completely with the Wigner distribution for a Poisson process on a plane. The cyclic matrices occur in a wide variety of physical situations, including disordered linear atomic chains and the Ising model in two dimensions. These exact results are also relevant to two-dimensional statistical mechanics and nu -parametrized quantum chromodynamics. PMID:18851127

  20. Flow in cyclic cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, we use a known duality between expanding and contracting cosmologies to construct a dual of the inflationary flow hierarchy applicable to contracting cosmologies such as ekpyrotic and cyclic models. We show that the inflationary flow equations are invariant under the duality and therefore apply equally well to inflation or to cyclic cosmology. We construct a self-consistent small-parameter approximation dual to the slow-roll approximation in inflation, and calculate the power spectrum of perturbations in this limit. We also recover the matter-dominated contracting solution of Wands, and the recently proposed adiabatic ekpyrosis solution.

  1. Cyclic membrane separation process

    DOEpatents

    Nemser, Stuart M.

    2005-05-03

    A cyclic process for controlling environmental emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vapor recovery in storage and dispensing operations of liquids maintains a vacuum in the storage tank ullage. In the first part of a two-part cyclic process ullage vapor is discharged through a vapor recovery system in which VOC are stripped from vented gas with a selectively gas permeable membrane. In the second part, the membrane is inoperative while gas pressure rises in the ullage. In one aspect of this invention, a vacuum is drawn in the membrane separation unit thus reducing overall VOC emissions.

  2. Realistic Cyclic Magnetic Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, L. G.

    2012-09-01

    This work presents a complete cyclic cosmological scenario based on nonlinear magnetic field. It is constructed from a model composed of five fluids, namely baryonic matter, dark matter, radiation, neutrinos and a cosmological magnetic field. The first four fluids are treated in the standard way and the fifth fluid, the magnetic field, is described by a nonlinear electrodynamics. The free parameters are fitted by observational data (SNIa, CMB, extragalactic magnetic fields, etc.) and by simple theoretical considerations. As a result arises a cyclic cosmological model that preserves the main successes of the standard Big Bang model and solves some other problems such as the initial singularity, the present acceleration and the Big Rip.

  3. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  4. Radioimmunoassay for cyclic nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.S.

    1984-02-21

    An improved radioimmunoassay for the determination of cyclic nucleotides in body fluids which comprises adding a source of divalent cation prior to assay minimizes the effects of both endogenous calcium ion and EDTA used as an anticoagulant in blood plasma samples.

  5. Cloud Point Extraction for Electroanalysis: Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Cory A; Bange, Adam; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2015-06-16

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) is a well-established technique for the preconcentration of hydrophobic species from water without the use of organic solvents. Subsequent analysis is then typically performed via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), UV-vis spectroscopy, or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, the suitability of CPE for electroanalytical methods such as stripping voltammetry has not been reported. We demonstrate the use of CPE for electroanalysis using the determination of cadmium (Cd(2+)) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Rather than using the chelating agents which are commonly used in CPE to form a hydrophobic, extractable metal complex, we used iodide and sulfuric acid to neutralize the charge on Cd(2+) to form an extractable ion pair. This offers good selectivity for Cd(2+) as no interferences were observed from other heavy metal ions. Triton X-114 was chosen as the surfactant for the extraction because its cloud point temperature is near room temperature (22-25 °C). Bare glassy carbon (GC), bismuth-coated glassy carbon (Bi-GC), and mercury-coated glassy carbon (Hg-GC) electrodes were compared for the CPE-ASV. A detection limit for Cd(2+) of 1.7 nM (0.2 ppb) was obtained with the Hg-GC electrode. ASV with CPE gave a 20x decrease (4.0 ppb) in the detection limit compared to ASV without CPE. The suitability of this procedure for the analysis of tap and river water samples was demonstrated. This simple, versatile, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective extraction method is potentially applicable to a wide variety of transition metals and organic compounds that are amenable to detection by electroanalytical methods.

  6. Cloud Point Extraction for Electroanalysis: Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, Cory A.; Bange, Adam; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) is a well-established technique for the pre-concentration of hydrophobic species from water without the use of organic solvents. Subsequent analysis is then typically performed via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), UV-Vis spectroscopy, or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, the suitability of CPE for electroanalytical methods such as stripping voltammetry has not been reported. We demonstrate the use of CPE for electroanalysis using the determination of cadmium (Cd2+) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) as a representative example. Rather than using the chelating agents which are commonly used in CPE to form a hydrophobic, extractable metal complex, we used iodide and sulfuric acid to neutralize the charge on Cd2+ to form an extractable ion pair. Triton X-114 was chosen as the surfactant for the extraction because its cloud point temperature is near room temperature (22–25° C). Bare glassy carbon (GC), bismuth-coated glassy carbon (Bi-GC), and mercury-coated glassy carbon (Hg-GC) electrodes were compared for the CPE-ASV. A detection limit for Cd2+ of 1.7 nM (0.2 ppb) was obtained with the Hg-GC electrode. Comparison of ASV analysis without CPE was also investigated and a 20x decrease (4.0 ppb) in the detection limit was observed. The suitability of this procedure for the analysis of tap and river water samples was also demonstrated. This simple, versatile, environmentally friendly and cost-effective extraction method is potentially applicable to a wide variety of transition metals and organic compounds that are amenable to detection by electroanalytical methods. PMID:25996561

  7. Cloud Point Extraction for Electroanalysis: Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Cory A; Bange, Adam; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2015-06-16

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) is a well-established technique for the preconcentration of hydrophobic species from water without the use of organic solvents. Subsequent analysis is then typically performed via atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), UV-vis spectroscopy, or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, the suitability of CPE for electroanalytical methods such as stripping voltammetry has not been reported. We demonstrate the use of CPE for electroanalysis using the determination of cadmium (Cd(2+)) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Rather than using the chelating agents which are commonly used in CPE to form a hydrophobic, extractable metal complex, we used iodide and sulfuric acid to neutralize the charge on Cd(2+) to form an extractable ion pair. This offers good selectivity for Cd(2+) as no interferences were observed from other heavy metal ions. Triton X-114 was chosen as the surfactant for the extraction because its cloud point temperature is near room temperature (22-25 °C). Bare glassy carbon (GC), bismuth-coated glassy carbon (Bi-GC), and mercury-coated glassy carbon (Hg-GC) electrodes were compared for the CPE-ASV. A detection limit for Cd(2+) of 1.7 nM (0.2 ppb) was obtained with the Hg-GC electrode. ASV with CPE gave a 20x decrease (4.0 ppb) in the detection limit compared to ASV without CPE. The suitability of this procedure for the analysis of tap and river water samples was demonstrated. This simple, versatile, environmentally friendly, and cost-effective extraction method is potentially applicable to a wide variety of transition metals and organic compounds that are amenable to detection by electroanalytical methods. PMID:25996561

  8. Comparison of the simple cyclic voltammetry (CV) and DPPH assays for the determination of antioxidant capacity of active principles.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Jesús F; Ruiz-Montoya, Mercedes; Palma, Alberto; Alonso-Garrido, Gema; Pintado, Sara; Rodríguez-Mellado, José M

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant activity of a number of small (low molecular weight) natural compounds found in spices, condiments or drugs (gallic acid, sesamol, eugenol, thymol, carvacrol, vanillin, salicylaldehyde, limonene, geraniol, 4-hexylresorcinol, etc.) has been evaluated using electrochemical and DPPH• radical scavenging measurements. Structural analysis of the tested compound suggest a remarkable activity for phenol derivatives and the importance of the -R groups located on the phenolic ring in the molecule's ability to act as free radical scavenging as well as their influence in the electrochemical behavior. The voltammetric method can be used for the determination of the antioxidant capability in the same manner as the DPPH• radical scavenging because of the correlation found between oxidation potentials and anti-radical power (ARP = 1/EC₅₀). Such electrochemical determination is fast and cheap and allows making measurements under a variety of experimental conditions. The accuracy of the electrochemical measurements is the same for all the compounds, irrespective of their scavenging activity, the opposite of what occurs in the DPPH• test. PMID:22555300

  9. Electrochemical identification of corrosion products on historical and archaeological bronzes using the voltammetry of micro-particles attached to a carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Satović, D; Martinez, S; Bobrowski, A

    2010-06-15

    An overview of the electrochemical method for the identification of microsampled corrosion products from historical and archaeological bronzes is reported. Two characteristic examples of long-term air and subterranean formed patinas and two artificial patinas formed on Cu-6%Sn bronze in sulphate and chloride solutions, were investigated in 0.1M HCl(aq) by means of the cyclic voltammetry of micro-particles attached to a carbon paste electrode. Patina constituent phases were identified by comparing the electrochemical parameters of the patina samples to those of reference compounds: CuO, Cu(2)O, SnO, SnO(2), CuCl, CuCl(2) x 2H(2)O and CuSO(4) x 5H(2)O. An identification scheme was suggested which may be applied to discern the various corrosion products of bronze based on electrochemical data (voltammetric peak potentials). The presence of two prevalent phases of sulphate and chloride patinas, CuSO(4) and CuCl, as well as the presence of Sn compounds was clearly indicated by the cyclic voltammetry of microparticles, in both, naturally and artificially formed samples. A comparison to the ATR-FTIR results revealed that the methods are complementary and that their simultaneous application could prove particularly valuable in drawing conclusions about the current shape and prospects of the conservation and restoration of bronze artefacts.

  10. Determination of allura red in some food samples by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmad H

    2005-01-01

    Square wave (SW) voltammetry was used to explore the adsorption properties of the food additive dye Allura Red on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). By using the adsorptive stripping voltammetric approach, we developed a sensitive electroanalytical method for the determination of this azo dye. A well-developed voltammetric peak probably related to the cathodic reduction of the azo moiety was obtained in pH 9 Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer at 613 mV. Cyclic voltammetric studies indicated that the reduction process was irreversible and primarily controlled by adsorption. The adsorptive voltammetric signal was evaluated with respect to various experimental conditions; the optimized values were supporting electrolyte, B-R buffer; pH 11; accumulation time, 180 s; accumulation potential, 0.0 V; scan rate, 900 mV/s; pulse amplitude, 75 mV; and SW frequency, 90 Hz. Adsorptive voltammetric peak current showed a linear response for Allura Red in the concentration range of 2.5 x 10(-8) to 2.0 x 10(-7) mol/L (r = 0.998). The limit of detection was 8.5 x 10(-9) mol/L (4.2 ng/mL), the precision in terms of relative standard deviation was 1.3%, and the mean recovery was 102%. Possible interferences by several substances usually present in food products such as food additive azo dyes (E110, E102), gelatin, natural and artificial sweeteners, preservatives, and antioxidants were also evaluated. The proposed electrochemical procedure was successfully applied to the determination of this food dye in commercially available candy and a soft drink. The results were compared by statistical evaluation with those obtained by a reference spectrophotometric method.

  11. Voltammetry of 6,6'-dithiodinicotinic acid on a self-assembled phospholipid monolayer prive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, R.; Vilariño, T.; Barriada, J. L.; Sastre de Vicente, M. E.; López-Fonseca, J. M.; Moncelli, M. R.

    1999-04-01

    This paper reports a voltammetric study of 6,6'-dithiodinicotinic acid (CPDS) across a biomimetic membrane system consisting of a monolayer of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, deposited on mercury. Because of the low solubility of this compound and its potential decomposition in alkaline media, estimation of pK values for the carboxyl and amino groups of the pyridine ring of the CPDS entailed using the Hammett equation. UV spectra seem to confirm the presence of the dianionic form of CPDS above pH=3-4. Differential capacity and cyclic voltammetry measurements were made in order to characterize the voltammetric behavior directly on mercury and through a monolayer of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine. Estimation of the CPDS hydrophobicity degree from the partition coefficient in octanol/ water suggests no penetration of the dianion into the monolayer and supports the fact that the named dianion undergoes protonation at the phospholipid/solution interface to give a neutral specie which penetration into the phospholipid region, favored by its higher hydrophobicity, is followed by electrochemical reduction at the mercury surface. Nous avons étudié par voltampérométrie le comportement de l'acide 6,6'-dithiodinicotinique (CPDS) sur l'électrode de mercure couverte par une monocouche de dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine. La caractérisation électrochimique a été effectuée par des mesures de la capacité différentielle et par voltamétrie cyclique au dessus d'un pH 3-4. Le spectre UV paraît confirmer la présence de la forme dianionique du CPDS. Cependant les données expérimentales associées à une estimation de l'hydrophobicité de la forme dianionique suggèrent que seule la forme neutre du CPDS peut être réduite sur la surface de l'électrode.

  12. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  13. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  14. Examination of dentin surface using AFM (our experience).

    PubMed

    Zapletalová, Zdenka; Kubínek, Roman; Vůjtek, Milan; Novotný, Radko

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as one the technique of Scanning Probe Microscopy is useful for imaging of surface structure. This method can yield three-dimensional high-resolution topographic images of sample surfaces by using a scanning technique for conductors and insulators on atomic scale. It is based upon mapping of atomic-forces on a surface of an investigated sample. The method is useful not only in physics and chemistry; it can be also applied in biological fields. Special construction of AFM scanner enables to follow biological samples in liquid environments. Artifacts caused by dehydration of samples are removed this way. Dentin of human teeth is a vital hydrated tissue. It is strongly sensitive to dehydration and drying that are commonly used in preparation of samples in examinations by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We describe our experience in examination of dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using contact method of AFM under moist conditions.

  15. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  16. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  17. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  18. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  19. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  20. CD-AFM reference metrology at NIST and SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Fu, Joseph; Orji, Ndubuisi; Guthrie, William; Allen, Richard; Cresswell, Michael

    2005-05-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and SEMATECH have been working together to improve the traceability of critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) dimensional metrology in semiconductor manufacturing. A major component of this collaboration has been the implementation of a Reference Measurement System (RMS) at SEMATECH using a current generation CD-AFM. An earlier tool, originally used at SEMATECH, has now been installed at NIST. Uncertainty budgets were developed for pitch, height, and CD measurements using both tools. At present, the standard uncertainties are approximately 0.2 % for pitch measurements and 0.4% for step height measurements. Prior to the current work, CD AFM linewidth measurements were limited to a standard uncertainty of about 5 nm. However, this limit can now be significantly reduced. This reduction results from the completion of the NIST/SEMATECH collaboration on the development of single crystal critical dimension reference materials (SCDDRM). A new generation of these reference materials was released to SEMATECH Member Companies during late 2004. The SEMATECH RMS was used to measure the linewidths of selected features on the distributed specimens. To reduce the uncertainty in tip width calibration, a separate transfer experiment was performed in which samples were measured by CD-AFM and then sent for high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In this manner, CD-AFM could be used to transfer the HRTEM width information to the distributed samples. Consequently, we are now able to reduce the limit on the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of CD-AFM width measurements to 1 nm.

  1. Electrochemical Investigation of Coenzyme Q10 on Silver Electrode in Ethanol Aqueous Solution and Its Determination Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Deng, Wei; Xu, Hu; Sun, Yinxing; Wang, Yuhong; Chen, Shouhui; Ding, Xianting

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemistry reduction of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on silver electrodes has been investigated in mixed solvent containing 95 vol. % ethanol and 5 vol. % water. A combination of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is employed to explore the mechanism of redox processes of CoQ10 in the presence and absence of oxygen, respectively. It has been proved that the redox reaction of CoQ10 is highly dependent on the oxygen in the solution compared with that of CoQ0, which may be attributed to the isoprenoid side chain effect of CoQ10 Moreover, the effects of experimental variables such as electrolyte component, pH, temperature, and sonication time on the amperometric and potentiometric responses of CoQ10 are presented. The differential pulse voltammetry method has been developed for the quantification of the CoQ10 in the complex samples. Under the optimum conditions, the method is linear over the concentration range of 1.00 × 10(-7) to 1.00 × 10(-3) mol/L (8.63 × 10(-2) to 8.63 × 10(2) mg/kg). The limit of detection (3σ/k) is 3.33 × 10(-8) mol/L (2.88 × 10(-2) mg/kg). The recoveries of the spiked samples are between 91% and 108%. The presented method can be applied to the analysis of CoQ10 in real samples without any pretreatment.

  2. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  3. Thermo-magnetic behaviour of AFM-MFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Arinero, R.; Bergez, W.; Tordjeman, Ph

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the behaviour of AFM cantilevers under an external magnetic field B and temperature field produced by a coil with an iron core. Four cantilever types were studied. Forces were measured for different B values and at various coil-to-cantilever separation distances. The results were analysed on the basis of a phenomenological model. This model contains the contribution of two terms, one monopole-monopole interaction at short distance, and one apparent paramagnetic interaction in \

  4. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  5. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Determination of ascorbic acid content of some fruit juices and wine by voltammetry performed at pt and carbon paste electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pisoschi, Aurelia Magdalena; Pop, Aneta; Negulescu, Gheorghe Petre; Pisoschi, Aurel

    2011-02-01

    A method was developed for assessing ascorbic acid concentration in fruit juices and wine by differential pulse voltammetry. The oxidation peak for ascorbic acid occurs at about 530 mV (versus SCE) on a Pt strip working electrode and at about 470 mV on a carbon paste working electrode. The influence of the operational parameters like the pulse amplitude and the pulse period on the analytical signal was investigated. The obtained calibration graph shows a linear dependence between the peak height and ascorbic acid concentration within the range 0.31-20 mM with a Pt working electrode, and within the range 0.07-20 mM with a carbon paste working electrode. The equation of the calibration graph was y = 21.839x + 35.726, r² = 0.9940, when a Pt strip electrode was used (where y represents the value of the current intensity measured for the peak height, expressed as µA and x the analyte concentration, as mM). R.S.D. = 2.09%, n = 10, C(ascorbic acid) = 2.5 mM. The equation of the calibration graph was y = 3.4429x + 5.7334, r² = 0.9971, when a carbon paste electrode was used (where y represents the value of intensity measured for the peak height, expressed as µA and x the analyte concentration, as mM). R.S.D. = 2.35%, n = 10, C(ascorbic acid) = 2.5 mM. The developed method was applied to ascorbic acid assessment in fruit juices and wine. The ascorbic acid content determined ranged between 6.83 mg/100 mL juice for soft drinks (Fanta Madness) and 54.74 mg/100 mL for citrus (lemon) juices obtained by squeezing fruit. Different ascorbic acid concentrations (from standard solutions) were added to the analysed samples, the degree of recovery being comprised between 94.74 and 104.97%. The results of ascorbic acid assessment by differential pulse voltammetry were compared with those obtained by cyclic voltammetry. The results obtained by the two methods were in good agreement.

  7. Voltammetry and coulometry with immersed thin layer electrodes. Part 1: Model for effects of solution resistivity in linear sweep voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, A. S.; Pons, S.; Cassidy, J.

    1984-11-01

    In non-aqueous solvent/electrolyte systems, solution resistivities as high as 3000 ohm-cm may be encountered. The resulting potential distribution problems are particularly severe, and it was suggested that implementation of thin layer methodology, even in solvents of relatively high dielectric constant, such as acetonitrile or dimethylformamide, would be difficult. It is in such poorly conducting media that the advantages of thin-layer methodology may often be most beneficial, however. In this paper the application of thin layer voltammetry in non-aqueous media is considered. The discussion is centered around immersed thin layer electrodes, i.e., those in which the edges of the thin layer cavity are immersed in bulk solution, since a greater cross sectional area is available for the flow of current, and the resulting potential distribution is therefore less severe. Such cell designs always suffer to some extent from diffusion of electroactive material from the bulk solution into the thin layer cavity, but it will be demonstrated experimentally that this does not seriously affect the usefulness of results.

  8. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  9. Determination of dipyridamole in pharmaceutical preparations using square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    de Toledo, Renata Alves; Castilho, Marilza; Mazo, Luiz Henrique

    2005-01-01

    An analytical methodology using square wave voltammetry (SWV) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) was developed for the quantitative determination of dipyridamole (DIP), a drug used for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases, in pharmaceutical tablets and injections of Persantin in phosphate buffer (pH 3.0; 0.1M). After optimization of the parameters for SWV, analytical curves were obtained for application in the range of 1.28 x 10(-6)M to 7.02 x 10(-6)M. It was found a detection limit (DL) of 1.88 x 10(-8)M (9.50 ng/ml). The repeatability and the reproducibility of the method were determinated by successive measurements of DIP solutions on the range of the analytical curve with a coefficient variation of 0.97% (n=5) and 1.15%, respectively. The apparent recoveries were obtained by the IUPAC recommended procedure using the second reduction peak. Recoveries obtained by SWV were compared with the UV-vis spectrophotometric method. It was found that the determination of DIP in Persantin tablets gave a mean value of 75.6+/-0.4 mg (100.8%) and 68.9+/-0.3 mg (91.8%) for SWV and UV-vis spectrophotometry, respectively. In the case of injections, it was found 10.4+/-0.1 mg (103.4%) and 9.9+/-0.2 mg (99.9%) for SWV and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Both apparent recoveries for the two types of formulations are in good accordance with the declared value of 75 mg (tablets) and 10 mg (injections).

  10. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  11. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  12. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  13. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  14. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Investigation of the reduction process of dopamine using paired pulse voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyoung; Oh, Yoonbae; Shin, Hojin; Blaha, Charles D.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of dopamine (DA) around +0.6V potential in anodic sweep and its reduction around −0.1V in cathodic sweep at a relatively fast scanning rate (300 V/s or greater) have been used for identification of DA oxidation in fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). However, compared to the oxidation peak of DA, the reduction peak has not been fully examined in analytical studies, although it has been used as one of the representative features to identify DA. In this study, the reduction process of DA was investigated using paired pulse voltammetry (PPV), which consists of two identical triangle-shaped waveforms, separated by a short interval at the holding potential. Especially, the discrepancies between the magnitude of the oxidation and reduction peaks of DA were investigated based on three factors: (1) the instant desorption of the DA oxidation product (dopamine-o-quinone: DOQ) after production, (2) the effect of the holding potential on the reduction process, and (3) the rate-limited reduction process of DA. For the first test, the triangle waveform FSCV experiment was performed on DA with various scanrates (from 400 to 1000 V/s) and durations of switching potentials of the triangle waveform (from 0.0 to 6.0 ms) in order to vary the duration between the applied oxidation potential at +0.6V and the reduction potential at −0.2V. As a result, the ratio of reduction over oxidation peak current response decreased as the duration became longer. To evaluate the effect of holding potentials during the reduction process, FSCV experiments were conducted with holding potential from 0.0V to −0.8V. We found that more negative holding potentials lead to larger amount of reduction process. For evaluation of the rate-limited reduction process of DA, PPV with a 1Hz repetition rate and various delays (2, 8, 20, 40 and 80ms) between the paired scans were utilized to determine how much reduction process occurred during the holding potential (−0.4V). These tests showed that

  16. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  17. High-speed AFM for Studying Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Biological molecules show their vital activities only in aqueous solutions. It had been one of dreams in biological sciences to directly observe biological macromolecules (protein, DNA) at work under a physiological condition because such observation is straightforward to understanding their dynamic behaviors and functional mechanisms. Optical microscopy has no sufficient spatial resolution and electron microscopy is not applicable to in-liquid samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize molecules in liquids at high resolution but its imaging rate was too low to capture dynamic biological processes. This slow imaging rate is because AFM employs mechanical probes (cantilevers) and mechanical scanners to detect the sample height at each pixel. It is quite difficult to quickly move a mechanical device of macroscopic size with sub-nanometer accuracy without producing unwanted vibrations. It is also difficult to maintain the delicate contact between a probe tip and fragile samples. Two key techniques are required to realize high-speed AFM for biological research; fast feedback control to maintain a weak tip-sample interaction force and a technique to suppress mechanical vibrations of the scanner. Various efforts have been carried out in the past decade to materialize high-speed AFM. The current high-speed AFM can capture images on video at 30-60 frames/s for a scan range of 250nm and 100 scan lines, without significantly disturbing week biomolecular interaction. Our recent studies demonstrated that this new microscope can reveal biomolecular processes such as myosin V walking along actin tracks and association/dissociation dynamics of chaperonin GroEL-GroES that occurs in a negatively cooperative manner. The capacity of nanometer-scale visualization of dynamic processes in liquids will innovate on biological research. In addition, it will open a new way to study dynamic chemical/physical processes of various phenomena that occur at the liquid-solid interfaces.

  18. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  19. Iron organic speciation determination in rainwater using cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Cheize, Marie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Croot, Peter L; Bucciarelli, Eva; Baudoux, Anne-Claire; Baker, Alex R

    2012-07-29

    A sensitive method using Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-ACSV) has been developed to determine for the first time iron (Fe) organic speciation in rainwater over the typical natural range of pH. We have adapted techniques previously developed in other natural waters to rainwater samples, using the competing ligand 1-nitroso-2-naphthol (NN). The blank was equal to 0.17±0.05 nM (n=14) and the detection limit (DL) for labile Fe was 0.15 nM which is 10-70 times lower than that of previously published methods. The conditional stability constant for NN under rainwater conditions was calibrated over the pH range 5.52-6.20 through competition with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The calculated value of the logarithm of β'(Fe(3+)(NN)(3)) increased linearly with increasing pH according to log β'(Fe(3+)(NN)(3)) (salinity=2.9, T=20 °C). The validation of the method was carried out using desferrioxamine mesylate B (DFOB) as a natural model ligand for Fe. Adequate detection windows were defined to detect this class of ligands in rainwater with 40 μM of NN from pH 5.52 to 6.20. The concentration of Fe-complexing natural ligands was determined for the first time in three unfiltered and one filtered rainwater samples. Organic Fe-complexing ligand concentrations varied from 104.2±4.1 nM equivalent of Fe(III) to 336.2±19.0 nM equivalent of Fe(III) and the logarithm of the conditional stability constants, with respect to Fe(3+), varied from 21.1±0.2 to 22.8±0.3. This method will provide important data for improving our understanding of the role of wet deposition in the biogeochemical cycling of iron.

  20. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes.We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the

  1. Determination of the Antiretroviral Drug Acyclovir in Diluted Alkaline Electrolyte by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar; Cordoves, Ana Isa Perez; Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a stripping method for the determination of acyclovir at the submicromolar concentration level. This method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation of acyclovir at thin-film mercury electrode, followed by a linear cyclic scan voltammetry measurement of the surface species. Optimal experimental conditions include a NaOH solution of 2.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 (supporting electrolyte), an accumulation potential of −0.40 V, and a scan rate of 100 mV s−1. The response of acyclovir is linear over the concentration range 0.02 to 0.12 ppm. For an accumulation time of 4 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 0.42 ppb (1.0 × 10−9 mol L−1). More convenient methods to measure the acyclovir in presence of the didanosine, efavirenz, nevirapine, nelfinavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine were also investigated. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the presence of acyclovir together with Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or DNA. PMID:23761958

  2. Square-wave adsorptive voltammetry of dexamethasone: redox mechanism, kinetic properties, and electroanalytical determinations in multicomponent formulations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Thiago Mielle B F; Ribeiro, Francisco Wirley P; Soares, Janete E S; de Lima-Neto, Pedro; Correia, Adriana N

    2011-06-15

    The electrochemical reduction behavior of dexamethasone at a hanging mercury drop electrode was investigated by cyclic and square-wave adsorptive voltammetries in a Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 2.0. The optimized experimental conditions consisted of a pulse potential frequency of 100 s(-1), a pulse amplitude of 15 mV, and a potential step height of 2 mV, with E(acc)=-0.60V and t(acc)=15s. From these parameters, it was also possible to develop a detailed study about the kinetic and mechanistic events involved in the reduction process. Two well-defined peaks were observed in the cathodic scan, and peak 2 was used to obtain analytical curves. A linear range between 4.98×10(-8) and 6.10×10(-7)mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 2.54×10(-9)mol L(-1) and a quantification limit of 8.47×10(-9)mol L(-1), was observed. Moreover, it was possible to achieve a simple, selective, and versatile methodology adaptable to the quantification of dexamethasone because common excipients used in multicomponent commercial formulations caused no interference. The satisfactory recoveries and the low relative standard deviation data reflected the high accuracy and precision of the proposed method for the determination of dexamethasone in injectable eye drops and elixir samples.

  3. Simultaneous AFM nano-patterning and imaging for photomask repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Tamer, Mehmet S.; van Es, Maarten H.; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a new AFM based nano-patterning technique that can be used for fast defect repairing of high resolution photomasks and possibly other high-speed nano-patterning applications. The proposed method works based on hammering the sample with tapping mode AFM followed by wet cleaning of the residuals. On the area where a specific pattern should be written, the tip-sample interaction force is tuned in a controlled manner by changing the excitation frequency of the cantilever without interrupting the imaging process. Using this method several patterns where transferred to different samples with imaging speed. While the pattern was transferred to the sample in each tracing scan line, the patterned sample was imaged in retracing scan line, thus the outcome was immediately visible during the experiment.

  4. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  6. MDI: integrity index of cytoskeletal fibers observed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Massimo; Bruni, Luca; Croci, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    The Modified Directional Index (MDI) is a form factor of the angular spectrum computed from the 2D Fourier transform of an image marking the prevalence of rectilinear features throughout the picture. We study some properties of the index and we apply it to AFM images of cell cytoskeleton regions featuring patterns of rectilinear nearly parallel actin filaments as in the case of microfilaments grouped in bundles. The analysis of AFM images through MDI calculation quantifies the fiber directionality changes which could be related to fiber damages. This parameter is applied to the images of Hs 578Bst cell line, non-tumoral and not immortalized human epithelial cell line, irradiated with X-rays at doses equivalent to typical radiotherapy treatment fractions. In the reported samples, we could conclude that the damages are mainly born to the membrane and not to the cytoskeleton. It could be interesting to test the parameter also using other kinds of chemical or physical agents.

  7. On CD-AFM bias related to probe bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, V. A.; Orji, N. G.; Vorburger, T. V.; Dixson, R. G.; Fu, J.; Silver, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Critical Dimension AFM (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, very small and flexible probes, often 15 nm to 20 nm in diameter, are now frequently used. Several recent publications have reported on uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements [1,2]. Results obtained in this work suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and thus potentially can explain much of the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe bias variation. We have developed and experimentally tested one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) models to describe the bending of cylindrical probes. An earlier 1D bending model reported by Watanabe et al. [3] was refined. Contributions from several new phenomena were considered, including: probe misalignment, diameter variation near the carbon nanotube tip (CNT) apex, probe bending before snapping, distributed van der Waals-London force, etc. The methodology for extraction of the Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe bending data was developed. To overcome limitations of the 1D model, a new 2D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Comparison of the new model with the 1D single point force (SPF) model revealed about 27 % difference in probe bending bias between the two. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1D SPF and 2D DF models was found. This finding simplifies use of the advanced 2D DF model of probe bending in various CD-AFM applications. New 2D and three-dimensional (3D) CDAFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  8. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  9. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  10. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  11. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  12. Nanoscale fabrication of a peptide layer using an AFM probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Chie; Obataya, Ikuo; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Miyake, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been applied in many studies to manipulate atoms or molecules. In particular, force spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool to elucidate intermolecular or intramolecular interactions and provide mechanical information. If enzymes could retain their activity when immobilized on probes, not only could enzyme-substrate interactions be investigated but also the probes could be used for precise biomolecular manipulation at the nano-scale. In our study, a method based on "Enzymatic Nanolithography" was successfully performed in a buffered solution using Staphylococcal serine V8 protease and AFM. To estimate the fabricating activity of the protease immobilized on the AFM tip to peptides immobilized on a substrate, we designed and synthesized peptides that showed enzymatic action specific to the protease. When the protease digested the reporter peptide a quencher residue was released from the main flame of the peptide and resulted in fluorescence. In the designed 9 mer peptides, TAMRA functioned as a good quencher for FAM. After contact of the protease-immobilized tip to the reporter peptide layer, a fluorescent area was observed by microscopic imaging.

  13. Confocal Raman-AFM, A New Tool for Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ute

    2005-03-01

    Characterization of heterogeneous systems, e.g. polymers, on the nanometer scale continues to grow in importance and to impact key applications in the field of materials science, nanotechnology and catalysis. The development of advanced polymeric materials for such applications requires detailed information about the physical and chemical properties of these materials on the nanometer scale. However, some details about the phase-separation process in polymers are difficult to study with conventional characterization techniques due to the inability of these methods to chemically differentiate materials with good spatial resolution, without damage, staining or preferential solvent washing. The CR-AFM is a breakthrough in microscopy. It combines three measuring techniques in one instrument: a high resolution confocal optical microscope, an extremely sensitive Raman spectroscopy system, and an Atomic Force Microscope. Using this instrument, the high spatial and topographical resolution obtained with an AFM can be directly linked to the chemical information gained by Confocal Raman spectroscopy. To demonstrate the capabilities of this unique combination of measuring techniques, polymer blend films, spin coated on glass substrates, have been characterized. AFM measurements reveal the structural and mechanical properties of the films, whereas Raman spectral images show the chemical composition of the blends.

  14. In situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration of AFM colloidal probes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sangjin; Franck, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to sense lateral forces applied to the AFM probe tip. Recent advances in tissue engineering and functional biomaterials have shown a need for the surface characterization of their material and biochemical properties under the application of lateral forces. LFM equipped with colloidal probes of well-defined tip geometries has been a natural fit to address these needs but has remained limited to provide primarily qualitative results. For quantitative measurements, LFM requires the successful determination of the lateral force or torque conversion factor of the probe. Usually, force calibration results obtained in air are used for force measurements in liquids, but refractive index differences between air and liquids induce changes in the conversion factor. Furthermore, in the case of biochemically functionalized tips, damage can occur during calibration because tip-surface contact is inevitable in most calibration methods. Therefore, a nondestructive in situ lateral force calibration is desirable for LFM applications in liquids. Here we present an in situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method for AFM colloidal probes. In this method, the laterally scanned substrate surface generated a creeping Couette flow, which deformed the probe under torsion. The spherical geometry of the tip enabled the calculation of tip drag forces, and the lateral torque conversion factor was calibrated from the lateral voltage change and estimated torque. Comparisons with lateral force calibrations performed in air show that the hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method enables quantitative lateral force measurements in liquid using colloidal probes.

  15. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  16. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  17. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  18. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Initially described in children, cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) is an idiopathic disorder that affects patients of all ages and is characterized by recurrent episodes of vomiting separated by symptom-free intervals or baseline health. Frequent misdiagnoses and delays in diagnosis often lead to years of recurrent vomiting. Similarities in the clinical features and symptoms of children and adults with CVS are often linked to migraines. Association with mitochondrial disorders and neuroendocrine dysfunction have been described in the pediatric CVS literature, whereas migraines, anxiety, and panic are common in adults with CVS. Various psychological, infectious, and physical stressors commonly precipitate episodes of CVS. Treatment is mostly empiric, with few controlled therapeutic studies conducted thus far. Associations with migraines have aided in developing pharmacologic treatment strategies for prophylaxis as well as abortive therapy during episodes, including the use of trip-tans. Most children outgrow CVS with time, though some children transition to migraine headaches or continue to have CVS as adults. Improved recognition of CVS in adults, along with the emergence of data in the use of anticonvulsants and antiemetics, may help further delineate pathophysiologic connections and therapeutic options for this debilitating disorder.

  19. On Cyclically Symmetrical Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, A.

    2001-07-01

    In a recent paper Carot et al. considered the definition of cylindrical symmetry as a specialisation of the case of axial symmetry. One of their propositions states that if there is a second Killing vector, which together with the one generating the axial symmetry, forms the basis of a two-dimensional Lie algebra, then the two Killing vectors must commute, thus generating an Abelian group. In this paper a similar result, valid under considerably weaker assumptions, is derived: any two-dimensional Lie transformation group which contains a one-dimensional subgroup whose orbits are circles, must be Abelian. The method used to prove this result is extended to apply to three-dimensional Lie transformation groups. It is shown that the existence of a one-dimensional subgroup with closed orbits restricts the Bianchi type of the associated Lie algebra to be I, II, III, VIIq = 0, VIII or IX. Some results on n-dimensional Lie groups are also derived and applied to show there are severe restrictions on the structure of the allowed four-dimensional Lie transformation groups compatible with cyclic symmetry.

  20. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. PMID:25999318

  1. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Block, Stephan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela; Hofacker, Ivo; Müller, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions.

  2. Ada and cyclic runtime scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Philip E.

    1986-01-01

    An important issue that must be faced while introducing Ada into the real time world is efficient and prodictable runtime behavior. One of the most effective methods employed during the traditional design of a real time system is the cyclic executive. The role cyclic scheduling might play in an Ada application in terms of currently available implementations and in terms of implementations that might be developed especially to support real time system development is examined. The cyclic executive solves many of the problems faced by real time designers, resulting in a system for which it is relatively easy to achieve approporiate timing behavior. Unfortunately a cyclic executive carries with it a very high maintenance penalty over the lifetime of the software that is schedules. Additionally, these cyclic systems tend to be quite fragil when any aspect of the system changes. The findings are presented of an ongoing SofTech investigation into Ada methods for real time system development. The topics covered include a description of the costs involved in using cyclic schedulers, the sources of these costs, and measures for future systems to avoid these costs without giving up the runtime performance of a cyclic system.

  3. Mercury(II) trace detection by a gold nanoparticle-modified glassy carbon electrode using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry including a chloride desorption step.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Laure; Hezard, Teddy; Gros, Pierre; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sonke, Jeroen E; Behra, Philippe; Evrard, David

    2015-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate by constant potential electrolysis and characterized by cyclic voltammetry in H2SO4 and field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). The modified AuNPs-GC electrode was used for low Hg(II) concentration detection using a Square Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (SWASV) procedure which included a chloride desorption step. The comparison of the obtained results with our previous work in which no desorption step was used showed that this latter step significantly improved the analytical performances, providing a three time higher sensitivity and a limit of detection of 80pM for 300s preconcentration, as well as a lower average standard deviation. The influence of chloride concentration on the AuNPs-GC electrode response to Hg(II) trace amounts was also studied and its optimal value confirmed to be in the 10(-2)M range. Finally, the AuNPs-GC electrode was used for the determination of Hg(II) in a natural groundwater sample from south of France. By using a preconcentration time of 3000s, a Hg(II) concentration of 19±3pM was found, which compared well with the result obtained by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (22±2pM). PMID:25966376

  4. Algebraic curves of maximal cyclicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caubergh, Magdalena; Dumortier, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with analytic families of planar vector fields, studying methods to detect the cyclicity of a non-isolated closed orbit, i.e. the maximum number of limit cycles that can locally bifurcate from it. It is known that this multi-parameter problem can be reduced to a single-parameter one, in the sense that there exist analytic curves in parameter space along which the maximal cyclicity can be attained. In that case one speaks about a maximal cyclicity curve (mcc) in case only the number is considered and of a maximal multiplicity curve (mmc) in case the multiplicity is also taken into account. In view of obtaining efficient algorithms for detecting the cyclicity, we investigate whether such mcc or mmc can be algebraic or even linear depending on certain general properties of the families or of their associated Bautin ideal. In any case by well chosen examples we show that prudence is appropriate.

  5. Nonsurgical treatment of cyclic esotropia.

    PubMed

    Voide, Nathalie; Presset, Claudine; Klainguti, Georges; Kaeser, Pierre-François

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic esotropia is characterized by a 24-hour period of straight eye position followed by 24 hours of large-angle esotropia. Possible mechanisms include notably progressive loss of compensation of a latent strabismus. The classic treatment is surgical correction of the angle measured on the days with manifest deviation. We report the first case of cyclic esotropia successfully treated by prismatic correction of the latent strabismus present on "straight" days. PMID:25828819

  6. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  7. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  8. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  9. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  10. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  11. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  12. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  13. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  14. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  15. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  16. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  17. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  18. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  19. AFM studies of semicrystalline polymer/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this work are to elucidate the effects of interaction strength on the crystallization of a polymer near an inorganic surface; connect filler induced polymer crystallinity with resulting property changes, especially for strongly interacting (i.e. hydrogen bonding) systems; and to devise atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods for probing the crystallinity and properties of polymer/layered silicate systems at the nanometer level. Three inorganically filled systems were studied: (1) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), (2) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), and (3) polypropylene (PP). Since it has the strongest, interactions, the PVA system is investigated first. AFM is used in conjunction with x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to show that strong polymer/filler interactions can promote a different crystalline structure and a different morphology than those seen in the bulk. The study then proceeds to the weakly interacting PEO/inorganic system where it is found that the inorganic layers disrupt crystalline morphology, but do not change the crystal structure. Furthermore, crystallization always occurs in volumes away from the inorganic filler. The third system (neutral interactions), PP/inorganic is then discussed. The three systems are compared with each other, and is found that the crystalline morphology and structure is highly dependent upon the strength of interaction between the polymer and filler. Due to its far-reaching morphology changes, the strongly interacting system was chosen for property studies. The composite structure study revealed a coexistence of exfoliated and intercalated MMT layers, especially for low and moderate silicate loadings. The inorganic layers promote a new crystalline phase different than the one of the respective neat PVA, characterized by higher melting temperature and a different crystal structure. This new crystal phase reflects on the composite materials properties, which have mechanical, thermal, and water

  20. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  1. Intrinsically high-Q dynamic AFM imaging in liquid with a significantly extended needle tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-06-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially available tapping-mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operational frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic material properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments.

  2. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  3. Determination of oxcarbazepine by Square Wave Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M Encarnación Burgoa; Renedo, Olga Domínguez; Martínez, M Julia Arcos

    2007-02-19

    A procedure for the determination of oxcarbazepine (OXC) by Square Wave Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (SWAdSV) has been optimized. Selection of the experimental parameters was made using experimental design methodology. The detection limit was 1.74 x 10(-7) mol dm(-3). This method was used to determine oxcarbazepine in pharmaceutical preparations.

  4. Lead-Testing Service to Elementary and Secondary Schools Using Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goebel, Amanda; Vos, Tracy; Louwagie, Anne; Lundbohm, Laura; Brown, Jay H.

    2004-01-01

    The undergraduate chemistry club of the Southwest Minnesota State University offers assistance in lead-testing through the anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) technique to elementary and secondary schools. Emphasis is given to this community service activity, which has increased club membership, and promoted discussion of water quality problems in…

  5. The Rise of Voltammetry: From Polarography to the Scanning Electrochemical Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Allen J.

    2007-01-01

    The drooping mercury electrode (DME) was previously used to carry out electrochemical experiments but invention of polarography technique changed this. Voltammetry with DME was given the term polarography and are used in measurement of current as a function of potential at small electrodes.

  6. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry of Environmental Indicators: Determination of Zinc in Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collado-Sanchez, C.; Hernandez-Brito, J. J.; Perez-Pena, J.; Torres-Padron, M. E.; Gelado-Caballero, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    A method for sample preparation and for the determination of average zinc content in algae using adsorptive stripping voltammetry are described. The students gain important didactic advantages through metal determination in environmental matrices, which include carrying out clean protocols for sampling and handling, and digesting samples using…

  7. Mechanical properties study of SW480 cells based on AFM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Song, Zhengxun; Qu, Yingmin; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Zuobin

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM), it has been widely applied in biomedicine. One of the most important applications is used as an indenter tool to do the indentation experiment in order to get the mechanical properties of cells. In this paper, SW480 cells were used as the test subjects. Through the analysis of the contact and indentation, Young's modulus (E), which is an important parameter of cancer cells, has been estimated. Experimental results show that different mechanical models should be chosen to calculate the E in different indentation depths. Here, the E of SW480 cells was (2.5 ± 0.8) KPa at the indentation depth of 99 nm.

  8. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  10. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  11. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  12. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  13. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions. PMID:23721486

  14. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  15. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  16. Color visualization of cyclic magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Alfredo; Estupiñán, Viviana

    2014-02-01

    We exploit the perceptual, circular ordering of the hues in a technique for the visualization of cyclic variables. The hue is thus meaningfully used for the indication of variables such as the azimuth and the units of the measurement of time. The cyclic (or circular) variables may be both of the continuous type or the discrete type; among the first there is azimuth and among the last you find the musical notes and the days of the week. A correspondence between the values of a cyclic variable and the chromatic hues, where the natural circular ordering of the variable is respected, is called a color code for the variable. We base such a choice of hues on an assignment of of the unique hues red, yellow, green and blue, or one of the 8 even permutations of this ordered list, to 4 cardinal values of the cyclic variable, suitably ordered; color codes based on only 3 cardinal points are also possible. Color codes, being intuitive, are easy to remember. A possible low accuracy when reading instruments that use this technique is compensated by fast, ludic and intuitive readings; also, the use of a referential frame makes readings precise. An achromatic version of the technique, that can be used by dichromatic people, is proposed.

  17. Synthesis of cyclic disulfide-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two SPPS approaches for producing cyclic disulfide-rich peptides in our laboratory, including cyclotides from plants, cyclic conotoxins from cone snail venoms, chlorotoxin from scorpion venom, and the sunflower trypsin inhibitor peptide, SFTI-1.

  18. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  19. In situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry of copper stained on the gold label after galvanic replacement reaction enlargement for ultrasensitive immunoassay of proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoli; Xu, Aigui; Wang, Linchun; Liu, Ling; Chao, Long; He, Fang; Tan, Yueming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Qingji

    2016-05-15

    We report a new protocol for ultrasensitive electrochemical sandwich-type immunosensing, on the basis of signal amplification by gold-label/copper-staining, galvanic replacement reactions (GRRs), and in situ microliter-droplet anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) after an enhanced cathodic preconcentration of copper. First, a sandwich-type immuno-structure is appropriately assembled at a glassy carbon electrode. Second, copper is selectively stained on the catalytic surfaces of second antibody-conjugated Au nanoparticles through CuSO4-ascorbic acid redox reaction, and the GRRs between HAuCl4 and the stained copper are used to amplify the quantity of copper. Finally, the corresponding antigen is determined based on simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-preconcentration of copper for in-situ ASV analysis directly at the immunoelectrode. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance and scanning electron microscopy are used for film characterization and/or process monitoring. Under optimized conditions, ultrasensitive analyses of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and human carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) are achieved. The limits of detection are 0.3 fg mL(-1) (equivalent to 7 IgG molecules in the 6 μL sample employed) for IgG (S/N=3) and 1.3 nU mL(-1) for CA125 (S/N=3), respectively, which are amongst the best reported to date for the two proteins. The theoretical feasibility of such a single-molecule-level amperometric immunoassay is also discussed based on the immunological reaction thermodynamics.

  20. Cytochrome c self-assembly on alkanethiol monolayer electrodes as characterized by AFM, IR, QCM, and direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Yoshitake, Tadateru; Yamashita, Yasunori; Bowden, Edmond F

    2007-05-22

    With the advantage of carbodiimide coupling chemistry, horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c) has been covalently immobilized onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) from 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) developed on single-crystal or polycrystalline gold substrate surfaces. The cyt c immobilized substrates thus prepared have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM); we have succeeded in obtaining surface topographical images down to single-protein resolution. AFM imaging has also shown densely packed, uniform protein monolayer formation that is highly suggestive of self-assembly of cyt c molecules on MUDA SAMs. Covalent attachment of cyt c has been further evidenced by reflection-absorption FT-IR as well as microgravimetric analysis using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). In the latter, the specific MUDA and cyt c surface concentrations were determined to be 0.86 +/- 0.11 nmol cm-2 (n = 5) and 28 +/- 12 pmol cm-2 (n = 5), both of which agree fairly well with their theoretical counterparts. The obtained QCM chips having the cyt c/MUDA/Au interfacial structure were found to be capable of the direct electrochemistry of the surface-attached cyt c molecules. Cyclic voltammetric measurements on the chips gave particular redox waves showing characteristics of surface process. The electroactive protein surface concentration was determined to be 7.2 +/- 4.8 pmol cm-2 (n = 6); it was almost consistent with values found in literature, while it was limited to 26% in magnitude for the QCM data. This was deemed to have arisen from the orientation variation of the surface-confined cyt c molecules and is discussed briefly.

  1. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  2. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  3. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  4. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  5. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  6. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  7. Detection of food additives by voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Grégoire; Kam, Victor; Berduque, Alfonso; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2008-06-25

    Electrochemistry at the liquid-liquid interface enables the detection of nonredoxactive species with electroanalytical techniques. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of two food additives, aspartame and acesulfame K, was investigated. Both ions were found to undergo ion-transfer voltammetry at the liquid-liquid interface. Differential pulse voltammetry was used for the preparation of calibration curves over the concentration range of 30-350 microM with a detection limit of 30 microM. The standard addition method was applied to the determination of their concentrations in food and beverage samples such as sweeteners and sugar-free beverages. Selective electrochemically modulated liquid-liquid extraction of these species in both laboratory solutions and in beverage samples was also demonstrated. These results indicate the suitability of liquid-liquid electrochemistry as an analytical approach in food analysis.

  8. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Silver Nanoparticles: Aggregation Leads to Incomplete Stripping

    PubMed Central

    Cloake, Samantha J; Toh, Her Shuang; Lee, Patricia T; Salter, Chris; Johnston, Colin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nanoparticle aggregation on anodic stripping voltammetry is reported. Dopamine-capped silver nanoparticles were chosen as a model system, and melamine was used to induce aggregation in the nanoparticles. Through the anodic stripping of the silver nanoparticles that were aggregated to different extents, it was found that the peak area of the oxidative signal corresponding to the stripping of silver to silver(I) ions decreases with increasing aggregation. Aggregation causes incomplete stripping of the silver nanoparticles. Two possible mechanisms of ‘partial oxidation’ and ‘inactivation’ of the nanoparticles are proposed to account for this finding. Aggregation effects must be considered when anodic stripping voltammetry is used for nanoparticle detection and quantification. Hence, drop casting, which is known to lead to aggregation, is not encouraged for preparing electrodes for analytical purposes. PMID:25861566

  9. Abrasive stripping square-wave voltammetry of blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, pomegranate, and sweet and blue potatoes.

    PubMed

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Šebojka; Novak, Ivana

    2011-08-01

    Electro-oxidation potentials of 7 fruits and vegetables were determined by abrasive stripping voltammetry. The responses were characterized by 2 peaks with maxima at 0.45 and 0.55 V compared with Ag/AgCl, respectively. Both electrode reactions appear reversible at a frequency of 8 Hz. They can be ascribed to anthocyanidins and ellagic acid as electroactive compounds. By this method, an antioxidative capacity of a certain plant can be quickly estimated without extraction of active components.

  10. Graphene electroanalysis: inhibitory effects in the stripping voltammetry of cadmium with surfactant free graphene.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Dale A C; Lacombe, Alexandre C; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2012-01-21

    We explore the use of surfactant free graphene towards the electroanalytical sensing of cadmium(II) ions via anodic stripping voltammetry. In line with literature methodologies, we modify an electrode substrate which exhibits relatively fast electron transfer with commercially available graphene which is free from surfactants. Surprisingly, we find that graphene reduces the analytical performance and hence inhibits the electrochemical detection of cadmium(II) ions, with calibration plots in model aqueous solutions revealing no advantages of employing graphene in this analytical context.

  11. AFM imaging of functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, C; Danzberger, J; Lukanov, P; Tîlmaciu, C-M; Galibert, A-M; Soula, B; Flahaut, E; Gruber, H J; Hinterdorfer, P; Ebner, A; Kienberger, F

    2009-07-01

    We present a comparative study of several non-covalent approaches to disperse, debundle and non-covalently functionalize double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs). We investigated the ability of bovine serum albumin (BSA), phospholipids grafted onto amine-terminated polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG(2000)-NH(2)), as well as a combination thereof, to coat purified DWNTs. Topographical imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to assess the coating of individual DWNTs and the degree of debundling and dispersion. Topographical images showed that functionalized DWNTs are better separated and less aggregated than pristine DWNTs and that the different coating methods differ in their abilities to successfully debundle and disperse DWNTs. Height profiles indicated an increase in the diameter of DWNTs depending on the functionalization method and revealed adsorption of single molecules onto the nanotubes. Biofunctionalization of the DWNT surface was achieved by coating DWNTs with biotinylated BSA, providing for biospecific binding of streptavidin in a simple incubation step. Finally, biotin-BSA-functionalized DWNTs were immobilized on an avidin layer via the specific avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19375857

  12. Conductive probe AFM measurements of conjugated molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Mizutani, Wataru; Liang, Tien-Tzu; Azehara, Hiroaki; Miyake, Koji; Sasaki, Shinya; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    The electrical conduction of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made from conjugated molecules was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), with a focus on the molecular structural effect on conduction. First, the electrical conduction of SAMs made from phenylene oligomer SAMs was measured. The resistances through the monolayers increased exponentially with an increase in molecular length and the decay constants of transconductance beta were about 0.45 to 0.61 A(-1) measured at lower bias region. We further investigated the influence of applied load on the resistances. The resistances through terphenyl SAMs increased with an increase in the applied load up to 14 nN. Second, using an insertion technique into insulating alkanethiol SAMs, the electrical conduction of single conjugated terphenyl methanethiol and oligo(para-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) molecules embedded into insulating alkanethiol SAMs were measured. Electrical currents through these single molecules of OPVs were estimated to be larger than those through single terphenyl molecules, suggesting that the OPV structure can increase the electrical conduction of single molecules. Third, apparent negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed at higher bias measurements of SAMs. The appearance of NDR might be related to roughness of SAM surface, because apparent NDR was often observed on rough surfaces. In any case, the tip-molecule contact condition strongly affected carrier transport through metal tip/SAM/metal junction.

  13. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  14. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  17. Copper-Based Electrochemical Sensor with Palladium Electrode for Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Manganese

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River. PMID:25476591

  18. Copper-based electrochemical sensor with palladium electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wenjing; Pei, Xing; Bange, Adam; Haynes, Erin N; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2014-12-16

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River.

  19. Copper-based electrochemical sensor with palladium electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wenjing; Pei, Xing; Bange, Adam; Haynes, Erin N; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2014-12-16

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River. PMID:25476591

  20. Ferrocene‐Boronic Acid–Fructose Binding Based on Dual‐Plate Generator–Collector Voltammetry and Square‐Wave Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Xu, Su‐Ying; Gross, Andrew J.; Hammond, Jules L.; Estrela, Pedro; Weber, James; Lacina, Karel; James, Tony D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The interaction of ferrocene‐boronic acid with fructose is investigated in aqueous 0.1 m phosphate buffer at pH 7, 8 and 9. Two voltammetric methods, based on 1) a dual‐plate generator–collector micro‐trench electrode (steady state) and 2) a square‐wave voltammetry (transient) method, are applied and compared in terms of mechanistic resolution. A combination of experimental data is employed to obtain new insights into the binding rates and the cumulative binding constants for both the reduced ferrocene‐boronic acid (pH dependent and weakly binding) and for the oxidised ferrocene‐boronic acid (pH independent and strongly binding). PMID:27525210

  1. Dissolution of uranophane: An AFM, XPS, SEM and ICP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Michael; Freund, Michael; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Burns, Peter C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2009-05-01

    Dissolution experiments on single crystals of uranophane and uranophane-β, Ca(H 2O) 5[(UO 2)(SiO 3(OH)] 2, from the Shinkolobwe mine of the Democratic Republic of Congo, were done in an aqueous HCl solution of pH 3.5 for 3 h, in HCl solutions of pH 2 for 5, 10 and 30 min, and in Pb 2+-, Ba-, Sr-, Ca- and Mg-HCl solutions of pH 2 for 30 min. The basal surfaces of the treated uranophane crystals were examined using atomic-force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solutions after dissolution experiments on single crystals and synthetic powders were analysed with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The morphology of the observed etch pits (measured by AFM) were compared to the morphology, predicted on the basis of the bond-valence deficiency of polyhedron chains along the edges of the basal surface. Etch pits form in HCl solutions of pH 2. Their decrease in depth with the duration of the dissolution experiment is explained with the stepwave dissolution model, which describes the lowering of the surrounding area of an etch pit with continuous waves of steps emanated from the etch pit into the rest of the crystal surface. Hillocks form in an HCl solution of pH 3.5, and the chemical composition of the surface (as indicated by XPS) shows that these hillocks are the result of the precipitation of a uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phase. Well-orientated hillocks form on the surface of uranophane in a SrCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2. They are part of an aged silica coating of composition Si 2O 2(OH) 4(H 2O) n. An amorphous layer forms on the surface of uranophane in a MgCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2, which has a composition and structure similar to silicic acid. Small crystallites of uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phases form on the surface of uranophane after treatment in Pb(NO 3) 2-HCl and BaCl 2-HCl solutions of pH 2. Dissolution experiments on synthetic uranophane powders

  2. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  3. Probing Ternary Solvent Effect in High V(oc) Polymer Solar Cells Using Advanced AFM Techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ding, Yi; Soliman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton V; Gesquiere, Andre J; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high V(oc) low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with V(oc) more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor-acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Finally, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing. PMID:26807919

  4. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  5. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  6. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  7. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  8. Electrochemical Characterization and Determination of Phenol and Chlorophenols by Voltammetry at Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Modified Screen Printed Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Negash, Negussie; Alemu, Hailemichael; Tessema, Merid

    2015-01-01

    Screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) has been modified with single wall carbon nanotube/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (SWCNT/PEDOT) composites for the determination of phenol and chlorophenols (phenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol). The effect of the modifiers on the electrode characteristics was evaluated and the responses were optimized for the voltammetric determination of phenol and chlorophenols. The parameters affecting the responses such as pH, scan rate, and stability were studied. The analytical performance of the SWCNT/PEDOT/SPCE using cyclic voltammetry was tested and found to be impressive. Under these conditions, the designed electrode showed a good performance for the voltammetric measurements of the phenolic compounds. The modified SPCE, when it is compared with other enzymatic and nonenzymatic sensors, showed a wider dynamic range for the detection of the phenolic compounds. The modified SPCE was used for the quantification of phenol in water samples. The results suggest that the method is quite useful for analyzing and monitoring phenols and chlorophenols. PMID:27347519

  9. Voltammetry and in situ scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of osmium, iron, and ruthenium complexes of 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine covalently linked to Au(111)-electrodes.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Princia; Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Nichols, Richard John; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-08-28

    We have studied self-assembled molecular monolayers (SAMs) of complexes between Os(II)/(III), Fe(II)/(III), and Ru(II)/(III) and a 2,2',6',2''-terpyridine (terpy) derivative linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 6-acetylthiohexyloxy substituent at the 4'-position of terpy. The complexes were prepared in situ by first linking the terpy ligand to the surface via the S-atom, followed by addition of suitable metal compounds. The metal-terpy SAMs were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy with full electrochemical potential control of substrate and tip (in situ STM). Sharp CV peaks were observed for the Os- and Fe complexes, with interfacial electrochemical electron transfer rate constants of 6-50 s(-1). Well-defined but significantly broader peaks (up to 300 mV) were observed for the Ru-complex. Addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) towards completion of the metal coordination spheres induced voltammetric sharpening. In situ STM images of single molecular scale strong structural features were observed for the osmium and iron complexes. As expected from the voltammetric patterns, the surface coverage was by far the highest for the Ru-complex which was therefore selected for scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. These correlations displayed a strong peak around the equilibrium potential with systematic shifts with increasing bias voltage, as expected for a sequential two-step in situ ET mechanism.

  10. A potentiostat featuring an integrator transimpedance amplifier for the measurement of very low currents—Proof-of-principle application in microfluidic separations and voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutilellis, G. D.; Economou, A.; Efstathiou, C. E.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the design and construction of a novel potentiostat which features an integrator transimpedance amplifier as a current-monitoring unit. The integration approach addresses the limitations of the feedback resistor approach used for current monitoring in conventional potentiostat designs. In the present design, measurement of the current is performed by a precision switched integrator transimpedance amplifier operated in the dual sampling mode which enables sub-pA resolution. The potentiostat is suitable for measuring very low currents (typical dynamic range: 5 pA-4.7 μA) with a 16 bit resolution, and it can support 2-, 3- and 4-electrode cell configurations. Its operation was assessed by using it as a detection module in a home-made capillary electrophoresis system for the separation and amperometric detection of paracetamol and p-aminophenol at a 3-electrode microfluidic chip. The potential and limitations of the proposed potentiostat to implement fast potential-scan voltammetric techniques were demonstrated for the case of cyclic voltammetry.

  11. A potentiostat featuring an integrator transimpedance amplifier for the measurement of very low currents--Proof-of-principle application in microfluidic separations and voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Koutilellis, G D; Economou, A; Efstathiou, C E

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the design and construction of a novel potentiostat which features an integrator transimpedance amplifier as a current-monitoring unit. The integration approach addresses the limitations of the feedback resistor approach used for current monitoring in conventional potentiostat designs. In the present design, measurement of the current is performed by a precision switched integrator transimpedance amplifier operated in the dual sampling mode which enables sub-pA resolution. The potentiostat is suitable for measuring very low currents (typical dynamic range: 5 pA-4.7 μA) with a 16 bit resolution, and it can support 2-, 3- and 4-electrode cell configurations. Its operation was assessed by using it as a detection module in a home-made capillary electrophoresis system for the separation and amperometric detection of paracetamol and p-aminophenol at a 3-electrode microfluidic chip. The potential and limitations of the proposed potentiostat to implement fast potential-scan voltammetric techniques were demonstrated for the case of cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27036788

  12. Ion-transfer voltammetry of local anesthetics at an organic solvent/water interface and pharmacological activity vs. ion partition coefficient relationship.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Katano, H; Senda, M

    2001-01-01

    The ion-transfer reaction of local anesthetics at an organic solvent/water interface has been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a stationary nitrobenzene (NB)/water (W) interface. Procaine and seven other local anesthetics gave reversible or quasi-reversible voltammograms at the NB/W interface in the pH range between 0.9 and 9.6. These drugs are present in aqueous solution in either neutral or ionic form, or both forms. The half-wave potential, as determined by the midpoint potential in CV, vs. pH curves, were determined and analyzed to determine the partition coefficients of both neutral and ionic forms of the drugs between NB and W. The partition coefficients of the ionic forms were derived from their formal potential of transfer at an NB/W interface. The dissociation constants of ionic forms of the drugs in NB were also deduced. A high correlation between the pharmacological activity and the partition coefficient of the ionic form of amide-linked local anesthetics has been shown.

  13. Cyclic statistics in rolling bearing diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Qu, Liangsheng

    2003-10-01

    Mechanical signals with amplitude modulated are characterized by periodic time-varying ensemble statistics and can be considered as cyclostationary. In this paper, the second order cyclic statistics, i.e. cyclic autocorrelation and cyclic spectrum, are introduced. A method of demodulation based on cyclic autocorrelation is derived from a signal model. The modulators and carrier are exhibited, respectively, in low- and high-frequency band of cyclic frequency domain. The three-dimensional spectral correlation figure, which represents cyclic frequency, frequency and spectral correlation strength simultaneously, is developed to express the demodulation results clearly. The method is tested by simulation signal and applied to diagnose rolling bearing faults. It obtained more information than other conventional methods, such as the frequency domain and the envelop detection. Furthermore, its effect is demonstrated by comparing with the wavelet envelope demodulation.

  14. Advances in targeting cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H; Ke, Hengming; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Wang, Yousheng; Chung, Jay; Manganiello, Vincent C

    2014-04-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) catalyse the hydrolysis of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, thereby regulating the intracellular concentrations of these cyclic nucleotides, their signalling pathways and, consequently, myriad biological responses in health and disease. Currently, a small number of PDE inhibitors are used clinically for treating the pathophysiological dysregulation of cyclic nucleotide signalling in several disorders, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, pharmaceutical interest in PDEs has been reignited by the increasing understanding of the roles of individual PDEs in regulating the subcellular compartmentalization of specific cyclic nucleotide signalling pathways, by the structure-based design of novel specific inhibitors and by the development of more sophisticated strategies to target individual PDE variants.

  15. Cyclic fatigue in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.; Kawabe, Y. . Tsukuba Lab.); Horibe, S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Static and cyclic fatigue behavior was investigated for two kinds of silicon nitride with different microstructures. These materials hardly show rising R-curve behavior. Nevertheless the considerable cyclic loading effect is obviously recognized in them. There has been observed an insignificant difference in the pure cyclic loading effect between coarse grained silicon nitride (SSN-1) and fine grained one (SSN-2). In addition, crack growth rate shows a transient acceleration or retardation when variable-amplitude cyclic loading is applied to SSN-1. Such a result implies the existence of a process zone near a crack tip which has a similar function to plastic zone in metals. Since the above cyclic crack behavior is inexplicable by the grain bridging degradation mechanisms, possible cyclic fatigue mechanisms are, thus, discussed.

  16. Cathode catalyst layers with ionomer to carbon mass ratios in the range 0-2 studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modestov, Alexander D.; Kapustin, Alexander V.; Avakov, Veniamin B.; Landgraf, Igor K.; Tarasevich, Mikhail R.

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of the cathode catalyst layers (CCL) containing HiSPEC 9100 Pt/C catalyst and ionomer (I) in ionomer to carbon mass ratio (I/C) range 0-2 were studied. Pt electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) and electrode low frequency capacitance were found to be independent of I/C value. Ionic resistance of CCL was found strongly dependent of I/C value. It reaches maximum value at I/C∼0.3. Ionic resistance of CCL with I/C = 0.05 increased 7 fold with the shift of electrode potential (E) from 0.4 V to 1.05 vs. RHE. Ionic resistance of an imitating layer, which contained ionomer-free Ketjenblack EC-300J carbon, increased by a factor of 20 with the potential shift from 0.1 V to 1.05 V vs. RHE. Ionic conductivity in ionomer-free CCLs is ascribed to the presence of protons which originate from ionization of oxygen containing acidic surface groups of carbon support. Application to the CCL of potential positive relative to potential of zero charge of carbon support (pzc) draws protons to the counter electrode, decreasing the ionic conductivity of the CCL. Pt mass specific activity (Im) dependence on I/C mass ratio reaches maximum at I/C ∼ 1.

  17. How Do Structure and Charge Affect Metal-Complex Binding to DNA? An Upper-Division Integrated Laboratory Project Using Cyclic Voltammetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulczynska, Agnieszka; Johnson, Reed; Frost, Tony; Margerum, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory project is described that integrates inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical techniques to reveal differences in binding between cationic metal complexes and anionic DNA (herring testes). Students were guided to formulate testable hypotheses based on the title question and a list of different metal…

  18. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.O.; Vukovic, Sinisa; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  19. [Cyclic Cushing's Syndrome - rare or rarely recognized].

    PubMed

    Kiałka, Marta; Doroszewska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Sandra; Milewicz, Tomasz; Stochmal, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome is a type of Cushing's disease which is characterized by alternating periods of increasing and decreasing levels of cortisol in the blood. The diagnostic criteria for cyclic Cushing's syndrome are at least three periods of hypercortisolism alternating with at least two episodes of normal levels of serum cortisol concentration. The epidemiology, signs, symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment of cyclic Cushing's syndrome have been discussed.

  20. Abrasive stripping square-wave voltammetry of blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, pomegranate, and sweet and blue potatoes.

    PubMed

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Šebojka; Novak, Ivana

    2011-08-01

    Electro-oxidation potentials of 7 fruits and vegetables were determined by abrasive stripping voltammetry. The responses were characterized by 2 peaks with maxima at 0.45 and 0.55 V compared with Ag/AgCl, respectively. Both electrode reactions appear reversible at a frequency of 8 Hz. They can be ascribed to anthocyanidins and ellagic acid as electroactive compounds. By this method, an antioxidative capacity of a certain plant can be quickly estimated without extraction of active components. PMID:22417490

  1. Electrochemistry and analytical determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) via adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Merli, Daniele; Zamboni, Daniele; Protti, Stefano; Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is hardly detectable and quantifiable in biological samples because of its low active dose. Although several analytical tests are available, routine analysis of this drug is rarely performed. In this article, we report a simple and accurate method for the determination of LSD, based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry in DMF/tetrabutylammonium perchlorate, with a linear range of 1-90 ng L(-1) for deposition times of 50s. LOD of 1.4 ng L(-1) and LOQ of 4.3 ng L(-1) were found. The method can be also applied to biological samples after a simple extraction with 1-chlorobutane. PMID:25159435

  2. Electrochemistry and analytical determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) via adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Merli, Daniele; Zamboni, Daniele; Protti, Stefano; Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is hardly detectable and quantifiable in biological samples because of its low active dose. Although several analytical tests are available, routine analysis of this drug is rarely performed. In this article, we report a simple and accurate method for the determination of LSD, based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry in DMF/tetrabutylammonium perchlorate, with a linear range of 1-90 ng L(-1) for deposition times of 50s. LOD of 1.4 ng L(-1) and LOQ of 4.3 ng L(-1) were found. The method can be also applied to biological samples after a simple extraction with 1-chlorobutane.

  3. Identifying individual chemical bonds in single-molecule chemical reaction products using nc-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; de Oteyza, Dimas G.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Riss, Alexander; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Gorman, Patrick; Etkin, Grisha; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Perez, Alejandro; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F.; Fischer, Felix R.

    2014-03-01

    Determining reaction pathways and products is an integral part of chemical synthesis. Ensemble measurements are commonly used, but identifying products of complex reactions at surfaces presents a significant challenge. Here we present a non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) study to directly address this issue. We followed the change of the chemical structures, from reactants to products of enediyne cyclization reactions on metal surfaces. Thermal annealing of enediynes induced a series of cyclization cascades leading to radical species and the formation of dimers. Atomically resolved nc-AFM images reveal the precise chemical structure and the formation of chemical bonds between single molecular units. With the support of DFT calculations, we identified the underlying chemical pathways and barriers, demonstrating the potential of this atomically resolved AFM technique to study unknown reaction products in surface chemistry at the single-molecule level.

  4. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  5. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  6. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  7. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  8. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Musawi, R. S. J.; Brousseau, E. B.; Geng, Y.; Borodich, F. M.

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves.

  9. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  10. Fabrication of carbon nanotube AFM probes using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kang, Won-Seok; Choi, Bung-Sam; Choi, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have shown a significant potential for obtaining high-resolution imaging of nanostructure and biological materials. In this paper, we report a simple method to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanoprobes for AFM using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Thiophenyl-modified SWNTs (SWNT-SHs) through amidation of SWNTs in chloroform allowed to be spread and form a stable Langmuir monolayer at the water/air interface. A simple two-step transfer process was used: (1) dipping conventional AFM probes into the Langmuir monolayer and (2) lifting the probes from the water surface. This results in the attachment of SWNTs onto the tips of AFM nanoprobes. We found that the SWNTs assembled on the nanoprobes were well-oriented and robust enough to maintain their shape and direction even after successive scans. AFM measurements of a nano-porous alumina substrate and deoxyribonucleic acid using SWNT-modified nanoprobes revealed that the curvature diameter of the nanoprobes was less than 3 nm and a fine resolution was obtained than that from conventional AFM probes. We also demonstrate that the LB method is a scalable process capable of simultaneously fabricating a large number of SWNT-modified nanoprobes.

  11. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  12. Nonlinear, nonbinary cyclic group codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    New cyclic group codes of length 2(exp m) - 1 over (m - j)-bit symbols are introduced. These codes can be systematically encoded and decoded algebraically. The code rates are very close to Reed-Solomon (RS) codes and are much better than Bose-Chaudhuri-Hocquenghem (BCH) codes (a former alternative). The binary (m - j)-tuples are identified with a subgroup of the binary m-tuples which represents the field GF(2 exp m). Encoding is systematic and involves a two-stage procedure consisting of the usual linear feedback register (using the division or check polynomial) and a small table lookup. For low rates, a second shift-register encoding operation may be invoked. Decoding uses the RS error-correcting procedures for the m-tuple codes for m = 4, 5, and 6.

  13. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  14. Cyclic Step-voltammetric Analysis of Cation-driven and Anion-driven Actuation in Polypyrrole Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Wataru; Pandey, Shyam S.; Fuchiwaki, Masaki; Kaneto, Keiichi

    2002-12-01

    Cation-driven and anion-driven electrochemomechanical deformations (ECMD) in electrodeposited polypyrrole (PPy) films have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and cyclic step-voltammetry (CSV). The film deposited from hydrochloric acid (PPyCl) expanded upon anodic reaction (anodic expansion) while that deposited from dodecyl-benzene sulfonic acid (PPyDBS) exhibited cathodic expansion. In the case of the film deposited from p-phenol sulfonic acid (PPyPPS), it was found to show the anodic expansion at 600 mV (vs Ag wire as a reference electrode) along with the cathodic contraction at -800 mV in CSV. The film obtained from the same lot, however, showed cathodic contraction and anodic expansion only by changing the oxidative potential from 600 mV to -100 mV. This phase inversion indicates that not only the polymerization electrolyte but also the redox potential determines the (de)insertion of ions in the PPyPPS film. Contractive electrochemical creeping was only observed in PPyPPS film in chloride salt electrolytes, indicating that the cation insertion induces the deinsertion of initial-dopant anion from the film.

  15. Electrochemical studies of quinine in surfactant media using hanging mercury drop electrode: a cyclic voltammetric study.

    PubMed

    Dar, Riyaz Ahmad; Brahman, Pradeep Kumar; Tiwari, Sweety; Pitre, Krishna Sadashiv

    2012-10-01

    The electrochemical behavior of quinine was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) using surfactant. The reduction peak current of quinine increases remarkably in presence of 1% CTAB. Its electrochemical behavior is quasi-reversible in the Britton-Robinson buffers of pH 10.38 by exhibiting the well-defined single cathodic and anodic waves and the ratio of I(p)(a)/I(p)(c) approaching one at the scan rate of 500 mVs(-1). On the basis of CV, SWV and Coulometry, electrochemical reduction mechanism of quinine has been proposed which has shown that protonation occurs on the nitrogen of the quinoline moiety. Linearity was obtained when the peak currents (I(p)) were plotted against concentrations of quinine in the range of 30.0-230.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.132 ng mL(-1) in SWV and 90.0-630.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.238 ng mL(-1) in DPV. Fast and sensitive SWV has been applied for the quantitative analysis of quinine in bark of Cinchona sp. and in soft drinks and a good recovery was obtained. The accuracy and precision of the method are determined and validated statistically. No interferences from other food additives were observed. The relative standard deviation for intraday and interday assay was 0.89 and 0.73% (n=3) respectively.

  16. Glyphosate detection with ammonium nitrate and humic acids as potential interfering substances by pulsed voltammetry technique.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gil, Pablo; Laguarda-Miro, Nicolas; Camino, Juan Soto; Peris, Rafael Masot

    2013-10-15

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to detect and quantify glyphosate on buffered water in presence of ammonium nitrate and humic substances. Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide active ingredient in the world. It is a non-selective broad spectrum herbicide but some of its health and environmental effects are still being discussed. Nowadays, glyphosate pollution in water is being monitored but quantification techniques are slow and expensive. Glyphosate wastes are often detected in countryside water bodies where organic substances and fertilizers (commonly based on ammonium nitrate) may also be present. Glyphosate also forms complexes with humic acids so these compounds have also been taken into consideration. The objective of this research is to study the interference of these common pollutants in glyphosate measurements by pulsed voltammetry. The statistical treatment of the voltammetric data obtained lets us discriminate glyphosate from the other studied compounds and a mathematical model has been built to quantify glyphosate concentrations in a buffer despite the presence of humic substances and ammonium nitrate. In this model, the coefficient of determination (R(2)) is 0.977 and the RMSEP value is 2.96 × 10(-5) so the model is considered statistically valid.

  17. Investigation of antioxidant capacity of the extracts of bilberry (VACCINUM MYRTILLIS L.) by voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vtorushina, A. N.; Nikonova, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the urgent issue of the search of new drugs based on plant raw materials that have an influence on various stages of oxidation processes occurring in the human body. The aim of this paper is to determine the antioxidant activity of the bilberry extracts that are used in the medicine practice by a cathodic voltammetry method. We consider the influence of water and alcohol bilberry extracts on the process of oxygen electroreduction. From these extracts the most activity relation to the process of cathodic oxygen reduction showed alcohol (40%) bilberry extract. It was also stated that the alcohol extract of bilberry has a greater antioxidant activity than other known antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, glucose, dihydroquercetin. Thus, after consideration of a number of plant objects, we showed the possibility of applying the method of cathodic voltammetry for the determination of total antioxidant activity of plant material and identifying and highlighting the most perspective sources of biologically active substances (BAS), as well as the ability of identifying extractants that fully extract BAS from plant raw materials. The activity data of extracts of plant raw materials gives an opportunity of establishing an effective yield phytopreparation based on bilberry that has an antioxidant effect.

  18. Hydrodynamic voltammetry as a rapid and simple method for evaluating soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Sazawa, Kazuto; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2015-03-04

    Soil enzymes play essential roles in catalyzing reactions necessary for nutrient cycling in the biosphere. They are also sensitive indicators of ecosystem stress, therefore their evaluation is very important in assessing soil health and quality. The standard soil enzyme assay method based on spectroscopic detection is a complicated operation that requires the removal of soil particles. The purpose of this study was to develop a new soil enzyme assay based on hydrodynamic electrochemical detection using a rotating disk electrode in a microliter droplet. The activities of enzymes were determined by measuring the electrochemical oxidation of p-aminophenol (PAP), following the enzymatic conversion of substrate-conjugated PAP. The calibration curves of β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu) and acid phosphatase (AcP) showed good linear correlation after being spiked in soils using chronoamperometry. We also performed electrochemical detection using real soils. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry can be used to assess the AcP in soils, with a detection time of only 90 s. Linear sweep voltammetry was used to measure the amount of PAP released from β-gal and β-glu by enzymatic reaction after 60 min. For the assessment of soil enzymes, the results of hydrodynamic voltammetry assay compared favorably to those using a standard assay procedure, but this new procedure is more user-friendly, rapid and simple.

  19. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  20. Cyclic malyl anthocyanins in Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Koshioka, M; Yoshida, H; Kan, Y; Fukui, Y; Koike, A; Yamaguchi, M

    2000-12-01

    3,5-Di-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl) pelargonidin 6''-O-4,6'''-O-1-cyclic malate and a previously reported cyanidin equivalent, 3,5-di-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl) cyanidin 6''-O-4,6'''-O-1-cyclic malate were identified from petals of deep pink and red-purple flower cultivars of Dianthus caryophyllus, respectively.

  1. Cyclic Linearization and Island Repair in Sluicing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Chunan

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic Linearization is adopted to account for the island repair of Sluicing in English. The extraction of wh-phrase out of certain islands undergoes non-successive-cyclic movement, which yields conflicting ordering statements. The derivation can be rescued by deleting all ordering statements in IP, including those conflicting ones. Two arguments…

  2. Rank estimation and the multivariate analysis of in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetric data

    PubMed Central

    Keithley, Richard B.; Carelli, Regina M.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Principal component regression has been used in the past to separate current contributions from different neuromodulators measured with in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Traditionally, a percent cumulative variance approach has been used to determine the rank of the training set voltammetric matrix during model development, however this approach suffers from several disadvantages including the use of arbitrary percentages and the requirement of extreme precision of training sets. Here we propose that Malinowski’s F-test, a method based on a statistical analysis of the variance contained within the training set, can be used to improve factor selection for the analysis of in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetric data. These two methods of rank estimation were compared at all steps in the calibration protocol including the number of principal components retained, overall noise levels, model validation as determined using a residual analysis procedure, and predicted concentration information. By analyzing 119 training sets from two different laboratories amassed over several years, we were able to gain insight into the heterogeneity of in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetric data and study how differences in factor selection propagate throughout the entire principal component regression analysis procedure. Visualizing cyclic voltammetric representations of the data contained in the retained and discarded principal components showed that using Malinowski’s F-test for rank estimation of in vivo training sets allowed for noise to be more accurately removed. Malinowski’s F-test also improved the robustness of our criterion for judging multivariate model validity, even though signal-to-noise ratios of the data varied. In addition, pH change was the majority noise carrier of in vivo training sets while dopamine prediction was more sensitive to noise. PMID:20527815

  3. Phase behaviors of cyclic diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Fan, Zhongyong; Yang, Yuliang; Qiu, Feng

    2011-11-01

    A spectral method of self-consistent field theory has been applied to AB cyclic block copolymers. Phase behaviors of cyclic diblock copolymers, such as order-disorder transition, order-order transition, and domain spacing size, have been studied, showing good consistency with previous experimental and theoretical results. Compared to linear diblocks, cyclic diblocks are harder to phase separate due to the topological constraint of the ring structure. A direct disorder-to-cylinder transition window is observed in the phase diagram, which is significantly different from the mean field phase diagram of linear diblock copolymers. The domain spacing size ratio between cyclic and linear diblock copolymers is typically close to 0.707, indicating in segregation that the cyclic polymer can be considered to be made up of linear diblocks with half of the original chain length. PMID:22070321

  4. Extraction, purification, identification and metabolism of 3',5'-cyclic UMP, 3',5'-cyclic IMP and 3',5'-cyclic dTMP from rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, R P; Kingston, E E; Hakeem, N A; Salih, S G; Beynon, J H; Moyse, C D

    1986-01-01

    The large-scale extraction and partial purification of endogenous 3',5'-cyclic UMP, 3',5'-cyclic IMP and 3',5'-cyclic dTMP are described. Rat liver, kidney, heart, spleen and lung tissues were subjected to a sequential purification procedure involving freeze-clamping, perchlorate extraction, alumina and Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. The samples thus obtained co-chromatographed with authentic cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP on t.l.c. and h.p.l.c. and the u.v. spectra of the extracted samples were identical with those of the standards. Fast atom bombardment of the three cyclic nucleotide standards yielded mass spectra containing a molecular protonated ion in each case; mass-analysed ion kinetic-energy spectrometry ('m.i.k.e.s') of these ions produced a spectrum unique to the parent cyclic nucleotide. The extracted putative cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP each produced a m.i.k.e.s. identical with that obtained with the corresponding cyclic nucleotide standard. Rat liver, heart, kidney, brain, intestine, spleen, testis and lung protein preparations were each found capable of the synthesis of cyclic UMP, cyclic IMP and cyclic dTMP from the corresponding nucleoside triphosphate, of the hydrolysis of these cyclic nucleotides and of their binding, with the exception that cyclic dTMP was not synthesized by the kidney preparation. PMID:3019316

  5. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  6. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  7. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  8. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  9. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  10. Hydrodynamic voltammetry at tubular electrodes-III Determination of traces of bismuth by differential-pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry at a glassy-carbon tubular electrode with in situ mercury plating.

    PubMed

    Zhen, W; Qiang, C

    1987-07-01

    An equation for the current in differential-pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry at tubular electrodes is derived. Application of a glassy-carbon tubular electrode to determination of traces of bismuth in environmental water samples by differential-pulse anodic-stripping voltammetry is described. In hydrochloric acid medium, the stripping peak current is proportional to the concentration of bismuth in the range 2-100 ng/ml, with a deposition time of 3-10 min. The detection limit is 0.5 ng/ml. PMID:18964381

  11. Mixed Strategies in cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intoy, Ben; Pleimling, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Physicists have been using evolutionary game theory to model and simulate cyclically competing species, with applications to lizard mating strategies and competing bacterial strains. However these models assume that each agent plays the same strategy, which is called a pure strategy in game theory, until they are beaten by a better strategy which they immediately adopt. We relax this constraint of an agent playing a single strategy by instead letting the agent pick its strategy randomly from a probability distribution, which is called a mixed strategy in game theory. This scheme is very similar to multiple occupancy models seen in the literature, the major difference being that interactions happen between sites rather than within them. Choosing strategies out of a distribution also has applications to economic/social systems such as the public goods game. We simulate a model of mixed strategy and cylic competition on a one-dimensional lattice with three and four strategies and find interesting spatial and stability properties depending on how discretized the choice of strategy is for the agents. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR-1205309.

  12. The influence of the capping agent on the oxidation of silver nanoparticles: nano-impacts versus stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Toh, Her Shuang; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    The influence of capping agents on the oxidation of silver nanoparticles was studied by using the electrochemical techniques of anodic stripping voltammetry and anodic particle coulometry ("nano-impacts"). Five spherical silver nanoparticles each with a different capping agent (branched polyethylenimine (BPEI), citrate, lipoic acid, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)) were used to perform comparative experiments. In all cases, regardless of the capping agent, complete oxidation of the single nanoparticles was seen in anodic particle coulometry. The successful quantitative detection of the silver nanoparticle size displays the potential application of anodic particle coulometry for nanoparticle characterisation. In contrast, for anodic stripping voltammetry using nanoparticles drop casting, it was observed that the capping agent has a very significant effect on the extent of silver oxidation. All five samples gave a low oxidative charge corresponding to partial oxidation. It is concluded that the use of anodic stripping voltammetry to quantify nanoparticles is unreliable, and this is attributed to nanoparticle aggregation.

  13. AFM probes fabricated with masked maskless combined anisotropic etching and p+ surface doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianqiang; Li, Xinxin; Bao, Haifei; Zuo, Guomin; Wang, Yuelin; Feng, Fei; Yu, Zhenyin; Ge, Xiaohong

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents a newly developed high-yield micro-fabrication technology for single-crystalline silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. Both the tips and the cantilevers are simultaneously formed by a masked-maskless combined anisotropic etching process. Compared to a conventional tip-to-cantilever sequential fabrication scheme, this tip-and-cantilever simultaneous formation can effectively increase fabrication yield by avoiding the tips damaged during the following processed photolithographic steps for defining the cantilevers. By heavy boron doping at the surface, the conductive AFM probe provides an electrical path to the electric ground of the AFM that helps to eliminate the electrostatic accumulation of charges and, therefore, eliminate undesirable electrostatic forces between the probes and the samples. A fabrication yield as high as 90% has been obtained for the AFM probes for 4 inch wafers. The tips after oxidation-sharpening treatment generally have a radius of 10-30 nm. The cantilever spring constant can be well controlled in the range of 0.025-40 N m-1. High-quality sample scanning results with the formed AFM probes are obtained with a slightly better resolution than that from commercial probes without surface conductive treatment.

  14. AFM Bio-Mechanical Investigation of the Taxol Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dylan; Patel, Dipika; Monjaraz, Fernando; Park, Soyeun

    2009-10-01

    Cancerous cells are known to be softer and easier to deform than normal cells. Changes in mechanical properties originate from the alteration of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of cancer treatment using Taxol is related to the stabilization of microtubules. It has been shown that Taxol binds to polymerized tublin, stabilizes it against disassembly, and consequently inhibits cell division. An accurate quantitative study still lacks to relate the microtubule stabilizing effect with the cellular mechanical properties. We utilized our AFM to study changes in elastic properties of treated breast cancer cells. The AFM has several advantages for precise force measurements on a localized region with nanometer lateral dimension. In previous AFM studies, measurable contributions from the underlying hard substrate have been an obstacle to accurately determine the properties on thin samples. We modified our AFM tip to obtain the exact deformation profile as well as reducing the high stresses produced. We have probed depth profiles of mechanical properties of the taxol-treated and untreated cells by varying the indentation depth of the AFM-nanoindenting experiments.

  15. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  16. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  17. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  18. Simultaneous determination of three herbicides by differential pulse voltammetry and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yongnian; Wang, Lin; Kokot, Serge

    2011-01-01

    A novel differential pulse voltammetry method (DPV) was researched and developed for the simultaneous determination of Pendimethalin, Dinoseb and sodium 5-nitroguaiacolate (5NG) with the aid of chemometrics. The voltammograms of these three compounds overlapped significantly, and to facilitate the simultaneous determination of the three analytes, chemometrics methods were applied. These included classical least squares (CLS), principal component regression (PCR), partial least squares (PLS) and radial basis function-artificial neural networks (RBF-ANN). A separately prepared verification data set was used to confirm the calibrations, which were built from the original and first derivative data matrices of the voltammograms. On the basis relative prediction errors and recoveries of the analytes, the RBF-ANN and the DPLS (D - first derivative spectra) models performed best and are particularly recommended for application. The DPLS calibration model was applied satisfactorily for the prediction of the three analytes from market vegetables and lake water samples. PMID:21512931

  19. Spectroelectrochemical sensing based on attenuated total internal reflectance stripping voltammetry. 3. Determination of cadmium and copper.

    PubMed

    Shtoyko, Tanya; Conklin, Sean; Maghasi, Anne T; Richardson, John N; Piruska, Aigars; Seliskar, Carl J; Heineman, William R

    2004-03-01

    The optical and electrochemical properties of metallic films on ITO surfaces resulting from deposition of copper and cadmium were monitored by stripping voltammetry-attenuated internal reflectance spectroscopy. The voltammetric or optical responses of both metals were examined with respect to solution conditions such as pH and presence of dissolved oxygen. The morphologies of these films were also examined using environmental scanning electron microscopy, and the microscopic electrodeposition patterns were found to influence the optical response. The wavelength dependence of the optical response of deposited copper was determined and compared with calculations; optimal performance was at 400 nm for copper. A linear calibration curve was obtained over a range of 1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-4) M for copper and compared with that of cadmium. The simultaneous determination of cadmium and copper was demonstrated, and the mechanism of co-deposition is discussed.

  20. Anodic stripping voltammetry with graphite felt electrodes for the trace analysis of silver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Trevor J

    2016-08-01

    Graphite felt (GF) is a mass produced porous carbon electrode material commonly used in redox flow batteries. Previous studies have suggested GF may have valuable applications in electroanalysis as a low cost disposable carbon electrode material, although most GF sensors have used flow cell arrangements. In this work, an elegant wetting technique is employed that allows GF electrodes to be used in quiescent solution to detect trace levels of silver in water via anodic stripping voltammetry. GF electrodes display good repeatability and a limit of detection of 25 nM of Ag(+) in 0.1 M HNO3, with a linear range spanning two orders of magnitude. This compares to a value of around 140 nM when using conventional carbon electrodes. Combined with their low cost and disposable nature, the results suggest GF electrodes can make a valuable contribution to electroanalysis. PMID:27276994

  1. Determination of Lamotrigine in Pharmaceutical Preparations by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry Using Screen Printed Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Calvo, M. Encarnación Burgoa; Arcos-Martínez, M. Julia

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure that has been optimized for the determination of lamotrigine by Differential Pulse Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (DPAdSV) using carbon screen-printed electrodes (CSPE) and mercury coated carbon screen-printed electrodes. Selection of the experimental parameters was made using experimental design methodology. The detection limit found was 5.0 × 10-6 M and 2.0 × 10-6 M for the non modified and Hg modified CSPE, respectively. In terms of reproducibility, the precision of the above mentioned methods was calculated in %RSD values at 9.83% for CSPE and 2.73% for Hg-CSPE. The Hg-coated CSPEs developed in this work were successfully applied in the determination of lamotrigine in pharmaceutical preparations.

  2. Determination of antioxidant activity of spices and their active principles by differential pulse voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Palma, Alberto; Ruiz Montoya, Mercedes; Arteaga, Jesús F; Rodríguez Mellado, Jose M

    2014-01-22

    The anodic oxidation of mercury in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to determine the antioxidant (AO) character of radical scavengers. Hydroperoxide radical is formed at the potentials of the oxidation peak on mercury electrodes, such radical reacting with the antioxidants in different extension. The parameter C10 (antioxidant concentration at which the peak area decreases by 10%) is used to measure the scavenging activity of the individual antioxidants. To establish the scavenging activity of antioxidant mixtures as a whole, the parameter, μ10 as the reverse of V10, V10 being the volume necessary to decrease the peak area in DPV by 10%, was selected. Higher μ10 values correspond to higher scavenging activity. The studies have been extended to aqueous extracts of some species. The results may be useful in explaining the effect of spices in vitro and in vivo studies.

  3. Classification of edible vegetable oils using square wave voltammetry with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gambarra-Neto, Francisco Fernandes; Marino, Glimaldo; Araújo, Mário César Ugulino; Galvão, Roberto Kawakami Harrop; Pontes, Márcio José Coelho; Medeiros, Everaldo Paulo de; Lima, Renato Sousa

    2009-03-15

    This paper proposes a simple and non-expensive electroanalytical methodology for classification of edible vegetable oils with respect to type (canola, sunflower, corn and soybean) and conservation state (expired and non-expired shelf life). The proposed methodology employs an alcoholic extraction procedure followed by square wave voltammetry (SWV). Two chemometric methods were compared for classification of the resulting voltammograms, namely Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) with variable selection by the Successive Projections Algorithm (SPA). The results were evaluated in terms of errors in a set of samples not included in the modelling process. The best results were obtained with the SPA-LDA method, which correctly classified all samples in terms of type and conservation state.

  4. Signal stability of Nafion-coated thin mercury film electrodes for stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, B; Jensen, N

    1994-03-01

    The signal stability of the Nafion-coated thin mercury film electrode (NCTMFE) was studied by using cadmium and lead as test analytes and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry as detection method. In particular, the effect of the casting solvent and the curing procedure employed in the preparation of the polymer film was examined. Best results were obtained with N,N-dimethylacetamide as casting solvent and a two-step curing procedure in which the polymer was evaporated to dryness at 55 degrees and cured at 105 degrees with a hot-air gun. Mercury plating was performed ex situ. An NCTMFE prepared in this manner has a better signal stability than ex situ-plated as well as in situ-plated conventional mercury film electrodes. PMID:18965949

  5. Determination of aluminium in tree samples by cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Opydo, J

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents a method of determination of aluminium in tree samples (wood, leaves, roots) based on the cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Al(III) complexed with alizarin S was determined by ASV method using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Optimal conditions were found to be: accumulation time 30-90 s, accumulation potential - 0.70 V versus SCE, supporting electrolyte 0.1 M ammonia-ammonium chloride buffer at pH 8.2 and concentration of alizarin 1 x 10(-5) M. The response of the system, a linear current-concentration relationship was observed up to 8 x 10(-6) M. The developed method has been tested by analysing international reference materials (BCR 62 Olive leaves and BCR 101 spruce needles). PMID:18966839

  6. Asymmetric cyclic evolution in polymerised cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycyna, Orest; Mielczarek, Jakub; Szydłowski, Marek E-mail: jakub.mielczarek@uj.edu.pl

    2009-12-01

    The dynamical systems methods are used to study evolution of the polymerised scalar field cosmologies with the cosmological constant. We have found all evolutional paths admissible for all initial conditions on the two-dimensional phase space. We have shown that the cyclic solutions are generic. The exact solution for polymerised cosmology is also obtained. Two basic cases are investigated, the polymerised scalar field and the polymerised gravitational and scalar field part. In the former the division on the cyclic and non-cyclic behaviour is established following the sign of the cosmological constant. The value of the cosmological constant is upper bounded purely from the dynamical setting.

  7. Processable Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes with Tunable Interiors

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, Rami; Zhang, Chen; van der Weegen, Rob; Ruiz, Luis; Li, Changyi; Keten, Sinan; Helms, Brett A.; Xu, Ting

    2011-09-06

    A facile route to generate cyclic peptide nanotubes with tunable interiors is presented. By incorporating 3-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid in the d,l-alternating primary sequence of a cyclic peptide, a functional group can be presented in the interior of the nanotubes without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes. The new design of such a cyclic peptide also enables one to modulate the nanotube growth process to be compatible with the polymer processing window without compromising the formation of high aspect ratio nanotubes, thus opening a viable approach toward molecularly defined porous membranes.

  8. Direct recognition and quantification by voltammetry of thiol/thioamide mixes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Laglera, Luis M; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Thiols and thioamides form part of the pool of reduced sulfur substances (RSS) that modify the health of aquatic ecosystems acting as radical scavengers and heavy metal ligands. Their concentrations could be easily determined in seawater by cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) were it not be for the coalescence of their responses in a single peak. Here, we modified the traditional CSV method of RSS analysis to allow individual recognition and quantification in thiol/thioamide mixes. Glutathione, cysteine, thiourea and thioacetamide in UV digested seawater were repeatedly analyzed shifting the deposition potential (E(dep)) in the range +0.07 to -0.4V at high resolution. The representation of peak height (i(p)) and peak potential (E(p)) vs E(dep) resulted in different and distinctive profiles for each substance that allowed the selection of adequate E(dep) ranges for their separate quantification. Copper saturation modified thiol profiles and cancelled the response of thioamides. The vs E(dep) profiles explained the nature of the different thiols and thioamides present in the sample and permitted their individual quantification with excellent accuracy. The utility of the method was put to test with seawater modified with natural unknown RSS from pore waters and Posidonia oceanica exudates. Although both samples gave similar CSV signals, the vs E(dep) profiles unveiled completely different electrochemical behaviors incompatible with a similar nature. Based on those profiles we hypothesized that pore waters released a glutathione/thiourea mix and that one or several unidentified RSS formed part of P. oceanica exudates. The analytical scheme proposed here opens a new door to the use of direct voltammetry in the qualitative and quantitative determination of RSS in natural waters. PMID:22284523

  9. Electrochemical sensor with substitutional stripping voltammetry for highly sensitive endotoxin assay.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shinichiro; Inoue, Kumi Y; Takahashi, Satoko; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a novel method for detection of endotoxin with extra-high sensitivity by using substitutional stripping voltammetry (SSV). In this method, a p-aminophenol (pAP) conjugated peptide (Boc-Leu-Gly-Arg-pAP; LGR-pAP) was used as a substrate for a protease, which is activated at the last step of the endotoxin-induced Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) cascade reaction. Extra-highly sensitive detection of pAP liberated by the endotoxin-induced LAL reaction was successfully realized with SSV, based on the accumulation of an amperometric signal owing to exchange of the oxidation current of pAP generated at an electrode in a reaction cell with silver deposition on another electrode in a deposition cell. This reaction is driven by the difference in the redox potential between pAP/quinoneimine and silver/silver ion. The amount of the deposited silver is quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). This SSV-based endotoxin assay was performed with a chip device comprising two cells, each of which was connected via a liquid junction made of Vycor® glass. The reaction cell and the deposition cell contained a standard endotoxin sample with LAL regents containing LGR-pAP and AgNO3 solution, respectively. After the cells were electrically connected for 60 min, ASV was conducted in the deposition cell to quantify the total electrical charge derived by the oxidation of free pAP in the reaction cell. The ASV signal increased with the increase of the endotoxin concentration in the sample solution in the range of 0.5-1000 EU L(-1).

  10. Dealloying NiCo and NiCoCu Alloy Thin Films Using Linear Sweep Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peecher, Benjamin; Hampton, Jennifer

    When electrodeposited into thin films, metals have well-known electrochemical potentials at which they will be removed from the film. These potential differences can be utilized to re-oxidize only certain metals in an alloy, altering the film's structure and composition. Here we discuss NiCo and NiCoCu thin films' response to linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) as a means of electrochemical dealloying. For each of four different metal ratios, films were dealloyed to various potentials in order to gain insight into the evolution of the film over the course of the LSV. Capacitance, topography, and composition were examined for each sample before and after linear sweep voltammetry was performed. For NiCo films with high percentages of Ni, dealloying resulted in almost no change in composition, but did result in an increased capacitance, with greater increases occurring at higher LSV potentials. Dealloying also resulted in the appearance of large (100-1000 nm) pores on the surface of the film. For NiCoCu films with high percentages of Ni, Cu was almost completely removed from the film at LSV potentials greater than 500 mV. The LSV first removed larger copper-rich dendrites from the film's surface before creating numerous nano-pores, resulting in a net increase in area. This work is supported by an Award to Hope College from the HHMI Undergraduate Science Education Program, the Hope College Department of Physics Frissel Research Fund, and the National Science Foundation under Grants RUI-DMR-1104725 and MRI-CHE-0959282.

  11. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  12. Quantitative atomic resolution force imaging on epitaxial graphene with reactive and nonreactive AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Boneschanscher, Mark P; van der Lit, Joost; Sun, Zhixiang; Swart, Ingmar; Liljeroth, Peter; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2012-11-27

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of graphene and graphite show contrast with atomic periodicity. However, the contrast patterns vary depending on the atomic termination of the AFM tip apex and the tip-sample distance, hampering the identification of the atomic positions. Here, we report quantitative AFM imaging of epitaxial graphene using inert (carbon-monoxide-terminated) and reactive (iridium-terminated) tips. The atomic image contrast is markedly different with these tip terminations. With a reactive tip, we observe an inversion from attractive to repulsive atomic contrast with decreasing tip-sample distance, while a nonreactive tip only yields repulsive atomic contrast. We are able to identify the atoms with both tips at any tip-sample distance. This is a prerequisite for future structural and chemical analysis of adatoms, defects, and the edges of graphene nanostructures, crucial for understanding nanoscale graphene devices.

  13. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Gumí-Audenis, B; Carlà, F; Vitorino, M V; Panzarella, A; Porcar, L; Boilot, M; Guerber, S; Bernard, P; Rodrigues, M S; Sanz, F; Giannotti, M I; Costa, L

    2015-11-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  14. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  15. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  16. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  17. Review and perspectives of AFM application on the study of deformable drop/bubble interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Kai; Ma, Mengyu; Jin, Hang; Angeli, Panagiota; Gong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The applications of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on the study of dynamic interactions and film drainage between deformable bodies dispersed in aqueous solutions are reviewed in this article. Novel experimental designs and recent advances in experimental methodologies are presented, which show the advantage of using AFM as a tool for probing colloidal interactions. The effects of both DLVO and non-DLVO forces on the colloid stabilization mechanism are discussed. Good agreement is found between the force - drop/bubble deformation behaviour revealed by AFM measurements and the theoretical modeling of film drainage process, giving a convincing explanation of the occurrence of certain phenomenon. However, the behaviour and shape of deformable drops as they approach or retract is still not well resolved. In addition, when surfactants are present further research is needed on the absorption of surfactant molecules into the interfaces, their mobility and the effects on interfacial film properties.

  18. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, David P.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R. J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kerper, P. S.; Warmack, R. J.

    1995-04-01

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 104, we demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS+) or two (pMP32) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in our preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  19. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  20. The structures of cyclic dihydronium cations.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sonjae; Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Bernal, Ivan; Karle, Jerome

    2007-10-23

    Recent experimental discoveries have revealed the existence of hitherto unexpected cyclic hydronium di-cations trapped within crystal structures. The molecular formulas are (H(14)O(6))(2+), present as two isomers, four- and six-member cyclic structures, and (H(18)O(8))(2+), an eight-member cyclic structure. As these unprecedented hydronium species are stabilized by the crystal structures in which they are captured, the question arises whether they could be stable as independent species as, for example, in solution or gas phase. Quantum mechanical density functional theory calculations are used to investigate this question. We find these doubly charged cyclic hydronium structures to be energetically stable and, as between the four- and six-member structures, the former has more binding energy than the latter. We also determine the theoretically optimized structures for all three ions and give their calculated atomic charges for both their crystal and optimized geometries.

  1. Synchronization in chaotic oscillators by cyclic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olusola, O. I.; Njah, A. N.; Dana, S. K.

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a type of cyclic coupling to investigate synchronization of chaotic oscillators. We derive analytical solutions of the critical coupling for stable synchronization under the cyclic coupling for the Rössler system and the Lorenz oscillator as paradigmatic illustration. Based on the master stability function (MSF) approach, the analytical results on critical coupling are verified numerically. An enhancing effect in terms of lowering the critical coupling or enlarging the synchronization window in a critical coupling space is noticed. The cyclic coupling is also applied in other models, Hindmarsh-Rose model, Sprott system, Chen system and forced Duffing system to confirm the enhancing effect. The cyclic coupling allows tuning of two coupling constants in reverse directions when an optimal control of synchronization is feasible.

  2. Mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, A.; Darwin, D.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of the mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression was studied and a simple analytic model was developed to represent its cyclic behavior. Experimental work consisted of monotonic and cyclic compressive loading of mortar. Two mixes were used, with proportions corresponding to concretes having water cement ratios of 0.5 and 0.6. Forty-four groups of specimens were tested at ages ranging from 5 to 70 days. complete monotonic and cyclic stress strain envelopes were obtained. A number of loading regimes were investigated, including cycles to a constant maximum strain. Major emphasis was placed on tests using relatively high stress cycles. Degradation was shown to be a continuous process and a function of both total strain and load history. No stability or fatigue limit was apparent.

  3. Cyclic loading in knee ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Weisman, G; Pope, M H; Johnson, R J

    1980-01-01

    The effect of cyclic loading on knee ligaments was studied both in vivo and in vitro. The compliance of the medial collateral ligaments of athletes participating in hockey, basketball, soccer, and downhill skiing was determined by using a specially built machine. Tests were conducted before and after participation in the various sports. Most subjects tested showed an increased compliance after their respective sporting activities. This observation was confirmed in the laboratory by imparting cyclic loading to 10 people under controlled conditions. The in vitro studies were conducted on the medial collateral ligaments of rats. These were tested to determine the effect of cyclic loading on the strength and stiffness of the ligaments. Results show a clear relationship between decreased stiffness or softening and a reduction in strength of the ligament. The amount of softening was related to the cyclic stress in the ligament.

  4. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets.

  5. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. PMID:26972765

  6. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  7. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  8. Probing the PEDOT:PSS/cell interface with conductive colloidal probe AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Zhang, H.; Kranz, C.; Wallace, G. G.; Higgins, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical information e.g., oxygen reduction can be obtained simultaneously. Conductive colloid AFM-SECM probes modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are used for single cell force measurements in mouse fibroblasts and single cell interactions are investigated as a function of the applied potential.Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical

  9. Resonance Frequency Analysis for Surface-Coupled AFM Cantilever in Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirman, B; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Shifts in the resonance frequencies of surface-coupled atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are used as the basis for the detection mechanisms in a number of scanning probe microscopy techniques including atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), force modulation microscopy, and resonance enhanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Here, we analyze resonance characteristics for AFM cantilever coupled to surface in liquid environment, and derive approximate expressions for resonant frequencies as a function of vertical and lateral spring constant of the tip-surface junction. This analysis provides a simplified framework for the interpretation of AFAM and PFM data in ambient, liquid, and vacuum environments.

  10. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  11. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  12. Study on the AFM Force Spectroscopy method for elastic modulus measurement of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichelis, A.; Pavarelli, S.; Mortati, L.; Sassi, G.; Sassi, M.

    2013-09-01

    The cell elasticity gives information about its pathological state and metastatic potential. The aim of this paper is to study the AFM Force Spectroscopy technique with the future goal of realizing a reference method for accurate elastic modulus measurement in the elasticity range of living cells. This biological range has not been yet explored with a metrological approach. Practical hints are given for the realization of a Sylgard elasticity scale. Systematic effects given by the sample curing thickness and nanoindenter geometry have been found with regards of the measured elastic modulus. AFM measurement reproducibility better than 20% is obtained in the entire investigated elastic modulus scale of 101 - 104 kPa.

  13. An Evaluation of the Impacts of AF-M315E Propulsion Systems for Varied Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fittje, James; Colozza, Anthony; Packard, Tom; Gyekenyesi, John; McLean, Christopher H.; Spores, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the AF-M315E COMPASS study is to identify near-term (3-5 years) and long term (5 years +) opportunities for infusion, specifically the thruster and associated component technologies being developed as part of the GPIM project. Develop design reference missions which show the advantages of the AF-M315E green propulsion system. Utilize a combination of past COMPASS designs and selected new designs to demonstrate AF-M315E advantages. Use the COMPASS process to show the puts and takes of using AF-M315E at the integrated system level.

  14. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides for plant disease control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources.

  15. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources. PMID:25774105

  16. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time. PMID:26924339

  17. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  18. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  20. The envelope-based cyclic periodogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclostationary analysis has proven effective in identifying signal components for diagnostic purposes. A key descriptor in this framework is the cyclic power spectrum, traditionally estimated by the averaged cyclic periodogram and the smoothed cyclic periodogram. A lengthy debate about the best estimator finally found a solution in a cornerstone work by Antoni, who proposed a unified form for the two families, thus allowing a detailed statistical study of their properties. Since then, the focus of cyclostationary research has shifted towards algorithms, in terms of computational efficiency and simplicity of implementation. Traditional algorithms have proven computationally inefficient and the sophisticated "cyclostationary" definition of these estimators slowed their spread in the industry. The only attempt to increase the computational efficiency of cyclostationary estimators is represented by the cyclic modulation spectrum. This indicator exploits the relationship between cyclostationarity and envelope analysis. The link with envelope analysis allows a leap in computational efficiency and provides a "way in" for the understanding by industrial engineers. However, the new estimator lies outside the unified form described above and an unbiased version of the indicator has not been proposed. This paper will therefore extend the analysis of envelope-based estimators of the cyclic spectrum, proposing a new approach to include them in the unified form of cyclostationary estimators. This will enable the definition of a new envelope-based algorithm and the detailed analysis of the properties of the cyclic modulation spectrum. The computational efficiency of envelope-based algorithms will be also discussed quantitatively for the first time in comparison with the averaged cyclic periodogram. Finally, the algorithms will be validated with numerical and experimental examples.

  1. Measuring Cyclic Error in Laser Heterodyne Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander; Zhao, Feng; Dekens, Frank; An, Xin; Azizi, Alireza; Chapsky, Jacob; Halverson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus have been devised for measuring cyclic errors in the readouts of laser heterodyne interferometers that are configured and operated as displacement gauges. The cyclic errors arise as a consequence of mixing of spurious optical and electrical signals in beam launchers that are subsystems of such interferometers. The conventional approach to measurement of cyclic error involves phase measurements and yields values precise to within about 10 pm over air optical paths at laser wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. The present approach, which involves amplitude measurements instead of phase measurements, yields values precise to about .0.1 microns . about 100 times the precision of the conventional approach. In a displacement gauge of the type of interest here, the laser heterodyne interferometer is used to measure any change in distance along an optical axis between two corner-cube retroreflectors. One of the corner-cube retroreflectors is mounted on a piezoelectric transducer (see figure), which is used to introduce a low-frequency periodic displacement that can be measured by the gauges. The transducer is excited at a frequency of 9 Hz by a triangular waveform to generate a 9-Hz triangular-wave displacement having an amplitude of 25 microns. The displacement gives rise to both amplitude and phase modulation of the heterodyne signals in the gauges. The modulation includes cyclic error components, and the magnitude of the cyclic-error component of the phase modulation is what one needs to measure in order to determine the magnitude of the cyclic displacement error. The precision attainable in the conventional (phase measurement) approach to measuring cyclic error is limited because the phase measurements are af-

  2. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. PMID:26517548

  3. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-22

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  4. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  5. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  6. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  7. The structure of high-methoxyl sugar acid gels of citrus pectin as determined by AFM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images of native high methoxyl sugar acid gels (HMSAG) were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the Tapping ModeTM. Electronic thinning of the pectin strands to one pixel wide allowed the pectin network to be viewed in the absence of variable strand widths related to preferentially solvate...

  8. Difference in cellular mechanics of cancer and normal cervical cells as seen with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Subba-Rao, Venkatesh; Woodworth, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Oncogenically transformed cells differ from their normal counter parts in many aspects, including organization and the amount of cytoskeleton. Consequently it is natural to expect to see the difference in cellular mechanics. Here we will present the study of such differences by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in-vitro. So far the present research is the first study of mechanics of cervical cells, and the third comparative study of differences between mechanics of cancer and normal cells down with the help of AFM. Using a micron size silica ball as the AFM probe, we presumably do not overstress the cell surface as it can be in the case of the sharp AFM tip, and consequently, we may use the classical Hertz model. In contrast to the reported previously studies (bladder and fibroblast cells), we found that oncogenically transformed cervical cells are more rigid than the normal cells. The reason for such difference will be discussed. To demonstrate the complexity of the problem, we study cell mechanics in detail. The Young's modulus of rigidity clearly shows two separate regions of rigidity depending on the depth of the probe penetration. There may be two alternative explanations of the difference in rigidity of this top layer: it is either the cell membrane layer or detected long-range (presumably steric) forces due to the molecular ``brush'' of glycocalyx molecules. Experiments and modal calculations will be presented to choose between these two possibilities.

  9. Accurate calibration and uncertainty estimation of the normal spring constant of various AFM cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-03-10

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke's law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  10. High spatial resolution surface imaging and analysis of fungal cells using SEM and AFM.

    PubMed

    Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2008-06-01

    We review the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) for probing the ultrastructure, chemistry, physical characteristics and motion of fungal cells. When first developed, SEM was used to image fixed/dehydrated/gold coated specimens, but here we describe more recent SEM developments as they apply to fungal cells. CryoSEM offers high resolution for frozen fungal samples, whereas environmental SEM allows the analysis of robust samples (e.g. spores) under ambient conditions. Dual beam SEM, the most recently developed, adds manipulation capabilities along with element detection. AFM has similar lateral and better depth resolution compared to SEM, and can image live cells including growing fungal hyphae. FS can analyze cell wall chemistry, elasticity and dynamic cell characteristics. The integration of AFM with optical microscopy will allow examination of individual molecules or cellular structures in the context of fungal cell architecture. SEM and AFM are complementary techniques that are clarifying our understanding of fungal biology. PMID:18068995

  11. Study of Thin Oxide Films with NC-AFM: Atomically Resolved Imaging and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, M.; Simon, G. H.; König, T.

    Results presented in the following show structural analysis of metaloxide surfaces and the extraction of physical quantities from the force field above such a surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). The measurements have been performed with our dual mode NC-AFM/STM in ultrahigh vacuum at 5 K. The introduction will be followed by a description of the experimental setup, including the ultrahigh vacuum cryogenic environment and our tuning fork tunneling current and force sensor. The sensor parameters affecting the measurements are given together with an amplitude characterization method. In the next section, a structure determination of ultrathin Alumina/NiAl(110) is shown. Atomic resolution could be achieved throughout both reflection domain unit cells. NC-AFM reveals details of morphological features, interconnections to substrate-film interactions, and comparability to theory also with respect to topographic height. In the last section, we present measurements beyond imaging, namely spectroscopy data taken on thin MgO films grown on Ag(001). Force-distance measurements based on atomically resolved NC-AFM images of these films have been taken. Inequivalent sites could be resolved and their effect on nucleation and adsorption processes is debated. Furthermore, work function shift measurements on different MgO film thicknesses grown on Ag(001) are studied and the impact of this shift on the catalytic properties of adsorbed metal species is discussed.

  12. Afm Measrurements of Martian Soil Particles Using Mems Technology - Results from the PHOENIX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautsch, S.; Parrat, D.; de Rooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Morookian, J. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Vijendran, S.; Sykulska, H.; Pike, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Light scattering experiments conducted on Mars indicated that soil particles have dimensions around 1 μm. Particles in that range play an important role in the gas exchange between sub-surface water ice and the atmosphere. Their shape can help tracing the geological history and may indicate past presence of liquid water. NASA's Phoenix mission therefore decided to analyze soil and dust particles in the sub-micrometer to a few micrometer range using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the first time on another planet. The co-axially mounted AFM was capable of resolving particles with 10nm lateral resolution. A MEMS approach combined with mechatronic concepts for the scanner was selected for implementing the AFM. For redundancy, the sensor chip featured eight silicon cantilevers each with a 7 to 8 μm high tip. The cantilevers could be cleaved off if contaminated. During NASA's Phoenix Mission, which operated on the red planet from May to October 2008, we could demonstrate successful AFM operations. The instrument has executed 85 experiments of which 26 were needed for calibration. Of the remaining experiments about half (28) returned images where signatures of particles could be discerned.

  13. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  14. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  15. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  16. AFM Studies of Lunar Soils and Application to the Mars 2001 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Anderson, M. S.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The upcoming Mars 01 mission will carry an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) as part of the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument. By operating in a tapping mode, the AFM is capable of sub-nanometer resolution in three dimensions and can distinguish between substances of different compositions by employing phase contrast imaging. To prepare for the Mars 01 mission, we are testing the AFM on a lunar soil to determine its ability to define particle shapes and sizes and grain-surface textures. The test materials are from the Apollo 17 soil 79221, which is a mixture of agglutinates, impact and volcanic beads, and mare and highland rock and mineral fragments. The majority of the lunar soil particles are less than 100 microns in size, comparable to the sizes estimated for martian dust. We have used the AFM to examine several different soil particles at various resolutions. The instrument has demonstrated the ability to identify parallel ridges characteristic of twinning on a 150 micron plagioclase feldspar particle. Extremely small (10-100 nanometer) adhering particles are visible on the surface of the feldspar grain, and they appear elongate with smooth surfaces. Phase contrast imaging of the nanometer particles shows several compositions to be present. When the AFM was applied to a 100 micron glass spherule, it was possible to define an extremely smooth surface; this is in clear contrast to results from a basalt fragment which exhibited a rough surface texture. Also visible on the surface of the glass spherule were chains of 100 nanometer and smaller impact melt droplets. For the '01 Mars mission, the AFM is intended to define the size and shape distributions of soil particles, in combination with the NMCA optical microscope system and images from the Robot Arm Camera (RAC). These three data sets will provide a means of assessing potentially hazardous soil and dust properties. The study that we have conducted on the lunar soils now suggests that the

  17. Effect of added water on voltammetry in near-critical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, M.E.; Deakin, M.R.; Novotny, M.V.; Wightman, R.M.

    1987-07-16

    The use of microvoltammetric electrodes in near-critical carbon dioxide has been investigated. The working electrode is a platinum disk of 5 ..mu..m radius and the test compound employed is ferrocene. Voltammetry is not possible without the addition of water to the electrochemical cell. At temperatures and pressures above the critical point for pure CO/sub 2/, a well-defined voltammetric wave for ferrocene is obtained in the presence of 0.64 M water. Added water also enables the dissolution of tetrahexylammonium hexafluorophosphate in this medium. The diffusion coefficient obtained from voltammograms of ferrocene recorded in these fluids is similar to that reported for other compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. However, in the presence of a high concentration (0.05 M) of the added salt, the value of the diffusion coefficient is lowered. These results demonstrate that the addition of water to near-critical carbon dioxide results in a fluid which has much greater solvating power than the pure supercritical fluid.

  18. Miniaturization in voltammetry: ultratrace element analysis and speciation with twenty-fold sample size reduction.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, D; Laglera, L M; Caprara, S

    2014-10-01

    Voltammetric techniques have emerged as powerful methods for the determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace elements without any preconcentration in several research fields. Nevertheless, large sample volumes are typically required (10 mL), which strongly limits their application and/or the precision of the results. In this work, we report a 20-fold reduction in sample size for trace and ultratrace elemental determination and speciation by conventional voltammetric instrumentation, introducing the lowest amount of sample (0.5 mL) in which ultratrace detection has been performed up to now. This goal was achieved by a careful design of a new sample holder. Reliable, validated results were obtained for the determination of trace/ultratrace elements in rainwater (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb) and seawater (Cu). Moreover, copper speciation in seawater samples was consistently determined by competitive ligand equilibration-cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV). The proposed apparatus showed several advantages: (1) 20-fold reduction in sample volume (the sample size is lowered from 120 to 6 mL for the CLE-CSV procedure); (2) decrease in analysis time due to the reduction in purging time up to 2.5 fold; (3) 20-fold drop in reagent consumption. Moreover, the analytical performances were not affected: similar detection capabilities, precision and accuracy were obtained. Application to sample of limited availability (e.g. porewaters, snow, rainwater, open ocean water, biological samples) and to the description of high resolution temporal trends may be easily foreseen.

  19. Speciation study of aluminium in beverages by Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Magnier, A; Fekete, V; Van Loco, J; Bolle, F; Elskens, M

    2014-05-01

    Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-AdSV) was used for determining the speciation of aluminium in commonly consumed beverages (water, tea, infusion, coffee, orange juice, tomato juice, beer and red wine). Aluminium determination involves the adsorption of Al-complexes with the ligand cupferron onto a hanging mercury drop electrode. All samples were studied at pH 6.5 with an accumulation step at -0.60 V (all potential values in the paper are given versus the Ag/AgCl, [KCl]=3 M reference electrode) during 60 s, and a final cupferron concentration of 4 × 10(-4)M. These conditions were used to establish (i) the concentration of electro-labile aluminium, (ii) the range of ligand concentrations and (iii) the conditional stability constants of beverage samples using titration procedures. The results based on Ruzic plots were compared to computer simulation with Visual MINTEQ. This comparison suggests that labile monomeric Al-forms and soluble organic complexes of low molecular weight can be quantified by the CLE-AdSV procedure. Overall the relative uncertainties on the determination of the electro-active Al fraction and the complexing parameters, i.e., concentration and conditional stability constant of natural ligands in the samples, are less than 15%. Thanks to these results, information on Al bioavailability in beverages was collected and discussed. This study also illustrates the value of computer simulations when complex, time-consuming voltammetric techniques are applied.

  20. Direct analysis of palladium in active pharmaceutical ingredients by anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rosolina, Samuel M; Chambers, James Q; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2016-03-31

    Anodic stripping voltammetry, a classical electroanalytical method has been optimized to analyze trace Pd(II) in active pharmaceutical ingredient matrices. The electroanalytical approach with an unmodified glassy carbon electrode was performed in both aqueous and 95% DMSO/5% water (95/5 DMSO/H2O) solutions, without pretreatment such as acid digestion or dry ashing to remove the organics. Limits of detection (LODs) in the presence of caffeine and ketoprofen were determined to be 11 and 9.6 μg g(-1), with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.7% and 2.3%, respectively. This method is simple, highly reproducible, sensitive, and robust. The instrumentation has the potential to be portable and the obviation of sample pretreatment makes it an ideal approach for determining lost catalytic metals in pharmaceutical-related industries. Furthermore, the simultaneous detection of Pd(II) with Cd(II) and Pb(II) in the low μg L(-1) range indicates that this system is capable of simultaneous multi-analyte analysis in a variety of matrices.

  1. Rapid determination of picomolar titanium in seawater with catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Croot, Peter L

    2011-08-15

    Titanium (Ti) is present as a trace element in seawater at extremely low concentrations (5-350 pM, where 1 pM = 10(-12) mol L(-1)) throughout the water column. Presently, little is known about the marine biogeochemistry of Ti and there is a distinct lack of oceanic measurements of Ti , because of the combined difficulties of trace-metal clean sampling for an element at such low levels and the lack of a suitable shipboard method of analysis. Here, a new cathodic stripping voltammetry procedure is presented for the rapid determination of Ti at pM concentrations in seawater that is capable of being used directly at sea. This method utilizes the catalytic enhancement of the reduction of the complex formed between Cupferron (N-nitrosophenylhydroxylamine) and Ti(IV). While Cupferron itself acts as both a complexing agent and an oxidizing agent, it was found that the optimal sensitivity was with bromate as an auxiliary oxidant. An advantage of this method is that it is useable over the pH range of 5.5-8. Under the conditions employed in this work, detection limits ranged from 5 pM to 12 pM. This new catalytic method is significantly more sensitive than existing methods and has been extensively tested at sea in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans.

  2. Dehydroindigo: a new piece into the Maya Blue puzzle from the voltammetry of microparticles approach.

    PubMed

    Doménech, Antonio; Doménech-Carbó, María Teresa; Vazquez de Agredos Pascual, María Luisa

    2006-03-30

    Combining a novel technique, the voltammetry of microparticles, with spectrometric, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy data, Maya Blue is detected in wall paintings of the Substructures A-3, A-5, and A-6, dated in the Early Classical period (440-450 a.c.), and the Substructure II-C, dated in the Late Preclassical period (150 b.C.), in the archaeological site of Calakmul (Campeche, Mexico), thus providing evidence on the use of the pigment 750 years prior to the date currently accepted. Electrochemical measurements, supported by spectrometric data, indicate that the presence of palygorskite-attached dehydroindigo, the oxidized form of indigo, contributes to the greenish color of Maya Blue. Enthalpy and entropy of attachment of such compounds to palygorskite are calculated from the temperature dependence of electrochemical data. Both attachment processes are endothermic, becoming thermodynamically spontaneous at moderate temperatures. Accordingly, ancient Mayas may modulate the hue of Maya Blue from turquoise to greenish blue by controlling the temperature during the crushing process.

  3. Determination of Anionic Surfactants Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Richard; Lord, Daniel

    1999-09-01

    An experiment has been developed for our undergraduate analytical chemistry course that demonstrates the indirect analysis of anionic surfactants by techniques normally associated with metal ion determination; that is, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). The method involves the formation of an extractable complex between the synthetic surfactant anion and the bis(ethylenediamine)diaqua copper(II) cation. This complex is extracted into chloroform and then back-extracted into dilute acid. The resulting Cu(II) ions are determined by AAS and ASV. Students are required to determine the concentration of a pre-prepared "unknown" anionic surfactant solution and to collect and analyze a real sample of their choice. After the two extraction processes, students typically obtain close to 100% analytical recovery. Correlation between student AAS and ASV results is very good, indicating that any errors that occur probably result from their technique (dilutions, extractions, preparation of standards, etc.) rather than from the end analyses. The experiment is a valuable demonstration of the following analytical principles: indirect analysis; compleximetric analysis; liquid-liquid (solvent) extraction; back-extraction (into dilute acid); analytical recovery; and metal ion analysis using flame-AAS and ASV.

  4. Application of adsorptive stripping voltammetry for determination of selected methoxyimino cephalosporins in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, Mara M; Kapetanović, Vera

    2010-09-01

    In last two decades different electroanalytical methods are used for sensitive and selective determination of cephalosporins. In this paper the electrochemical behavior of methoxyimino cephalosporins, reduction mechanism and nature of the process at the mercury electrode surface is presented. Special attention is paid to the cephalosporins adsorption at the mercury surface. Based on this phenomenon, the adsorptive stripping methods are established for determination of low concentration of these drugs in urine samples, both in-vitro, and in-vivo conditions. The application of the adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV) for determination of cefpodoxime proksetile (CP), cefotaxime (CF), desacetylcefotaxime (DCF) and cefetamet (CEF) is summarized. The best sensitivity of determination in-vitro in urine was achieved for CP, in acid solutions (LOD 7.410(-9)M and LOQ 2.410(-8)M), followed by CF, CEF and DCF. This is in accordance with the strength of their adsorption. Determination of CF and DCF by AdSDPV in-vivo is also presented. Compared to other analytical methods, AdSDPV showed advantages in simplicity of the sample preparation, and over the other voltamperometric methods, higher sensitivity and selectivity.

  5. Detecting Naturally-Produced Sulfide Nanoparticles by Adsorptive, Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helz, G. R.; Krznaric, D.; Bura-Nakic, E.; Ciglenecki, I.

    2007-12-01

    Growing evidence implies that metal sulfide nanoparticles of natural origin exist in some aquatic environments. These nanoparticles could play important roles as mediators of trace metal nutrition and toxicity. Thermodynamics suggests that in sulfidic environments (total transition metaltotal sulfide) the most insoluble metal sulfide (usually Hg or Cu) will form the predominant sulfide nanoparticle. New experimental methods for detecting and distinguishing between such nanoparticles are needed. We report that mercury electrodes effectively preconcentrate a number of different metal sulfide nanoparticles, enabling their detection by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Voltammetrically, nanoparticulate analytes differ fundamentally from dissolved analytes; e.g. analyte accumulation is very sensitive to electrolyte composition and concentration in accord with the Schulze-Hardy Rule. EDTA or acid treatment of samples is useful for distinguishing highly insoluble nanoparticles (HgS, CuS) from FeS. Nanoparticulate sulfur potentially interferes. Supersaturated solutions can generate artifactual analyte on Hg electrode surfaces. Despite such potential pitfalls, progress is encouraging. Preliminary, qualitative results from natural waters will be reported.

  6. Sensitive quantitation of Ochratoxin A in cocoa beans using differential pulse voltammetry based aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Hayat, Akhtar; Catanante, Gaëlle; Istamboulie, Georges; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose for the first time a sensitive Ochratoxin A (OTA) detection in cocoa beans using competitive aptasensor by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In the proposed method, biotin labeled and free OTA competed to bind with immobilized aptamer onto the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), and percentage binding was calculated. The detection was performed after adding avidin-ALP to perform avidin-biotin reaction; the signal was generated through a suitable substrate 1-naphthyl phosphate (1-NP), for alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The cocoa samples were extracted and purified using molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) columns specifically designed for OTA. The developed aptasensor showed a good linearity in the range 0.15-5 ng/mL with the limit of detection (LOD) 0.07 ng/mL and 3.7% relative standard deviation (RSD). The aptasensor displayed good recovery values in the range 82.1-85% with 3.87% RSD, thus, demonstrated the efficiency of proposed aptasensor for such matrices.

  7. Square wave voltammetry in the determination of Ni2+ and Al3+ in biological sample.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Alexandre T; Vargas, Alexandro M M; Santos, Lídia B; Nozaki, Jorge; Muniz, Edvani C; Tambourgi, Elias B

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, the amounts of Ni (nickel) and Al (aluminum) in tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) were determined using square wave voltammetry (SWV) with glassy carbon working microelectrode with a mercury thin film, platinum counter electrode, and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Ni was studied through the formation of the dimethylglyoxime-Ni (Ni-DMG) complex, while Al was studied through the formation of the Alizarin R-Al complex. The detection limit found for Ni-DMG and Alizarin R-Al complexes were 1.70 x 10(-7) and 1.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. The voltammetric anodic curves for the Alizarin R-Al complex were recorded over the potential range from -0.8 to -0.05 V while the voltammetric cathodic curve for the Ni-DMG complex was recorded over the potential range from -0.7 to -1.2 V. These methods detected low concentrations of Ni and Al in biological samples efficiently.

  8. Sensitive quantitation of Ochratoxin A in cocoa beans using differential pulse voltammetry based aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Hayat, Akhtar; Catanante, Gaëlle; Istamboulie, Georges; Marty, Jean-Louis

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose for the first time a sensitive Ochratoxin A (OTA) detection in cocoa beans using competitive aptasensor by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). In the proposed method, biotin labeled and free OTA competed to bind with immobilized aptamer onto the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), and percentage binding was calculated. The detection was performed after adding avidin-ALP to perform avidin-biotin reaction; the signal was generated through a suitable substrate 1-naphthyl phosphate (1-NP), for alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The cocoa samples were extracted and purified using molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) columns specifically designed for OTA. The developed aptasensor showed a good linearity in the range 0.15-5 ng/mL with the limit of detection (LOD) 0.07 ng/mL and 3.7% relative standard deviation (RSD). The aptasensor displayed good recovery values in the range 82.1-85% with 3.87% RSD, thus, demonstrated the efficiency of proposed aptasensor for such matrices. PMID:26304413

  9. Aspartame decreases evoked extracellular dopamine levels in the rat brain: an in vivo voltammetry study.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Brian P; Cummings, Deirdre R; Skaggs, Tricia A

    2007-12-01

    Conflicting reports exist concerning the effect aspartame (APM, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester) has upon brain biogenic amines. In the following study, in vivo voltammetry was utilized to measure evoked extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the striatum of rats in order to assess APM's effect. Time-course experiments revealed a significant decline in evoked extracellular DA levels within 1h of a single systemic dose (500mg/kg i.p.) when compared to vehicle-injected controls. The effect was frequency dependent and showed a significant decrease utilizing high frequency stimulation parameters (50 and 60Hz). In order to further determine APM's potential to alter evoked extracellular DA levels, extended stimulation periods were employed to deplete releasable stores both before and after APM administration in intact and 6-OHDA partially lesioned animals. The extended stimulation periods were applied at 60Hz for 2,5,10 and 20s durations. APM decreased DA levels under these conditions in both intact and 6-OHDA partially lesioned animals by an average of 34% and 51%, respectively. Kinetic analysis performed on frequency series indicated that the diminished DA levels corresponded to a significant reduction in DA release. These findings suggest that APM has a relatively potent effect of decreasing evoked extracellular DA levels when administered systemically under the conditions specified.

  10. Determination of water in room temperature ionic liquids by cathodic stripping voltammetry at a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan; Bond, Alan M; Lu, Xunyu

    2012-03-20

    An electrochemical method based on cathodic stripping voltammetry at a gold electrode has been developed for the determination of water in ionic liquids. The technique has been applied to two aprotic ionic liquids, (1-butyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and two protic ionic liquids, (bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium acetate and triethylammonium acetate). When water is present in an ionic liquid, electrooxidation of a gold electrode forms gold oxides. Thus, application of an anodic potential scan or holding the potential of the electrode at a very positive value leads to accumulation of an oxide film. On applying a cathodic potential scan, a sensitive stripping peak is produced as a result of the reduction of gold oxide back to gold. The magnitude of the peak current generated from the stripping process is a function of the water concentration in an ionic liquid. The method requires no addition of reagents and can be used for the sensitive and in situ determination of water present in small volumes of ionic liquids. Importantly, the method allows the determination of water in the carboxylic acid-based ionic liquids, such as acetate-based protic ionic liquids, where the widely used Karl Fischer titration method suffering from an esterification side reaction which generates water as a side product.

  11. Chemical speciation of iron in seawater by cathodic stripping voltammetry with dihydroxynaphthalene.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Constant M G

    2006-01-01

    The chemical speciation of iron in seawater is determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry using 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) as adsorptive and competing ligand. The optimized conditions include a DHN concentration of 0.5-1 microM, seawater at its original pH of 8, and equilibration overnight. The alpha-coefficient for DHN (=[FeDHN]/[Fe']) was calibrated against EDTA giving values of 166 for 0.5 microM DHN and 366 at 1 microM DHN and a value of 8.51 +/- 0.07 for log K'(Fe'DHN). The dissociation of the natural iron species FeL was found to have a characteristic reaction time of 50 min, indicating that titrations should be equilibrated overnight rather than the shorter periods sometimes used onboard ship. The method was applied to samples from the Pacific giving ligand concentrations of 1.1 and 1.6 nM for deep and surface waters, respectively, with an average value for log K'(FeL) of 11.9 +/- 0.3 compared to a value of 11.5 for the siderophore deferoxamine. The results are similar to those obtained previously for similar samples, but the new method has much greater sensitivity for iron than previous methods, leading to lower limits of detection and shorter analysis time.

  12. Influence of smectite suspension structure on sheet orientation in dry sediments: XRD and AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L

    2010-06-15

    The structure-building phenomena within clay aggregates are governed by forces acting between clay particles. Measurements of such forces are important to understand in order to manipulate the aggregate structure for applications such as dewatering of mineral processing tailings. A parallel particle orientation is required when conducting XRD investigation on the oriented samples and conduct force measurements acting between basal planes of clay mineral platelets using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate how smectite clay platelets were oriented on silicon wafer substrate when dried from suspension range of methods like SEM, XRD and AFM were employed. From these investigations, we conclude that high clay concentrations and larger particle diameters (up to 5 microm) in suspension result in random orientation of platelets in the substrate. The best possible laminar orientation in the clay dry film, represented in the XRD 001/020 intensity ratio of 47 was obtained by drying thin layers from 0.02 wt.% clay suspensions of the natural pH. Conducted AFM investigations show that smectite studied in water based electrolytes show very long-range repulsive forces lower in strength than electrostatic forces from double-layer repulsion. It was suggested that these forces may have structural nature. Smectite surface layers rehydrate in water environment forms surface gel with spongy and cellular texture which cushion approaching AFM probe. This structural effect can be measured in distances larger than 1000 nm from substrate surface and when probe penetrate this gel layer, structural linkages are forming between substrate and clay covered probe. These linkages prevent subsequently smooth detachments of AFM probe on way back when retrieval. This effect of tearing new formed structure apart involves larger adhesion-like forces measured in retrieval. It is also suggested that these effect may be enhanced by the nano-clay particles interaction.

  13. Structural impact of cations on lipid bilayer models: nanomechanical properties by AFM-force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Giannotti, Marina I; Sanz, Fausto

    2014-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has become an invaluable tool for studying the micro- and nanoworlds. As a stand-alone, high-resolution imaging technique and force transducer, it defies most other surface instrumentation in ease of use, sensitivity and versatility. The main strength of AFM relies on the possibility to operate in an aqueous environment on a wide variety of biological samples, from single molecules - DNA or proteins - to macromolecular assemblies like biological membranes. Understanding the effect of mechanical stress on membranes is of primary importance in biophysics, since cells are known to perform their function under a complex combination of forces. In the later years, AFM-based Force-Spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has provided a new vista on membrane mechanics in a confined area within the nanometer realm, where most of the specific molecular interactions take place. Lipid membranes are electrostatically charged entities that physiologically coexist with electrolyte solutions. Thus, specific interactions with ions are a matter of considerable interest. The distribution of ions in the solution and their interaction with the membranes are factors that substantially modify the structure and dynamics of the cell membranes. Furthermore, signaling processes are modified by the membrane capability of retaining ions. Supported Lipid Bilayers (SLBs) are a versatile tool to investigate phospholipid membranes mimicking biological surfaces. In the present contribution, we review selected experiments on the mechanical stability of SLBs as models of lipid membranes by means of AFM-FS, with special focus on the effect of cations and ionic strength in the overall nanomechanical stability. PMID:24341385

  14. Aircraft control by propeller cyclic blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1979-01-01

    A theory is developed for aircraft control obtained from the propeller forces and moments generated by blade angle variation during a blade revolution. The propeller blade is pitched harmonically one cycle per propeller revolution which results in vehicle control forces and moments, termed cyclic-control. Using a power series respresentation of an arbitrary function of cyclic-blade angle, cyclic-control theory is developed which leads to exact solutions in terms of derivatives of steady-state thrust and power with respect to blade angle. An alternative solution, when the cyclic-blade angle function is limited to a sinusoidal cycle, is in terms of Bessel functions. An estimate of non-steady azimuth angle change or lag is presented. Cyclic-control analysis applied to the counter-rotating propeller shows that control forces or moments can be uniquely isolated from each other. Thus the dual rotor, in hovering mode, has propulsion without rotor tilt or moments, or, when in propeller mode at the tail of an air ship or submarine, vehicle control with no vehicle movement. Control isolation is also attainable from three or more propellers in-line.

  15. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Andreev, Oleg A; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  16. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Andreev, Oleg A.; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  17. Cyclic transformation of orbital angular momentum modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlederer, Florian; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Malik, Mehul; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-04-01

    The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.

  18. Recovery of cyclic antidepressants with gastric lavage.

    PubMed

    Watson, W A; Leighton, J; Guy, J; Bergman, R; Garriott, J C

    1989-01-01

    The role of lavage fluid volume in recovery of cyclic antidepressant with gastric lavage was determined in 13 patients treated for moderate to severe cyclic antidepressant intoxication. An orogastric tube was placed, gastric contents aspirated, and gastric lavage performed with 60 to 180 mL aliquots of tap water or 0.9% NaCl for irrigation. A volume of 12.8 +/- 4.4 liters of lavage fluid was instilled, and 97.6 +/- 6.9% of this volume was recovered. The recovered aspirate and lavage fluid were inspected for the presence of particulate matter and saved in 4 to 5 liter collections. Determination of cyclic antidepressant and metabolite concentrations was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the amount of cyclic antidepressant recovered was calculated. The mean total amount recovered was 110 mg and ranged from 2.4 mg to 342 mg. Of the total amount recovered, 88% +/- 13% was recovered in the first 4 to 5 liters of lavage fluid. An estimate of the dose ingested was available in 7 patients, with 8.7% (0.4% to 21.7%) of the estimated dose recovered by lavage. There were no cases of significant drug recovery in clear lavage fluid. We conclude that if gastric lavage is undertaken in cyclic antidepressant intoxications, it should utilize 5 liters initially and then continue only if particulate matter is seen.

  19. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Naik, Vikrant V; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E; Spencer, Nicholas D; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-21

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.

  20. Cyclic nucleotides of cone-dominant retinas. Reduction of cyclic AMP levels by light and by cone degeneration.

    PubMed

    Farber, D B; Souza, D W; Chase, D G; Lolley, R N

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted retinas or whole eyes of 13-line ground squirrels (Citellus tridecemlineatus) and western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) contain higher levels of cyclic AMP than of cyclic GMP. In these cone-dominant retinas, light reduces cyclic AMP content selectively. Freezing of dark- or light-adapted retinas or eyes also reduces cyclic AMP content, with only minimal changes in cyclic GMP levels. In addition, exposure of frozen retinas of dark-adapted ground squirrel to light results in a significant decrease in cyclic AMP content. The destruction of cone visual cells of ground squirrel retina by iodoacetic acid injection decreases the cyclic nucleotide content of the dark-adapted retina. Considering the relative loss of cyclic nucleotides from cone degeneration, we estimate that the content of cyclic AMP in visual cells of ground squirrel retina is about four times greater than that of cyclic GMP. PMID:6256308

  1. Dynamics of electron transport by elastic bending of short DNA duplexes. Experimental study and quantitative modeling of the cyclic voltammetric behavior of 3'-ferrocenyl DNA end-grafted on gold.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Demaille, Christophe

    2006-01-18

    The dynamics of electron transport within a molecular monolayer of 3'-ferrocenylated-(dT)(20) strands, 5'-thiol end-grafted onto gold electrode surfaces via a short C2-alkyl linker, is analyzed using cyclic voltammetry as the excitation/measurement technique. It is shown that the single-stranded DNA layer behaves as a diffusionless system, due to the high flexibility of the ss-DNA chain. Upon hybridization by the fully complementary (dA)(20) target, the DNA-modified gold electrode displays a highly unusual voltammetric behavior, the faradaic signal even ultimately switching off at a high enough potential scan rate. This remarkable extinction phenomenon is qualitatively and quantitatively justified by the model of elastic bending diffusion developed in the present work which describes the motion of the DNA-borne ferrocene moiety as resulting from the elastic bending of the duplex DNA toward and away from the electrode surface. Its use allows us to demonstrate that the dynamics of electron transport within the hybridized DNA layer is solely controlled by the intrinsic bending elasticity of ds-DNA. Fast scan rate cyclic voltammetry of end-grafted, redox-labeled DNA layers is shown to be an extremely efficient method to probe the bending dynamics of short-DNA fragments in the submillisecond time range. The persistence length of the end-anchored ds-DNA, a parameter quantifying the flexibility of the nanometer-long duplex, can then be straightforwardly and accurately determined from the voltammetry data.

  2. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes. PMID:21446752

  3. Characterization of single 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle attachments on AFM tips for single sub-4-nm object pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hui-Wen; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Tang, Song-Nien; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the attachment of a 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle (Au-NP) to the tip of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe through the application of a current-limited bias voltage. The resulting probe is capable of picking up individual objects at the sub-4-nm scale. We also discuss the mechanisms involved in the attachment of the Au-NP to the very apex of an AFM probe tip. The Au-NP-modified AFM tips were used to pick up individual 4-nm quantum dots (QDs) using a chemically functionalized method. Single QD blinking was reduced considerably on the Au-NP-modified AFM tip. The resulting AFM tips present an excellent platform for the manipulation of single protein molecules in the study of single protein-protein interactions.

  4. Cyclic and low temperature effects on microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic temperature and low temperature operating life tests, and pre-/post-life device evaluations were used to determine the degrading effects of thermal environments on microcircuit reliability. Low power transistor-transistor-logic gates and linear devices were included in each test group. Device metallization systems included aluminum metallization/aluminum wire, aluminum metallization/gold wire, and gold metallization/gold wire. Fewer than 2% electrical failures were observed during the cyclic and low temperature life tests and the post-life evaluations revealed approximately 2% bond pull failures. Reconstruction of aluminum die metallization was observed in all devices and the severity of the reconstruction appeared to be directly related to the magnitude of the temperature excursion. All types of bonds except the gold/gold bonds were weakened by exposure to repeated cyclic temperature stress.

  5. Holographic dark energy in a cyclic universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingfei; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Hongya

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we study the cosmological evolution of the holographic dark energy in a cyclic universe, generalizing the model of holographic dark energy proposed by Li. The holographic dark energy with c<1 can realize a quintom behavior; namely, it evolves from a quintessence-like component to a phantom-like one. The holographic phantom energy density grows rapidly and dominates the late-time expanding phase, helping to realize a cyclic universe scenario in which the high energy regime is modified by the effects of quantum gravity, causing a turn-around (and a bounce) of the universe. The dynamical evolution of holographic dark energy in the regimes of low energy and high energy is governed by two differential equations, respectively. It is of importance to link the two regimes for this scenario. We propose a link condition giving rise to a complete picture of holographic evolution of a cyclic universe.

  6. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for investigating protein crystal growth. Earlier AFM studies were among the first to demonstrate that these crystals grew by dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms [1]. These investigations were restricted to the micron range where only surface features, such as dislocation hillocks and 2D islands are visible. Most AFM instruments can scan at higher resolutions and have the potential to resolve individual protein molecules at nanometer ranges. Such scans are essential for determining the molecular packing arrangements on crystal faces and for probing the growth process at the molecular level. However, at this resolution the AFM tip influences the image produced, with the resulting image being a convolution of the tip shape and the surface morphology [2]. In most studies this problem is resolved by deconvoluting the image to obtain the true surface morphology. Although deconvolution routines work reasonably well for simple one- dimensional shapes, for complex surfaces this approach does not produce accurate results. In this study we devised a new approach which takes advantage of the precise molecular order of crystal surfaces, combined with the knowledge of individual molecular shapes from the crystallographic data of the protein and the AFM tip shape. This information is used to construct expected theoretical AFM images by convoluting the tip shape with the constructed crystal surface shape for a given surface packing arrangement. By comparing the images from actual AFM scans with the constructed ones for different possible surface packing arrangements, the correct packing arrangement can be conclusively determined. This approach was used in this study to determine the correct one from two possible packing arrangements on (I 10) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Another novel AFM technique was also devised to measure the dimension of individual growth units of the crystal faces

  7. Cyclic entropy: An alternative to inflationary cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2015-07-01

    We address how to construct an infinitely cyclic universe model. A major consideration is to make the entropy cyclic which requires the entropy to be reset to zero in each cycle expansion → turnaround → contraction → bounce → etc. Here, we reset entropy at the turnaround by selecting the introverse (visible universe) from the extroverse which is generated by the accelerated expansion. In the model, the observed homogeneity is explained by the low entropy at the bounce. The observed flatness arises from the contraction together with the reduction in size between the expanding and contracting universe. The present flatness is predicted to be very precise.

  8. Cyclic Polymer with Alternating Monomer Sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Zi; Zhao, Youliang; Zhang, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic polymers with alternating monomer sequence are synthesized for the first time based on the ring-closure strategy. Well-defined telechelic alternating polymers are synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization by copolymerizing the electron acceptor monomer of N-benzylmaleimide and donor monomer of styrene with a feed ratio of 1 between them. The corresponding cyclic alternating polymers are then produced by the UV-induced Diels-Alder click reaction to ring-close the linear alternating polymer precursors under highly diluted reaction solution.

  9. Multiparameter Estimation in Voltammetry When an Electron Transfer Process Is Coupled to a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Morris, Graham P; Mashkina, Elena; Bethwaite, Blair; Gillow, Kathryn; Baker, Ruth E; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2016-05-01

    Estimation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in electrochemical studies is usually undertaken via comparison of the experimental results with theory based on a model that mimics the experiment. The present study examines the credibility of transient d.c. and a.c. voltammetric theory-experiment comparisons for recovery of the parameters needed to model the ubiquitous mechanism when an electron transfer (E) reaction is followed by a chemical (C) step in the EC process ([Formula: see text]). The data analysis has been undertaken using optimization methods facilitated in some cases by grid computing. These techniques have been applied to the simulated (5% noise added) and experimental (reduction of trans-stilbene) voltammograms to assess the capabilities of parameter recovery of E(0) (reversible potential for the E step), k(0) (heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E(0)), α (charge transfer coefficient for the E step), and k(f) and k(b) (forward and backward rate constants for the C step) under different kinetic regimes. The advantages provided by the use of a.c. instead of d.c. voltammetry and data optimization methods over heuristic approaches to "experiment"-theory comparisons are discussed, as are the limitations in the efficient recovery of a unique set of parameters for the EC mechanism. In the particular experimental case examined herein, results for the protonation of the electrochemically generated stilbene dianion demonstrate that, notwithstanding significant advances in experiment and theory of voltammetric analysis, reliable recovery of the parameters for the EC mechanism with a fast chemical process remains a stiff problem. PMID:27041344

  10. Multiparameter Estimation in Voltammetry When an Electron Transfer Process Is Coupled to a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Morris, Graham P; Mashkina, Elena; Bethwaite, Blair; Gillow, Kathryn; Baker, Ruth E; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2016-05-01

    Estimation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in electrochemical studies is usually undertaken via comparison of the experimental results with theory based on a model that mimics the experiment. The present study examines the credibility of transient d.c. and a.c. voltammetric theory-experiment comparisons for recovery of the parameters needed to model the ubiquitous mechanism when an electron transfer (E) reaction is followed by a chemical (C) step in the EC process ([Formula: see text]). The data analysis has been undertaken using optimization methods facilitated in some cases by grid computing. These techniques have been applied to the simulated (5% noise added) and experimental (reduction of trans-stilbene) voltammograms to assess the capabilities of parameter recovery of E(0) (reversible potential for the E step), k(0) (heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E(0)), α (charge transfer coefficient for the E step), and k(f) and k(b) (forward and backward rate constants for the C step) under different kinetic regimes. The advantages provided by the use of a.c. instead of d.c. voltammetry and data optimization methods over heuristic approaches to "experiment"-theory comparisons are discussed, as are the limitations in the efficient recovery of a unique set of parameters for the EC mechanism. In the particular experimental case examined herein, results for the protonation of the electrochemically generated stilbene dianion demonstrate that, notwithstanding significant advances in experiment and theory of voltammetric analysis, reliable recovery of the parameters for the EC mechanism with a fast chemical process remains a stiff problem.

  11. Determination of bismuth and copper using adsorptive stripping voltammetry couple with continuous wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Shokooh S; Ensafi, Ali A; Khayamian, T

    2007-01-15

    A new method is proposed for the determination of bismuth and copper in the presence of each other based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry of complexes of Bi(III)-chromazorul-S and Cu(II)-chromazorul-S at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). Copper is an interfering element for the determination of Bi(III) because, the voltammograms of Bi(III) and Cu(II) overlapped with each other. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was applied to separate the voltammograms. In this regards, wavelet filter, resolution of the peaks and the fitness were optimized to obtain minimum detection limit for the elements. Through continuous wavelet transform Symlet4 (Sym4) wavelet filter at dilation 6, quantitative and qualitative analysis the mixture solutions of bismuth and copper was performed. It was also realized that copper imposes a matrix effect on the determination of Bi(III) and the standard addition method was able to cope with this effect. Bismuth does not have matrix effect on copper determination, therefore, the calibration curve using wavelet coefficients of CWT was used for determination of Cu(II) in the presence of Bi(III). The detection limits were 0.10 and 0.05ngml(-1) for bismuth and copper, respectively. The linear dynamic range of 0.1-30.0 and 0.1-32.0ngml(-1) were obtained for determination of bismuth in the presence of 24.0ngml(-1) of copper and copper in the presence of 24.0ngml(-1) of bismuth, respectively. The method was used for determination of these two cations in water and human hair samples. The results indicate the ability of method for the determination of these two elements in real samples. PMID:19071307

  12. Evaluation of seven cosubstrates in the quantification of horseradish peroxidase enzyme by square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2012-01-15

    The electrochemical detection for horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems was optimized. o-Phenilendiamine, phenol, hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, p-chlorophenol, p-aminophenol and 3,3'-5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were evaluated as cosubstrates of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Therefore, the reaction time, the addition sequence of the substrates, the cosubstrate:H(2)O(2) ratio and the electrochemical techniques were elected by one-factor optimization assays while the buffer pH, the enzymatic activity and cosubstrate and H(2)O(2) concentrations for each system were selected simultaneously by response surface methodology. Then, the calibration curves for seven horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems were built and the analytic parameters were analyzed. o-Phenilendiamine was selected as the best cosubstrate for the HRP enzyme. For this system the reaction time of 60s, the phosphate buffer pH 6.0, and the concentrations of 2.5×10(-4)molL(-1) o-phenilendiamine and of 1.25×10(-4)molL(-1) H(2)O(2) were chosen as the optimal conditions. In these conditions, the calibration curve of horseradish peroxidase by square wave voltammetry showed a linearity range from 9.5×10(-11) to 1.9×10(-8)molL(-1) and the limit of detection of 3.8×10(-11)molL(-1) with RSD% of 0.03% (n=3). PMID:22265528

  13. Head space voltammetry: a novel voltammetric method for volatile organics and a case study for phenol.

    PubMed

    Volkan Özdokur, K; Pelit, Levent; Ertaş, Hasan; Timur, Suna; Ertaş, F Nil

    2012-08-30

    Present paper describes the results of a novel method which combines the Head space (HS) preconcentration of the analyte on the electrode prior to the voltammetric analysis. Thereafter, the method was called HS-Voltammetry. The performance of the method was tested upon using an electroactive and volatile molecule, phenol molecule, which gives an oxidation peak at conventional electrodes. In this study, a glassy carbon electrode was modified with polypyrrole by electropolymerization and then, the electrode was placed over the solution in a sealed vial heated gently on a hotplate with a stirrer for phenol determination. By controlling the thickness of the polymeric coating and optimizing preconcentration parameters such as vial pH and temperature, stirring rate and exposure time, a very consistent (5.2% at 5.0×10(-7) M) fraction of the analyte can be extracted during a predetermined time. The oxidation peak current at 0.8 V depended linearly on the phenol concentration over a wide range (3 orders of magnitude). The detection limit was estimated as 7.0×10(-8) M at 60 °C (S/N=3) which is well below the limit set by the European Community for phenols in wastewaters (ca. 5×10(-6) M). The effect of other phenolic compounds was also examined and it was shown that head space preconcentration eliminated the interference of non-volatile phenolic acids studied. For volatile phenolic compounds, the selectivity can be maintained in cases when isolated peaks are obtained for each component. The proposed method has been applied successfully for the determination of phenol in artificial wastewater and recovery percentage was calculated as 93%.

  14. Determination of tryptamine in foods using square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel J E; Martínez, Ana M; Ribeiro, Williame F; Bichinho, Kátia M; Di Nezio, María Susana; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Araujo, Mario C U

    2016-07-01

    Tryptamine, a biogenic amine, is an indole derivative with an electrophilic substituent at the C3 position of the pyrrole ring of the indole moiety. The electrochemical oxidation of tryptamine was investigated using glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and focusing on trace level determination in food products by square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV). The electrochemical responses of tryptamine were evaluated using differing voltammetric techniques over a wide pH range, a quasi-reversible electron-transfer to redox system represented by coupled peaks P1-P3, and an irreversible reaction for peak P2 were demonstrated. The proton and electron counts associated with the oxidation reactions were estimated. The nature of the mass transfer process was predominantly diffusion-limited for the oxidation process of P1, the most selective and sensitive analytical response (acetate buffer solution pH 5.3), being used for the development of SWAdSV method, under optimum conditions. The excellent response allowed the development of an electroanalytical method with a linear response range of from 4.7-54.5)×10(-)(8)molL(-1), low detection limit (0.8×10(-)(9)molL(-)(1)), and quantification limit (2.7×10(-9)molL(-1)), and acceptable levels of repeatability (3.6%), and reproducibility (3.8%). Tryptamine content was determined in bananas, tomatoes, cheese (mozzarella and gorgonzola), and cold meats (chicken sausage and pepperoni sausage), yielding recoveries above 90%, with excellent analytical performance using simple and low cost instrumentation.

  15. Evaluation of seven cosubstrates in the quantification of horseradish peroxidase enzyme by square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Hernandez, Silvia R

    2012-01-15

    The electrochemical detection for horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems was optimized. o-Phenilendiamine, phenol, hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, p-chlorophenol, p-aminophenol and 3,3'-5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine were evaluated as cosubstrates of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Therefore, the reaction time, the addition sequence of the substrates, the cosubstrate:H(2)O(2) ratio and the electrochemical techniques were elected by one-factor optimization assays while the buffer pH, the enzymatic activity and cosubstrate and H(2)O(2) concentrations for each system were selected simultaneously by response surface methodology. Then, the calibration curves for seven horseradish peroxidase-cosubstrate-H(2)O(2) systems were built and the analytic parameters were analyzed. o-Phenilendiamine was selected as the best cosubstrate for the HRP enzyme. For this system the reaction time of 60s, the phosphate buffer pH 6.0, and the concentrations of 2.5×10(-4)molL(-1) o-phenilendiamine and of 1.25×10(-4)molL(-1) H(2)O(2) were chosen as the optimal conditions. In these conditions, the calibration curve of horseradish peroxidase by square wave voltammetry showed a linearity range from 9.5×10(-11) to 1.9×10(-8)molL(-1) and the limit of detection of 3.8×10(-11)molL(-1) with RSD% of 0.03% (n=3).

  16. Detection of heavy metal ions in water by high-resolution surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy combined with anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Forzani, Erica S; Tao, Nongjian

    2007-06-15

    High-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) capability has been demonstrated for detecting heavy metal ions in water. Metal ions are electroplated onto the gold SPR sensing surface and are quantitatively detected by stripping voltammetry. Both the SPR angular shift and electrochemical current signal are recorded to identify the type and amount of the metal ions in water. The performance of the combined approach is further enhanced by a differential detection approach. The gold sensor surface is divided into a reference and a sensing area, and the difference in the SPR angles from the two areas is detected with a quadrant cell photodetector as a differential signal. Our system demonstrated quantitative detection of copper, lead, and mercury ions in water from part-per-million to sub-part-per-billion levels with good linearity.

  17. Use of anodic stripping voltammetry to determine zinc(II), lead(II), and copper(II) in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkina, L.M.; Gus'kova, V.P.

    1988-01-20

    The existing standard procedure for the polarographic determination of Zn, Pb, and Cu, based on the cathodic polarization of a dropping mercury electrode, is laborious and time-consuming and allows one to determine the above-mentioned trace elements only when they are separated beforehand. We consider the possibility of using anodic stripping voltammetry with a mercury film electrode for the simultaneous determination of Zn(II), Pb(II), and Cu(II) in foods.

  18. Enhancing the Electrochemical Behavior of Pure Copper by Cyclic Potentiodynamic Passivation: A Comparison between Coarse- and Nano-Grained Pure Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza

    2016-07-01

    Electrochemical behavior of coarse- and nano-grained pure copper were modified and improved to a large extent by the application of cyclic potentiodynamic passivation. The efficacy of this method was evaluated on the basis of grain size which is of great importance in corrosion studies. In this study, the eight passes of accumulative roll bonding process at room temperature were successfully performed to produce nano-grained pure copper. Transmission electron microscopy image indicated that the average grain size reached below 100 nm after eight passes. On the basis of cyclic voltammetry and also the electrochemical tests performed after that, it was revealed that cyclic potentiodynamic passivation had a significant improving effect on the passive behavior of both coarse- and nano-grained samples. In addition, a superior behavior of nano-grained sample in comparison to coarse-grained one was distinguished by its smaller cyclic voltammogram loops, nobler free potentials, larger capacitive arcs in the Nyquist plots, and less charge carrier densities within the passive film.

  19. Enhancing the Electrochemical Behavior of Pure Copper by Cyclic Potentiodynamic Passivation: A Comparison between Coarse- and Nano-Grained Pure Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemical behavior of coarse- and nano-grained pure copper were modified and improved to a large extent by the application of cyclic potentiodynamic passivation. The efficacy of this method was evaluated on the basis of grain size which is of great importance in corrosion studies. In this study, the eight passes of accumulative roll bonding process at room temperature were successfully performed to produce nano-grained pure copper. Transmission electron microscopy image indicated that the average grain size reached below 100 nm after eight passes. On the basis of cyclic voltammetry and also the electrochemical tests performed after that, it was revealed that cyclic potentiodynamic passivation had a significant improving effect on the passive behavior of both coarse- and nano-grained samples. In addition, a superior behavior of nano-grained sample in comparison to coarse-grained one was distinguished by its smaller cyclic voltammogram loops, nobler free potentials, larger capacitive arcs in the Nyquist plots, and less charge carrier densities within the passive film.

  20. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  1. A model for cyclic mechanical reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhai; Kong, Fang; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force regulates a broad range of molecular interactions in biology. Three types of counterintuitive mechanical regulation of receptor–ligand dissociation have been described. Catch bonds are strengthened by constant forces, as opposed to slip bonds that are weakened by constant forces. The phenomenon that bonds become stronger with prior application of cyclic forces is termed cyclic mechanical reinforcement (CMR). Slip and catch bonds have respectively been explained by two-state models. However, they assume fast equilibration between internal states and hence are inadequate for CMR. Here we propose a three-state model for CMR where both loading and unloading regulate the transition of bonds among the short-lived, intermediate, and long-lived state. Cyclic forces favor bonds in the long-lived state, hence greatly prolonging their lifetimes. The three-state model explains the force history effect and agrees with the experimental CMR effect of integrin α5β1–fibronectin interaction. This model helps decipher the distinctive ways by which molecular bonds are mechanically strengthened: catch bonds by constant forces and CMR by cyclic forces. The different types of mechanical regulation may enable the cell to fine tune its mechanotransduction via membrane receptors. PMID:27786286

  2. Scale invariant density perturbations from cyclic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul Howard

    2016-04-01

    It is shown how quantum fluctuations of the radiation during the contraction era of a comes back empty (CBE) cyclic cosmology can provide density fluctuations which re-enter the horizon during the subsequent expansion era and at lowest order are scale invariant, in a Harrison-Zel’dovich-Peebles sense. It is necessary to be consistent with observations of large scale structure.

  3. Femtomolar Detection of Silver Nanoparticles by Flow-Enhanced Direct-Impact Voltammetry at a Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the femtomolar detection of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by direct-impact voltammetry. This is achieved through the use of a random array of microelectrodes (RAM) integrated into a purpose-built flow cell, allowing combined diffusion and convection to the electrode surface. A coupled RAM-flow cell system is implemented and is shown to give reproducible wall-jet type flow characteristics, using potassium ferrocyanide as a molecular redox species. The calibrated flow system is then used to detect and quantitatively size Ag nanoparticles at femtomolar concentrations. Under flow conditions, it is found the nanoparticle impact frequency increases linearly with the volumetric flow rate. The resulting limit of detection is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the previous detection limit for direct-impact voltammetry (900 fM) [J. Ellison et al. Sens. Actuators, B2014, 200, 47], and is more than 30 times smaller than the previous detection limit for mediated-impact voltammetry (83 fM) [T. M. Alligrant et al. Langmuir2014, 30, 13462]. PMID:27494652

  4. Femtomolar Detection of Silver Nanoparticles by Flow-Enhanced Direct-Impact Voltammetry at a Microelectrode Array.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Bartlett, Thomas R; Fair, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen; Compton, Richard G

    2016-09-01

    We report the femtomolar detection of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by direct-impact voltammetry. This is achieved through the use of a random array of microelectrodes (RAM) integrated into a purpose-built flow cell, allowing combined diffusion and convection to the electrode surface. A coupled RAM-flow cell system is implemented and is shown to give reproducible wall-jet type flow characteristics, using potassium ferrocyanide as a molecular redox species. The calibrated flow system is then used to detect and quantitatively size Ag nanoparticles at femtomolar concentrations. Under flow conditions, it is found the nanoparticle impact frequency increases linearly with the volumetric flow rate. The resulting limit of detection is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the previous detection limit for direct-impact voltammetry (900 fM) [J. Ellison et al. Sens. Actuators, B 2014, 200, 47], and is more than 30 times smaller than the previous detection limit for mediated-impact voltammetry (83 fM) [T. M. Alligrant et al. Langmuir 2014, 30, 13462]. PMID:27494652

  5. AFM combines functional and morphological analysis of peripheral myelinated and demyelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Alejandro; Bui, Chin Chu; Suter, Ueli; Young, Peter; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2007-10-01

    Demyelination of the myelinated peripheral or central axon is a common pathophysiological step in the clinical manifestation of several human diseases of the peripheral and the central nervous system such as the majority of Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndromes and multiple sclerosis, respectively. The structural degradation of the axon insulating myelin sheath has profound consequences for ionic conduction and nerve function in general, but also affects the micromechanical properties of the nerve fiber. We have for the first time investigated mechanical properties of rehydrated, isolated peripheral nerve fibers from mouse using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have generated quantitative maps of elastic modulus along myelinated and demyelinated axons, together with quantitative maps of axon topography. This study shows that AFM can combine functional and morphological analysis of neurological tissue at the level of single nerve fibers.

  6. SEM and AFM images of pyrite surfaces after bioleaching by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-L; Chen, B-Y; Lan, Y-W; Cheng, Y-C

    2003-09-01

    The bioleaching mechanism of pyrite by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans was examined with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the pyrite surface. The presence of pyrite eliminated the lag phase during growth of this microorganism. This was due to the stimulatory effect on cell growth of the slight amount of Cu2+ that had leached from the pyrite. Zn2+ was found to be much more readily solubilized than Cu2+. The efficiency of bioleaching was four times higher than that of chemical leaching. SEM images provided evidence of direct cell attachment onto the pyrite surface, thereby enhancing the bioleaching rate. Furthermore, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were found on the pyrite surface after 4 days of oxidation. AFM images showed that the pyrite surface area positively correlated with the oxidation rate. A combination of direct and indirect mechanism is probably responsible for the oxidation of pyrite by T. thiooxidans.

  7. Accurate and precise calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Pratt, Jon R

    2012-09-21

    Accurate cantilever spring constants are important in atomic force microscopy both in control of sensitive imaging and to provide correct nanomechanical property measurements. Conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) spring constant calibration techniques are usually performed in an AFM. They rely on significant handling and often require touching the cantilever probe tip to a surface to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of the configuration. This can damage the tip. The thermal calibration technique developed for laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) can be used to calibrate cantilevers without handling or touching the tip to a surface. Both flexural and torsional spring constants can be measured. Using both Euler-Bernoulli modeling and an SI traceable electrostatic force balance technique as a comparison we demonstrate that the LDV thermal technique is capable of providing rapid calibrations with a combination of ease, accuracy and precision beyond anything previously available.

  8. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  9. Surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres: An AFM-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; D'Haese, Cécile; Nysten, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) electrical modes were used to study the surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres. The surface electrical conductivity was studied by current sensing AFM and I-V spectroscopy. Kelvin probe force microscopy was used to measure the surface contact potential. The oxide film, known as passivation layer, covering the fibre surface gives rise to the observation of an apparently semiconducting behaviour. The passivation layer generally exhibits a p-type semiconducting behaviour, which is attributed to the predominant formation of chromium oxide on the surface of the stainless steel fibres. At the nanoscale, different behaviours are observed from points to points, which may be attributed to local variations of the chemical composition and/or thickness of the passivation layer. I-V curves are well fitted with an electron tunnelling model, indicating that electron tunnelling may be the predominant mechanism for electron transport.

  10. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  11. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  12. Determination of work of adhesion of biological cell under AFM bead indentation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinyao; Siamantouras, E; Liu, K K; Liu, X

    2016-03-01

    Hertz contact theory has been widely used for the determination of cell elasticity based on AFM indentation experiments. In light of the adhesive contact between AFM tip and cell, this study applied Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model to fit the indentation force-displacement (F-D) curves reported previously. A MIN6 cell has been modeled as first a sphere and then a flattened cell with different thicknesses. The results have shown that both basic JKR model and "generalized" JKR model can best describe the unloading force-displacement behaviors of the indentation curves. The Young׳s modulus of the cell and the work of adhesion of the cell-indenter interface are obtained. In comparison to the Hertzian contact model, the JKR model provides obviously better fitting to the experimental results, indicating that the adhesion is significant in the cell interaction. PMID:26688423

  13. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  14. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  15. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. Mode coupling in a hanging-fiber AFM used as a rheological probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, C.; Laurent, J.; Steinberger, A.; Bellon, L.; Ciliberto, S.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the advantages and drawbacks of a method which measures the viscosity of liquids at microscales, using a thin glass fiber fixed on the tip of a cantilever of an ultra-low-noise Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When the fiber is dipped into a liquid, the dissipation of the cantilever-fiber system, which is linked to the liquid viscosity, can be computed from the power spectral density of the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever deflection. The high sensitivity of the AFM allows us to show the existence and to develop a model of the coupling between the dynamics of the fiber and that of the cantilever. This model, which accurately fits the experimental data, gives also more insights into the dynamics of coupled microdevices in a viscous environment.

  17. AFM characterization of nanobubble formation and slip condition in oxygenated and electrokinetically altered fluids.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Pan, Yunlu; Daniels, Stephanie

    2013-02-15

    Nanobubbles are gas-filled features that spontaneously form at the interface of hydrophobic surfaces and aqueous solutions. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to characterize the morphology of nanobubbles formed on hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) films immersed in DI water, saline, saline with oxygen and an electrokinetically altered saline solution produced with Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow under elevated oxygen pressure. AFM force spectroscopy was used to evaluate hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces and boundary slip condition in various fluids. The effect of solution, electric field and surface charge on shape, size and density of nanobubbles as well as slip length was quantified and the results and underlying mechanisms are presented in this paper.

  18. Characterization of the polycaprolactone melt crystallization: complementary optical microscopy, DSC, and AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Speranza, V; Sorrentino, A; De Santis, F; Pantani, R

    2014-01-01

    The first stages of the crystallization of polycaprolactone (PCL) were studied using several techniques. The crystallization exotherms measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were analyzed and compared with results obtained by polarized optical microscopy (POM), rheology, and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results suggest a strong influence of the observation scale. In particular, the AFM, even if limited on time scale, appears to be the most sensitive technique to detect the first stages of crystallization. On the contrary, at least in the case analysed in this work, rheology appears to be the least sensitive technique. DSC and POM provide closer results. This suggests that the definition of induction time in the polymer crystallization is a vague concept that, in any case, requires the definition of the technique used for its characterization.

  19. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  20. Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Franz, Clemens M; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A

    2014-07-01

    The ability to perturb individual cells and to obtain information at the single-cell level is of central importance for addressing numerous biological questions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers great potential for this prospering field. Traditionally used as an imaging tool, more recent developments have extended the variety of cell-manipulation protocols. Fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) combines AFM with microfluidics via microchanneled cantilevers with nano-sized apertures. The crucial element of the technology is the connection of the hollow cantilevers to a pressure controller, allowing their operation in liquid as force-controlled nanopipettes under optical control. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrated a broad spectrum of single-cell applications including isolation, deposition, adhesion and injection in a range of biological systems. PMID:24856959

  1. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application.

  2. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  3. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ferat; Yablon, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization. PMID:26665072

  4. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-01

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (<100 nm) oscillations are readily measured with AFM. Resonance oscillation frequencies were measured for drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops.

  5. Characterization and Optimization of Quartz Tuning Fork-Based Force Sensors for Combined STM/AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino

    This chapter will be divided in two main parts. In the first one, we will show a detailed analysis of the dynamics of quartz tuning fork resonators which are being increasingly used in scanning probe microscopy as force sensors. We will also show that a coupled harmonic oscillators model, which includes a finite coupling between the prongs, is in remarkable agreement with the observed motion of the tuning forks. Relevant parameters for the tuning fork performance such as the effective spring constant can be obtained from our analysis. In the second one, we will present an implementation of a quartz tuning fork supplemented with optimized tips based on carbon fibers. The remarkable electrical and mechanical properties of carbon fiber make these tips more suitable for combined and/or simultaneous STM and AFM than conventional metallic tips. The fabrication and the characterization of these carbon fiber tips as well as their performance in STM/AFM will be detailed.

  6. In vitro study of AFB1 and AFM1 effects on human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell model.

    PubMed

    Luongo, D; Russo, R; Balestrieri, A; Marzocco, S; Bergamo, P; Severino, L

    2014-10-01

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus spp. that can occur as a natural contaminant in foods and feeds of vegetable origin. Post-ingestion, AFB(1) can be metabolized in the liver of mammals into hydroxylated aflatoxin M(1) (AFM(1)) that is excreted with milk. Although several studies have been carried out to evaluate effects of AFB(1) on the immune system, studies regarding AFM(1) are moreover lacking. The aim of the current study was to investigate effects of AFB(1) and AFM(1) on immune function using a lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell line as an experimental model. Both AFB(1) and AFM(1) produced significant decreases in Jurkat cell proliferation, whereas only minor effects were noted on interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ cytokines mRNA expression in stimulated cells that had been pre-incubated with AFB(1) and AFM(1). Particularly, AFB(1), but not AFM(1), at the highest concentration (50 µM) induced a marked increase in IL-8 mRNA expression. The results of the current study suggested the existence of a concentration threshold for AFB(1) and AFM(1) needed to exert biological activity on cell viability and innate immunity.

  7. Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Various Dairy Products: Evidence for Biologically Reduced Amount of AFM1 in Yoghurt

    PubMed Central

    RAHIMIRAD, Amir; MAALEKINEJAD, Hassan; OSTADI, Araz; YEGANEH, Samal; FAHIMI, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a carcinogenic substance is found in milk and dairy products. The effect of season and type of dairy products on AFMi level in northern Iran was investigated in this study. Methods Three hundred samples (each season 75 samples) including raw and pasteurized milk, yoghurt, cheese, and cream samples were collected from three distinct milk producing farms. The samples were subjected to chemical and solid phase extractions and were analyzed by using HPLC technique. Recovery percentages, limit of detection and limit of quantification values were determined. Results Seventy percent and 98% were the minimum and maximum recoveries for cheese and raw milk, respectively and 0.021 and 0.063 ppb were the limit of detection and limit of quantification values for AFM1. We found that in autumn and winter the highest level (0.121 ppb) of AFM1 in cheese and cream samples and failed to detect any AFM1 in spring samples. Interestingly, our data showed that the yoghurt samples had the lowest level of AFM1 in all seasons. Conclusion There are significant differences between the AFM1 levels in dairy products in various seasons and also various types of products, suggesting spring and summer yoghurt samples as the safest products from AFM1 level point of view. PMID:25927044

  8. Liquid solution delivery through the pulled nanopipette combined with QTF-AFM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Manhee; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Kunyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-02-01

    Nanopipette is a versatile fluidic tool for biochemical analysis, controlled liquid delivery in bio-nanotechnology. However, most of the researches have been performed in solution based system, thus it is challenge to study nanofluidic properties of the liquid solution delivery through the nanopipette in ambient conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the liquid ejection, dispersion, and subsequent deposition of the nanoparticles via a 30 nm aperture pipette based on the quartz tuning fork -- atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) combined nanopipette system.

  9. Morphological analysis of stainless steel scale like surface morphology using STM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Vignal, V.; Olive, J.M.; Desjardins, D.; Roux, J.C.; Genton, V.

    1997-12-19

    A combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation of stainless steel like surface morphology formed either in electropolishing bath or in HNO{sub 3} medium is reported. A new numerical technique using the Nanoscope III software is proposed. The dimension, slope and orientation of scales can be easily determined. Moreover, grain boundaries structure and probable oxides present in the upper part of the film can be deduced.

  10. The NTA-His6 bond is strong enough for AFM single-molecular recognition studies.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Claire; Gruber, Hermann J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2007-01-01

    There is a need in current atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecular recognition studies for generic methods for the stable, functional attachment of proteins on tips and solid supports. In the last few years, the site-directed nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-polyhistidine (Hisn) system has been increasingly used towards this goal. Yet, a crucial question in this context is whether the NTA-Hisn bond is sufficiently strong for ensuring stable protein immobilization during force spectroscopy measurements. Here, we measured the forces between AFM tips modified with NTA-terminated alkanethiols and solid supports functionalized with His6-Gly-Cys peptides in the presence of Ni2+. The force histogram obtained at a loading rate of 6600 pN s(-1) showed three maxima at rupture forces of 153 +/- 57 pN, 316 +/- 50 pN and 468 +/- 44 pN, that we attribute primarily to monovalent and multivalent interactions between a single His6 moiety and one, two and three NTA groups, respectively. The measured forces are well above the 50-100 pN unbinding forces typically observed by AFM for receptor-ligand pairs. The plot of adhesion force versus log (loading rate) revealed a linear regime, from which we deduced a kinetic off-rate constant of dissociation, k(off) approximately 0.07 s(-1). This value is in the range of that estimated for the multivalent interaction involving two NTA, using fluorescence measurements, and may account for an increased binding stability of the NTA-His6 bond. We conclude that the NTA-His6 system is a powerful, well-suited platform for the stable, oriented immobilization of proteins in AFM single-molecule studies. PMID:17712775

  11. Study of mechanical behavior of AFM silicon tips under mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopycinska-Mueller, M.; Gluch, J.; Köhler, B.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we address critical issues concerning calibration of AFM based methods used for nanoscale mechanical characterization of materials. It has been shown that calibration approaches based on macroscopic models for contact mechanics may yield excellent results in terms of the indentation modulus of the sample, but fail to provide a comprehensive and actual information concerning the tip–sample contact radius or the mechanical properties of the tip. Explanations for the severely reduced indentation modulus of the tip included the inadequacies of the models used for calculations of the tip–sample contact stiffness, discrepancies in the actual and ideal shape of the tip, presence of the amorphous silicon phase within the silicon tip, as well as negligence of the actual size of the stress field created in the tip during elastic interactions. To clarify these issues, we investigated the influence of the mechanical load applied to four AFM silicon tips on their crystalline state by exposing them to systematically increasing loads, evaluating the character of the tip–sample interactions via the load-unload stiffness curves, and assessing the state of the tips from HR-TEM images. The results presented in this paper were obtained in a series of relatively simple and basic atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) experiments. The novel combination of TEM imaging of the AFM tips with the analysis of the load-unload stiffness curves gave us a detailed insight into their mechanical behavior under load conditions. We were able to identify the limits for the elastic interactions, as well as the hallmarks for phase transformation and dislocation formation and movement. The comparison of the physical dimensions of the AFM tips, geometry parameters determined from the values of the contact stiffness, and the information on the crystalline state of the tips allowed us a better understanding of the nanoscale contact.

  12. Functionalized AFM probes for force spectroscopy: eigenmode shapes and stiffness calibration through thermal noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-06-01

    The functionalization of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever with a colloidal bead is a widely used technique when the geometry between the probe and the sample must be controlled, particularly in force spectroscopy. But some questions remain: how does a bead glued at the end of a cantilever influence its mechanical response? And more importantly for quantitative measurements, can we still determine the stiffness of the AFM probe with traditional techniques?In this paper, the influence of the colloidal mass loading on the eigenmode shape and resonant frequency is investigated by measuring the thermal noise on rectangular AFM microcantilevers with and without beads attached at their extremities. The experiments are performed with a home-made ultra-sensitive AFM, based on differential interferometry. The focused beam from the interferometer probes the cantilever at different positions and the spatial shapes of the modes are determined up to the fifth resonance, without external excitation. The results clearly demonstrate that the first eigenmode is almost unchanged by mass loading. However the oscillation behavior of higher resonances presents a marked difference: with a particle glued at its extremity, the nodes of the modes are displaced towards the free end of the cantilever. These results are compared to an analytical model taking into account the mass and inertial moment of the load in an Euler-Bernoulli framework, where the normalization of the eigenmodes is explicitly worked out in order to allow a quantitative prediction of the thermal noise amplitude of each mode. A good agreement between the experimental results and the analytical model is demonstrated, allowing a clean calibration of the probe stiffness.

  13. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results.

  14. A cyclic GMP-dependent signalling pathway regulates bacterial phytopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-Qi; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Febrer, Melanie; McCarthy, Yvonne; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Liu, Chung-Liang; Swarbreck, David; Rogers, Jane; Maxwell Dow, J; Chou, Shan-Ho; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-09-11

    Cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is a second messenger whose role in bacterial signalling is poorly understood. A genetic screen in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) identified that XC_0250, which encodes a protein with a class III nucleotidyl cyclase domain, is required for cyclic GMP synthesis. Purified XC_0250 was active in cyclic GMP synthesis in vitro. The linked gene XC_0249 encodes a protein with a cyclic mononucleotide-binding (cNMP) domain and a GGDEF diguanylate cyclase domain. The activity of XC_0249 in cyclic di-GMP synthesis was enhanced by addition of cyclic GMP. The isolated cNMP domain of XC_0249 bound cyclic GMP and a structure-function analysis, directed by determination of the crystal structure of the holo-complex, demonstrated the site of cyclic GMP binding that modulates cyclic di-GMP synthesis. Mutation of either XC_0250 or XC_0249 led to a reduced virulence to plants and reduced biofilm formation in vitro. These findings describe a regulatory pathway in which cyclic GMP regulates virulence and biofilm formation through interaction with a novel effector that directly links cyclic GMP and cyclic di-GMP signalling.

  15. Fracture Growth Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Martinez, Jonathan; McLean, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant in orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent flaws will not cause failure during the design life. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environmentally-assisted cracking (K (sub EAC)) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched specimens SE(B) representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to the monopropellant at 50 degrees Centigrade for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant was found to be at least 22.0 kilopounds per square inch. The stress intensity factor of the weld material was at least 31.3 kilopounds per square inch.

  16. Analysis of time-resolved interaction force mode AFM imaging using active and passive probes.

    PubMed

    Giray Oral, Hasan; Parlak, Zehra; Levent Degertekin, F

    2012-09-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) mode imaging for atomic force microscopy (AFM). A nonlinear model of an active AFM probe, performing simultaneous topography and material property imaging on samples with varying elasticity and adhesion is implemented in Simulink®. The model is capable of simulating various imaging modes, probe structures, sample material properties, tip-sample interaction force models, and actuation and feedback schemes. For passive AFM cantilevers, the model is verified by comparing results from the literature. As an example of an active probe, the force sensing integrated readout and active tip (FIRAT) probe is used. Simulation results indicate that the active and damped nature of FIRAT provides a significant level of control over the force applied to the sample, minimizing sample indentation and topography error. Active tip control (ATC) preserves constant contact time during force control for stable contact while preventing the loss of material property information such as elasticity and adhesive force. Simulation results are verified by TRIF mode imaging of the samples with both soft and stiff regions. PMID:22813887

  17. Rational fabrication of a gold-coated AFM TERS tip by pulsed electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Kun; Huang, Teng-Xiang; Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Li, Mao-Hua; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Fang-Zu; Ren, Bin

    2015-11-21

    Reproducible fabrication of sharp gold- or silver-coated tips has become the bottleneck issue in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, especially for atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based TERS. Herein, we developed a novel method based on pulsed electrodeposition to coat a thin gold layer over atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to produce plasmonic TERS tips with high reproducibility. We systematically investigated the influence of the deposition potential and step time on the surface roughness and sharpness. This method allows the rational control of the radii of gold-coated TERS tips from a few to hundreds of nanometers, which allows us to systematically study the dependence of the TERS enhancement on the radius of the gold-coated AFM tip. The maximum TERS enhancement was achieved for the tip radius in the range of 60-75 nm in the gap mode. The coated gold layer has a strong adhesion with the silicon tip surface, which is highly stable in water, showing the great potential for application in the aqueous environment. PMID:26482226

  18. Brain Tumor Classification Using AFM in Combination with Data Mining Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Huml, Marlene; Silye, René; Zauner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Although classification of astrocytic tumors is standardized by the WHO grading system, which is mainly based on microscopy-derived, histomorphological features, there is great interobserver variability. The main causes are thought to be the complexity of morphological details varying from tumor to tumor and from patient to patient, variations in the technical histopathological procedures like staining protocols, and finally the individual experience of the diagnosing pathologist. Thus, to raise astrocytoma grading to a more objective standard, this paper proposes a methodology based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) derived images made from histopathological samples in combination with data mining techniques. By comparing AFM images with corresponding light microscopy images of the same area, the progressive formation of cavities due to cell necrosis was identified as a typical morphological marker for a computer-assisted analysis. Using genetic programming as a tool for feature analysis, a best model was created that achieved 94.74% classification accuracy in distinguishing grade II tumors from grade IV ones. While utilizing modern image analysis techniques, AFM may become an important tool in astrocytic tumor diagnosis. By this way patients suffering from grade II tumors are identified unambiguously, having a less risk for malignant transformation. They would benefit from early adjuvant therapies. PMID:24062997

  19. Extension of gravity center method for diameter calibration of polystyrene standard particles with a metrological AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Ichiko; Takahata, Keiji; Sugawara, Kentaro; Gonda, Satoshi; Ehara, Kensei

    2012-06-01

    In the particle diameter calibration using metrological AFM, the distance between center points of neighboring two particles is referred to as "lateral diameter" when a single-layer close-packed structure of particles is successfully formed. The distance between an apex of a particle and a substrate is referred to as "vertical diameter." In the previous studies, lateral diameter was calculated by manually selecting and extracting a line profile from metrological AFM data and directly applying a method to calculate a pitch of one-dimensional grating. As the manual line profile extraction depends on who does it, however, there is a possibility that calculated lateral diameter is varied from person to person. We developed a technology to calibrate diameter of polystyrene latex (PSL) particles by using our metrological AFM. In this study, the gravity center method is extended to three dimensions to calculate position of and the center of gravity in each particle. Lateral diameter, which was defined as distance between gravity centers of neighboring two particles, is calibrated and uncertainty in the lateral diameter calibration is evaluated. Deformation of particles was also estimated by using Young's modulus of thin film PSL and bulk PSL.

  20. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463