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Sample records for afm energy dispersive

  1. Investigation of growth rate dispersion in lactose crystallisation by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2014-09-01

    α-Lactose monohydrate crystals have been reported to exhibit growth rate dispersion (GRD). Variation in surface dislocations has been suggested as the cause of GRD, but this has not been further investigated to date. In this study, growth rate dispersion and the change in morphology were investigated in situ and via bottle roller experiments. The surfaces of the (0 1 0) faces of crystals were examined with Atomic Force Microscopy. Smaller, slow growing crystals tend to have smaller (0 1 0) faces with narrow bases and displayed a single double spiral in the centre of the crystal with 2 nm high steps. Additional double spirals in other crystals resulted in faster growth rates. Large, fast growing crystals were observed to have larger (0 1 0) faces with fast growth in both the a and b directions (giving a broader crystal base) with macro steps parallel to the (c direction). The number and location of spirals or existence of macro steps appears to influence the crystal morphology, growth rates and growth rate dispersion in lactose crystals.

  2. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W

    2003-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C{sub 6}A{sub 2}S-bar{sub 2}H{sub 34} or {l_brace}Ca{sub 6}[Al(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O{r_brace}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2}. If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125.

  3. Natural patterns of energy dispersal.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Teemu; Annila, Arto

    2010-12-01

    Universal patterns such as power-law dependences, skewed distributions, tree-like structures, networks and spirals are associated with energy dispersal processes using the principle of least action. Also ubiquitous temporal courses such as sigmoid growth, bifurcations and chaos are ascribed to the decrease of free energy in the least time. Moreover, emergence of natural standards such as the common genetic code and chirality consensus of amino acids are understood to follow from the quest to maximize the dispersal of energy. Many mathematical functions that model natural patterns and processes are found as approximations of the evolutionary equation of motion that has been derived from statistical physics of open systems. The evolutionary processes can be described as flows of energy that run from high energy sources to low energy sinks in the least time. However, the equation of evolution cannot be solved in general because the flows of energy and their driving forces are inseparable. Since the energy of the system keeps changing, the paths of evolution cannot be integrated from a given initial state to a final state. Although evolutionary courses of these non-Hamiltonian systems with two or more alternative ways of dissipation cannot be predicted, the flows of energy will search and naturally select paths of least action, known as geodesics, to consume free energy in the least time. The scale-invariant natural patterns follow from this natural law that impinges on processes at all scales of space and time.

  4. Determination and simulation of nanoscale energy dissipation processes in amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos J; Garcia, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    We develop a theoretical framework that explains the use of amplitude modulation AFM to measure and identify energy dissipation processes at the nanoscale. The variation of the dissipated energy on a surface by a vibrating tip as a function of its amplitude has a shape that singles out the dissipative process. The method is illustrated by calculating the dynamic-dissipation curves for surface adhesion energy hysteresis, long-range interfacial interactions and viscoelastic processes. We also show that by diving the dissipated energy by its maximum value, the dynamic-dissipation curves become independent of the experimental parameters. In particular, for long-range dissipative processes we have derived an analytical relationship that shows the independence of the normalized dynamic-dissipation curves with respect the free amplitude, cantilever constant or quality factor.

  5. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G.

    2013-11-01

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  6. Electromagnetic energy momentum in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T. G.

    2011-01-15

    The standard derivations of electromagnetic energy and momentum in media take Maxwell's equations as the starting point. It is well known that for dispersive media this approach does not directly yield exact expressions for the energy and momentum densities. Although Maxwell's equations fully describe electromagnetic fields, the general approach to conserved quantities in field theory is not based on the field equations, but rather on the action. Here an action principle for macroscopic electromagnetism in dispersive, lossless media is used to derive the exact conserved energy-momentum tensor. The time-averaged energy density reduces to Brillouin's simple formula when the fields are monochromatic. The time-averaged momentum density for monochromatic fields corresponds to the familiar Minkowski expression DxB, but for general fields in dispersive media the momentum density does not have the Minkowski value. The results are unaffected by the debate over momentum balance in light-matter interactions.

  7. Localized overlap algorithm for unexpanded dispersion energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rob, Fazle; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Misquitta, Alston J.; Podeszwa, Rafał

    2014-03-21

    First-principles-based, linearly scaling algorithm has been developed for calculations of dispersion energies from frequency-dependent density susceptibility (FDDS) functions with account of charge-overlap effects. The transition densities in FDDSs are fitted by a set of auxiliary atom-centered functions. The terms in the dispersion energy expression involving products of such functions are computed using either the unexpanded (exact) formula or from inexpensive asymptotic expansions, depending on the location of these functions relative to the dimer configuration. This approach leads to significant savings of computational resources. In particular, for a dimer consisting of two elongated monomers with 81 atoms each in a head-to-head configuration, the most favorable case for our algorithm, a 43-fold speedup has been achieved while the approximate dispersion energy differs by less than 1% from that computed using the standard unexpanded approach. In contrast, the dispersion energy computed from the distributed asymptotic expansion differs by dozens of percent in the van der Waals minimum region. A further increase of the size of each monomer would result in only small increased costs since all the additional terms would be computed from the asymptotic expansion.

  8. Ecological succession as an energy dispersal process.

    PubMed

    Würtz, Peter; Annila, Arto

    2010-04-01

    Ecological succession is described by the 2nd law of thermodynamics. According to the universal law of the maximal energy dispersal, an ecosystem evolves toward a stationary state in its surroundings by consuming free energy via diverse mechanisms. Species are the mechanisms that conduct energy down along gradients between repositories of energy which consist of populations at various thermodynamic levels. The salient characteristics of succession, growing biomass production, increasing species richness and shifting distributions of species are found as consequences of the universal quest to diminish energy density differences in least time. The analysis reveals that during succession the ecosystem's energy transduction network, i.e., the food web organizes increasingly more effective in the free energy reduction by acquiring new, more effective and abandoning old, less effective species of energy transduction. The number of species does not necessarily peak at the climax state that corresponds to the maximum-entropy partition of species maximizing consumption of free energy. According to the theory of evolution by natural selection founded on statistical physics of open systems, ecological succession is one among many other evolutionary processes.

  9. Low Energy Lorentz Violation from Modified Dispersion at High Energies.

    PubMed

    Husain, Viqar; Louko, Jorma

    2016-02-12

    Many quantum theories of gravity propose Lorentz-violating dispersion relations of the form ω=|k|f(|k|/M⋆), with recovery of approximate Lorentz invariance at energy scales much below M⋆. We show that a quantum field with this dispersion predicts drastic low energy Lorentz violation in atoms modeled as Unruh-DeWitt detectors, for any f that dips below unity somewhere. As an example, we show that polymer quantization motivated by loop quantum gravity predicts such Lorentz violation below current ion collider rapidities.

  10. Steering the Self-Assembly of Octadecylamine Monolayers on Mica by Controlled Mechanical Energy Transfer from the AFM Tip

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, J.J.; Heredia-Guerrero, J.A.; Salmeron, M.

    2010-06-24

    We have studied the effect of mechanical energy transfer from the tip of an Atomic Force Microscope on the dynamics of self-assembly of monolayer films of octadecylamine on mica. The formation of the self-assembled film proceeds in two successive stages, the first being a fast adsorption from solution that follows a Langmuir isotherm. The second is a slower process of island growth by aggregation of the molecules dispersed on the surface. We found that the dynamics of aggregation can be altered substantially by the addition of mechanical energy into the system through controlled tip-surface interactions. This leads to either the creation of pinholes in existing islands as a consequence of vacancy concentration, and to the assembly of residual molecules into more compact islands.

  11. Electron Microburst Energy Dispersion Derived by Test Particle Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Parks, G. K.; Park, Y.; Tsurutani, B.

    2011-12-01

    Electron microbursts, energetic electron precipitation having duration less than 1 sec, have been thought to be generated by chorus wave and electron interactions. While the coincidence of chorus and microburst occurrence supports the wave-particle interaction theory, more crucial evidences have not been observed to explain the origin of microbursts. We think one of the observational evidences could be energy dispersion of microbursts. During chorus waves propagate along magnetic field, the resonance condition should be satisfied at different magnetic latitude for different energy electrons because chorus waves are coherent waves having narrow frequency band and electron microbursts have wide energy range, at least several hundreds KeV. If we observed electron microbursts at low altitude, the arrival time of different energy electrons should make unique energy dispersion structures. In order to observe the energy dispersion, we need a detector having fast time resolution and wide energy range. Our study is focused on defining the time resolution and energy range required to measure microburst energy dispersion. We performed test particles simulation interacting with simple coherent waves like chorus waves. By the wave-particle interaction, energetic electrons (test particles) changed pitch angles and some electrons were detected with energy dispersion at 600 km. We assumed a detector measuring microbursts at the altitude of 600 km. These results provide useful information in designing electron detectors for the future mission.

  12. A continuum solvent model of the multipolar dispersion solvation energy.

    PubMed

    Duignan, Timothy T; Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2013-08-15

    The dispersion energy is an important contribution to the total solvation energies of ions and neutral molecules. Here, we present a new continuum model calculation of these energies, based on macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The model uses the frequency dependent multipole polarizabilities of molecules in order to accurately calculate the dispersion interaction of a solute particle with surrounding water molecules. It includes the dipole, quadrupole, and octupole moment contributions. The water is modeled via a bulk dielectric susceptibility with a spherical cavity occupied by the solute. The model invokes damping functions to account for solute-solvent wave function overlap. The assumptions made are very similar to those used in the Born model. This provides consistency and additivity of electrostatic and dispersion (quantum mechanical) interactions. The energy increases in magnitude with cation size, but decreases slightly with size for the highly polarizable anions. The higher order multipole moments are essential, making up more than 50% of the dispersion solvation energy of the fluoride ion. This method provides an accurate and simple way of calculating the notoriously problematic dispersion contribution to the solvation energy. The result establishes the importance of using accurate calculations of the dispersion energy for the modeling of solvation. PMID:23837890

  13. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  14. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  15. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  16. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  17. Integrated assessment of dispersed energy resources deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Blanco, Raquel; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Kawaan, Cornelia P.; Osborn, Julie G.; Rubio, F. Javier

    2000-06-01

    The goal of this work is to create an integrated framework for forecasting the adoption of distributed energy resources (DER), both by electricity customers and by the various institutions within the industry itself, and for evaluating the effect of this adoption on the power system, particularly on the overall reliability and quality of electrical service to the end user. This effort and follow on contributions are intended to anticipate and explore possible patterns of DER deployment, thereby guiding technical work on microgrids towards the key technical problems. An early example of this process addressed is the question of possible DER adopting customer disconnection. A deployment scenario in which many customers disconnect from their distribution company (disco) entirely leads to a quite different set of technical problems than a scenario in which customers self generate a significant share or all of their on-site electricity requirements and additionally buy and sell energy and ancillary services (AS) locally and/or into wider markets. The exploratory work in this study suggests that the economics under which customers disconnect entirely are unlikely.

  18. Inverse energy dispersion of energetic ions observed in the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hwang, K.-J.; Wang, Y.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Fok, M.-C.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Kitamura, N.; Burch, J. L.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Lester, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a case study of energetic ions observed by the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft in the magnetosheath just outside the subsolar magnetopause that occurred at 1000 UT on 8 December 2015. As the magnetopause receded inward, the EPD observed a burst of energetic (˜50-1000 keV) proton, helium, and oxygen ions that exhibited an inverse dispersion, with the lowest energy ions appearing first. The prolonged interval of fast antisunward flow observed in the magnetosheath and transient increases in the H components of global ground magnetograms demonstrate that the burst appeared at a time when the magnetosphere was rapidly compressed. We attribute the inverse energy dispersion to the leakage along reconnected magnetic field lines of betatron-accelerated energetic ions in the magnetosheath, and a burst of reconnection has an extent of about 1.5 RE using combined Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar and EPD observations.

  19. Electromagnetic energy dispersion in a 5D universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, John G.

    2010-06-15

    Electromagnetism is analyzed in a 5D expanding universe. Compared to the usual 4D description of electrodynamics it can be viewed as adding effective charge and current densities to the universe that are static in time. These lead to effective polarization and magnetization of the vacuum, which is most significant at high redshift. Electromagnetic waves propagate but group and phase velocities are dispersive. This introduces a new energy scale to the cosmos. And as a result electromagnetic waves propagate with superluminal speeds but no energy is transmitted faster than the canonical speed of light c.

  20. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  1. Energy-entropy dispersion relation in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, H.; Haeussler, P.

    2013-10-01

    For a number of virus- and bacterium genomes we use the concept of block entropy from information theory and compare it with the corresponding configurational energy, defined via the ionization energies of the nucleotides and a hopping term for their interactions in the sense of a tight-binding model. Additionally to the four-letter alphabet of the nucleotides we discuss a reduction to a two-letter alphabet. We find a well defined relation between block entropy and block energy for a not too large block length which can be interpreted as a generalized dispersion relation for all genome sequences. The relation can be used to look for enhanced interactions between virus and bacterium genomes. Well known examples for virus-virus and virus-bacterium interactions are analyzed along this line.

  2. Bose gas with generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, M. A.; Martinez, J. G.; Garcia, J.

    We report the critical temperature, the condensed fraction, the internal energy and the specific heat for a d-dimensional Bose gas with a generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap, i.e., ɛ =ɛ0 for k = 0 and ɛ =ɛ0 + Δ +csks , for k > 0 , where ℏk is the particle momentum, ɛ0 the lowest particle energy, cs a constant with dimension of energy multiplied by a length to the power s > 0 . When Δ > 0 , a Bose-Einstein critical temperature Tc ≠ 0 exists for any d / s >= 0 at which the internal energy shows a peak and the specific heat shows a jump. The critical temperature and the specific heat jump increase as functions of the gap but they decrease as functions of d / s . Thermodynamic properties are ɛ0 independent since this is just a reference energy. For Δ = 0 we recover the results reported in Ref. [1]. V. C. Aguilera-Navarro, M. de Llano y M. A. Solís, Eur. J. Phys. 20, 177 (1999). We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  3. Synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.; Barnes, P.; Cockcroft, J. K.; Colston, S. L.; Häusermann, D.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Jupe, A. C.; Kunz, M.

    1998-04-01

    Energy-dispersive diffraction tomography using white-beam synchrotron X-rays with energies up to 140 keV yields images of the interior features of solid objects up to 50 mm thick. The volume sampled is determined by the geometry of the diffracting lozenge defined by the incident beam, the detector system collimation and the Bragg angle. Using conventional beam slits to form a highly collimated 50 μm × 50 μm incident beam and a 40 μm collimator aperture, we demonstrate on a PEEK phantom that a lateral resolution (transverse to the beam direction) of a few microns can be achieved. The resolution in the direction of the incident beam is necessarily poorer than this since the diffracting lozenge is elongated in this direction, with length increasing rapidly at small angles. There is no evidence of significant contamination of the diffracted intensity by the effects of multiple scattering from outside the primary lozenge.

  4. Imaging Dispersive Energy Analyzer (IDEA) for Ionosphere-Thermosphere Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syrstad, E. A.; Fenn, D.; Watson, M.; Schicker, S.; Smith, B.

    2011-12-01

    We present a new instrument concept for in situ satellite-based measurement of ion drifts / neutral winds, temperature, density, and composition. The Imaging Dispersive Energy Analyzer (IDEA) combines high-throughput dispersive energy analysis with 2-D imaging ion detection to provide complete characterization of the velocity distribution of a charged particle stream. The IDEA deflector operates at a small (<15 V) d.c. potential, with no voltage scanning necessary. All ions transmitted through the entrance collimator are deflected according to kinetic energy and detected by a microchannel plate (MCP) / imaging anode system (100% duty cycle). This produces a characteristic detector image from which the critical atmospheric parameters can be retrieved. Major species are separated by their mean kinetic energies according to the spacecraft velocity (e.g., 4.7 eV for O and 8.2 eV for N2). Spatial distributions are fit by maximal-likelihood routines, with centroid positions yielding each component of the neutral wind / ion drift velocity (assuming knowledge of the spacecraft pointing vector), and temperature determined from distribution width. The IDEA deflector consists of resistive glass side plates to propagate a linear potential gradient between copper end plates. The exit plane is a semi-transparent gate with parallel wires, with each wire at a unique voltage according to vertical position and contact point with the resistive glass. This design yields an 'ideal' electrostatic deflector, with no fringing or perturbed fields, in a very compact geometry. Thus, ions follow predictable trajectories, and straightforward data analysis produces highly accurate measurements of the ion velocity distribution function. Two recently proposed instrument suites, the Ion Drifts, Electric Fields, and Temperature (IDEFT) sensor and the Total Thermosphere Sensor (TTS), use orthogonally-oriented IDEA analyzers and a shared imaging detector to characterize the ionosphere and

  5. Energy dispersive X-ray reflectivity characterization of semiconductor heterostructures and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Mayer, T.M.; Krstelj, Z.M.

    1995-07-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray reflectivity is a versatile tool for analyzing thin film structures. Layer thickness, interface roughness and composition can be determined with a single non-destructive measurement. Use of energy dispersive detection enables spectra to be acquired in less than 500 s with a rotating anode X-ray generator, making the study of kinetics possible.

  6. Efficient Calculations of Dispersion Energies for Nanoscale Systems from Coupled Density Response Functions.

    PubMed

    Podeszwa, Rafał; Cencek, Wojciech; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2012-06-12

    Dispersion energies computed from coupled Kohn-Sham (CKS) dynamic density-density response functions are known to be highly accurate. At the same time, the computational algorithm is of only modest complexity compared to other accurate methods of dispersion energy calculation. We present a new implementation of this algorithm that removes several computational barriers present in current implementations and enables calculations of dispersion energies for systems with more than 200 atoms using more than 5000 basis functions. The improvements were mainly achieved by reorganizing the algorithm to minimize memory and disk usage. We present applications to two systems: the buckycatcher complex with fullerene and the vancomycin complex with a diacetyl-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala bacterial wall precursor, both calculations performed with triple-ζ-quality basis sets. Our implementation makes it possible to use ab initio computed dispersion energies in popular "density functional theory plus dispersion" approaches.

  7. Correlation energy and dispersion interaction in the ab initio potential energy curve of the neon dimer.

    PubMed

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    A close approximation to the empirical potential energy curve of the neon dimer is obtained by coupled-cluster singles plus doubles plus noniterative triples calculations by using nonaugmented correlation-consistent basis sets without counterpoise corrections and complementing them by three-term extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The potential energy is resolved into a self-consistent-field Hartree-Fock contribution and a correlation contribution. The latter is shown to decay in the long-range region in accordance with the empirical dispersion expansion.

  8. Dispersion-Energy-Driven Wagner–Meerwein Rearrangements in Oligosilanes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The installation of structural complex oligosilanes from linear starting materials by Lewis acid induced skeletal rearrangement reactions was studied under stable ion conditions. The produced cations were fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy at low temperature, and the reaction course was studied by substitution experiments. The results of density functional theory calculations indicate the decisive role of attractive dispersion forces between neighboring trimethylsilyl groups for product formation in these rearrangement reactions. These attractive dispersion interactions control the course of Wagner–Meerwein rearrangements in oligosilanes, in contrast to the classical rearrangement in hydrocarbon systems, which are dominated by electronic substituent effects such as resonance and hyperconjugation. PMID:27195490

  9. MAVEN observations of energy-time dispersed electron signatures in Martian crustal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Brain, D. A.; Larson, D. E.; Lillis, R. J.; Hara, T.; Livi, R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-02-01

    Energy-time dispersed electron signatures are observed by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission in the vicinity of strong Martian crustal magnetic fields. Analysis of pitch angle distributions indicates that these dispersed electrons are typically trapped on closed field lines formed above strong crustal magnetic sources. Most of the dispersed electron signatures are characterized by peak energies decreasing with time rather than increasing peak energies. These properties can be explained by impulsive and local injection of hot electrons into closed field lines and subsequent dispersion by magnetic drift of the trapped electrons. In addition, the dispersed flux enhancements are often bursty and sometimes exhibit clear periodicity, suggesting that the injection and trapping processes are intrinsically time dependent and dynamic. These MAVEN observations demonstrate that common physical processes can operate in both global intrinsic magnetospheres and local crustal magnetic fields.

  10. Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging using a high-resolution linear radon transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) analysis is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear-wave profile. One of the key steps in the MASW method is to generate an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity domain, so dispersion curves can be determined by picking peaks of dispersion energy. In this paper, we propose to image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy by high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT). The shot gather is first transformed along the time direction to the frequency domain and then the Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy can be imaged by high-resolution LRT using a weighted preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Synthetic data with a set of linear events are presented to show the process of generating dispersive energy. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that, compared with the slant stacking algorithm, high-resolution LRT can improve the resolution of images of dispersion energy by more than 50%. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  11. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect. PMID:18233401

  12. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  13. Finessing the fracture energy barrier in ballistic seed dispersal.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Robert D

    2012-04-01

    Fracture is a highly dissipative process in which much of the stored elastic energy is consumed in the creation of new surfaces. Surprisingly, many plants use fracture to launch their seeds despite its seemingly prohibitive energy cost. Here we use Impatiens glandulifera as model case to study the impact of fracture on a plant's throwing capacity. I. glandulifera launches its seeds with speeds up to 4 m/s using cracks to trigger an explosive release of stored elastic energy. We find that the seed pod is optimally designed to minimize the cost of fracture. These characteristics may account for its success at invading Europe and North America. PMID:22431608

  14. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  15. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  16. On an energy-latitude dispersion pattern of ion precipitation potentially associated with magnetospheric EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Ni, B.; Yue, C.; Jiang, F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-10-01

    Ion precipitation mechanisms are usually energy dependent and contingent upon magnetospheric/ionospheric locations. Therefore, the pattern of energy-latitude dependence of ion precipitation boundaries seen by low Earth orbit satellites can be implicative of the mechanism(s) underlying the precipitation. The pitch angle scattering of ions led by the field line curvature, a well-recognized mechanism of ion precipitation in the central plasma sheet (CPS), leads to one common pattern of energy-latitude dispersion, in that the ion precipitation flux diminishes at higher (lower) latitudes for protons with lower (higher) energies. In this study, we introduce one other systematically existing pattern of energy-latitude dispersion of ion precipitation, in that the lower energy ion precipitation extends to lower latitude than the higher-energy ion precipitation. Via investigating such a "reversed" energy-latitude dispersion pattern, we explore possible mechanisms of ion precipitation other than the field line curvature scattering. We demonstrate via theories and simulations that the H-band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave is capable of preferentially scattering keV protons in the CPS and potentially leads to the reversed energy-latitude dispersion of proton precipitation. We then present detailed event analyses and provide support to a linkage between the EMIC waves in the equatorial CPS and ion precipitation events with reversed energy-latitude dispersion. We also discuss the role of ion acceleration in the topside ionosphere which, together with the CPS ion population, may result in a variety of energy-latitude distributions of the overall ion precipitation.

  17. Time-Resolved Energy-Dispersive XAFS Station for Wide-Energy Range at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.; Uruga, T.; Tanida, H.; Yokota, S.; Imai, Y.; Irie, T.

    2007-01-19

    A time-resolved energy-dispersive XAFS (DXAFS) station has been constructed at the bending magnet beamline BL28B2 at SPring-8 to study the local structural changes of materials during chemical reactions and functional processes. The bending magnet source at SPring-8 has a high photon flux above 50 keV. The purpose of this station is to measure DXAFS spectra in a wide energy range from 7 to 50 keV covering K-edges of lanthanides. Its main components are a polychromator with a bent silicon crystal, a mirror to reject higher harmonics, and a position-sensitive detector (PSD). To correspond to a wide energy range, polychromators for Bragg and Laue geometry were developed for the energy range below and above 12 keV, respectively. The PSD used is CCD coupled with a fluorescent screen and lens system. The fluorescent materials and their thickness were optimized for measurement in the x-ray range. Good quality spectra of Ce K-edge (40.5 keV) were obtained with exposures of 360 ms for the standard samples. The present status of the system and some experimental examples are presented in this report.

  18. The effect of dispersion forces on the interaction energies and far infrared spectra of protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    We could show by means of dispersion-corrected DFT calculations that the interaction energy in protic ionic liquids can be dissected into Coulomb interaction, hydrogen bonding and dispersion interaction. The H-bond energy as well as the dispersion energy can be quantified to be 50 kJ mol(-1) each representing ten percent of the overall interaction energy. The dispersion interaction could be dissected into two portions. One third could be related to the dispersion interaction within an ion-pair enhancing the H-bond strength, two thirds stem from dispersion interaction between the ion-pairs. This distribution of dispersion interaction is reflected in the far infrared (FIR) spectra. The H-bond band is shifted weaker than the low frequency band where the latter indicates diffuse cation-anion interaction and H-bond bending motions. Finally, we can dissect the different types of interaction energies indicating their characteristic influence on vibrational modes in the FIR.

  19. Non-pairwise additivity of the leading-order dispersion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, Joshua W.

    2015-02-28

    The leading-order (i.e., dipole-dipole) dispersion energy is calculated for one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) infinite lattices, and an infinite 1D array of infinitely long lines, of doubly occupied locally harmonic wells. The dispersion energy is decomposed into pairwise and non-pairwise additive components. By varying the force constant and separation of the wells, the non-pairwise additive contribution to the dispersion energy is shown to depend on the overlap of density between neighboring wells. As well separation is increased, the non-pairwise additivity of the dispersion energy decays. The different rates of decay for 1D and 2D lattices of wells is explained in terms of a Jacobian effect that influences the number of nearest neighbors. For an array of infinitely long lines of wells spaced 5 bohrs apart, and an inter-well spacing of 3 bohrs within a line, the non-pairwise additive component of the leading-order dispersion energy is −0.11 kJ mol{sup −1} well{sup −1}, which is 7% of the total. The polarizability of the wells and the density overlap between them are small in comparison to that of the atomic densities that arise from the molecular density partitioning used in post-density-functional theory (DFT) damped dispersion corrections, or DFT-D methods. Therefore, the nonadditivity of the leading-order dispersion observed here is a conservative estimate of that in molecular clusters.

  20. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  1. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  2. Evaluating Chemical Dispersant Efficacy In An Experimental Wave Tank: 1, Dispersant Effectiveness As A Function Of Energy Dissipation Rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous laboratory test systems have been developed for the comparison of efficacy between various chemical oil dispersant formulations. However, for the assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness under realistic sea state, test protocols are required to produce hydrodynam...

  3. X-ray photoemission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (X-ray photoemission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls and specimens aged 30 min and 3 h at room temperature in distilled water and 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). Each X-ray photoemission cycle consisted of three scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 min for usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately}1,500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {micro}m area for 500 s. The X-ray photoemission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorus. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

  4. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  5. Two and three-body interatomic dispersion energy contributions to binding in molecules and solids.

    SciTech Connect

    von Lilienfeld-Toal, Otto Anatole; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2010-03-01

    We present numerical estimates of the leading two- and three-body dispersion energy terms in van der Waals interactions for a broad variety of molecules and solids. The calculations are based on London and Axilrod-Teller-Muto expressions where the required interatomic dispersion energy coefficients, C{sub 6} and C{sub 9}, are computed 'on the fly' from the electron density. Inter- and intramolecular energy contributions are obtained using the Tang-Toennies (TT) damping function for short interatomic distances. The TT range parameters are equally extracted on the fly from the electron density using their linear relationship to van der Waals radii. This relationship is empiricially determined for all the combinations of He-Xe rare gas dimers, as well as for the He and Ar trimers. The investigated systems include the S22 database of noncovalent interactions, Ar, benzene and ice crystals, bilayer graphene, C{sub 60} dimer, a peptide (Ala{sub 10}), an intercalated drug-DNA model [ellipticine-d(CG){sub 2}], 42 DNA base pairs, a protein (DHFR, 2616 atoms), double stranded DNA (1905 atoms), and 12 molecular crystal polymorphs from crystal structure prediction blind test studies. The two- and three-body interatomic dispersion energies are found to contribute significantly to binding and cohesive energies, for bilayer graphene the latter reaches 50% of experimentally derived binding energy. These results suggest that interatomic three-body dispersion potentials should be accounted for in atomistic simulations when modeling bulky molecules or condensed phase systems.

  6. Two- and three-body interatomic dispersion energy contributions to binding in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2010-06-01

    We present numerical estimates of the leading two- and three-body dispersion energy terms in van der Waals interactions for a broad variety of molecules and solids. The calculations are based on London and Axilrod-Teller-Muto expressions where the required interatomic dispersion energy coefficients, C6 and C9, are computed "on the fly" from the electron density. Inter- and intramolecular energy contributions are obtained using the Tang-Toennies (TT) damping function for short interatomic distances. The TT range parameters are equally extracted on the fly from the electron density using their linear relationship to van der Waals radii. This relationship is empiricially determined for all the combinations of He-Xe rare gas dimers, as well as for the He and Ar trimers. The investigated systems include the S22 database of noncovalent interactions, Ar, benzene and ice crystals, bilayer graphene, C60 dimer, a peptide (Ala10), an intercalated drug-DNA model [ellipticine-d(CG)2], 42 DNA base pairs, a protein (DHFR, 2616 atoms), double stranded DNA (1905 atoms), and 12 molecular crystal polymorphs from crystal structure prediction blind test studies. The two- and three-body interatomic dispersion energies are found to contribute significantly to binding and cohesive energies, for bilayer graphene the latter reaches 50% of experimentally derived binding energy. These results suggest that interatomic three-body dispersion potentials should be accounted for in atomistic simulations when modeling bulky molecules or condensed phase systems.

  7. Constraining the Energy-Momentum Dispersion Relation with Planck-Scale Sensitivity Using Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Mercati, Flavio; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Tino, Guglielmo M.

    2009-10-23

    We use the results of ultraprecise cold-atom-recoil experiments to constrain the form of the energy-momentum dispersion relation, a structure that is expected to be modified in several quantum-gravity approaches. Our strategy of analysis applies to the nonrelativistic (small speeds) limit of the dispersion relation, and is therefore complementary to an analogous ongoing effort of investigation of the dispersion relation in the ultrarelativistic regime using observations in astrophysics. For the leading correction in the nonrelativistic limit the exceptional sensitivity of cold-atom-recoil experiments remarkably allows us to set a limit within a single order of magnitude of the desired Planck-scale level, thereby providing the first example of Planck-scale sensitivity in the study of the dispersion relation in controlled laboratory experiments.

  8. Concepts for design of an energy management system incorporating dispersed storage and generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkham, H.; Koerner, T.; Nightingale, D.

    1981-04-01

    New forms of generation based on renewable resources must be managed as part of existing power systems in order to be utilized with maximum effectiveness. Many of these generators are by their very nature dispersed or small, so that they will be connected to the distribution part of the power system. This situation poses new questions of control and protection, and the intermittent nature of some of the energy sources poses problems of scheduling and dispatch. Under the assumption that the general objectives of energy management will remain unchanged, the impact of dispersed storage and generation on some of the specific functions of power system control and its hardware are discussed.

  9. Concepts for design of an energy management system incorporating dispersed storage and generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, H.; Koerner, T.; Nightingale, D.

    1981-01-01

    New forms of generation based on renewable resources must be managed as part of existing power systems in order to be utilized with maximum effectiveness. Many of these generators are by their very nature dispersed or small, so that they will be connected to the distribution part of the power system. This situation poses new questions of control and protection, and the intermittent nature of some of the energy sources poses problems of scheduling and dispatch. Under the assumption that the general objectives of energy management will remain unchanged, the impact of dispersed storage and generation on some of the specific functions of power system control and its hardware are discussed.

  10. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  11. High-energy dispersion anomalies in actinide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, T.; Durakiewicz, T.; Zhu, J.-X.; Joyce, J. J.; Graf, Matthias J.

    2012-02-01

    The observation of a prominent peak-dip-hump feature in the spectral weight in number of actinide compounds including Pu-115 superconductors and non-superconducting U-115 remains an unsolved problem. We have developed a first-principles intermediate coupling model to show that most aspects of these strong correlation features can be understood from the spin-fluctuation interaction.[1] The results show that a strong peak in the spin-fluctuation dressed self-energy is present around 0.5 eV in all these materials, which is mostly created by spin-orbit split 5f bands. These fluctuations couple to the single-particle spectrum and give rise to a peak-dip-hump feature, characteristic of the coexistence of itinerant and localized electronic states. Results are in quantitative agreement with photoemission spectra. Finally, we show that the studied actinides can be understood within the rigid-band filling approach, in which the spin-fluctuation coupling constant follows the same materials dependence as the superconducting transition temperature Tc. Work is supported by US DOE. [4pt] [1] T. Das. J.-X. Zhu, and M. J. Graf, arXiv:1108.0272

  12. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  13. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  14. On the calculation of the gauge volume size for energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Rowles, Matthew R

    2011-11-01

    Equations for the calculation of the dimensions of a gauge volume, also known as the active volume or diffraction lozenge, in an energy-dispersive diffraction experiment where the detector is collimated by two ideal slits have been developed. Equations are given for equatorially divergent and parallel incident X-ray beams, assuming negligible axial divergence. PMID:21997921

  15. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  16. Rossby wave energy dispersion from tropical cyclone in zonal basic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenli; Fei, Jianfang; Huang, Xiaogang; Liu, Yudi; Ma, Zhanhong; Yang, Lu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates tropical cyclone energy dispersion under horizontally sheared flows using a nonlinear barotropic model. In addition to common patterns, unusual features of Rossby wave trains are also found in flows with constant vorticity and vorticity gradients. In terms of the direction of the energy dispersion, the wave train can rotate clockwise and elongate southwestward under anticyclonic circulation (ASH), which contributes to the reenhancement of the tropical cyclone (TC). The wave train even splits into two obvious wavelike trains in flows with a southward vorticity gradient (WSH). Energy dispersed from TCs varies over time, and variations in the intensity of the wave train components typically occur in two stages. Wave-activity flux diagnosis and ray tracing calculations are extended to the frame that moves along with the TC to reveal the concrete progress of wave propagation. The direction of the wave-activity flux is primarily determined by the combination of the basic flow and the TC velocity. Along the flux, the distribution of pseudomomentum effectively illustrates the development of wave trains, particularly the rotation and split of wave propagation. Ray tracing involves the quantitative tracing of wave features along rays, which effectively coincide with the wave train regimes. Flows of a constant shear (parabolic meridional variation) produce linear (nonlinear) wave number variations. For the split wave trains, the real and complex wave number waves move along divergent trajectories and are responsible for different energy dispersion ducts.

  17. Two and three-body interatomic dispersion energy contributions to binding in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lilienfeld, Anatole; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2010-03-01

    Numerical estimates of the leading two and three body dispersion energy terms in van der Waals (vdW) interactions are presented for a broad variety of molecules and solids. The calculations employ London and Axilrod-Teller-Muto expressions damped at short interatomic distances, where the required interatomic dispersion energy coefficients, C6 and C9, are computed from first-principles. The investigated systems include the S22 database of non-covalent interactions, benzene and ice crystals, bilayer graphene, fullerene dimer, a poly peptide (Ala10), an intercalated drug-DNA model (Ellipticine-d(CG)2), 42 DNA base pairs, a protein (DHFR, 2616 atoms), double stranded DNA (1905 atoms), and molecular crystals from a crystal structure blind test. We find that the 2 and 3-body interatomic dispersion energies contribute significantly to binding and cohesive energies, for some systems they can reach up to 50% of experimental estimates of absolute binding. Our results suggest that interatomic 3-body dispersion potentials should be accounted for in atomistic simulations when modeling bulky molecules or condensed phase systems.

  18. The relative effect of behaviour in larval dispersal in a low energy embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Rémi M.; Chassé, Joël; Metaxas, Anna

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the relative importance of tidal phase, larval behaviour, release site, depth layer, and vertical swimming velocity on mean in-sea dispersal distance, retention, distance from shore, and population connectivity. Using a biophysical model, we simulated larval dispersal of marine benthic invertebrates for 6 taxonomic groups representing different combinations of swimming speed, and depth preference in St. George's Bay, NS, Canada, a shallow bay with low energy (e.g. lack of estuarine circulation). The biophysical model was run over a period of 3 months, from Jul to Sep, representing the period when larvae of the targeted species were present, and at each of 3 years. Overall, release site had the strongest effect of all factors on the dispersal metrics. Although less important than release site in our system, vertical distribution and swim speed had a significant effect which would likely be more pronounced in high (i.e. with features such as estuarine circulation or internal waves) than low energy environments. Retention and distance from shore were more responsive to our manipulations than dispersal distance, both in terms of the number of ecologically significant effects and the magnitudes of their effect size. These findings allow for the prioritization of biophysical model parameters and improved simulations of larval dispersal.

  19. First order variation of the dispersion function with particle energy deviation

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, J.P.; Jaeger, J.

    1984-12-01

    The variation of the dispersion function with the particle energy deviation can presently be calculated from second order transfer matrices; its periodic solution is determined numerically. The general differential equations for the dispersion function deduced from the complete equation of motion to second order are solved, using Green's function integral leading to an analytical expression of the periodic solution of the dispersion function D/sub 0/ and of the first order perturbation, D/sub 1/, with respect to energy deviation. The same method can be extended to higher order perturbations of the dispersion function. The determination of the periodic solution as well as the transportation of these two dispersion functions through any element depends only on two particular integrals. These integrals are derived for the general case of a combined function magnet, with up to second order components. The derivation includes the contribution from the edges. Chapter 2 and 3 deal with closed machines, chapter 4 applies these results to beam transport lines. These analytical expressions are then applied to a typical machine in order to illustrate the most important driving terms; the results do agree with those obtained by optics programs like MAD or DIMAT based on second order transfer matrices.

  20. Possible enhancements of AFM spin-fluctuations in high-TC cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlborg, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Ab-initio band calculations for high-TC cuprates, together with modelling based of a free electron like band, show a strong interaction between anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) spin waves and periodic lattice distortions as for phonons, even though this type of spin-phonon coupling (SPC) is underestimated in calculations using the local density approximation. The SPC has a direct influence on the properties of the HTC cuprates and it can explain many observations. The strongest effects are seen for modulated waves in the CuO bond direction, and a band gap is formed near the X,Y points, but unusal band dispersion (like ``waterfalls'') might also be induced below the Fermi energy (EF) in the diagonal direction. The band results are used to propose different ways of increasing AFM spin-fluctuations locally, and to have a higher density-of-states (DOS) at EF. Static potential modulations, via periodic distribution of dopants or lattice distortions, can be tuned to increase the DOS. This opens for possibilities to enhance coupling for spin fluctuations (λsf) and superconductivity. The exchange enhancement is in general increased near a surface, which suggests a tendency towards static spin configurations. The sensivity of the band results to corrections of the local density potential are discussed.

  1. Low-energy phonon dispersion in LaFe4Sb12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Boehm, Martin; Mutka, Hannu; Koza, Michael M.

    We studied the vibrational dynamics of a single crystal of LaFe4Sb12 by three-axis inelastic neutron spectroscopy. The dispersion of phonons with wave vectors q along [ xx 0 ] and [ xxx ] directions in the energy range of eigenmodes with high amplitudes of lanthanum vibrations, i.e., at ℏω < 12 meV is identified. Symmetry-avoided anticrossing dispersion of phonons is established in both monitored directions and distinct eigenstates at high-symmetry points and at the Brillouin-zone center are discriminated. The experimentally derived phonon dispersion and intensities are compared with and backed up by ab initio lattice dynamics calculations. results of the computer model match well with the experimental data.

  2. HOMO band dispersion of crystalline rubrene: Effects of self-energy corrections within the GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Susumu; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Schindlmayr, Arno

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the band dispersion and relevant electronic properties of rubrene single crystals within the GW approximation. Due to the self-energy correction, the dispersion of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) band increases by 0.10 eV compared to the dispersion of the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues within the generalized gradient approximation, and the effective hole mass consequently decreases. The resulting value of 0.90 times the electron rest mass along the Γ-Y direction in the Brillouin zone is closer to experimental measurements than that obtained from density-functional theory. The enhanced bandwidth is explained in terms of the intermolecular hybridization of the HOMO(Y) wave function along the stacking direction of the molecules. Overall, our results support the bandlike interpretation of charge-carrier transport in rubrene.

  3. Resonance energy transfer from dibucaine to acriflavine in polystyrene latex dispersions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Kuwabara, Hiroe; Gong, Yong-Kuan; Takaki, Yuki; Nakashima, Kenichi

    2003-07-01

    Resonance energy transfer from dibucaine (DC) to acriflavine (AF) has been investigated both in homogeneous aqueous solutions and in polystyrene latex dispersions. The energy transfer reaction is observed by monitoring fluorescence quenching of DC as well as sensitized emission of AF. It is found that the energy transfer from DC to AF is remarkably enhanced on going from the aqueous homogeneous solution to the latex dispersion. This is mainly attributed to the fact that both the donor and acceptor are effectively adsorbed onto the latex particles, as evidenced by the measurement of adsorption isotherms. From the adsorption experiments, it is also elucidated that electrostatic interaction is significant at low DC concentration, while hydrophobic interaction dominates at the higher concentration especially at higher pH.

  4. High-dispersion energy analyzer of charged particles in the form of two coaxial cylinders with an end diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkova, T. Ya.

    2012-12-01

    We propose an energy analyzer of charged particles based on the coaxial electrostatic lens that has been studied earlier. The optimal regimes of operation of such an analyzer are determined using numerical simulation by varying four independent parameters. It is found that linear energy dispersion is an order of magnitude higher than the dispersion of widely used energy analyzers of the type of a plane and cylindrical mirrors, as well as a number of other devices for analyzing the energy of charged particles.

  5. Application of high-resolution linear Radon transform for Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging and mode separating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) analysis is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear-wave profile. One of the key steps in the MASW method is to generate an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity domain, so dispersion curves can be determined by picking peaks of dispersion energy. In this paper, we image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy and separate multimodes from a multichannel record by high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT). We first introduce Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging by high-resolution LRT. We then show the process of Rayleigh-wave mode separation. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that (1) compared with slant stacking algorithm, high-resolution LRT can improve the resolution of images of dispersion energy by more than 50% (2) high-resolution LRT can successfully separate multimode dispersive energy of Rayleigh waves with high resolution; and (3) multimode separation and reconstruction expand frequency ranges of higher mode dispersive energy, which not only increases the investigation depth but also provides a means to accurately determine cut-off frequencies.

  6. Computing dispersive, polarizable, and electrostatic shifts of excitation energy in supramolecular systems: PTCDI crystal.

    PubMed

    Megow, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    The gas-to-crystal-shift denotes the shift of electronic excitation energies, i.e., the difference between ground and excited state energies, for a molecule transferred from the gas to the bulk phase. The contributions to the gas-to-crystal-shift comprise electrostatic as well as inductive polarization and dispersive energy shifts of the molecular excitation energies due to interaction with environmental molecules. For the example of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-diimide (PTCDI) bulk, the contributions to the gas-to-crystal shift are investigated. In the present work, electrostatic interaction is calculated via Coulomb interaction of partial charges while inductive and dispersive interactions are obtained using respective sum over states expressions. The coupling of higher transition densities for the first 4500 excited states of PTCDI was computed using transition partial charges based on an atomistic model of PTCDI bulk obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. As a result it is concluded that for the investigated model system of a PTCDI crystal, the gas to crystal shift is dominated by dispersive interaction. PMID:27608991

  7. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Thomas J. A.; Lewis, Edward A.; Haigh, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  8. Computing dispersive, polarizable, and electrostatic shifts of excitation energy in supramolecular systems: PTCDI crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megow, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    The gas-to-crystal-shift denotes the shift of electronic excitation energies, i.e., the difference between ground and excited state energies, for a molecule transferred from the gas to the bulk phase. The contributions to the gas-to-crystal-shift comprise electrostatic as well as inductive polarization and dispersive energy shifts of the molecular excitation energies due to interaction with environmental molecules. For the example of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-diimide (PTCDI) bulk, the contributions to the gas-to-crystal shift are investigated. In the present work, electrostatic interaction is calculated via Coulomb interaction of partial charges while inductive and dispersive interactions are obtained using respective sum over states expressions. The coupling of higher transition densities for the first 4500 excited states of PTCDI was computed using transition partial charges based on an atomistic model of PTCDI bulk obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. As a result it is concluded that for the investigated model system of a PTCDI crystal, the gas to crystal shift is dominated by dispersive interaction.

  9. A New Technique for High-Pressure Angle-Dispersive Powder Diffraction Using an Energy-Dispersive Setup and White Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Uchida, T.; von Dreele, R. B.; Rivers, M. L.; Nishiyama, N.; Funakoshi, K.; Nozawa, A.; Kaneko, H.

    2004-12-01

    We introduce a new step-scan diffraction technique, which collects angle-dispersive data using a solid-state detector (SSD) and white synchrotron radiation. By step-scanning a well-calibrated SSD over a limited 2θ range, a series of 1-dimensional energy dispersive data (intensity vs. energy) are obtained as a function of 2θ . The entire intensity (Int) dataset consists of several thousand channels covering a range of photon energies, E, (up to ~150 keV) at each of the ~1000 2θ steps, forming a 2-4 mega-element two-dimensional array, Int(E, 2θ ). These intensity data are then regrouped according to photon energies, which are defined in the multichannel SSD as individual channels, yielding a large number of intensity versus 2θ (angle-dispersive) datasets, Int(E=const., 2θ ), each of which corresponds to a given photon energy or wavelength. The entire dataset, selected subsets or composite scans can be used for multiple dataset Rietveld refinement. Data collected on α -Al2O3 (a NIST diffraction standard) at ambient conditions, from both the tapered undulator at 13-ID-D, APS and the bending magnet beamline BL04B1, SPring-8, were analyzed using the Rietveld technique, with varying schemes of data treatment. We demonstrate that data within certain energy bands (Δ E/E=±10 percent) may be binned together to improve counting statistics in a composite angle dispersive scan, so that data can be collected with much coarser scan steps of 0.1° or 0.2° . This technique has been used to collect high-pressure angle-dispersive data at the BL04 bending magnet beamline at SPring-8, with the multianvil apparatus SPEED-1500, up to 20 GPa and 1100 K. Data obtained on several materials will be shown to demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous high pressure and temperature Rietveld refinement.

  10. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  11. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  12. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  13. Generating an image of dispersive energy by frequency decomposition and slant stacking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Miller, R.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for calculating an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity (f-v) domain. The frequency decomposition is first applied to a shot gather in the offset-time domain to stretch impulsive data into pseudo-vibroseis data or frequency-swept data. Because there is a deterministic relationship between frequency and time in a sweep used in the frequency decomposition, the first step theoretically completes the transform from time to frequency. The slant stacking is then performed on the frequency-swept data to complete the transform from offset to velocity. This simple two-step algorithm generates an image of dispersive energy in the f-v domain. The straightforward transform only uses offset information of data so that this algorithm can be applied to data acquired with arbitrary geophone-acquisition geometry. Examples of synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that this algorithm generates accurate images of dispersive energy of the fundamental as well as higher modes. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2007.

  14. Artifacts in energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the scanning electron microscope (II).

    PubMed

    Fiori, C E; Newbury, D E

    1980-01-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra obtained with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer on an electron beam instrument can be severely compromised by the presence of electromagnetic interference. Sources of electromagnetic interference include ground currents and signals generated by time-varying currents in instrument components such as scan coils. Spectrometer resolution can be degraded by the accumulation of ice and vaccum oil on critical components of the device. Operation at high electron energy can cause artifacts in spectra due to direct entry of electrons and spurious x-rays into the detector. Processing high energy photons (above 40 keV) can lead to detector saturation effects which degrade resolution and affect dead time correction. Transmission of high energy x-rays through the detector accompanied by Compton scattering can lead to a distortion of the low energy portion of the spectrum.

  15. Artifacts in energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the scanning electron microscope (II).

    PubMed

    Fiori, C E; Newbury, D E

    1980-01-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra obtained with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer on an electron beam instrument can be severely compromised by the presence of electromagnetic interference. Sources of electromagnetic interference include ground currents and signals generated by time-varying currents in instrument components such as scan coils. Spectrometer resolution can be degraded by the accumulation of ice and vaccum oil on critical components of the device. Operation at high electron energy can cause artifacts in spectra due to direct entry of electrons and spurious x-rays into the detector. Processing high energy photons (above 40 keV) can lead to detector saturation effects which degrade resolution and affect dead time correction. Transmission of high energy x-rays through the detector accompanied by Compton scattering can lead to a distortion of the low energy portion of the spectrum. PMID:7423119

  16. X-ray reflectivity measurements of surface roughness using energy dispersive detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Warwick, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a new technique for measuring x-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive x-ray detection. The benefits of this method are the use of a fixed scattering angle and parallel detection of all energies simultaneously. These advantages make the technique more readily useable with laboratory x-ray sources and more compatible with growth chambers. We find excellent agreement between the calculated Fresnel reflectivity and the reflectivity obtained from a smooth Ge (001) surface. Reflectivities obtained during 500 eV Xe ion bombardment of Ge surfaces demonstrate the sensitivity of the technique to be better than 1 {angstrom}. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Application of decision tree algorithm for identification of rock forming minerals using energy dispersive spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaş, Efe; Çubukçu, H. Evren; Artuner, Harun

    2014-05-01

    Rapid and automated mineral identification is compulsory in certain applications concerning natural rocks. Among all microscopic and spectrometric methods, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS) integrated with scanning electron microscopes produce rapid information with reliable chemical data. Although obtaining elemental data with EDS analyses is fast and easy by the help of improving technology, it is rather challenging to perform accurate and rapid identification considering the large quantity of minerals in a rock sample with varying dimensions ranging between nanometer to centimeter. Furthermore, the physical properties of the specimen (roughness, thickness, electrical conductivity, position in the instrument etc.) and the incident electron beam (accelerating voltage, beam current, spot size etc.) control the produced characteristic X-ray, which in turn affect the elemental analyses. In order to minimize the effects of these physical constraints and develop an automated mineral identification system, a rule induction paradigm has been applied to energy dispersive spectral data. Decision tree classifiers divide training data sets into subclasses using generated rules or decisions and thereby it produces classification or recognition associated with these data sets. A number of thinsections prepared from rock samples with suitable mineralogy have been investigated and a preliminary 12 distinct mineral groups (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, apatite, amphibole, plagioclase, K- feldspar, zircon, magnetite, titanomagnetite, biotite, quartz), comprised mostly of silicates and oxides, have been selected. Energy dispersive spectral data for each group, consisting of 240 reference and 200 test analyses, have been acquired under various, non-standard, physical and electrical conditions. The reference X-Ray data have been used to assign the spectral distribution of elements to the specified mineral groups. Consequently, the test data have been analyzed using

  18. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  19. Weighted-density functionals for cavity formation and dispersion energies in continuum solvation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Gunceler, Deniz; Arias, T. A.

    2014-10-01

    Continuum solvation models enable efficient first principles calculations of chemical reactions in solution, but require extensive parametrization and fitting for each solvent and class of solute systems. Here, we examine the assumptions of continuum solvation models in detail and replace empirical terms with physical models in order to construct a minimally-empirical solvation model. Specifically, we derive solvent radii from the nonlocal dielectric response of the solvent from ab initio calculations, construct a closed-form and parameter-free weighted-density approximation for the free energy of the cavity formation, and employ a pair-potential approximation for the dispersion energy. We show that the resulting model with a single solvent-independent parameter: the electron density threshold (nc), and a single solvent-dependent parameter: the dispersion scale factor (s6), reproduces solvation energies of organic molecules in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride with RMS errors of 1.1, 0.6 and 0.5 kcal/mol, respectively. We additionally show that fitting the solvent-dependent s6 parameter to the solvation energy of a single non-polar molecule does not substantially increase these errors. Parametrization of this model for other solvents, therefore, requires minimal effort and is possible without extensive databases of experimental solvation free energies.

  20. Weighted-density functionals for cavity formation and dispersion energies in continuum solvation models

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Gunceler, Deniz; Arias, T. A.

    2014-10-07

    Continuum solvation models enable efficient first principles calculations of chemical reactions in solution, but require extensive parametrization and fitting for each solvent and class of solute systems. Here, we examine the assumptions of continuum solvation models in detail and replace empirical terms with physical models in order to construct a minimally-empirical solvation model. Specifically, we derive solvent radii from the nonlocal dielectric response of the solvent from ab initio calculations, construct a closed-form and parameter-free weighted-density approximation for the free energy of the cavity formation, and employ a pair-potential approximation for the dispersion energy. We show that the resulting model with a single solvent-independent parameter: the electron density threshold (n{sub c}), and a single solvent-dependent parameter: the dispersion scale factor (s{sub 6}), reproduces solvation energies of organic molecules in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride with RMS errors of 1.1, 0.6 and 0.5 kcal/mol, respectively. We additionally show that fitting the solvent-dependent s{sub 6} parameter to the solvation energy of a single non-polar molecule does not substantially increase these errors. Parametrization of this model for other solvents, therefore, requires minimal effort and is possible without extensive databases of experimental solvation free energies.

  1. Quantification of raindrop kinetic energy for improved prediction of splash-dispersed pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lovell, D J; Parker, S R; Van Peteghem, P; Webb, D A; Welham, S J

    2002-05-01

    ABSTRACT An electronic sensor, based on a piezoelectric transducer, was tested in the laboratory using simulated raindrops, and in natural rainfall. Data were also collected for splash dispersal using tracer dyes in laboratory experiments and the Long Ashton splashmeter in field experiments. Droplets impacting on sensor produce sound waves that are detected by an omnidirectional microphone sealed within an acoustic chamber. An electrical charge, proportional to the sound wave, is produced by the microphone and is converted to a categorical scale and then stored to provide an accumulation of impacts over a specified period of time. Calibration of the sensor was done using single-droplet impacts of known mass and impacting velocity. A linear relationship was shown between the categorical scale and the kinetic energy of impacting droplets (adjusted r(2) = 0.99). The best relationship fitted between splash dispersal from dye cup, and kinetic energy was a second-order polynomial (adjusted r(2) > 0.99). Splash height, recorded by the Long Ashton splashmeter during 41 natural rainfall events, was correlated closely with sensor output (adjusted r(2) = 0.87). Our studies indicate that the sensor provides quantitative data which could be incorporated into disease management systems to provide estimates of inoculum dispersal gradients within crop canopies.

  2. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  3. Method to compensate the dispersion of kinetic energy resolution in a velocity map imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lan, Pengfei; Feng, Zhengpeng; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2014-10-01

    Here we present a novel method to improve the kinetic energy resolution of a velocity map imaging(VMI) spectrometer. The main modifications, compared to the original design of Eppink and Parker (1997 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68 3477), are two additional grid electrodes. One of the electrodes is a grounded grid and the other is an arc-shaped grid with negative voltages (or positive voltages for an ions spectrometer). The arc-shaped electrode is axially symmetrical around the spectrometer axis. The field constructed by the two electrodes is to compensate the dispersion of the ‘v’-shaped energy resolution. Simulations by SIMION and reconstructions by the basis set expansion Abel transform method show that the kinetic energy resolution can be improved drastically by our new method. Furthermore, the accuracy in the determination of the kinetic energy of ion/electrons remains unchanged with respect to the original design.

  4. Energy Efficienct Processes for Making Tackifier Dispersions used to make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Rakesh Gupta

    2006-07-26

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an energy efficient, environmentally friendly and low cost process (compared to the current process) for making tackifier dispersions that are used to make pressure-sensitive adhesives. These adhesives are employed in applications such as self-adhesive postage stamps and disposable diapers and are made by combining the tackifier dispersion with a natural or synthetic rubber latex. The current process for tackifier dispersion manufacture begins by melting a (plastic) resin and adding water to it in order to form a water-in-oil emulsion. This is then converted to an oil-in-water emulsion by phase inversion in the presence of continuous stirring. The resulting emulsion is the tackifier dispersion, but it is not concentrated and the remaining excess water has to be transported and removed. The main barrier that has to be overcome in the development of commercial quality tackifier dispersions is the inability to directly emulsify resin in water due to the very low viscosity of water as compared to the viscosity of the molten resin. In the present research, a number of solutions were proposed to overcome this barrier, and these included use of different mixer types to directly form the emulsion from the molten resin but without going through a phase inversion, the idea of forming a solid resin-in-water suspension having the correct size and size distribution but without melting of the resin, and the development of techniques of making a colloidal powder of the resin that could be dispersed in water just prior to use. Progress was made on each of these approaches, and each was found to be feasible. The most appealing solution, though, is the last one, since it does not require melting of the resin. Also, the powder can be shipped in dry form and then mixed with water in any proportion depending on the needs of the process. This research was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory, and it was determined the new process

  5. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  6. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  8. [Application of the racial algorithm in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Yao-Yao; Ge, Liang-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-02-01

    In the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, scintillation detector such as NaI (Tl) detector usually has a low energy resolution at around 8%. The low energy resolution causes problems in spectral data analysis especially in the high background and low counts condition, it is very limited to strip the overlapped spectrum, and the more overlapping the peaks are, the more difficult to peel the peaks, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis can't be carried out because we can't recognize the peak address and peak area. Based on genetic algorithm and immune algorithm, we build a new racial algorithm which uses the Euclidean distance as the judgment of evolution, the maximum relative error as the iterative criterion to be put into overlapped spectrum analysis, then we use the Gaussian function to simulate different overlapping degrees of the spectrum, and the racial algorithm is used in overlapped peak separation and full spectrum simulation, the peak address deviation is in +/- 3 channels, the peak area deviation is no more than 5%, and it is proven that this method has a good effect in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis.

  9. Decoupling the contribution of dispersive and acid-base components of surface energy on the cohesion of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Umang V; Olusanmi, Dolapo; Narang, Ajit S; Hussain, Munir A; Tobyn, Michael J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2014-11-20

    This study reports an experimental approach to determine the contribution from two different components of surface energy on cohesion. A method to tailor the surface chemistry of mefenamic acid via silanization is established and the role of surface energy on cohesion is investigated. Silanization was used as a method to functionalize mefenamic acid surfaces with four different functional end groups resulting in an ascending order of the dispersive component of surface energy. Furthermore, four haloalkane functional end groups were grafted on to the surface of mefenamic acid, resulting in varying levels of acid-base component of surface energy, while maintaining constant dispersive component of surface energy. A proportional increase in cohesion was observed with increases in both dispersive as well as acid-base components of surface energy. Contributions from dispersive and acid-base surface energy on cohesion were determined using an iterative approach. Due to the contribution from acid-base surface energy, cohesion was found to increase ∼11.7× compared to the contribution from dispersive surface energy. Here, we provide an approach to deconvolute the contribution from two different components of surface energy on cohesion, which has the potential of predicting powder flow behavior and ultimately controlling powder cohesion.

  10. Thermally induced dispersion mechanisms for aluminum-based plate-type fuels under rapid transient energy deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V.; Taleyarkham, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    A thermally induced dispersion model was developed to analyze for dispersive potential and determine onset of fuel plate dispersion for Al-based research and test reactor fuels. Effect of rapid energy deposition in a fuel plate was simulated. Several data types for Al-based fuels tested in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor in Japan and in the Transient Reactor Test in Idaho were reviewed. Analyses of experiments show that onset of fuel dispersion is linked to a sharp rise in predicted strain rate, which futher coincides with onset of Al vaporization. Analysis also shows that Al oxidation and exothermal chemical reaction between the fuel and Al can significantly affect the energy deposition characteristics, and therefore dispersion onset connected with Al vaporization, and affect onset of vaporization.

  11. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  12. Influence of gravity level and interfacial energies on dispersion-forming tendencies in hypermonotectic Cu-Pb-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. B.; Curreri, P. A.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Results on the nondirectional solidification of several hypermonotectic Cu-Pb-Al alloys were obtained aboard NASA's KC-135 zero-gravity aircraft in order to determine the influence of interfacial energies and gravity levels on dispersion-forming tendencies. The Al content was systematially varied in the alloys. The dispersion-forming ability is correlated with gravity level during solidification, the interfacial energy between the immiscible phases, and the tendency for the minority immiscible phase to wet the walls of the crucible.

  13. Energy Dispersive X-Ray and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies for Performance and Corrosion Analysis of PEMWEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, S. M., Iii; Zhang, F.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers (PEMWEs) are a promising energy storage technology due to their high efficiency, compact design, and ability to be used in a renewable energy system. Before they are able to make a large commercial impact, there are several hurdles facing the technology today. Two powerful techniques for both in-situ and ex- situ characterizations to improve upon their performance and better understand their corrosion are electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In this paper, the authors use both methods in order to characterize the anode gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMWE cell and better understand the corrosion that occurs in the oxygen electrode during electrolysis.

  14. Distinction between entrance and exit wounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takakura, Ayaka; Jamal, Mostofa; Ito, Asuka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shoji; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated gunshot wounds in two autopsy cases using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Lead and copper were detected in the entrance wound of one case and lead, antimony, and copper were detected in that of the other case. In the exit wounds of both cases, lead, antimony, and copper were below detection limits. These findings indicate that the detection of metallic elements, such as lead, antimony, and copper, which are found in bullets, may be useful for differentiating entrance from exit wounds using EDX. PMID:27591531

  15. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  16. Processing and quantification of x-ray energy dispersive spectra in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1988-08-01

    Spectral processing in x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy deals with the extraction of characteristic signals from experimental data. In this text, the four basic procedures for this methodology are reviewed and their limitations outlined. Quantification, on the other hand, deals with the interpretation of the information obtained from spectral processing. Here the limitations are for the most part instrumental in nature. The prospects of higher voltage operation does not, in theory, present any new problems and may in fact prove to be more desirable assuming that electron damage effects do not preclude analysis. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Quantitative analysis of annealed scanning probe tips using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cobley, R. J.; Brown, R. A.; Barnett, C. J.; Maffeis, T. G. G.; Penny, M. W.

    2013-01-14

    A quantitative method to measure the reduction in oxide species on the surface of electrochemically etched tungsten tips during direct current annealing is developed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Oxide species are found to decrease with annealing current, with the trend repeatable over many tips and along the length of the tip apex. A linear resistivity approximation finds significant oxide sublimation occurs at 1714 K, but surface melting and tip broadening at 2215 K. This method can be applied to calibrate any similar annealing stage, and to identify the tradeoff regime between required morphological and chemical properties.

  18. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  19. Practical applications of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Gibson, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis is a powerful tool that can reveal the presence and relative quantities of elements in minute particles in biologic materials. Although this technique has been used in some aspects of dental research, it has rarely been applied to diagnostic oral pathology. The purpose of this paper is to inform practicing dentists and oral specialists about the diagnostic potential of this procedure by presenting three case reports. The first case involved the identification of flakes of a metallic material claimed by a 14-year-old girl to appear periodically between her mandibular molars. In the second case, a periodontist was spared a lawsuit when a freely mobile mass in the antrum of his patient was found to be a calcium-phosphorus compound not related to the periodontal packing that had been used. The third case involved the differential diagnosis of amalgam tattoo and graphite tattoo in a pigmented lesion of the hard palate mucosa. The results of the analyses were significant and indicate a role for this technique in the assessment of selected cases. Potential for wider use of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology exists as research progresses.

  20. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  1. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  2. Coulomb Interaction Effect in Weyl Fermions with Tilted Energy Dispersion in Two Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroki; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-03-18

    Weyl fermions with tilted linear dispersions characterized by several different velocities appear in some systems including the quasi-two-dimensional organic semiconductor α-(BEDT-TTF)_{2}I_{3} and three-dimensional WTe_{2}. The Coulomb interaction between electrons modifies the velocities in an essential way in the low-energy limit, where the logarithmic corrections dominate. Taking into account the coupling to both the transverse and longitudinal electromagnetic fields, we derive the renormalization group equations for the velocities of the tilted Weyl fermions in two dimensions, and found that they increase as the energy decreases and eventually hit the speed of light c to result in the Cherenkov radiation. Especially, the system restores the isotropic Weyl cone even when the bare Weyl cone is strongly tilted and the velocity of electrons becomes negative in certain directions. PMID:27035318

  3. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  4. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  5. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  6. On CD-AFM bias related to probe bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, V. A.; Orji, N. G.; Vorburger, T. V.; Dixson, R. G.; Fu, J.; Silver, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Critical Dimension AFM (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, very small and flexible probes, often 15 nm to 20 nm in diameter, are now frequently used. Several recent publications have reported on uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements [1,2]. Results obtained in this work suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and thus potentially can explain much of the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe bias variation. We have developed and experimentally tested one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) models to describe the bending of cylindrical probes. An earlier 1D bending model reported by Watanabe et al. [3] was refined. Contributions from several new phenomena were considered, including: probe misalignment, diameter variation near the carbon nanotube tip (CNT) apex, probe bending before snapping, distributed van der Waals-London force, etc. The methodology for extraction of the Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe bending data was developed. To overcome limitations of the 1D model, a new 2D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Comparison of the new model with the 1D single point force (SPF) model revealed about 27 % difference in probe bending bias between the two. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1D SPF and 2D DF models was found. This finding simplifies use of the advanced 2D DF model of probe bending in various CD-AFM applications. New 2D and three-dimensional (3D) CDAFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  7. Review and perspectives of AFM application on the study of deformable drop/bubble interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Kai; Ma, Mengyu; Jin, Hang; Angeli, Panagiota; Gong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The applications of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on the study of dynamic interactions and film drainage between deformable bodies dispersed in aqueous solutions are reviewed in this article. Novel experimental designs and recent advances in experimental methodologies are presented, which show the advantage of using AFM as a tool for probing colloidal interactions. The effects of both DLVO and non-DLVO forces on the colloid stabilization mechanism are discussed. Good agreement is found between the force - drop/bubble deformation behaviour revealed by AFM measurements and the theoretical modeling of film drainage process, giving a convincing explanation of the occurrence of certain phenomenon. However, the behaviour and shape of deformable drops as they approach or retract is still not well resolved. In addition, when surfactants are present further research is needed on the absorption of surfactant molecules into the interfaces, their mobility and the effects on interfacial film properties.

  8. The Role of Energy Dispersion in the Genesis and Life Cycle of African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Michael

    This dissertation uses energy dispersion and wave packet concepts to provide a better conceptual model of the genesis and life cycle of African Easterly Waves and to better understand the instability of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). The existence of an upstream (eastward) group velocity for AEWs is shown based on single-point lag regressions using gridded reanalysis data from 1990 to 2010. The eastward energy dispersion is consistent with the direction of ageostrophic geopotential flux vectors. A local eddy kinetic energy (EKE) budget reveals that, early in the life cycle of AEWs, growth rate due to geopotential flux convergence exceeds baroclinic and barotropic growth rates. Later in the life cycle, EKE decay due to geopotential flux divergence cancels or exceeds baroclinic and barotropic growth. A potential vorticity (PV) budget is used to diagnose tendencies related to group propagation. Although both upstream and downstream group speeds are possible because of the reversal in the mean meridional PV gradient, upstream propagation associated with the positive poleward PV gradient dominates wave packet evolution. Analogous to the concept of downstream development of midlatitude baroclinic waves, new AEWs develop preferentially upstream of the older ones, thus providing a mechanism for seeding new waves. The usefulness of upstream development as a genesis mechanism for AEWs is demonstrated by performing a case study of the AEW which ultimately produced hurricane Alberto (2000). The case study uses the ERA-interim reanalysis combined with surface observations and TRMM data. Using a local EKE budget, we attribute its genesis to energy dispersion from a preceding AEW. After genesis, baroclinic and barotropic conversion dominated the energetics of this AEW. Some strengths and weaknesses of upstream development as a paradigm for AEW genesis are discussed with respect to other potential mechanisms. The stability of the AEJ is examined applying the concept of absolute

  9. Surface energy changes and their relationship with the dispersibility of salmeterol xinafoate powders for inhalation after storage at high RH.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal; Larson, Ian; Young, Paul; Stewart, Peter

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the relationship between surface energy of micronized lactose, coarse lactose and salmeterol xinafoate and dispersibility from a mixture after storage at 75% RH. Surface energies, dispersibility, morphology, and the presence of amorphous domains were determined by inverse gas chromatography, twin stage impinger, scanning electron microscope and dynamic vapour sorption, respectively. The fine particle fraction of mixture decreased significantly in 4 weeks (P<0.05), reaching a static level in 3 months. Amorphous content was not detected in the micronized lactose, coarse lactose and salmeterol xinafoate. After conditioning stored samples at 75% RH for 2h, dispersive surface energy of both micronized and coarse lactose significantly decreased (P<0.05), while the polar surface energy of all significantly increased (P<0.05) resulting in significant increase in total surface energy after storage. After conditioning stored samples at 0% RH for 2h, no significant difference was observed in any surface energy parameter. This study concluded that the total surface energy increased during storage at high RH due to the adhered surface moisture. The mechanism of decreased dispersibility was related to increased capillary/solid bridging interactions and to possible increased interaction of contiguous particles due to increased polar surface energy. PMID:19732829

  10. Energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toptygin, I. N.; Levina, K.

    2016-02-01

    We study the relation between the energy-momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field and the group velocity of quasi-monochromatic waves in a nonabsorptive, isotropic, spatially and temporally dispersive dielectric. It is shown that the Abraham force acting on a dielectric is not needed for the momentum conservation law to hold if the dielectric is free of external charges and currents and if the Abraham momentum density is used. The energy-momentum tensor turns out to be symmetric, and the Maxwell stress tensor is expressed either in terms of the momentum density vector and the group velocity or in terms of the energy density and the group velocity. The stress tensor and the energy density are essentially dependent on the frequency and wave vector derivatives of the functions that describe the electromagnetic properties of the medium (i.e., the dielectric permittivity and the magnetic permeability). The obtained results are applicable to both ordinary and left-handed media. The results are compared with those of other authors. The pressure a wave exerts on the interface between two media is calculated. For both ordinary and left-handed media, either 'radiation pressure' or 'radiation attraction' can occur at the interface, depending on the material parameters of the two media. For liquid dielectrics, the striction effect is considered.

  11. Food stress prompts dispersal behavior in apterous pea aphids: do activated aphids incur energy loss?

    PubMed

    Tabadkani, Seyed Mohammad; Ahsaei, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Nozari, Jamasb

    2013-02-17

    The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hem: Aphididae), has been repeatedly used as a model species in a wide range of biological studies including genetics, ecology, physiology, and behavior. When red pea aphids feed on low quality plants in crowded conditions, some individuals lose their color shade and become pale yellowish, while other individuals on the same host plants remain changeless. The pale aphids have been shown to walk significantly faster and migrate more frequently to neighboring plants compared to the original red ones. We hypothesized that the color change and higher activity of pale aphids are directly associated with their suboptimal nutritional status. We showed that the pale aphids have significantly lower wet and dry weights than red ones. Analyses of energy reserves in individual aphids revealed that the pale aphids suffer a significant loss in their lipid and soluble carbohydrate contents. Our results provide a strong link between host quality, body color, dispersal rate, and energy reserves of pea aphids. Apparently, utilization of energy reserves resulted from an imbalance in food sources received by the aphids stimulates them to walk more actively to find new hosts and restore their lost energy. This reversible shift enables aphids to quickly respond to deprived host plants much earlier than the appearance of winged morph and restore their original status when they find appropriate host.

  12. An Overview of High-Resolution, Non-Dispersive, Imaging Spectrometers for High-Energy Photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy has become a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites initiated a new era in x-ray astronomy. Despite their successes, there is still need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band and for extended sources. What is needed is a non-dispersive imaging spectrometer - essentially a 14-bit x-ray color camera. And a requirement for a nondispersive spectrometer designed to provide eV-scale spectral resolution is a temperature below 0.1 K. The required spectral resolution and the constraints of thermodynamics and engineering dictate the temperature regime nearly independently of the details of the sensor or the read-out technology. Low-temperature spectrometers can be divided into two classes - - equilibrium and non-equilibrium. In the equilibrium devices, or calorimeters, the energy is deposited in an isolated thermal mass and the resulting increase in temperature is measured. In the non-equilibrium devices, the absorbed energy produces quantized excitations that are counted to determine the energy. The two approaches have different strong points, and within each class a variety of optimizations have been pursued. I will present the basic fundamentals of operation and the details of the most successful device designs to date. I will also discuss how the measurement priorities (resolution, energy band, count rate) influence the optimal choice of detector technology.

  13. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  14. AFM imaging of functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, C; Danzberger, J; Lukanov, P; Tîlmaciu, C-M; Galibert, A-M; Soula, B; Flahaut, E; Gruber, H J; Hinterdorfer, P; Ebner, A; Kienberger, F

    2009-07-01

    We present a comparative study of several non-covalent approaches to disperse, debundle and non-covalently functionalize double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs). We investigated the ability of bovine serum albumin (BSA), phospholipids grafted onto amine-terminated polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG(2000)-NH(2)), as well as a combination thereof, to coat purified DWNTs. Topographical imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to assess the coating of individual DWNTs and the degree of debundling and dispersion. Topographical images showed that functionalized DWNTs are better separated and less aggregated than pristine DWNTs and that the different coating methods differ in their abilities to successfully debundle and disperse DWNTs. Height profiles indicated an increase in the diameter of DWNTs depending on the functionalization method and revealed adsorption of single molecules onto the nanotubes. Biofunctionalization of the DWNT surface was achieved by coating DWNTs with biotinylated BSA, providing for biospecific binding of streptavidin in a simple incubation step. Finally, biotin-BSA-functionalized DWNTs were immobilized on an avidin layer via the specific avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19375857

  15. Energy dispersive-EXAFS of Pd nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.-Y.; Booth, S. G.; Uehara, A.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Cibin, G.; Pham, V.-T.; Nataf, L.; Dryfe, R. A. W.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Energy dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EDE) has been applied to Pd nanoparticle nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface under control over the interfacial potential and thereby the driving force for nucleation. Preliminary analysis focusing on Pd K edge-step height determination shows that under supersaturated conditions the concentration of Pd near the interface fluctuate over a period of several hours, likely due to the continuous formation and dissolution of sub-critical nuclei. Open circuit potential measurements conducted ex-situ in a liquid/liquid electrochemical cell support this view, showing that the fluctuations in Pd concentration are also visible as variations in potential across the liquid/liquid interface. By decreasing the interfacial potential through inclusion of a common ion (tetraethylammonium, TEA+) the Pd nanoparticle growth rate could be slowed down, resulting in a smooth nucleation process. Eventually, when the TEA+ ions reached an equilibrium potential, Pd nucleation and particle growth were inhibited.

  16. Soil characterization by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence: sampling strategy for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Custo, Graciela; Boeykens, Susana; Dawidowski, L; Fox, L; Gómez, D; Luna, F; Vázquez, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    This work describes a sampling strategy that will allow the use of portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) instruments for "in situ" soil analysis. The methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations for any type of environmental studies and it was applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, by evaluating data coming from an EDXRF spectrometer with a radioisotope excitation source. Simulating non-treated sampled as "in situ" samples and a soil characterization for Campana area was intended. "In situ" EDXRF methodology is a powerful analytical modality with the advantage of providing data immediately, allowing a fast general screening of the soil composition. PMID:16038489

  17. Compositional analysis of Ceramic Glaze by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedr, A.; Abdel-kareem, O.; Elnabi, S. H.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for the analysis of Egyptian Islamic glaze ceramic sample. The sample dating back to Fatimid period (969-1169AD), and collected from Al-Fustat excavation store in Cairo. The analysis of contaminated pottery sample has been performed to draw mapping for the elemental compositions by LIBS technique. LIBS measurements have been done by the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm) of Nd: YAG laser for the elemental analysis and performing the cleaning processes of the pottery sample. In addition, complementary analyses were carried out by scanning electron microscopy linked with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX) to obtain verification of chemical results. The morphological surfaces before and after cleaning has been done by Optical Microscopy (OM).

  18. Microscopic mechanism of 1/f noise in graphene: role of energy band dispersion.

    PubMed

    Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghatak, Subhamoy; Kochat, Vidya; Sneha, E S; Sampathkumar, Arjun; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Ghosh, Arindam

    2011-03-22

    A distinctive feature of single-layer graphene is the linearly dispersive energy bands, which in the case of multilayer graphene become parabolic. A simple electrical transport-based probe to differentiate between these two band structures will be immensely valuable, particularly when quantum Hall measurements are difficult, such as in chemically synthesized graphene nanoribbons. Here we show that the flicker noise, or the 1/f noise, in electrical resistance is a sensitive and robust probe to the band structure of graphene. At low temperatures, the dependence of noise magnitude on the carrier density was found to be opposite for the linear and parabolic bands. We explain our data with a comprehensive theoretical model that clarifies several puzzling issues concerning the microscopic origin of flicker noise in graphene field-effect transistors (GraFET). PMID:21332148

  19. Evaluation on determination of iodine in coal by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jackson, J.C.; Palmer, C.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A quick and inexpensive method of relative high iodine determination from coal samples was evaluated. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provided a detection limit of about 14 ppm (3 times of standard deviations of the blank sample), without any complex sample preparation. An analytical relative standard deviation of 16% was readily attainable for coal samples. Under optimum conditions, coal samples with iodine concentrations higher than 5 ppm can be determined using this EDXRF method. For the time being, due to the general iodine concentrations of coal samples lower than 5 ppm, except for some high iodine content coal, this method can not effectively been used for iodine determination. More work needed to meet the requirement of determination of iodine from coal samples for this method. Copyright ?? 2005 by The Geochemical Society of Japan.

  20. High pressure dynamic XAS studies using an energy-dispersive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathon, O.; Occelli, F.; Lescoute, E.; Sollier, A.; Loubeyre, P.; Helsby, W.; Headspith, J.; Torchio, R.; Kantor, I.; Pascarelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present in this paper recent advances in the high pressure domain provided by the introduction of time-resolved energy-dispersive XAS (EDXAS) techniques at synchrotrons. We highlight technical aspects and describe two modes of acquisition: the 'movie' mode, where the time resolution is given by the detector acquisition speed and the 'pump-and-probe' mode, where the time resolution is given by the delay between the pump and the probe. These two modes define a frontier in the time resolution, respectively above and below the ∼10 μs regime. In the former, examples of applications are chemical stability and reactions at high pressure and high temperature or probing the warm dense matter regime using rapid current ramps. In the latter, an example is given on studies of dynamically compressed matter, by coupling single-bunch EDXAS at high-brilliance synchrotron to a nanosecond high-power laser.

  1. Precise calculations in simulations of the interaction of low energy neutrons with nano-dispersed media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem'ev, V. A.; Nezvanov, A. Yu.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss properties of the interaction of slow neutrons with nano-dispersed media and their application for neutron reflectors. In order to increase the accuracy of model simulation of the interaction of neutrons with nanopowders, we perform precise quantum mechanical calculation of potential scattering of neutrons on single nanoparticles using the method of phase functions. We compare results of precise calculations with those performed within first Born approximation for nanodiamonds with the radius of 2-5 nm and for neutron energies 3 × 10-7-10-3 eV. Born approximation overestimates the probability of scattering to large angles, while the accuracy of evaluation of integral characteristics (cross sections, albedo) is acceptable. Using Monte-Carlo method, we calculate albedo of neutrons from different layers of piled up diamond nanopowder.

  2. Sodium Chloride Diffusion during Muscle Salting Evidenced by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, Rénata; Peyrin, Frédéric; Vénien, Annie; Hénot, Jean Marc; Astruc, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    To better understand the relationship between the muscle structure and NaCl transfers in meat, we used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze brined and dry-salted rat muscles. The muscles were freeze-dried to avoid the delocalization of soluble ions that happens in regular dehydration through a graded series of ethanol. Na and Cl maps were superimposed on SEM images to combine the muscle structure and NaCl diffusion. Brining causes rapid diffusion of NaCl through the tissue. Most brine diffuses in a linear front from the muscle surface, but a small proportion enters through the perimysium network. The muscle area penetrated by brine shows heterogeneous patterns of NaCl retention, with some connective tissue islets containing more NaCl than other parts of perimysium. NaCl penetration is considerably slower after dry salting than after brining.

  3. High-energy x-ray anomalous dispersion correction for silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Moshe; Hart, Michael

    1988-02-01

    Energy-dependent structure factors measured by Saka and Kato [Acta Crystallogr., Sect. A 43, 252 (1987); 43, 255 (1987)] for silicon are analyzed, and values of the real part of the anomalous dispersion correction term f'(ω) extracted for 12 wavelengths in the range 0.3-0.8 Å with an estimated accuracy of a few millielectrons. This is the first experimental set of such data for wavelengths less than 0.56 Å. The agreement with previous high-accuracy data for 0.56 and 0.71 Å is very good. Comparison with nonrelativistic and relativistic theoretical calculations shows excellent agreement down to 0.4 Å with very recent relativistic calculations including multipole and retardation terms. For shorter wavelengths a small deviation between theory and experiment is observed. Possible causes for this are discussed.

  4. UV-curable low surface energy fluorinated polycarbonate-based polyurethane dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyeon-Deuk; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2011-10-15

    UV-curable low surface energy fluorinated polycarbonate-based polyurethane dispersions were synthesized by incorporating a hydroxy-terminated perfluoropolyether (PFPE) into the soft segment of polyurethane. The effects of the PFPE content on the UV-curing behavior, physical, surface, thermal properties and refractive index were investigated. The UV-curing behavior was analyzed by photo-differential scanning calorimetry. The surface free energy of the UV-cured film, which is related to the water or oil repellency, was calculated from contact angle measurements using the Lewis acid-base three liquids method. The surface free energy decreased significantly with increasing fluorine concentration because PFPE in the soft segment was tailored to the surface and produced a UV-cured film with a hydrophobic fluorine enriched surface, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With increasing the fluorine content, the refractive indices of UV-cured films decreased. However, the UV-curing rate and final conversion was decreased with increasing contents of PFPE, which resulted in the decrease of the glass transition temperature (T(g)), crosslink density, tensile strength and surface hardness. PMID:21788027

  5. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore » FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  6. UV-curable low surface energy fluorinated polycarbonate-based polyurethane dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyeon-Deuk; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2011-10-15

    UV-curable low surface energy fluorinated polycarbonate-based polyurethane dispersions were synthesized by incorporating a hydroxy-terminated perfluoropolyether (PFPE) into the soft segment of polyurethane. The effects of the PFPE content on the UV-curing behavior, physical, surface, thermal properties and refractive index were investigated. The UV-curing behavior was analyzed by photo-differential scanning calorimetry. The surface free energy of the UV-cured film, which is related to the water or oil repellency, was calculated from contact angle measurements using the Lewis acid-base three liquids method. The surface free energy decreased significantly with increasing fluorine concentration because PFPE in the soft segment was tailored to the surface and produced a UV-cured film with a hydrophobic fluorine enriched surface, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With increasing the fluorine content, the refractive indices of UV-cured films decreased. However, the UV-curing rate and final conversion was decreased with increasing contents of PFPE, which resulted in the decrease of the glass transition temperature (T(g)), crosslink density, tensile strength and surface hardness.

  7. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of the FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.

  8. Energy allocation during the maturation of adults in a long-lived insect: implications for dispersal and reproduction.

    PubMed

    David, G; Giffard, B; van Halder, I; Piou, D; Jactel, H

    2015-10-01

    Energy allocation strategies have been widely documented in insects and were formalized in the context of the reproduction process by the terms 'capital breeder' and 'income breeder'. We propose here the extension of this framework to dispersal ability, with the concepts of 'capital disperser' and 'income disperser', and explore the trade-off in resource allocation between dispersal and reproduction. We hypothesized that flight capacity was sex-dependent, due to a trade-off in energy allocation between dispersal and egg production in females. We used Monochamus galloprovincialis as model organism, a long-lived beetle which is the European vector of the pine wood nematode. We estimated the flight capacity with a flight mill and used the number of mature eggs as a proxy for the investment in reproduction. We used the ratio between dry weights of the thorax and the abdomen to investigate the trade-off. The probability of flying increased with the adult weight at emergence, but was not dependent on insect age or sex. Flight distance increased with age in individuals but did not differ between sexes. It was also positively associated with energy allocation to thorax reserves, which increased with age. In females, the abdomen weight and the number of eggs also increase with age with no negative effect on flight capacity, indicating a lack of trade-off. This long-lived beetle has a complex strategy of energy allocation, being a 'capital disperser' in terms of flight ability, an 'income disperser' in terms of flight performance and an 'income breeder' in terms of egg production.

  9. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy-dispersive

  10. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy-dispersive

  11. AFM nanoindentations of diatom biosilica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Losic, Dusan; Short, Ken; Mitchell, James G; Lal, Ratnesh; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2007-04-24

    Diatoms have intricately and uniquely nanopatterned silica exoskeletons (frustules) and are a common target of biomimetic investigations. A better understanding of the diatom frustule structure and function at the nanoscale could provide new insights for the biomimetic fabrication of nanostructured ceramic materials and lightweight, yet strong, scaffold architectures. Here, we have mapped the nanoscale mechanical properties of Coscinodiscus sp. diatoms using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation. Mechanical properties were correlated with the frustule structures obtained from high-resolution AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Significant differences in the micromechanical properties for the different frustule layers were observed. A comparative study of other related inorganic material including porous silicon films and free-standing membranes as well as porous alumina was also undertaken.

  12. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  13. AFM cantilever vibration detection with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; Wagner, Ryan; Keller, Robert; Killgore, Jason

    Cantilever oscillations for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are conventionally measured with an optical lever system. The speed of AFM cantilevers can be increased by decreasing the size of the cantilever; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the current optical lever approach. Here we demonstrate an electron detection scheme in an SEM for detecting AFM cantilever oscillations. An oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to the propagation direction of a stationary ~ 1 nm diameter electron probe, and the oscillatory change in electron scattering resulting from the changing thickness of the electron irradiated area of the AFM tip is detected with a transmitted electron detector positioned below the AFM tip. We perform frequency sweep and ring-down experiments to determine the first resonant frequency and Q factor of an AFM cantilever.

  14. Phase evolution in carbide dispersion strengthened nanostructured copper composite by high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zuhailawati; Nur Hawadah, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, high-energy ball milling was applied to synthesis in situ nanostructured copper based composite reinforced with metal carbides. Cu, M (M=W or Ti) and graphite powder mixture were mechanically alloyed for various milling time in a planetary ball mill with composition of Cu-20vol%WC and Cu-20vol%TiC. Then the as-milled powder were compacted at 200 to 400 MPa and sintered in a vacuum furnace at 900°C. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that formation of tungsten carbides (W2C and WC phases) was observed after sintering of Cu-W-C mixture while TiC precipitated in as-milled powder of Cu-Ti-C composite after 5 h and become amorphous with longer milling. Mechanism of MA explained the cold welding and fracturing event during milling. Cu-W-C system shows fracturing event is more dominant at early stage of milling and W particle still existed after milling up to 60 h. While in Cu-Ti-C system, cold welding is more dominant and all Ti particles dissolved into Cu matrix.

  15. Liquid solution delivery through the pulled nanopipette combined with QTF-AFM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Manhee; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Kunyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-02-01

    Nanopipette is a versatile fluidic tool for biochemical analysis, controlled liquid delivery in bio-nanotechnology. However, most of the researches have been performed in solution based system, thus it is challenge to study nanofluidic properties of the liquid solution delivery through the nanopipette in ambient conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the liquid ejection, dispersion, and subsequent deposition of the nanoparticles via a 30 nm aperture pipette based on the quartz tuning fork -- atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) combined nanopipette system.

  16. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  17. AFM and EDX Study of Self Assembled Pt Nanostructures on PEDOT Thin Films under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senevirathne, Indrajith; Mohney, Austin; Buchheit, Joshua; Goonewardene, Anura

    2011-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructure systems on conductive polymer thin films under ambient conditions are interesting due to their use in BioMEMS and hybrid systems further and considering the physics of the polymer - metal interactions The observed nanostructures have deformed spherical shape. The Pt was magnetron sputter deposited at RT (300K), PEDOT Baytron P 60nm thick, spin coated on glass slides cleaned with acetone and IPA. The system was studied using ambient IC mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for its structure. Elemental composition/distribution of the system was measured with Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy (EDX). Pt nanostructures on the surface observed to be likely Volmer - Weber growth mode At Pt coverage of 120 ML, nanostructures had a mean diameter of 32 nm and mean height of 5 nm. When annealing at 15min at 473K systems changes to smaller nanostructures coexisting with bigger structures of mean diameter of 120 nm and mean height of 36 nm. Elemental/morphological variations when annealed at successively higher temperatures were also investigated. NSF Grant #: 0923047 and PASSHE FPDC (LOU # 2010-LHU-03).

  18. Dispersed, decentralized and renewable energy sources: alternatives to national vulnerability and war. Final report, July 1979-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McCasker, J.; Clark, W.

    1980-12-01

    Section 1 and 2 of this report contain background information on centralized energy systems and the relationship between vulnerability of these systems, energy planning, and existing civil defense programs. Section 3 and 4 contain an extensive investigation, review and categorization of alternative approaches to centralized, vulnerable energy systems; a review of dispersed and renewable technologies which can be appropriately implemented at the local level; and matrices for evaluation of these technologies for emergency and crisis planning. Specific recommendations to FEMA are included on the use of localized energy approaches for emergency response and recovery situations.

  19. AFM studies of semicrystalline polymer/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    vapor transmission properties superior to that of the neat polymer and its conventionally filled composites. For example, for a 5wt.% MMT exfoliated composite, the softening temperature increases by 25°C, the Young's modulus triples with a decrease of only 20% in toughness, whereas there is also a 60% reduction in the water permeability. Furthermore, due to the nanoscale dispersion of filler, the nanocomposites retain their optical clarity. Finally, to better connect changes in morphology with property enhancements, AFM methods were devised which allow direct imaging of morphology as well as local properties.

  20. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  1. An energy dispersive x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics study of liquid dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Russina, Olga; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first x-ray diffraction study on liquid dimethyl carbonate. Diffraction spectra were collected with an energy-dispersive instrument, whose wide Q-range allows the structure determination of weakly ordered systems (such as liquids). The structural correlation in this liquid ranges up to about 20 Å. The observed patterns are interpreted with a structural model derived from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were run using OPLS force field, only slightly modified to restrain bond distances to the experimental values. The model structure function and radial distribution functions, averaged among the productive trajectory frames, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones. Molecular dynamics results show that the deviations from C2v cis-cis structure, predicted by ab initio calculations and observed by electron diffraction in the gas phase, are small. By analyzing the intra- and intermolecular pair distribution functions, it was possible to assign the peaks of the experimental radial distribution function to specific structural correlations, and to compute the different average intermolecular coordination numbers. The intermolecular methyl-carbonyl oxygen distance is thoroughly discussed to assess the presence of weak C-H⋯ṡO hydrogen bonds.

  2. High temperature monitoring of silicon carbide ceramics by confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we presented an alternative method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics at various high temperatures in air by measuring the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratios (ICo/IRa) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of SiC ceramics with the confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. A calibration curve of the relationship between ICo/IRa and Zeff was established by using a set of 8 SiC calibration samples. The sensitivity of this approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished samples of Zeff differing from each other by only 0.01. The linear relationship between the variation of Zeff and the variations of contents of C, Si and O of SiC ceramics were found, and the corresponding calculation model of the relationship between the ΔZ and the ΔCC, ΔCSi, and ΔCO were established. The variation of contents of components of the tested SiC ceramics after oxidation at high temperature was quantitatively calculated based on the model. It was shown that the results of contents of carbon, silicon and oxygen obtained by this method were in good agreement with the results obtained by XPS, giving values of relative deviation less than 1%. It was concluded that the practicality of this proposed method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of SiC ceramics at high temperatures was acceptable.

  3. Energy Dispersive XAFS: Characterization of Electronically Excited States of Copper(I) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (ED-XAS), in which the whole XAS spectrum is acquired simultaneously, has been applied to reduce the real-time for acquisition of spectra of photoinduced excited states by using a germanium microstrip detector gated around one X-ray bunch of the ESRF (100 ps). Cu K-edge XAS was used to investigate the MLCT states of [Cu(dmp)2]+ (dmp =2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) and [Cu(dbtmp)2]+ (dbtmp =2,9-di-n-butyl-3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) with the excited states created by excitation at 450 nm (10 Hz). The decay of the longer lived complex with bulky ligands, was monitored for up to 100 ns. DFT calculations of the longer lived MLCT excited state of [Cu(dbp)2]+ (dbp =2,9-di-n-butyl-1,10-phenanthroline) with the bulkier diimine ligands, indicated that the excited state behaves as a Jahn–Teller distorted Cu(II) site, with the interligand dihedral angle changing from 83 to 60° as the tetrahedral coordination geometry flattens and a reduction in the Cu–N distance of 0.03 Å. PMID:23718738

  4. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  5. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, Elżbieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment.

  6. Elemental analysis of mining wastes by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, O.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Garcia, G.

    2007-08-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) tri-axial geometry experimental spectrometer has been employed to determine the concentrations of 13 different elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb) in mine wastes from different depths of two mine tailings from the Cartagena-La Union (Spain) mining district. The elements were determined and quantified using the fundamental parameters method. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were compared to the values from the European and Spanish legislation to evaluate the environmental risk and to classify the wastes as inert wastes or as wastes that have to be control land-filled. The results obtained demonstrate that these wastes can be considered as inert for the considered elements, apart from the concentration levels of Zn and Pb. Whilst Zn slightly overpasses the regulatory levels, Pb mean value exceeds three to six times the value to be considered as Class I potential land-filling material.

  7. Energy dispersive X-ray analyses of organelles of NaCI-treated maize root cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Ralf

    1984-04-01

    NaCl sensitive plants of Zea mays cv. ADOUR were grown in nutrient solutions with or without NaCl. Frozen, hydrated root-tip tissues were investigated by means of an ETEC scanning electron microscope fitted with a KEVEX energy dispersive X-ray analyser. Morphological details of the gently etched but non-coated surface of the cross fractured specimen were easy to identify and to analyse using an electron beam with a low intensity at 10 kV. X-ray data obtained from cell compartments and organelles as nuclei, nucleoli and mitochondria within individual cells establish typical X-ray spectra. Comparisons of these spectra support the hypothesis that Na + ions are predominantly localized in vacuoles and also to a lesser extent in the cytoplasm, e.g. in small vesicles, but not in other cell organelles. Furthermore the analysed cell compartments show differences in the distribution of Mg, P, S, Cl, K and Ca effected by the addition of NaCl to the growth medium. The X-ray data are discussed in relation to the physiological meaning of a NaCl induced redistribution of elements within individual maize root cells.

  8. Two time-dependent, focus-dependent experiments using the energy-dispersive spectrometer at LURE

    SciTech Connect

    Fontaine, A.; Baudelet, F.; Dartyge, E.; Guay, D. , Bat. 209d, F91405 Orsay Cedex ); Itie, J.P. , Bat. 209d, F91405 Orsay Cedex Laboratoire des Milieux Condenses Tour 14 Universite Paris VI-CNRS, F-75232 Paris ); Polian, A. ); Tolentino, H. , Bat. 209d, F91405 Orsay Cedex ); Tourillon, G. , Bat. 209d, F91405 Orsay Cedex )

    1992-01-01

    Rather than a brief review of what has been achieved at LURE (A. Fontaine, E. Dartyge, J. P. Itie, A. Polian, H. Tolentino, and G. Tourillon, {ital Topics} {ital in} {ital Current} {ital Chemistry} {bold 151}, (Springer, Berlin, 1989), Vol. 151) since 1985 with the fully dedicated, energy dispersive x-ray absorption fine structure beam line, we will present two classes of experiments plus a discussion on the present ultimate source of noise of our mechanical movement-free spectrometer. Moreover, the readers interested in this field, can find two other studies with the new born ports at Hamburg (M. Hagelstein, S. Cunis, R. Frahm, W. Niemann, and P. Rabe, Phys. B {bold 158}, 324 (1989)) and Daresbury (G. Baker, C. Richard, A. Catlow, J. Couves, A. J. Dent, G. Derbyshire, G. N. Greaves, and J. M. Thomas, XAFS VI York 1990). Related to this field are the quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectrometers developed initially at Hamburg under R. Frahm (R. Frahm, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A {bold 270}, 578 (1988)) and at LURE under P. Lagarde and C. Prietto (P. Lagarde, M. Lemonnier, and H. Dexpert, Physica B {bold 158}, 337 (1989)), which have been able in these two years to open new routes in a wide variety of science.

  9. Current-Temperature Scaling for a Schottky Interface with Nonparabolic Energy Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Y. S.; Ang, L. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the Schottky transport in a narrow-gap semiconductor and few-layer graphene in which the energy dispersions are highly nonparabolic. We propose that the contrasting current-temperature scaling relation of J ∝T2 in the conventional Schottky interface and J ∝T3 in graphene-based Schottky interface can be reconciled under Kane's k .p nonparabolic band model for narrow-gap semiconductors. Our model suggests a more general form of J ∝(T2+γ kBT3) , where the nonparabolicty parameter γ provides a smooth transition from T2 to T3 scaling. For few-layer graphene, we find that N -layer graphene with A B C stacking follows J ∝T2 /N +1 , while A B A stacking follows a universal form of J ∝T3 regardless of the number of layers. Intriguingly, the Richardson constant extracted from the Arrhenius plot using an incorrect scaling relation disagrees with the actual value by 2 orders of magnitude, suggesting that correct models must be used in order to extract important properties for many Schottky devices.

  10. EVALUATION OF MIXING ENERGY IN FLASKS USED FOR DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laboratory screening protocol for dispersant effectiveness consists of placing water, oil, and a dispersant in a flask and mixing the contents on an orbital shaker. Two flasks are being investigated, a simple Erlenmeyer (used in EPA's...

  11. Förster resonance energy transfer rate in any dielectric nanophotonic medium with weak dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wubs, Martijn; Vos, Willem L.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the ongoing debate about nanophotonic control of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), notably by the local density of optical states (LDOS), we study FRET and spontaneous emission in arbitrary nanophotonic media with weak dispersion and weak absorption in the frequency overlap range of donor and acceptor. This system allows us to obtain the following two new insights. Firstly, we derive that the FRET rate only depends on the static part of the Green function. Hence, the FRET rate is independent of frequency, in contrast to spontaneous-emission rates and LDOS that are strongly frequency dependent in nanophotonic media. Therefore, the position-dependent FRET rate and the LDOS at the donor transition frequency are completely uncorrelated for any nondispersive medium. Secondly, we derive an exact expression for the FRET rate as a frequency integral of the imaginary part of the Green function. This leads to very accurate approximation for the FRET rate that features the LDOS that is integrated over a huge bandwidth ranging from zero frequency to far into the UV. We illustrate these general results for the analytic model system of a pair of ideal dipole emitters—donor and acceptor—in the vicinity of an ideal mirror. We find that the FRET rate is independent of the LDOS at the donor emission frequency. Moreover, we observe that the FRET rate hardly depends on the frequency-integrated LDOS. Nevertheless, the FRET is controlled between inhibition and 4×enhancement at distances close to the mirror, typically a few nm. Finally, we discuss the consequences of our results to applications of Förster resonance energy transfer, for instance in quantum information processing.

  12. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. Cells mechanics with AFM: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia

    2012-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to study mechanics of cells. Cell is far from being a homogeneous medium. This creates a number of problems which will be discussed as well as the ways to solve them. We will focus on the following problems: 1. Cellular surface brush (microvilli, glycocalyx..) surrounds cells. A simple model to separate the brush and cell deformation will be overviewed. 2. Problem of nonlinearity of stress-strain relation. Although unsolved, this may indirectly tested: the rigidity modulus should be reasonably independent of penetration. We will show that it can be achieved when using relatively dull AFM probes (the radii of microns) only. 3. Heterogeneity of cell surface. Cells are not homogeneous over the surface. We will discuss the question how many points is enough to characterize the cell. We will exemplify the above with human cervical epithelial cells. We will demonstrate that without proper consideration of the above problems, the error in defining the modulus of rigidity can easily reach an order of magnitude.

  14. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, K. K.; Sanders, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  15. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  16. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Coroado, J.

    2010-04-01

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial µ-EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 µm diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of µm lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  17. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    PubMed

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  18. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  19. Backscattered electron imaging and windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis: a new technique for gallstone analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, H.S.; Lillemoe, K.D.; Magnuson, T.H.; Frasca, P.; Pitt, H.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with or without conventional energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis is currently used to identify gallstone microstructure and inorganic composition. Organic calcium salts are among many biliary constituents thought to have a role in gallstone nidation and growth. However, current analytical techniques which identify these salts are destructive and compromise gallstone microstructural data. We have developed a new technique for gallstone analysis which provides simultaneous structural and compositional identification of calcium salts within gallstones. Backscattered electron imaging is used to localize calcium within cholesterol at minimum concentrations of 0.01%. Windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis produces elemental spectra of gallstone calcium salts which are qualitatively and quantitatively different. These combined techniques provide simultaneous structural and compositional information obtained from intact gallstone cross-sections and have been used to identify calcium salts in gallstones obtained at cholecystectomy from 106 patients.

  20. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-22

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  1. Determination of calcium and iodine in gall bladder stone using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Neslihan; Şahin, Yusuf

    2002-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques were used to analyze gall bladder stones. Enrichment of Ca and I was observed in the gall bladder stone taken from a patient. The concentration of Ca has been determined with an annular 55Fe radioactive source and the concentration of I with an annular 241Am radioactive source using the standard addition method in 2π geometry. A Si(Li)-detector was used to measure Ca and I concentrations in the gall bladder stones.

  2. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  3. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell.

  4. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  6. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. Interface energy effect on the dispersion relation of nano-sized cylindrical piezoelectric/piezomagnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Liu, Yue; Liu, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Jin-Xi

    2015-02-01

    Interface between the constituents plays an important role in the non-destructive detection of smart piezoelectric/piezomagnetic devices. The propagation of SH waves in nano-sized cylindrically multiferroic composites consisting of a piezoelectric layer and a piezomagnetic central cylinder is investigated, and the size-dependent dispersion relation with interface effect is derived. The general solutions of decoupled governing equation in different regions are expressed by using Bessel functions, and the unknown coefficients are determined by satisfying the boundary conditions at the inner interface with negligible thickness and the outer surface of the structure. Through the numerical examples of dispersion relation, it is found that the interface around the nano-cylinder may remarkably reduce the phase velocity, depending on the combination of the value of thickness ratio and the surface condition. The interface shows different effect on the first and second modes of dispersion relation.

  8. EVALUATION OF MIXING ENERGY IN LABORATORY FLASKS USED FOR DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The evaluation of dispersant effectiveness used for oil spills is commonly done using tests conducted in laboratory flasks. The success of a test relies on replication of the conditions at sea. We used a hot wire anemometer to characterize the turbulence characteristics in the s...

  9. Activation energy distributions predicted by dispersive kinetic models for nucleation and denucleation: anomalous diffusion resulting from quantization.

    PubMed

    Skrdla, Peter J

    2011-06-23

    The activation energy distributions underpinning the two complementary dispersive kinetic models described by the author in a recent work (Skrdla, P. J. J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 9329) are derived and investigated. In the case of nucleation rate-limited conversions, which exhibit "acceleratory" sigmoidal transients (a kind of S-shaped stretched exponential conversion profile), an activation energy distribution visually similar to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (M-B) distribution is recovered, consistent with the original derivation of that model. In the case of predominantly "deceleratory" conversions, the activation energy distribution is skewed from normal in the opposite direction. While the "M-B-like" activation energy distribution supports the empirical observation of a rate enhancement as a function of the conversion time in nucleation rate-limited processes, the complementary distribution, with its pronounced low-energy tail, reflects a slow-down in the specific rate as the conversion progresses, consistent with experimentally observed denucleation rate-limited conversions. Activation energy distributions were also plotted for real-world data (Qu, H.; Louhi-Kultanen, M.; Kallas, J. Cryst. Growth Des. 2007, 7, 724), depicting the impact of various additives on the nucleation rate-limited kinetics of the solvent-mediated phase transformation of the crystalline drug carbamazepine. Last, by coupling the author's dispersive kinetic description of the time-dependent activation energy for nucleation to the classical description of the critical nucleus energy provided by the Kelvin equation, an accelerated hopping mechanism for the diffusion of monomers to the growing embryo surface was observed. That hopping mechanism was rationalized by modifying the Einstein-Smoluchowski (E-S) equation to allow it to describe the "supra-brownian" molecular motion thought to lie at the heart of nucleation kinetics.

  10. Low energy kink in the band dispersions of Sr2 RuO 4 studied by ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul; Kim, Choonghyun; Koh, Y. Y.; Yu, Jaejun; Arita, M.; Shimada, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Kim, C.

    2011-03-01

    In Sr 2 Ru O4 , incommensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuations (IAF) were reported to have 4 - 10 meV energy with {q} = (0.6 π , 0.6 π) while the lowest optical phonon is at 12meV. If an electron is coupled to AIF in Sr 2 Ru O4 , the electronic band dispersions will kink below 10meV. Then, one can attribute the low energy kinks below 10meV to the electron-IAF coupling. In spite of the fact that multiple kink energies were recently reported in Sr 2 Ru O4 , kinks below 10meV has not been observed. To look for the so far unobserved electron-IAF coupling in Sr 2 Ru O4 , we performed ultra high resolution angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) experiments on Sr 2 Ru O4 with clean surfaces. In the results, we observe kinks in the band dispersions at energies below 10 meV which show strong momentum dependence. To elucidate the origin of these new kinks, we compare ARPES results with inelastic neutron scattering and band calculation results.

  11. Structural and Mechanical Mechanisms of Ocular Tissues Probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Rico, Felix; Moy, Vincent T.

    In recent years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become an important tool in ophthalmic research. It has gained popularity largely because AFM is not restricted by the diffraction limits of light microscopy and can be applied to resolve images with molecular resolution. AFM is a minimally invasive technique and can be used to visualize molecular structures under near-physiological conditions. In addition, the AFM can be employed as a force apparatus to characterize the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials on the micron level and at the level of individual proteins. In this article, we summarize recent AFM studies of ocular tissues, while highlighting the great potential of AFM technology in ophthalmic research. Previous research demonstrates the versatility of the AFM as high resolution imaging technique and as a sensitive force apparatus for probing the mechanical properties of ocular tissues. The structural and mechanical properties of ocular tissues are of major importance to the understanding of the optomechanical functions of the human eye. In addition, AFM has played an important role in the development and characterization of ocular biomaterials, such as contact lenses and intraocular lenses. Studying ocular tissues using Atomic Force Microscopy has enabled several advances in ophthalmic research.

  12. Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging and mode separating by high-resolution linear Radon transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.; Xia, J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) has been increasingly used for obtaining vertical shear-wave velocity profiles within near-surface materials. MASW uses a multichannel recording approach to capture the time-variant, full-seismic wavefield where dispersive surface waves can be used to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The technique consists of (1) acquisition of broadband, high-frequency ground roll using a multichannel recording system; (2) efficient and accurate algorithms that allow the extraction and analysis of 1D Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves; (3) stable and efficient inversion algorithms for estimating S-wave velocity profiles; and (4) construction of the 2D S-wave velocity field map.

  13. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  14. New reference and test materials for the characterization of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers at scanning electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Rackwitz, Vanessa; Krumrey, Michael; Laubis, Christian; Scholze, Frank; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2015-04-01

    Checking the performance of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers as well as validation of the results obtained with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) at a scanning electron microscope (SEM) involve the use of (certified) reference and dedicated test materials. This paper gives an overview on the test materials mostly employed by SEM/EDX users and accredited laboratories as well as on those recommended in international standards. The new BAM reference material EDS-CRM, which is currently in the process of certification, is specifically designed for the characterization of EDS systems at a SEM through calibration of the spectrometer efficiency in analytical laboratories in a simple manner. The certification of the spectra by means of a reference EDS is described. The focus is on the traceability of EDS efficiency which is ensured by measurements of the absolute detection efficiency of silicon drift detectors (SDD) and Si(Li) detectors at the laboratory of the PTB using the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary X-ray source standard. A new test material in development at BAM for testing the performance of an EDS in the energy range below 1 keV is also briefly presented.

  15. An Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Analysis of Elemental Changes of a Persimmon Phytobezoar Dissolved in Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Higashi, Reiji; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Shin; Shiraha, Hidenori; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of phytobezoar dissolution by Coca-Cola(®), persimmon phytobezoar pieces removed from a 60-year-old Japanese woman were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The amount of calcium significantly decreased after dissolution treatment using Coca-Cola(®), suggesting a potential contribution of calcium to dissolution mechanisms. Moreover, immersion in Coca-Cola(®) for 120 hours on the exterior surface revealed that Coca-Cola(®) did not permeate persimmon phytobezoars. This is the first study to investigate the mechanisms of persimmon phytobezoar permeability and dissolution induced by Coca-Cola(®).

  16. Benzyne-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, Igor V.; Frolova, Lilia V.; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.

    2012-01-01

    The benzyne functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using a mixture of o-trimethylsilylphenyl triflate and cesium fluoride that react with the carbon surface. The reaction requires at least 2 days of treatment before the appearance of Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectral signatures that verify modification. Raman spectra of modified graphene and graphite show a rich structure of lines corresponding to C=C-C, C-H, and low frequency modes of surface-attached benzyne rings. PMID:23505324

  17. Benzyne-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Magedov, Igor V; Frolova, Lilia V; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A; Kalugin, Nikolai G

    2013-04-01

    The benzyne functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using a mixture of o-trimethylsilylphenyl triflate and cesium fluoride that react with the carbon surface. The reaction requires at least 2 days of treatment before the appearance of Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectral signatures that verify modification. Raman spectra of modified graphene and graphite show a rich structure of lines corresponding to C=C-C, C-H, and low frequency modes of surface-attached benzyne rings.

  18. Energy transfer between amphiphilic porphyrin polymer shells and upconverting nanoparticle cores in water-dispersible nano-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Kaur, S; Branda, N R

    2015-02-28

    The synthesis of water-dispersible nano-assemblies containing upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) and porphyrin molecules using a one-pot method is described. When the nano-assemblies are excited by 980 nm near-infrared light, the intensity of the 'green emission' band of the UCNP is reduced due to a combination of Föster Resonace Energy Transfer (FRET) and emission-reabsorption. This process is also responsible for the emission from the porphyrin chromophores despite the fact they do not absorb near-infrared light.

  19. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  20. A numerical model for multiple detector energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Xu, W; Dycus, J H; Sang, X; LeBeau, J M

    2016-05-01

    Here we report a numerical approach to model a four quadrant energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer in the transmission electron microscope. The model includes detector geometries, specimen position and absorption, shadowing by the holder, and filtering by the Be carrier. We show that this comprehensive model accurately predicts absolute counts and intensity ratios as a function of specimen tilt and position. We directly compare the model to experimental results acquired with a FEI Super-X EDS four quadrant detector. The contribution from each detector to the sum is investigated. The program and source code can be downloaded from https://github.com/subangstrom/superAngle.

  1. A new background subtraction method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra using a cubic spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Kai; Chen, Man; Peng, Shiqi; Zhao, Weigang; He, Jialin; Zhao, Guangcui

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to subtract the background from the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrum using a cubic spline interpolation. To accurately obtain interpolation nodes, a smooth fitting and a set of discriminant formulations were adopted. From these interpolation nodes, the background is estimated by a calculated cubic spline function. The method has been tested on spectra measured from a coin and an oil painting using a confocal MXRF setup. In addition, the method has been tested on an existing sample spectrum. The result confirms that the method can properly subtract the background.

  2. An Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Analysis of Elemental Changes of a Persimmon Phytobezoar Dissolved in Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Higashi, Reiji; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Shin; Shiraha, Hidenori; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of phytobezoar dissolution by Coca-Cola(®), persimmon phytobezoar pieces removed from a 60-year-old Japanese woman were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The amount of calcium significantly decreased after dissolution treatment using Coca-Cola(®), suggesting a potential contribution of calcium to dissolution mechanisms. Moreover, immersion in Coca-Cola(®) for 120 hours on the exterior surface revealed that Coca-Cola(®) did not permeate persimmon phytobezoars. This is the first study to investigate the mechanisms of persimmon phytobezoar permeability and dissolution induced by Coca-Cola(®). PMID:27629955

  3. Determination of metal components in marine sediments using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tung, Joanne Wai Ting

    2004-11-01

    A rapid energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometric method for the analysis of metal components of marine sediments has been presented. Calibrations were made using synthetic matrix. The agreement of the results for sediment standard reference materials with reference values is satisfactory. Major advantages of the non-destructive ED-XRF technique over conventional chemical digestion methods include the applicability to analyzing the major oxide components, as well as to trace metals, and the avoidance of hazardous chemicals. The method has been applied to the routine analysis of Hong Kong marine sediment.

  4. In situ multi-element analyses by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence on varnishes of historical violins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echard, Jean-Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Varnishes of Italian violins and other historical stringed instruments have been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The instruments whose varnishes were to be analyzed were chosen from the collection kept in Musée de la Musique in Paris. Direct analyses were performed on instrument varnishes, without any sampling and non-destructively, showing inorganic elements such as lead, mercury and iron that could be related to siccatives or pigments. Analytical results and their comparison with old formulae or traditional recipes of violin varnishes, as with the few previous analytical results, will be discussed.

  5. Discrimination of land-use types in a catchment by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Melquiades, F L; Andreoni, L F S; Thomaz, E L

    2013-07-01

    Differences in composition and chemical elemental concentration are important information for soil samples classification. The objective of this study is to present a direct methodology, that is non-destructive and without complex sample preparation, in order to discriminate different land-use types and soil degradation, employing energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and multivariate analysis. Sample classification results from principal component analysis, utilizing spectral data and elemental concentration values demonstrate that the methodology is efficient to discriminate different land-use types.

  6. Engineering Strategies and Methods for Avoiding Air-Quality Externalities: Dispersion Modeling, Home Energy Conservation, and Scenario Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Andrew James

    Energy conservation can improve air quality by reducing emissions from fuel combustion. The human health value retained through better air quality can then offset the cost of energy conservation. Through this thesis' innovative yet widely-accessible combination of air pollution dispersion modeling and atmospheric chemistry, it is estimated that the health value retained by avoiding emissions from Ontario's former coal-fired generating stations is 5.74/MWh (using an upper-bound value of 265,000 per year of life lost). This value is combined with energy modeling of homes in the first-ever assessment of the air-quality health benefits of low-energy buildings. It is shown that avoided health damages can equal 7% of additional construction costs of energy efficient buildings in Ontario. At 7%, health savings are a significant item in the cost analysis of efficient buildings. Looking to energy efficiency in the context of likely future low-resource natural gas scenarios, building efficient buildings today is shown to be more economically efficient than any building retrofit option. Considering future natural gas scarcity in the context of Ontario's Long-Term Energy Plan reveals that Ontario may be forced to return to coal-fired electricity. Projected coal use would result in externalities greater than $600 million/year; 80% more than air-quality externalities from Ontario's electricity in 1985. Radically aggressive investment in electricity conservation (75% reduction per capita by 2075) is one promising path forward that keeps air-quality externalities below 1985 levels. Non-health externalities are an additional concern, the quantification, and ultimately monetization, of which could be practical using emerging air pollution monitoring technologies. Energy, conservation, energy planning, and energy's externalities form a complex situation in which today's decisions are critical to a successful future. It is clear that reducing the demand for energy is essential and

  7. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  8. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  9. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation**

    PubMed Central

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested high-accuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm−3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 μm) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 μm). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm−3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown. PMID:27099408

  10. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results.

  11. Portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and radiography system for archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna; Perez Gravie, Homero

    2011-03-01

    Starting on a laboratory developed portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer; three different analytical results can be performed: analysis of chemical elements, analysis of major chemical crystalline phase and structural analysis, which represents a contribution to a new, low cost development of portable X-ray analyzer; since these results are respectively obtained with independent equipments for X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and radiography. Detection limits of PXRF were characterized using standard reference materials for ceramics, glass, bronze and bones, which are the main materials requiring quantitative analysis in art and archeological objects. A setup for simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (ED (XRF-XRD)) in the reflection mode has been tested for in situ and non-destructive analysis according to the requirements of art objects inspection. The system uses a single low power X-ray tube and an X-ray energy dispersive detector to measure X-ray diffraction spectrum at a fixed angle. Application to the identification of jadeite-jade mineral in archeological objects by XRD is presented. A local high resolution radiography image obtained with the same low power X-ray tube allows for studies in painting and archeological bones.

  12. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    PubMed

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  13. One-loop omega-potential of quantum fields with ellipsoid constant-energy surface dispersion law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Shipulya, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    Rapidly convergent expansions of a one-loop contribution to the partition function of quantum fields with ellipsoid constant-energy surface dispersion law are derived. The omega-potential is naturally decomposed into three parts: the quasiclassical contribution, the contribution from the branch cut of the dispersion law, and the oscillating part. The low- and high-temperature expansions of the quasiclassical part are obtained. An explicit expression and a relation of the contribution from the cut with the Casimir term and vacuum energy are established. The oscillating part is represented in the form of the Chowla-Selberg expansion of the Epstein zeta function. Various resummations of this expansion are considered. The general procedure developed is then applied to two models: massless particles in a box both at zero and nonzero chemical potential, and electrons in a thin metal film. Rapidly convergent expansions of the partition function and average particle number are obtained for these models. In particular, the oscillations of the chemical potential of conduction electrons in graphene and a thin metal film due to a variation of size of the crystal are described.

  14. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  15. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  16. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  17. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Paul R; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-03-21

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na(+), water-Cl(-), and the naphthalene dimer. PMID:27004862

  18. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Paul R.; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-03-01

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na+, water-Cl-, and the naphthalene dimer.

  19. Staggered magnetization and low-energy magnon dispersion in the multiferroic skyrmion host Cu2OSeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy G.; Trump, Benjamin A.; Kindervater, Jonas; Jones, Lacy L.; Stone, Matthew B.; McQueen, Tyrel M.; Broholm, Collin L.

    We present neutron diffraction and inelastic scattering of the insulating helimagnet, Cu2OSeO3 which provide evidence for staggered magnetization and elucidate the associated low-energy magnon spectrum. The modulation wavelength of approximately λ ~ 50 nm detected at antiferromagnetic Bragg points is of the same length scale as previously reported for the skyrmion lattice. This superstructure evidences the composite nature of the spin-1 tetrahedra that form the topological magnetic structure of the material. To understand the interplay of ferrimagnetism and long wavelength modulated magnetism, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering on a co-aligned sample of chemical vapor transport grown single crystals. We shall present the low-energy magnon dispersion and infer an effective spin Hamiltonian to account for the long-wavelength, low-energy magnetism of Cu2OSeO3. The work at IQM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Material Sciences and Engineering, under Grant No. DEFG02-08ER46544. GGM also acknowledges support from the NSF-GRFP Grant No. DGE-1232825.

  20. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  1. Improved dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior of cyclosporine A using high-energy amorphous solid dispersion approach.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Sato, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kumiko; Kawabata, Yohei; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2010-10-31

    The aim of the present investigation is to develop solid dispersion (SD) formulations of cyclosporine A (CsA) for improving the oral bioavailability of CsA. Amorphous SDs of CsA with eight hydrophilic polymers were prepared with wet-mill employing zirconia beads. The physicochemical properties were characterized with a focus on morphology, crystallinity, thermal behavior, dissolution, and interaction of CsA with co-existing polymer. Although CsA molecules were found to be amorphous in all wet-milled formulations, some SD formulations failed to improve the dissolution. Of all CsA formulations, SD using polymer with HPC(SSL) exhibited the largest improvement in dissolution behavior. Pharmacokinetic profiling of orally dosed CsA in rats was carried out using UPLC/ESI-MS. After the oral administration of HPC(SSL)-based SD, enhanced CsA exposure was observed with increases in C(max) and AUC of ca. 5-fold, and the variation in AUC was ca. 40% less than that of amorphous CsA. Infrared spectroscopic studies suggested an interaction between CsA and HPC(SSL), as evidenced by the conformational transition of CsA. From the improved dissolution and pharmacokinetic data, the amorphous SD approach using wet-milling technology should lead to consistent and enhanced bioavailability, leading to an improved therapeutic potential of CsA. PMID:20705124

  2. Elastic modulus of polypyrrole nanotubes: AFM measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Polypyrrole nanotubes were electrochemically synthesized within the pores of nanoporous track-etched membranes. After dissolution of the template membrane, they were dispersed on PET membranes. Their tensile elastic modulus was measured by probing them in three points bending using an atomic force microscope. The elastic modulus was deduced from force-curve measurements. In this communication, the effect of the synthesis temperature and of the nanotube diameter will be presented. Especially it will be shown that the elastic modulus strongly increases when the nanotube outer diameter is reduced from 160 nm down to 35 nm. These results are in good agreement with previous results showing that the electrical conductivity of polypyrrole nanotubes increases by more than one order of magnitude when the diameter decreases in the same range. These behaviors could be explained by a larger ratio of well-oriented defect-free polymer chains in smaller tubes.

  3. Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of moss and soil from abandoned mining of Pb-Zn ores.

    PubMed

    Koz, B

    2014-09-01

    This research investigates heavy metal pollution around one of the most important mining areas in Turkey, the Sebinkarahisar (Giresun) lead-zinc mining, by means of analyzing moss and soil samples collected in the neighborhood of the copper mining at different distances. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (Epsilon 5, PANalytical, Almelo, The Netherlands) is utilized in the experiments. The results have indicated that the both moss and soil samples contain aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, barium, cerium, tungsten, and lead. The comparison of the heavy metal concentrations with the typical measurements in the world and with the limit values for the human health has revealed the critical heavy metal pollution levels in the region. The possible consequences of these results are briefly discussed from the point of potential hazards to ecology and human health.

  4. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  5. Analysis of aqueous and organic fission-product solutions by energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksbank, R.D.; Stewart, J.H. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Because of a revival of interest in reprocessing spent nuclear reactor fuel, ORNL is re-evaluating existing data on extractions. Organic degradation products and new organic extractant systems must also be investigated. Analysis of these solutions present several problems for the analytical chemist. Conventional wet chemical techniques usually require aqueous solutions. Organic solutions must be stripped or wet ashed to convert them to an aqueous system. Stripping is not always quantitative, and the high phosphorus content of organic extractants makes wet ashing difficult. Radiolysis degrades many organic solutions. In aqueous solutions, low acid concentrations cause Pu to polymerize and Zr and Mo to form colloids or precipitate; therefore, sample pretreatment becomes necessary. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a multi-element technique, unaffected by chemical states, capable of analyzing both aqueous and organic solutions. Thie technique has been applied to the determination of U, Pu, Th, Mo, Zr and Re in cold flow sheet development.

  6. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  7. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis of Si sidewall surface etched by deep-reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Nishioka, Kunio; Sato, Mina

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the composition of a passivation film on a sidewall etched by deep-reactive ion etching (RIE) using SF6/O2 and C4F8 plasma, by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. It was found that the compositions of carbon and fluorine in the passivation film on the etched sidewall depend on the width and depth of the etched trench. It is important to understand both the plasma behavior and the passivation film composition to carry out fabrication by deep-RIE. We consider that these results of the EDX analysis of an etched sidewall will be useful for understanding plasma behavior in order to optimize the process conditions of deep-RIE.

  8. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the cornea. Application to paraffin sections of normal and diseased corneas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.R.; Streeten, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of chemical elements in the normal human cornea was studied by energy dispersive x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy of routinely prepared paraffin sections. Calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur were consistently present in quantities above background and varied in concentration regionally. Analysis of fresh-frozen tissue, an approximation of the in vivo state, gave a similar elemental profile to paraffin sections, except for the loss of diffusable electrolytes in the latter. After fixation, S was the most abundant element and was highest in Descemet's membrane. Corneas with granular, lattice, macular, and Fuchs endothelial dystrophies, band keratopathy, and spheroidal degeneration were also examined. Characteristic patterns of abnormal S and Ca distribution were found in each of the dystrophies. The relative proportions of Ca, P, and S gave diagnostic profiles for distinguishing band keratopathy and spheroidal degeneration.

  9. [Line scanning analysis of white porcelain from Gong Kiln in early Tang dynasty by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xue; Mao, Zhen-wei; Feng, Min; Hu, Yao-wu; Wang, Chang-sui; Liu, Hong-miao

    2005-07-01

    Gong kiln, for its long porcelain-firing history, was one of three representative white porcelain kilns in northern China. In order to improve the quality and whiteness of white porcelain, a decorating layer or cosmetic earth was laid on the body surface in Gong kiln during early Tang dynasty, which was able to blot out rough surface and weaken the influence of fuscous body upon surface color. In this paper the main chemical composition of the white porcelain's profile was analyzed by using energy disperse X-Ray fluorescence. The result showed that different materials were used as cosmetic earth during early Tang dynasty, in accordance with the phenomenon under optical microscope. In addition, the glaze belongs to calcium glaze in which plant ash was added.

  10. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  11. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  12. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  13. Low-cost virtual instrumentation system of an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Junfeng; Zeng, Libo; Liu, Ronggui; Liu, Juntang; Zhang, Zelan

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXS). It was constructed using the new architecture of a virtual instrument (VI), which is low-cost, space-saving, fast and flexible way to develop the instrument. Computer-aided teaching (CAT) was used to develop the instrument and operation rather than a traditional instrument technique. The VI was designed using the object-oriented program language C++ and compact programmable logical devices (CPLD). These include spectra collection and processing, quantitative analysis and X-ray-intensity distribution analysis. The procedure is described in detail. The VI system gives an e¡ective and user-friendly human interface for the whole analytical task. Some examples are described. PMID:18924732

  14. Sodium lauryl sulfate enhances nickel penetration through guinea-pig skin. Studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, M.; Sagstroem, S.R.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a common ingredient of detergents, on the penetration of nickel through the stratum corneum in the guinea-pig skin model was studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to evaluate the barrier-damaging properties of this common detergent. The EDX technique allows a simultaneous determination of physiologically important elements, e.g., Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca and S in addition to Ni at each point of measurement in epidermal cell strata. Our results show that SLS reduces the barrier function to Ni-ion penetration of the stratum corneum. In addition we have shown that EDX allows analysis of the influence of different factors involved in nickel penetration through the skin by giving data on the physiological effects on the epidermal cells caused by the applied substances.

  15. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Materials and Methods: Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that, in both Zirconomer and Fuji IX glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Conclusion: Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans. PMID:27583226

  16. A Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter System for the Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Performed on a Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, K.; Hara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We are conducting the development of a transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter system for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), performed using a scanning-transmission electron microscope (STEM). The operating temperature of the TES microcalorimeter was maintained using a compact dry 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. This was pre-cooled by a remote helium cooling loop system and a Gifford-McMahon cooler. These conditions allowed for high-resolution STEM imaging to be achieved. A single-pixel TES microcalorimeter with a polycapillary optic was selected to demonstrate the analytical operation of the EDS system in the STEM. For a Ti-It-Pt sample, an X-ray energy resolution of 8.6 eV full-width at half maximum (FWHM) was obtained at Ir M_{α 1}, Pt M_{α 1}, and Ir M_{β }. Using an electron device sample, element distribution maps of Si, Ti, and W were obtained using a Si K_{α 1} X-ray energy resolution of 9.7 eV FWHM.

  17. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  18. Modified dispersion relations lead to a finite zero point gravitational energy

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, Remo; Mandanici, Gianluca

    2011-04-15

    We compute the zero point energy in a spherically symmetric background distorted at high energy as predicted by Gravity's Rainbow. In this context we setup a Sturm-Liouville problem with the cosmological constant considered as the associated eigenvalue. The eigenvalue equation is a reformulation of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. With the help of a canonical decomposition, we find that the relevant contribution to one loop is given by the graviton quantum fluctuations around the given background. By means of a variational approach based on Gaussian trial functionals, we find that the ordinary divergences can here be handled by an appropriate choice of the rainbow's functions, in contrast to what happens in other conventional approaches. A final discussion on the connection of our result with the observed cosmological constant is also reported.

  19. Free energy landscapes and volumes of coexisting phases for a colloidal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Trinh Hoa; Wang, G. F.; Lai, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Treating the repulsive part of a pairwise potential by the hard-sphere form and its attractive part by the effective depletion potential form, we calculate using this model potential the colloidal domains of phase separation. Differing from the usual recipe of applying the thermodynamic conditions of equal pressure and equal chemical potential where the branches of coexisting phases are the ultimate target, we employ the free energy density minimization approach [G. F. Wang and S. K. Lai, Phys. Rev. E 70, 051402 (2004)] to crosshatch the domains of equilibrium phases, which consist of the gas, liquid, and solid homogeneous phases as well as the coexistence of these phases. This numerical procedure is attractive since it yields naturally the colloidal volume of space occupied by each of the coexisting phases. In this work, we first examine the change in structures of the fluid and solid free energy density landscapes with the effective polymer concentration. We show by explicit illustration the link between the free energy density landscapes and the development of both the metastable and stable coexisting phases. Then, attention is paid to the spatial volumes predicted at the triple point. It is found here that the volumes of spaces of the three coexisting phases at the triple point vary one dimensionally, whereas for the two coexisting phases, they are uniquely determined.

  20. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Determination of Dissociation Energies of Dispersion-Dominated Aromatic Molecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Frey, Jann A; Holzer, Christof; Klopper, Wim; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2016-05-11

    The dissociation energy (D0) of an isolated and cold molecular complex in the gas-phase is a fundamental measure of the strength of the intermolecular interactions between its constituent moieties. Accurate D0 values are important for the understanding of intermolecular bonding, for benchmarking high-level theoretical calculations, and for the parametrization of force-field models used in fields ranging from crystallography to biochemistry. We review experimental and theoretical methods for determining gas-phase D0 values of M·S complexes, where M is a (hetero)aromatic molecule and S is a closed-shell "solvent" atom or molecule. The experimental methods discussed involve M-centered (S0 → S1) electronic excitation, which is often followed by ionization to the M(+)·S ion. The D0 is measured by depositing a defined amount of vibrational energy in the neutral ground state, giving M(‡)·S, the neutral S1 excited state, giving M*·S, or the M(+)·S ion ground state. The experimental methods and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Based on the electronic structure of M and S, we classify the M·S complexes as Type I, II, or III, and discuss characteristic properties of their respective potential energy surfaces that affect or hinder the determination of D0. Current theoretical approaches are reviewed, which comprise methods based on a Kohn-Sham reference determinant as well as wave function-based methods based on coupled-cluster theory. PMID:27055105

  2. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Microstructural Dispersions in Immiscible Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity driven separation and preferential wetting precludes uniform microstructural distributions during solidification processing of immiscible, liquid-liquid mixtures. Historically, it is, however, established that liquid/liquid suspensions can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. Following a brief introduction the results of experiments on immiscible mixtures subjected to ultrasonic energy during solidification processing will be compared and evaluated in view of a recently developed mathematical model. The presentation continues by discussion of scaling the model to commercial viability and concludes with the implications of such processing in a microgravity environment.

  3. Characterizing the Use of Ultrasonic Energy in Promoting Uniform Microstructural Dispersions in Immiscible Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity driven separation and preferential wetting precludes uniform microstructural distributions during solidification processing of immiscible, liquid-liquid mixtures. Historically, it is, however, established that liquid/liquid suspensions can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. Following a brief introduction the results of experiments on immiscible mixtures subjected to ultrasonic energy during solidification processing will be compared and evaluated in view of a recently developed mathematical model. The presentation continues by discussion of scaling the model to commercial viability and concludes with the implications of such processing in a microgravity environment.

  4. Crossover from inelastic magnetic scattering of Cooper pairs to spin-wave dispersion produces the low-energy kink structure in the spectra of cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present GW-based-self-energy calculations for the state of the coexisting spin-density-wave and d-wave superconductivity in a series of cuprate superconductors. The spin-resonance spectrum is found to exhibit the typical “hourglass” form whose upward and downward dispersion branches come from the gapped-spin-wave and magnetic scattering, of Cooper pairs, respectively. We show that the crossover between these two different dispersion features leads to an abrupt change of slope in the quasiparticle self-energy, and hence, the low-energy kink commences in the single-particle quasiparticle spectrum. The calculated electron-boson-coupling strength agrees well with experimental data as a function of temperature, doping, and material. The results demonstrate that electronic correlations dominate the quasiparticle spectra of cuprates near the low-energy kink, suggesting a relatively smaller role for phonons in this energy range.

  5. Modeling complex dispersed energy and clean water systems for the United States/Mexico border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Hugo Francisco Lopez

    As world population grows, and its technology evolves, the demand for electricity inexorably increases. Until now most of this electricity has been produced via fossil fuels, non-renewable energy resources that are irreversibly deteriorating our environment. On the economical aspect it does not get any better. Let's not forget market rules, the higher the demand and lower the offer, the higher the price we will have to pay. Oil is an excellent example. Some countries try to solve this situation with Pharaohnic projects, i.e. investing absurd amounts of money in 'green electricity' building monstrous dams to power equally monstrous hydroelectric power plants. The only problem with this is that it is not green at all---it does have an enormous environmental impact---it is extremely complicated and expensive to implement. It is important to point out, that this research project does not try to solve world's thirst for electricity. It is rather aimed to help solve this problematic at a much lower scale---it should be considered as an extremely small step in the right direction. It focuses on satisfying the local electricity needs with renewable, non-contaminating and locally available resources. More concisely, this project focuses on the attainment and use of hydrogen as an alternate energy source in El Paso/Juarez region. Clean technology is nowadays available to produce hydrogen and oxygen, i.e. the photoelectrolysis process. Photovoltaic cells coupled with electrolytic devices can be used to produce hydrogen and oxygen in a sustainable manner. In this research, simulation models of hybrid systems were designed and developed. They were capable to compare, predict and evaluate different options for hydrogen generation. On the other hand, with the produced hydrogen from the electrolysis process it was possible to generate electricity through fuel cells. The main objectives of the proposed research were to define how to use the resources for the attainment of hydrogen

  6. Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering with cone collimation using X-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-09-01

    Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering (ED-SAXS) with an innovative design of cone collimation based on an ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) had been explored. Using this new cone collimation system, scattering angle 2θ has a theoretical minimum angle related to the mean half-opening angle of the hollow cone beam of 1.42 mrad, and with the usable X-ray energy ranging from 4 to 30 keV, the resulting observable scattering vector q is down to a minimum value of about 0.003 Å-1 (or a Bragg spacing of about 2100 Å). However, the absorption of lower energies by X-ray capillary optics, sample transmission, and detector response function limits the application range to lower energy. Cone collimation ED-SAXS experiments carried out on pure water, Lupolen, and in situ temperature-dependent measurement of diacetylenic acid/melamine micelle solid were presented at three different scattering angles 2θ of 0.18°, 0.70° and 1.18° to illustrate the new opportunities offered by this technique as well as its limitations. Also, a comparison has been made by replacing the PPXRL with a pinhole, and the result shows that cone collimation ED-SAXS based on ESBC with PPXRL was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (i.e., reducing the parasitic background scattering) than ESBC with a pinhole. The cone collimation instrument based on X-ray capillary optics could be considered as a promising tool to perform SAXS experiments, especially cone collimation ED-SAXS has potential application for the in situ temperature-dependent studying on the kinetics of phase transitions.

  7. Different mode-locking methods in high energy all-normal dispersion Yb femtosecond all-fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepanek, Jan; Michalska, Maria; Kardaś, Tomasz; Radzewicz, Czesław; Stepanenko, Yuriy

    2015-05-01

    Ultrafast all-fiber oscillators are currently one of the most rapidly developing laser technologies. Many advantages like: environmental stability, low sensitivity to misalignment, excellent beam quality (intrinsic single transverse mode operation), high energy and an excellent active medium efficiency make them the lasers of choice for a variety of applications. In this paper the designs of all-fiber all-normal dispersion femtosecond lasers are described. Due to large positive chirp, the pulses inside the cavity are highly stretched in time and they can achieve higher energies with the same peak power as shorter pulses. High insensitivity to mechanical perturbations or temperature drift is another highly valued property of presented configurations. Two of reported lasers are extremely stable due to the fact that their cavities are built entirely of polarization maintaining fibers and optical elements. We used highly Yb3+ ions doped fibers as an active medium pumped by a fiber coupled 976 nm laser diode. The central wavelength of our laser oscillators was 1030 nm. Three methods of passive mode-locking in all-fiber cavities were studied. In particular, the designs with Nonlinear Polarization Evolution (NPE), Nonlinear Optical Loop Mirror (NOLM) and Nonlinear Amplifying Loop Mirror (NALM) as artificial saturable absorbers were investigated. The most attention was paid to all-PM-fiber configurations. We present two self-starting, high energy, all-fiber configurations: one delivering pulses with energy of 4.3 nJ and dechirped pulse duration of 150 fs based on the NALM and another with a 6.8 nJ, 390 fs pulses in configuration with the NOLM. The influence of different artificial saturable absorber on output pulse characteristics were studied and analyzed.

  8. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode. PMID:27400534

  9. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode.

  10. Misfit strain of oxygen precipitates in Czochralski silicon studied with energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröschel, A.; Will, J.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.

    2014-06-01

    Annealed Czochralski Silicon wafers containing SiOx precipitates have been studied by high energy X-ray diffraction in a defocused Laue setup using a laboratory tungsten tube. The energy dispersive evaluation of the diffracted Bragg intensity of the 220 reflection within the framework of the statistical dynamical theory yields the static Debye-Waller factor E of the crystal, which gives access to the strain induced by the SiOx precipitates. The results are correlated with precipitate densities and sizes determined from transmission electron microscopy measurements of equivalent wafers. This allows for the determination of the constrained linear misfit ɛ between precipitate and crystal lattice. For samples with octahedral precipitates the values ranging from ɛ = 0.39 (+0.28/-0.12) to ɛ = 0.48 (+0.34/-0.16) indicate that self-interstitials emitted into the matrix during precipitate growth contribute to the lattice strain. In this case, the expected value calculated from literature values is ɛ = 0.26 ± 0.05. Further, the precise evaluation of Pendellösung oscillations in the diffracted Bragg intensity of as-grown wafers reveals a thermal Debye-Waller parameter for the 220 reflection B220(293 K) of 0.5582 ± 0.0039 Å2 for a structure factor based on spherically symmetric scattering contributions.

  11. Development of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence as a mobile analysis method for hazardous metals in transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a widely applied technique for both laboratory and field-based characterization of metals in complex matrices. Here an EDXRF method is described for analysis of 13 hazardous (RCRA) metals in Portland cement, a typical matrix for transuranic (TRU) waste from US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Samples are analyzed as homogeneous powders prepared by simple drying, mixing, and milling. Analyses are performed using a commercial EDXRF spectrometer equipped with an X-ray tube, a high-resolution Si(Li) detector, and fundamental parameters software for data reduction. The spectrometer is rugged and suitable for use in either mobile or fixed-based laboratories. Standardization is accomplished using fundamental parameters techniques for several prepared standards which bracket the expected range in metal concentrations, and typical standardization uncertainties are < 10%. Detection limits range from 2--20 ppm and meet required action levels with a few exceptions including Be, Hg and V. Accuracy is evaluated from a series of unknown quality control samples and ranges from 85--102%, whereas the total method uncertainty is typically < 10%. Consequently, this simple, rapid, and inexpensive technique can provide quantitative characterization of virtually all of the RCRA metals in TRU waste cement samples.

  12. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  13. Examination of dentin surface using AFM (our experience).

    PubMed

    Zapletalová, Zdenka; Kubínek, Roman; Vůjtek, Milan; Novotný, Radko

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as one the technique of Scanning Probe Microscopy is useful for imaging of surface structure. This method can yield three-dimensional high-resolution topographic images of sample surfaces by using a scanning technique for conductors and insulators on atomic scale. It is based upon mapping of atomic-forces on a surface of an investigated sample. The method is useful not only in physics and chemistry; it can be also applied in biological fields. Special construction of AFM scanner enables to follow biological samples in liquid environments. Artifacts caused by dehydration of samples are removed this way. Dentin of human teeth is a vital hydrated tissue. It is strongly sensitive to dehydration and drying that are commonly used in preparation of samples in examinations by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We describe our experience in examination of dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using contact method of AFM under moist conditions.

  14. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  15. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  16. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  17. CD-AFM reference metrology at NIST and SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Fu, Joseph; Orji, Ndubuisi; Guthrie, William; Allen, Richard; Cresswell, Michael

    2005-05-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and SEMATECH have been working together to improve the traceability of critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) dimensional metrology in semiconductor manufacturing. A major component of this collaboration has been the implementation of a Reference Measurement System (RMS) at SEMATECH using a current generation CD-AFM. An earlier tool, originally used at SEMATECH, has now been installed at NIST. Uncertainty budgets were developed for pitch, height, and CD measurements using both tools. At present, the standard uncertainties are approximately 0.2 % for pitch measurements and 0.4% for step height measurements. Prior to the current work, CD AFM linewidth measurements were limited to a standard uncertainty of about 5 nm. However, this limit can now be significantly reduced. This reduction results from the completion of the NIST/SEMATECH collaboration on the development of single crystal critical dimension reference materials (SCDDRM). A new generation of these reference materials was released to SEMATECH Member Companies during late 2004. The SEMATECH RMS was used to measure the linewidths of selected features on the distributed specimens. To reduce the uncertainty in tip width calibration, a separate transfer experiment was performed in which samples were measured by CD-AFM and then sent for high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In this manner, CD-AFM could be used to transfer the HRTEM width information to the distributed samples. Consequently, we are now able to reduce the limit on the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of CD-AFM width measurements to 1 nm.

  18. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, W. C.; Wessel, J. C.; Nygard, E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non-destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  19. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications

    PubMed Central

    Barber, W. C.; Wessel, J. C.; Nygard, E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  20. Molecular dispersion energy parameters for alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, S.; Deublein, S.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2014-01-28

    Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions containing alkali and halide ions are determined by molecular simulation. The following ions are studied: Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}. The employed ion force fields consist of one Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and one concentric point charge with a magnitude of ±1 e. The SPC/E model is used for water. The LJ size parameter of the ion models is taken from Deublein et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 084501 (2012)], while the LJ energy parameter is determined in the present study based on experimental self-diffusion coefficient data of the alkali cations and the halide anions in aqueous solutions as well as the position of the first maximum of the radial distribution function of water around the ions. On the basis of these force field parameters, the electric conductivity, the hydration dynamics of water molecules around the ions, and the enthalpy of hydration is predicted. Considering a wide range of salinity, this study is conducted at temperatures of 293.15 and 298.15 K and a pressure of 1 bar.

  1. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  2. Thermo-magnetic behaviour of AFM-MFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Arinero, R.; Bergez, W.; Tordjeman, Ph

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the behaviour of AFM cantilevers under an external magnetic field B and temperature field produced by a coil with an iron core. Four cantilever types were studied. Forces were measured for different B values and at various coil-to-cantilever separation distances. The results were analysed on the basis of a phenomenological model. This model contains the contribution of two terms, one monopole-monopole interaction at short distance, and one apparent paramagnetic interaction in \

  3. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  4. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Spontaneous aggregation of humic acid observed with AFM at different pH.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Claudio; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Cho, Hyen Goo; Francioso, Ornella; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella

    2015-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy in contact (AFM-C) mode was used to investigate the molecular dynamics of leonardite humic acid (HA) aggregate formed at different pH values. HA nanoparticles dispersed at pH values ranging from 2 to 12 were observed on a mica surface under dry conditions. The most clearly resolved and well-resulted AFM images of single particle were obtained at pH 5, where HA appeared as supramolecular particles with a conic shape and a hole in the centre. Those observations suggested that HA formed under these conditions exhibited a pseudo-amphiphilic nature, with secluded hydrophobic domains and polar subunits in direct contact with hydrophilic mica surface. Based on molecular simulation methods, a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) model was proposed to explain the HA ring-like morphology. The LCC model optimized the parameters of β-O-4 linkages between 14 units of 1-4 phenyl propanoid, and resulted in an optimized structure comprising 45-50 linear helical molecules looped spirally around a central cavity. Those results added new insights on the adsorption mechanism of HA on polar surfaces as a function of pH, which was relevant from the point of view of natural aggregation in soil environment. PMID:26295541

  6. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  7. In-situ and operando characterization of batteries with energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, William Arthur

    Batteries play a pivotal role in the low-carbon society that is required to thwart the effects of climate change. Alternative low-carbon energy sources, such as wind and solar, are often intermittent and unreliable. Batteries are able capture their energy and deliver it later when it is needed. The implementation of battery systems in grid-level and transportation sectors is essential for efficient use of alternative energy sources. Scientists and engineers need better tools to analyze and measure the performance characteristics of batteries. One of the main hindrances in the progress of battery research is that the constituent electrode materials are inaccessible once an electrochemical cell is constructed. This leaves the researcher with a limited number of available feedback mechanisms to assess the cell's performance, e.g., current, voltage, and impedance. These data are limited in their ability to reveal the more-localized smaller-scale structural mechanisms on which the batteries' performance is so dependent. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is one of the few techniques that can internally probe a sealed battery. By analyzing the structural behavior of battery electrodes, one is able to gain insight to the physical properties on which the battery's performance is dependent. In this dissertation, EDXRD with ultrahigh energy synchrotron radiation is used to probe the electrodes of manufactured primary and secondary lithium batteries under in-situ and operando conditions. The technique is then applied to solve specific challenges facing lithium ion batteries. Diffraction spectra are collected from within a battery at 40 micrometer resolution. Peak-fitting is used to quantitatively estimate the abundance of lithiated and non-lithiated phases. Through mapping the distribution of phases within, structural changes are linked to the battery's galvanic response. A three-dimensional spatial analysis of lithium iron phosphate batteries suggests that evolution

  8. Studies of dispersion energy in hydrogen-bonded systems. H2O-HOH, H2O-HF, H3N-HF, HF-HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześniak, M. M.; Scheiner, Steve

    1984-02-01

    Dispersion energy is calculated in the systems H2O-HOH, H2O-HF, H3N-HF, and HF-HF as a function of the intermolecular separation using a variety of methods. M≂ller-Plesset perturbation theory to second and third orders is applied in conjunction with polarized basis sets of 6-311G** type and with an extended basis set including a second set of polarization functions (DZ+2P). These results are compared to a multipole expansion of the dispersion energy, based on the Unsöld approximation, carried out to the inverse tenth power of the intermolecular distance. Pairwise evaluation is also carried out using both atom-atom and bond-bond formulations. The MP3/6-311G** results are in generally excellent accord with the leading R-6 term of the multipole expansion. This expansion, if carried out to the R-10 term, reproduces extremely well previously reported dispersion energies calculated via variation-perturbation theory. Little damping of the expansion is required for intermolecular distances equal to or greater than the equilibrium separation. Although the asymptotic behavior of the MP2 dispersion energy is somewhat different than that of the other methods, augmentation of the basis set by a second diffuse set of d functions leads to quite good agreement in the vicinity of the minima. Both the atom-atom and bond-bond parametrization schemes are in good qualitative agreement with the other methods tested. All approaches produce similar dependence of the dispersion energy upon the angular orientation between the two molecules involved in the H bond.

  9. Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluoresence mapping of enamel and dental materials after chemical erosion.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nahórny, Sídnei; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-10-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence was employed to test the hypothesis that beverage consumption or mouthwash utilization will change the chemical properties of dental materials and enamel mineral content. Bovine enamel samples (n = 45) each received two cavity preparations (n = 90), each pair filled with one of three dental materials (R: nanofilled composite resin; GIC: glass-ionomer cement; RMGIC: resin-modified GIC). Furthermore, they were treated with three different solutions (S: saliva; E: erosion/Pepsi Twist®; or EM: erosion+mouthwash/Colgate Plax®). It was found that mineral loss in enamel was greater in GICE samples than in RE > RMGICE > RMGICEM > REM > GICEM. An increased percentage of Zr was found in REM indicating organic matrix degradation. Dental materials tested (R, GIC, and RMGIC) were not able to protect adjacent enamel from acid erosion by the soft drink tested. The use of mouthwash promoted protection of enamel after erosion by the soft drink. To avoid chemical dissolution by mouthwashes, protection by resin composites with surface sealants is recommended.

  10. Determination of selenium at trace levels in geologic materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low levels of selenium (0.1-500 ppm) in both organic and inorganic geologic materials can be semiquantitatively measured by isolating Se as a thin film for presentation to an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Suitably pulverized samples are first digested by fusing with a mixture of Na2CO3 and Na2O2. The fusion cake is dissolved in distilled water, buffered with NH4Cl, and filtered to remove Si and the R2O3 group. A carrier solution of Na2TeO4, plus solid KI, hydrazine sulfate and Na2SO3, is added to the filtrate. The solution is then vacuum-filtered through a 0.45-??m pore-size filter disc. The filter, with the thin film of precipitate, is supported between two sheets of Mylar?? film for analysis. Good agreement is shown between data reported in this study and literature values reported by epithermal neutron-activation analysis and spectrofluorimetry. The method can be made quantitative by utilizing a secondary precipitation to assure complete recovery of the Se. The X-ray method offers fast turn-around time and a reasonably high production rate. ?? 1981.

  11. Faults and foibles of quantitative scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2012-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a powerful and flexible elemental analysis method that can identify and quantify elements with atomic numbers > 4 (Be) present as major constituents (where the concentration C > 0.1 mass fraction, or 10 weight percent), minor (0.01<= C <= 0.1) and trace (C < 0.01, with a minimum detectable limit of ~+/- 0.0005 - 0.001 under routine measurement conditions, a level which is analyte and matrix dependent ). SEM/EDS can select specimen volumes with linear dimensions from ~ 500 nm to 5 μm depending on composition (masses ranging from ~ 10 pg to 100 pg) and can provide compositional maps that depict lateral elemental distributions. Despite the maturity of SEM/EDS, which has a history of more than 40 years, and the sophistication of modern analytical software, the method is vulnerable to serious shortcomings that can lead to incorrect elemental identifications and quantification errors that significantly exceed reasonable expectations. This paper will describe shortcomings in peak identification procedures, limitations on the accuracy of quantitative analysis due to specimen topography or failures in physical models for matrix corrections, and quantitative artifacts encountered in xray elemental mapping. Effective solutions to these problems are based on understanding the causes and then establishing appropriate measurement science protocols. NIST DTSA II and Lispix are open source analytical software available free at www.nist.gov that can aid the analyst in overcoming significant limitations to SEM/EDS.

  12. Distribution of toxic elements in teeth treated with amalgam using μ-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Ferreira, C.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Pessanha, S.

    2016-08-01

    Over the years, the presence of mercury in amalgam fillings has raised some safety concerns. Amalgam is one of the most commonly used tooth fillings and contains approximately 50% of elemental mercury and 50% of other metals, mostly silver, tin and copper. Amalgam can release small amounts of mercury vapor over time, and patients can absorb these vapors by inhaling or ingesting them. In this study, 10 human teeth treated with dental amalgam were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) to study the diffusion of its constituents, Ag, Cu, Sn and Hg. The used EDXRF setup, makes use of a polycapillary lens to focus radiation up to 25 μm allowing the mapping of the elemental distribution in the samples. Quantification was performed using the inbuilt software based on the Fundamental Parameters method for bulk samples, considering a hydroxyapatite matrix. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the surface enamel to the inner region (dentin and pulp cavity). Mercury concentration profiles show strong levels of this element close to the amalgam region, decreasing significantly in the dentin, and increasing again up to 40,000 μg·g- 1 in the cavity were the pulp used to exist when the tooth was vital.

  13. A study of heavy metal pollution in Lake Victoria sediments by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Makundi, I N

    2001-01-01

    Sources of heavy metal pollution of Lake Victoria is of interest due to its economic and domestic implication in East Africa. Sediments from the shore of Lake Victoria and from some streams flowing into the lake have been analyzed for their heavy metal content using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis. The samples were collected from seventeen different locations around the Municipality of Mwanza divided into three zones according to their activities. The results show that sediments from Mwanza North, which is least in anthropogenic activities, contains Cr and Co in addition to metals of terrestrial origin (K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, and Zr), samples from Mwanza Central, which is the town center, contains high concentrations of V, Cu, Zn and Pb, and samples collected from Mwanza South, which is the industrial area, contains the highest concentrations of V, Cu, Zn, As and Pb. It is concluded that the industrial and sewage wastes discharged into the lake are the main sources of the heavy metal contamination of Lake Victoria. Further studies will be required to assess detriments of these pollutants to human and aquatic life before policy for the factories responsible is put in place. PMID:11501314

  14. Simultaneous nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticles using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Haidi D; Drinkel, Emma E; Orzechovicz, Beatriz; Leopoldino, Elder C; Souza, Franciane D; Almerindo, Gizelle I; Perdona, Cristian; Nome, Faruk

    2013-11-01

    A selective method is proposed for the determination of palladium, gold, and sulfur in catalytic systems, by direct liquid analysis using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), under an atmosphere of helium or air. This method allows a nondestructive analysis of palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold nanoparticulate catalysts stabilized by imidazolium propane sulfonate based zwitterionic surfactants, allowing the samples to be reused for catalytic studies. The signals from palladium, rhodium, platinum, and gold samples in the presence of imidazolium propane sulfonate-based zwitterionic surfactants obtained using EDXRF before (Pd(2+), Rh(2+), Pt(2+), and Au(3+)) and after (Pd(0), Rh(0), Pt(0), and Au(0)) formation of nanoparticles are essentially identical. The results show that the EDXRF method is nondestructive and allows detection and quantification of the main components of platinum, gold, rhodium, and palladium NPs, including the surfactant concentration, with detection and quantification limits in the range of 0.4-3 mg L(-1). The matrices used in such samples present no problems, even allowing the detection and quantification of interfering elements.

  15. A chemical signal possibly related to physiology in fossil cells detected by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X

    2006-02-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) is a widely used tool employed to detect elemental composition and its spatial distribution in a sample without causing damage. Charcoalified cytoplasm is a new type of fossil material that came to people's attention only recently. In this paper, EDXMA is used for the first time to detect the spatial elemental distribution in charcoalified cytoplasm of two fossil plants that are more than 100 million years old. The results demonstrate certain elemental distribution patterns within charcoalified cytoplasm and the surrounding cell walls. Based on the results from cytological studies of extant material, the heterogeneous spatial elemental distribution within the charcoalified cytoplasm has the potential to be related to the maturation of cells, the presence of certain organelles, and the physiology of these organelles. This is the first chemical signal detected in cytoplasm residue that can possibly be related to plant physiology. This paves the way for further research on fossil cytoplasm, which will better our understanding on the physiology of fossil plants.

  16. Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluoresence mapping of enamel and dental materials after chemical erosion.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nahórny, Sídnei; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-10-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence was employed to test the hypothesis that beverage consumption or mouthwash utilization will change the chemical properties of dental materials and enamel mineral content. Bovine enamel samples (n = 45) each received two cavity preparations (n = 90), each pair filled with one of three dental materials (R: nanofilled composite resin; GIC: glass-ionomer cement; RMGIC: resin-modified GIC). Furthermore, they were treated with three different solutions (S: saliva; E: erosion/Pepsi Twist®; or EM: erosion+mouthwash/Colgate Plax®). It was found that mineral loss in enamel was greater in GICE samples than in RE > RMGICE > RMGICEM > REM > GICEM. An increased percentage of Zr was found in REM indicating organic matrix degradation. Dental materials tested (R, GIC, and RMGIC) were not able to protect adjacent enamel from acid erosion by the soft drink tested. The use of mouthwash promoted protection of enamel after erosion by the soft drink. To avoid chemical dissolution by mouthwashes, protection by resin composites with surface sealants is recommended. PMID:23095448

  17. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of mine waters from the Migori Gold Mining Belt in Southern Nyanza, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odumo, O B; Mustapha, A O; Patel, J P; Angeyo, H K

    2011-09-01

    Analyses of water samples from Mikei, Osiri, Masara and Macalder (Makalda) gold mines of the Migori gold mining belt of Southwestern Kenya were done to determine the level of heavy metals using the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique. The concentrations of the heavy metals were; copper (29.34 ± 5.01-14,975.59 ± 616.14 μg/L); zinc (33.69 ± 4.29-683.15 ± 32.93 μg/L); arsenic (958.16 ± 60.14-18,047.52 ± 175.00 μg/L) and lead (19.51 ± 5.5-214.53 ± 6.29 μg/L). High levels of arsenic and lead were noted. These heavy metals are not only dangerous to the lives of miners and the local inhabitants; they are also a threat to aquatic life since these waters finally find their way into Lake Victoria.

  18. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  19. An analysis of Mn-Zn ferrite microstructure by impedance spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyau, V.; Wang, G.-Y.; Bue, M. Lo; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2012-03-01

    AC (alternative current) resistivity measurement results on Mn-Zn sintered ferrite were analyzed in the 0.1-500 MHz range. From electrical point of view, the material could be represented by an equivalent circuit of parallel resistance-capacitance cells connected in series corresponding to the contributions from bulk grains in one hand, and grain boundary layers in the other hand. The experimental resistivity curves were fitted with the model. The as obtained parameters give information on dielectric properties and conductivity of both bulk grains and boundary layers. For the studied material, it appears that the resistivity at low frequencies is increased 27 times due to the boundary layers effects. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry characterization where performed in order to detect impurities at a grain boundary layer which can explain those wide differences between bulk grains and boundary layers electrical properties. It appears that the two components have close chemical compositions, but some calcium impurities segregate at the boundary which increases dramatically the resistivity of these layers. Furthermore, the bulk grains show relative permittivity around 350 at low frequency which is much smaller than the one measured for the whole material which is in the 50,000-100,000 range. This giant-dielectric behavior can be explained by an internal barrier layer at the grain boundaries. At last, the components of classical eddy current losses including losses due to ohmic effects and (true) dielectric losses on both bulk grain and boundary layers are distinguished.

  20. The detection of food soils on stainless steel using energy dispersive X-ray and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, K A; Benson, P S; Verran, J

    2011-09-01

    Organic soiling is a major issue in the food processing industries, causing a range of biofouling and microbiological problems. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to quantify and determine the biochemical groups of food soils on stainless steel surfaces. EDX quantified organic material on surfaces where oily based residues predominated, but was limited in its usefulness since other food soils were difficult to detect. FT-IR provided spectral 'fingerprints' for each of the soils tested. Key soiling components were associated with specific peaks, viz. oils at 3025 cm(-1)-3011 cm(-1), proteins at 1698 cm(-1)-1636 cm(-1) and carbohydrates at 1658 cm(-1)-1596 cm(-1), 783 cm(-1)-742 cm(-1). High concentrations of some soils (10%) were needed for detection by both EDX and FT-IR. The two techniques may be of use for quantifying and identifying specific recalcitrant soils on surfaces to improve cleaning and hygiene regimes.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of lichens on ceramic roofing tiles by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analyses.

    PubMed

    Kiurski, Jelena S; Ranogajec, Jonjaua G; Ujhelji, Agnes L; Radeka, Miroslava M; Bokorov, Milos T

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the actions of some lichens on the quality of ceramic roofing tiles was investigated in view of textural and microstructural changes considering their biocorrosion resistance. Two types (extruded and pressed) of the real ceramic roofing tiles aged 6 to 10 years, as well as the ceramic model systems formed with the additives of the specific chemical composition Cu-slag powder (10 wt%) and CuO powder (1 wt%), treated with various concentrations of oxalic acid (0.01 wt%, 0.1 wt%, and 4 wt%) were investigated. The thalli of lichen (Verrucaria nigrescens) growth on ceramic roofing tile were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Investigation by SEM and EDS gave information regarding the ultrastructure characteristics of the thallus and the lichen-ceramic tile contact zone, allowing the observation of the hyphal penetration and filling up of the fissures and cracks by the lichens' hyphae. The CuO as the raw mixture additive changed the quality of the surface of the ceramic model systems as it has increased resistance to oxalic acid actions. The textural changes in the ceramic model systems and the formation of the identified destructive crystal phase, whewellite, were slowed down. The fundamental interactions between lichens and ceramic materials of the model systems have been identified as physico-chemical processes based on oxalic acid actions, which could cause ceramic matrix deterioration and consequently aging of ceramic roofing tile systems.

  2. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  3. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  4. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  5. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  7. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  8. High-speed AFM for Studying Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Biological molecules show their vital activities only in aqueous solutions. It had been one of dreams in biological sciences to directly observe biological macromolecules (protein, DNA) at work under a physiological condition because such observation is straightforward to understanding their dynamic behaviors and functional mechanisms. Optical microscopy has no sufficient spatial resolution and electron microscopy is not applicable to in-liquid samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize molecules in liquids at high resolution but its imaging rate was too low to capture dynamic biological processes. This slow imaging rate is because AFM employs mechanical probes (cantilevers) and mechanical scanners to detect the sample height at each pixel. It is quite difficult to quickly move a mechanical device of macroscopic size with sub-nanometer accuracy without producing unwanted vibrations. It is also difficult to maintain the delicate contact between a probe tip and fragile samples. Two key techniques are required to realize high-speed AFM for biological research; fast feedback control to maintain a weak tip-sample interaction force and a technique to suppress mechanical vibrations of the scanner. Various efforts have been carried out in the past decade to materialize high-speed AFM. The current high-speed AFM can capture images on video at 30-60 frames/s for a scan range of 250nm and 100 scan lines, without significantly disturbing week biomolecular interaction. Our recent studies demonstrated that this new microscope can reveal biomolecular processes such as myosin V walking along actin tracks and association/dissociation dynamics of chaperonin GroEL-GroES that occurs in a negatively cooperative manner. The capacity of nanometer-scale visualization of dynamic processes in liquids will innovate on biological research. In addition, it will open a new way to study dynamic chemical/physical processes of various phenomena that occur at the liquid-solid interfaces.

  9. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  10. Studies on the formation of polymeric nano-emulsions obtained via low-energy emulsification and their use as templates for drug delivery nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Calderó, G; Montes, R; Llinàs, M; García-Celma, M J; Porras, M; Solans, C

    2016-09-01

    Ethylcellulose nanoparticles have been obtained from O/W nano-emulsions of the water/polyoxyethylene 10 oleyl ether/[ethyl acetate+4wt% ethylcellulose] system by low energy-energy emulsification at 25°C. Nano-emulsions with droplet sizes below 200nm and high kinetic stability were chosen for solubilising dexamethasone (DXM). Phase behaviour, conductivity and optical analysis studies of the system have evidenced for the first time that both, the polymer and the drug play a role on the structure of the aggregates formed along the emulsification path. Nano-emulsion formation may take place by both, phase inversion and self-emulsification. Spherical polymeric nanoparticles containing surfactant, showing sizes below 160nm have been obtained from the nano-emulsions by organic solvent evaporation. DXM loading in the nanoparticles was high (>90%). The release kinetics of nanoparticle dispersions with similar particle size and encapsulated DXM but different polymer to surfactant ratio were studied and compared to an aqueous DXM solution. Drug release from the nanoparticle dispersions was slower than from the aqueous solution. While the DXM solution showed a Fickian release pattern, the release behaviour from the nanoparticle dispersions was faster than that expected from a pure Fickian release. A coupled diffusion/relaxation model fitted the results very well, suggesting that polymer chains undergo conformational changes enhancing drug release. The contribution of diffusion and relaxation to drug transport in the nanoparticle dispersions depended on their composition and release time. Surfactant micelles present in the nanoparticle dispersion may exert a mild reservoir effect. The small particle size and the prolonged DXM release provided by the ethylcellulose nanoparticle dispersions make them suitable vehicles for controlled drug delivery applications.

  11. Studies on the formation of polymeric nano-emulsions obtained via low-energy emulsification and their use as templates for drug delivery nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Calderó, G; Montes, R; Llinàs, M; García-Celma, M J; Porras, M; Solans, C

    2016-09-01

    Ethylcellulose nanoparticles have been obtained from O/W nano-emulsions of the water/polyoxyethylene 10 oleyl ether/[ethyl acetate+4wt% ethylcellulose] system by low energy-energy emulsification at 25°C. Nano-emulsions with droplet sizes below 200nm and high kinetic stability were chosen for solubilising dexamethasone (DXM). Phase behaviour, conductivity and optical analysis studies of the system have evidenced for the first time that both, the polymer and the drug play a role on the structure of the aggregates formed along the emulsification path. Nano-emulsion formation may take place by both, phase inversion and self-emulsification. Spherical polymeric nanoparticles containing surfactant, showing sizes below 160nm have been obtained from the nano-emulsions by organic solvent evaporation. DXM loading in the nanoparticles was high (>90%). The release kinetics of nanoparticle dispersions with similar particle size and encapsulated DXM but different polymer to surfactant ratio were studied and compared to an aqueous DXM solution. Drug release from the nanoparticle dispersions was slower than from the aqueous solution. While the DXM solution showed a Fickian release pattern, the release behaviour from the nanoparticle dispersions was faster than that expected from a pure Fickian release. A coupled diffusion/relaxation model fitted the results very well, suggesting that polymer chains undergo conformational changes enhancing drug release. The contribution of diffusion and relaxation to drug transport in the nanoparticle dispersions depended on their composition and release time. Surfactant micelles present in the nanoparticle dispersion may exert a mild reservoir effect. The small particle size and the prolonged DXM release provided by the ethylcellulose nanoparticle dispersions make them suitable vehicles for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:27341306

  12. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes.We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the

  13. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  14. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  15. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analysis of isothermally aged SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobranszky, J.; Szabo, P. J.; Berecz, T.; Hrotko, V.; Portko, M.

    2004-10-01

    Due to thermal effects, several precipitation and segregation processes are known in duplex stainless steels. These microstructural changes influence both of the original phases, but in different ways. Isothermal ageing in a large range of temperature was performed on SAF 2507 type steel. The temperature range was 300-1000 °C, the ageing time was between 100 s and 24 h. This paper discusses the results of ageing at 900 °C. Microstructural changes were investigated by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. This technique allowed the determination of the microstructure of the secondary austenite and sigma phase and their mutual orientation properties. Beside this, thermoelectric power measurements were also performed, which gave information about the kinetics of the precipitation process. Results showed that sigma-phase precipitation started right after 200 s in the case of annealed steel, and faster than 100 s in the cold-rolled state. After 5000 s, the delta-ferrite disappeared. Chemical composition of sigma phase was independent on the ageing time. A small decrease in nickel content was observed with a slight increase of Cr content. Small amount of chi phase had also been observed on the ferrite-ferrite boundaries, but later they changed into sigma phase. Similarly to sigma phase, chi phase showed significant phosphorus enrichment. During ageing, small chrome nitride precipitates developed, which amount increased in time, and some vanadium could be measured in them. The orientation relationship between austenite and sigma phase deviated from Nenno-orientationship with about 24°, and seems to form a [110]‖[310] relationship, which was characteristic right from the beginning of the process, and remains more or less constant.

  16. Applicability of the energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis for quantification of irregular calcium deposits on fruit and leaf cuticles.

    PubMed

    Hunsche, M; Noga, G

    2008-12-01

    In our studies, we evaluated the relation between CaCl(2) concentration and the scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis parameters, net intensity, peak/background and standardized percentage of atoms and percentage of weight after application of single microdroplets on enzymatically isolated tomato fruit cuticles and apple seedling leaves. After analysis, the Ca/Cl ratio was calculated and the area ultimately covered with Ca and Cl within the droplet spread area determined. According to our findings, all evaluated parameters were influenced by both droplet volume and calcium chloride concentration, whereas Pearson's analysis revealed a strong correlation between net intensity and area ultimately covered by Ca or Cl, respectively. Simple linear regressions for net intensity, peak/background and Ca/Cl ratio showed variable determination coefficients (R(2)) ranging between 0.49 and 0.79. Multiple regression equations comprising net intensity, Ca/Cl ratio and deposit area were established to estimate the amount of calcium present on the cuticles. Equation slopes depended on droplet volumes, with determination coefficients of 0.89 and 0.81 for 0.5 and 1.0-microL droplets, respectively. The importance of the physicochemical properties of the spray solution was exploited in another study where a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic adjuvant was added to a 10 g L(-1) CaCl(2) solution, which was applied to apple seedling leaves. The addition of adjuvants increased values of net intensity and peak/background, which correlated significantly with the area covered by calcium. The importance of the methodology for studies on the interaction between leaf applied fertilizers (also extended to agrochemicals) and the characteristics of target surfaces is discussed. PMID:19094022

  17. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin--a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear.

  18. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin - a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear. PMID:24294356

  19. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  20. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  1. Simultaneous AFM nano-patterning and imaging for photomask repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Tamer, Mehmet S.; van Es, Maarten H.; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a new AFM based nano-patterning technique that can be used for fast defect repairing of high resolution photomasks and possibly other high-speed nano-patterning applications. The proposed method works based on hammering the sample with tapping mode AFM followed by wet cleaning of the residuals. On the area where a specific pattern should be written, the tip-sample interaction force is tuned in a controlled manner by changing the excitation frequency of the cantilever without interrupting the imaging process. Using this method several patterns where transferred to different samples with imaging speed. While the pattern was transferred to the sample in each tracing scan line, the patterned sample was imaged in retracing scan line, thus the outcome was immediately visible during the experiment.

  2. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  4. MDI: integrity index of cytoskeletal fibers observed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Massimo; Bruni, Luca; Croci, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    The Modified Directional Index (MDI) is a form factor of the angular spectrum computed from the 2D Fourier transform of an image marking the prevalence of rectilinear features throughout the picture. We study some properties of the index and we apply it to AFM images of cell cytoskeleton regions featuring patterns of rectilinear nearly parallel actin filaments as in the case of microfilaments grouped in bundles. The analysis of AFM images through MDI calculation quantifies the fiber directionality changes which could be related to fiber damages. This parameter is applied to the images of Hs 578Bst cell line, non-tumoral and not immortalized human epithelial cell line, irradiated with X-rays at doses equivalent to typical radiotherapy treatment fractions. In the reported samples, we could conclude that the damages are mainly born to the membrane and not to the cytoskeleton. It could be interesting to test the parameter also using other kinds of chemical or physical agents.

  5. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  6. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  7. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  8. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  9. Amalgam tattoo: report of an unusual clinical presentation and the use of energy dispersive X-ray analysis as an aid to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Greer, J.L.; Daniels, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual appearing gingival amalgam pigmentation (amalgam tattoo) that completely surrounded the maxillary right first premolar in a 13-year-old boy is presented. Because of the wide distribution and apparent clinical progression of the discoloration, an excisional biopsy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis of amalgam pigmentation was confirmed in paraffin sections by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Silver, tin, and mercury were detected in the specimen.

  10. A study on identification of the blunt lethal objects of wood, iron, brick and stone in homicide by SEM and EDAX (energy dispersive analysis x-ray).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y W; Tao, X; Li, Z Q; Chen, L; Zhou, W C

    1989-06-01

    The qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of residues on wound in homicide cases were done by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis X-ray system (EDAX) in this paper. It provides a new method of examination for identifying lethal objects in homicidal cases. Our experiment provides some advantages in these examinations, such as saving time, objective conclusion and exact results in practical cases.

  11. Nanoscale fabrication of a peptide layer using an AFM probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Chie; Obataya, Ikuo; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Miyake, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been applied in many studies to manipulate atoms or molecules. In particular, force spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool to elucidate intermolecular or intramolecular interactions and provide mechanical information. If enzymes could retain their activity when immobilized on probes, not only could enzyme-substrate interactions be investigated but also the probes could be used for precise biomolecular manipulation at the nano-scale. In our study, a method based on "Enzymatic Nanolithography" was successfully performed in a buffered solution using Staphylococcal serine V8 protease and AFM. To estimate the fabricating activity of the protease immobilized on the AFM tip to peptides immobilized on a substrate, we designed and synthesized peptides that showed enzymatic action specific to the protease. When the protease digested the reporter peptide a quencher residue was released from the main flame of the peptide and resulted in fluorescence. In the designed 9 mer peptides, TAMRA functioned as a good quencher for FAM. After contact of the protease-immobilized tip to the reporter peptide layer, a fluorescent area was observed by microscopic imaging.

  12. Confocal Raman-AFM, A New Tool for Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ute

    2005-03-01

    Characterization of heterogeneous systems, e.g. polymers, on the nanometer scale continues to grow in importance and to impact key applications in the field of materials science, nanotechnology and catalysis. The development of advanced polymeric materials for such applications requires detailed information about the physical and chemical properties of these materials on the nanometer scale. However, some details about the phase-separation process in polymers are difficult to study with conventional characterization techniques due to the inability of these methods to chemically differentiate materials with good spatial resolution, without damage, staining or preferential solvent washing. The CR-AFM is a breakthrough in microscopy. It combines three measuring techniques in one instrument: a high resolution confocal optical microscope, an extremely sensitive Raman spectroscopy system, and an Atomic Force Microscope. Using this instrument, the high spatial and topographical resolution obtained with an AFM can be directly linked to the chemical information gained by Confocal Raman spectroscopy. To demonstrate the capabilities of this unique combination of measuring techniques, polymer blend films, spin coated on glass substrates, have been characterized. AFM measurements reveal the structural and mechanical properties of the films, whereas Raman spectral images show the chemical composition of the blends.

  13. In situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration of AFM colloidal probes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sangjin; Franck, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to sense lateral forces applied to the AFM probe tip. Recent advances in tissue engineering and functional biomaterials have shown a need for the surface characterization of their material and biochemical properties under the application of lateral forces. LFM equipped with colloidal probes of well-defined tip geometries has been a natural fit to address these needs but has remained limited to provide primarily qualitative results. For quantitative measurements, LFM requires the successful determination of the lateral force or torque conversion factor of the probe. Usually, force calibration results obtained in air are used for force measurements in liquids, but refractive index differences between air and liquids induce changes in the conversion factor. Furthermore, in the case of biochemically functionalized tips, damage can occur during calibration because tip-surface contact is inevitable in most calibration methods. Therefore, a nondestructive in situ lateral force calibration is desirable for LFM applications in liquids. Here we present an in situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method for AFM colloidal probes. In this method, the laterally scanned substrate surface generated a creeping Couette flow, which deformed the probe under torsion. The spherical geometry of the tip enabled the calculation of tip drag forces, and the lateral torque conversion factor was calibrated from the lateral voltage change and estimated torque. Comparisons with lateral force calibrations performed in air show that the hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method enables quantitative lateral force measurements in liquid using colloidal probes.

  14. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  15. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  16. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney).

  17. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney). PMID:25618680

  18. Low-energy dispersion of dynamic charge stripes in La1.75Sr0.25NiO4 observed with inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ruidan; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda; Reznik, Dmitry; Winn, Barry

    The dynamic stripe correlations have been the subject of intense research, owing to the possible links with high-Tc superconductivity. In light of a recently published, direct observation of charge-stripe fluctuations in La2-xSrxNiO4 using inelastic neutron scattering, we did a follow-up neutron experiment on a x=0.25 sample to characterize the low-energy dispersion of these dynamic charge stripes using the HYSPEC instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source. The scattering signals are collected in the vicinity of a charge-order peak with a large wave vector (4.4, 3, 0), where dynamic spin-stripe correlations are negligible. Mapping the low-energy charge-stripe fluctuations in a wide temperature range, we observe a finite dispersion along the stripe-modulation direction at T >=160K where the charge stripes become disordered, while the steep dispersion in the orthogonal direction is not resolved. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-SC00112704.

  19. Determination of the sequence of intersecting lines from laser toner and seal ink by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Li, Bing

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify that the combination of Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray mapping could be applied to line intersection problems. The spectral data of red seal ink, laser toner and their intersections, such as peak location and peak intensity, were described. Relative peak height ratios of different chemical components in intersecting lines were used to distinguish the sequences. Energy dispersive X-ray mapping characteristics of intersecting areas were also detailed. The results show that both the laser toner and the seal ink appear on the surface of intersections, regardless of the sequence. The distribution of the two inks on the surface is influenced not only by the sequence of heterogeneous lines but also by diffusion. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray mapping are able to explore the chemical components and the corresponding elemental distribution in the intersections. The combination of these two techniques has provided a reliable method for sequencing intersecting lines of red seal ink and laser toner, and more importantly, this method may be a basis for sequencing superimposed lines from other writing instruments.

  20. Departures from the Energy-Biodiversity Relationship in South African Passerines: Are the Legacies of Past Climates Mediated by Behavioral Constraints on Dispersal?

    PubMed Central

    Péron, Guillaume; Altwegg, Res

    2015-01-01

    Legacies of paleoclimates in contemporary biodiversity patterns have mostly been investigated with global datasets, or with weakly dispersive organisms, and as a consequence been interpreted in terms of geographical or physical constraints. If paleoclimatic legacies also occurred at the regional scale in the distributions of vagile organisms within biomes, they would rather suggest behavioral constraints on dispersal, i.e., philopatric syndromes. We examined 1) the residuals of the regression between contemporary energy and passerine species richness in South African biomes and 2) phylogenetic dispersion of passerine assemblages, using occupancy models and quarter-degree resolution citizen science data. We found a northeast to southwest gradient within mesic biomes congruent with the location of Quaternary mesic refugia, overall suggesting that as distance from refugia increased, more clades were lacking from local assemblages. A similar but weaker pattern was detected in the arid Karoo Biomes. In mobile organisms such as birds, behavioral constraints on dispersal appear strong enough to influence species distributions thousands of years after historical range contractions. PMID:26208300

  1. Adjustable rheology of fumed silica dispersion in urethane prepolymers: Composition-dependent sol and gel behaviors and energy-mediated shear responses

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong Song, Yihu Wang, Xiang Zheng, Qiang

    2015-07-15

    Variation of colloidal and interfacial interactions leads to a microstructural diversity in fumed silica dispersions exhibiting absolutely different sol- or gel-like rheological responses. In this study, fumed silicas with different surface areas (200–400 m{sup 2}/g) and surface characteristics (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) are dispersed into moisture-cured polyurethane. The microstructures investigated using transmission electron microscope are associated perfectly with three different rheological behaviors: (i) Sols with well-dispersed silica aggregates, (ii) weak gels with agglomerate-linked networks, and (iii) strong gels with concentrated networks of large agglomerates. Though sols and gels are well distinguished by shear thickening or sustained thinning response through steady shear flow test, it is interesting that the sols and weak gels exhibit a uniform modulus plateau-softening-hardening-softening response with increasing dynamic strain at frequency 10 rad s{sup −1} while the strong gels show a sustained softening beyond the linear regime. Furthermore, the onset of softening and hardening can be normalized: The two softening are isoenergetic at mechanical energies of 0.3 J m{sup −3} and 10 kJ m{sup −3}. On the other hand, the hardening is initiated by a critical strain of 60%. The mechanisms involved in the generation of the sol- and the gel-like dispersions and their structural evolutions during shear are thoroughly clarified in relation to the polyols, the characteristic and content of silica and the curing catalysts.

  2. Methanol clusters (CH3OH)n: putative global minimum-energy structures from model potentials and dispersion-corrected density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kazachenko, Sergey; Bulusu, Satya; Thakkar, Ajit J

    2013-06-14

    Putative global minima are reported for methanol clusters (CH3OH)n with n ≤ 15. The predictions are based on global optimization of three intermolecular potential energy models followed by local optimization and single-point energy calculations using two variants of dispersion-corrected density functional theory. Recurring structural motifs include folded and/or twisted rings, folded rings with a short branch, and stacked rings. Many of the larger structures are stabilized by weak C-H···O bonds.

  3. Elemental analysis of sunflower cataract in Wilson's disease: a study using scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyo Ju; Kim, Joon Mo; Choi, Chul Young

    2014-04-01

    Signature ophthalmic characteristics of Wilson's disease (WD) are regarded as diagnostically important manifestations of the disease. Previous studies have proved the common occurrence of copper accumulation in the liver of patients with WD. However, in the case of sunflower cataracts, one of the rare diagnostic signs of WD, no study has demonstrated copper accumulation in the lens capsules of sunflower cataracts in WD patients. To investigate the nanostructure and elemental composition of sunflower cataracts in WD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was done on the capsulorhexised anterior lens capsule of sunflower cataracts in WD in order to evaluate anatomical variation and elemental changes. We utilized energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the elemental composition of the lens capsule using both point and mapping spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis was performed for relative comparison of the elements. TEM showed the presence of granular deposits of varying size (20-350 nm), appearing mainly in the posterior one third of the anterior capsule. The deposits appeared in linear patterns with scattered dots. There were no electron-dense particles in the epithelial cell layer of the lens. Copper and sulfur peaks were consistently revealed in electron-dense granular deposits. In contrast, copper and sulfur peaks were absent in other tissues, including granule-free lens capsules and epithelial tissue. Most copper was exclusively located in clusters of electron-dense particles, and the copper distribution overlapped with sulfur on mapping spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis presented inconsistent ratios of copper to sulfur in each electron-dense granule. The mean ratio of copper to sulfur was about 3.25 (with a range of 2.39-3.78). This is the first elemental analysis of single electron particles in sunflower cataracts using EDS in the ophthalmic area. Sunflower cataracts with WD are assumed to be the result of accumulation of heterogeneous

  4. Combination of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine indium concentration in InGaN thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Walther, T.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to determine the indium concentration, x, of In x Ga1-x N thin films by combining plasmon excitation studies in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a novel way of quantification of the intensity of x-ray lines in energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The plasmon peak in EELS of InGaN is relatively broad. We fitted a Lorentz function to the main plasmon peak to suppress noise and the influence from the neighboring Ga 3d transition in the spectrum, which improves the precision in the evaluation of the plasmon peak position. As the indium concentration of InGaN is difficult to control during high temperature growth due to partial In desorption, the nominal indium concentrations provided by the growers were not considered reliable. The indium concentration obtained from EDXS quantification using Oxford Instrument ISIS 300 x-ray standard quantification software often did not agree with the nominal indium concentration, and quantification using K and L lines was inconsistent. We therefore developed a self-consistent iterative procedure to determine the In content from thickness-dependent k-factors, as described in recent work submitted to Journal of Microscopy. When the plasmon peak position is plotted versus the indium concentration from EDXS we obtain a linear relationship over the whole compositional range, and the standard error from linear least-squares fitting shows that the indium concentration can be determined from the plasmon peak position to within Δx = ± 0.037 standard deviation.

  5. Unspecific membrane protein-lipid recognition: combination of AFM imaging, force spectroscopy, DSC and FRET measurements.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Jordi H; Montero, M Teresa; Morros, Antoni; Domènech, Òscar

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we will describe in quantitative terms the unspecific recognition between lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, a polytopic model membrane protein, and one of the main components of the inner membrane of this bacterium. Supported lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) (3:1, mol/mol) in the presence of Ca(2+) display lateral phase segregation that can be distinguished by atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as force spectroscopy. LacY shows preference for fluid (Lα) phases when it is reconstituted in POPE : POPG (3:1, mol/mol) proteoliposomes at a lipid-to-protein ratio of 40. When the lipid-to-protein ratio is decreased down to 0.5, two domains can be distinguished by AFM. While the upper domain is formed by self-segregated units of LacY, the lower domain is constituted only by phospholipids in gel (Lβ) phase. On the one hand, classical differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements evidenced the segregation of a population of phospholipids and point to the existence of a boundary region at the lipid-protein interface. On the other hand, Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements in solution evidenced that POPE is selectively recognized by LacY. A binary pseudophase diagram of POPE : POPG built from AFM observations enables to calculate the composition of the fluid phase where LacY is inserted. These results are consistent with a model where POPE constitutes the main component of the lipid-LacY interface segregated from the fluid bulk phase where POPG predominates.

  6. [Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for determination of shooting distance].

    PubMed

    Havel, J

    2003-10-01

    The article follows up the experiences Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic necrochemical method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons--authors: dipl. Ing. J. Havel and dipl. Ing. K. Zelenka and Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for identification of inlets (gunshot--entries) and outlets (gunshot--exits)--author: dipl. Ing. J. Havel.

  7. Synthesis of polymer nano-brushes by self-seeding method and study of various morphologies by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbolaghi, S.; Abbaspoor, S.; Abbasi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Polymer brushes due to their high sensitivity to environmental changes are the best and newest means for developing the responsive materials. Polymer nano-brushes consisting various surface morphologies and uniformly distributed amorphous grafted chains were synthesized via single-crystal growth procedure. Poly(ethylene glycol)- b-polystyrene (PEG- b-PS) and poly(ethylene glycol)- b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PEG- b-PMMA) block copolymers were prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). On the basis of various height differences, phase regions were detectable through atomic force microscopy (AFM NanoscopeIII). The novelty of this work is developing and characterizing the random and intermediate single-co-crystals. Besides, some other sorts of brush-covered single crystals like homo-brush and matrix-dispersed mixed-brushes were involved just for comparing the distinct morphologies. The intermediate (neither matrix-dispersed nor random) single-co-crystals were detectable through their thickness fluctuations in AFM height profiles. On the contrary, the random single-co-crystals were verified through comparing with their corresponding homopolymer and homo-brush single crystals. The growth fronts of (120), (240), (200) and (040) were detected by electron diffraction of transmission electron microscope.

  8. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  9. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  10. Generation of high energy square-wave pulses in all anomalous dispersion Er:Yb passive mode locked fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Semaan, Georges; Ben Braham, Fatma; Salhi, Mohamed; Meng, Yichang; Bahloul, Faouzi; Sanchez, François

    2016-04-18

    We have experimentally demonstrated square pulses emission from a co-doped Er:Yb double-clad fiber laser operating in anomalous dispersion DSR regime using the nonlinear polarization evolution technique. Stable mode-locked pulses have a repetition rate of 373 kHz with 2.27 µJ energy per pulse under a pumping power of 30 W in cavity. With the increase of pump power, both the duration and the energy of the output square pulses broaden. The experimental results demonstrate that the passively mode-locked fiber laser operating in the anomalous regime can also realize a high-energy pulse, which is different from the conventional low-energy soliton pulse.

  11. Momentum-Transfer-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of BaBiO3: Anisotropic Dispersion of Threshold Excitation and Optically Forbidden Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Dravid, V. P.; Bulut, N.; Han, P. D.; Klein, M. V.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Zhang, F. C.

    1995-09-01

    Momentum-transfer-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy of the valence band transitions in BaBiO3 has revealed for the first time that dispersion of the excitation at the optical gap \\(~2 eV\\) and an optically forbidden transition at 4.5 eV are all anisotropic along [100] and [110]. The anisotropic dispersion of the threshold excitation cannot be described by a simple charge density wave picture but can be explained by a small exciton model proposed in this paper. The optically forbidden transition is found to agree well with a proposed molecular orbital model, where the transition is assigned as the excitation from the O 2pσ nonbonding states to the empty Bi 6s state.

  12. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  13. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  14. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  15. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-03-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels.

  16. Nanomechanics of new materials — AFM and computer modelling studies of trichoptera silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Janusz; Strzelecka, Joanna; Mikulska, Karolina; Tszydel, Mariusz; Balter, Aleksander; Nowak, Wiesław

    2011-04-01

    Caddisfly (Trichopera) can glue diverse material underwater with a silk fiber. This makes it a particularly interesting subject for biomimetcs. Better understanding of silk composition and structure could lead to an adhesive capable to close bleeding wounds or to new biomaterials. However, while spiderweb or silkworm secretion is well researched, caddisfly silk is still poorly understood. Here we report a first nanomechanical analysis of H. Angustipennis caddisfly silk fiber. An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) imaging shows dense 150 nm bumps on silk surface, which can be identified as one of features responsible for its outstanding adhesive properties. AFM force spectroscopy at the fiber surface showed, among others, characteristic saw like pattern. This pattern is attributed to sacrificial bond stretching and enhances energy dissipation in mechanical deformation. Similarities of some force curves observed on Tegenaria domestica spiderweb and caddisfly silk are also discussed. Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed that the strength of short components of Fib-H HA species molecules, abundant in Trichoptera silk is critically dependent on calcium presence.

  17. An innovative method and experiment for fabricating bulgy shape nanochannel using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zone-Ching; Jheng, Hao-Yuan; Ding, Hao-Yang

    2015-08-01

    The paper proposes using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the concept of specific down force energy (SDFE) to establish an innovative offset cycle cutting method for fabricating a bulgy shape nanochannel on a single-crystal silicon substrate. In the offset cycle cutting method, cutting is performed at a constant down force in all cutting passes. After the first cutting pass, the AFM probe is offset rightward for the second pass and subsequently offset leftward to the middle (i.e., between the positions of the first two cutting passes) for the third cutting pass. Applying a step-by-step method to modify the offset distance and approach the defined SDFE value, this study determined the depth of the middle cutting pass and smaller values of upward bulginess and downward indentation at the bottom of the nanochannel. The nanochannel width can be increased by increasing the number of offset cycle cutting passes. In addition, by applying the proposed method, this study involved a simulation and experiment concerning the cutting path plan of bulgy shape nanochannels. Furthermore, using a small down force along the burr path is proposed for reducing burr height. The results of the simulation and experiment were compared to verify the feasibility of the method.

  18. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels. PMID:24663394

  19. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  20. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  1. AFM and electroanalytical studies of synthetic oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chiorcea Paquim, A-M; Diculescu, V C; Oretskaya, T S; Oliveira Brett, A M

    2004-11-15

    The first and most important step in the development and manufacture of a sensitive DNA-biosensor for hybridization detection is the immobilization procedure of the nucleic acid probe on the transducer surface, maintaining its mobility and conformational flexibility. MAC Mode AFM images were used to demonstrate that oligonucleotide (ODN) molecules adsorb spontaneously at the electrode surface. After adsorption, the ODN layers were formed by molecules with restricted mobility, as well as by superposed molecules, which can lead to reduced hybridization efficiency. The images also showed the existence of pores in the adsorbed ODN film that revealed large parts of the electrode surface, and enabled non-specific adsorption of other ODNs on the uncovered areas. Electrostatic immobilization onto a clean glassy carbon electrode surface was followed by hybridization with complementary sequences and by control experiments with non-complementary sequences, studied using differential pulse voltammetry. The data obtained showed that non-specific adsorption strongly influenced the results, which depended on the sequence of the ODNs. In order to reduce the contribution of non-specific adsorbed ODNs during hybridization experiments, the carbon electrode surface was modified. After modification, the AFM images showed an electrode completely covered by the ODN probe film, which prevented the undesirable binding of target ODN molecules to the electrode surface. The changes of interfacial capacitance that took place after hybridization or control experiments showed the formation of a mixed multilayer that strongly depended on the local environment of the immobilized ODN.

  2. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  3. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  4. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  5. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  6. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  7. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  8. Application of melt extrusion in the development of a physically and chemically stable high-energy amorphous solid dispersion of a poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Jay P; Cao, Yu; Kowalski, James; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2008-01-01

    Formulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in high-energy amorphous forms is a common strategy to enhance solubility, dissolution rate and, consequently, oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Amorphous APIs are, however, susceptible to recrystallization and, therefore, there is a need to physically stabilize them as solid dispersions in polymeric carriers. Hot melt extrusion has in recent years gained wide acceptance as a method of choice for the preparation of solid dispersions. There is a potential that the API, the polymer or both may degrade if excessively high temperature is needed in the melt extrusion process, especially when the melting point of the API is high. This report details a novel method where the API was first converted to an amorphous form by solvent evaporation and then melt-extruded with a suitable polymer at a drug load of at least 20% w/w. By this means, melt extrusion could be performed much below the melting temperature of the drug substance. Since the glass transition temperature of the amorphous drug was lower than that of the polymer used, the drug substance itself served as the plasticizer for the polymer. The addition of surfactants in the matrix enhanced dispersion and subsequent dissolution of the drug in aqueous media. The amorphous melt extrusion formulations showed higher bioavailability than formulations containing the crystalline API. There was no conversion of amorphous solid to its crystalline form during accelerated stability testing of dosage forms.

  9. Higher-order electric multipole contributions to retarded non-additive three-body dispersion interaction energies between atoms: equilateral triangle and collinear configurations.

    PubMed

    Salam, A

    2013-12-28

    The theory of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to calculate higher electric multipole contributions to the dispersion energy shift between three atoms or molecules arranged in a straight line or in an equilateral triangle configuration. As in two-body potentials, three-body dispersion interactions are viewed in the QED formalism to arise from exchange of virtual photons between coupled pairs of particles. By employing an interaction Hamiltonian that is quadratic in the electric displacement field means that third-order perturbation theory can be used to yield the energy shift for a particular combination of electric multipole polarizable species, with only six time-ordered diagrams needing to be summed over. Specific potentials evaluated include dipole-dipole-quadrupole (DDQ), dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole (DQQ), and dipole-dipole-octupole (DDO) terms. For the geometries of interest, near-zone limiting forms are found to exhibit an R(-11) dependence on separation distance for the DDQ interaction, and an R(-13) behaviour for DQQ and DDO shifts, agreeing with an earlier semi-classical computation. Retardation weakens the potential in each case by R(-1) in the far-zone. It is found that by decomposing the octupole moment into its irreducible components of weights-1 and -3 that the former contribution to the DDO potential may be taken to be a higher-order correction to the leading triple dipole energy shift. PMID:24387355

  10. Higher-order electric multipole contributions to retarded non-additive three-body dispersion interaction energies between atoms: Equilateral triangle and collinear configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Salam, A.

    2013-12-28

    The theory of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) is used to calculate higher electric multipole contributions to the dispersion energy shift between three atoms or molecules arranged in a straight line or in an equilateral triangle configuration. As in two-body potentials, three-body dispersion interactions are viewed in the QED formalism to arise from exchange of virtual photons between coupled pairs of particles. By employing an interaction Hamiltonian that is quadratic in the electric displacement field means that third-order perturbation theory can be used to yield the energy shift for a particular combination of electric multipole polarizable species, with only six time-ordered diagrams needing to be summed over. Specific potentials evaluated include dipole-dipole-quadrupole (DDQ), dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole (DQQ), and dipole-dipole-octupole (DDO) terms. For the geometries of interest, near-zone limiting forms are found to exhibit an R{sup −11} dependence on separation distance for the DDQ interaction, and an R{sup −13} behaviour for DQQ and DDO shifts, agreeing with an earlier semi-classical computation. Retardation weakens the potential in each case by R{sup −1} in the far-zone. It is found that by decomposing the octupole moment into its irreducible components of weights-1 and -3 that the former contribution to the DDO potential may be taken to be a higher-order correction to the leading triple dipole energy shift.

  11. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  12. Effect of hydration on the structure of oriented lipid membranes investigated by in situ time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caminiti, Ruggero; Caracciolo, Giulio; Pisani, Michela

    2005-06-20

    In situ time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) was applied to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)-oriented membranes. The measurements allowed a very high density time sampling of the evolution of the structural properties of the DOTAP bilayer such as the lamellar d-spacing, the membrane thickness, and the size of the interbilayer water region. Time-resolved EDXD has been found to provide important information on the role played by free water molecules on the structure and fluidity of lipid bilayer.

  13. Energy dispersion of the electrosubbands in parabolic confining quantum wires: interplay of Rashba, Dresselhaus, lateral spin-orbit interaction and the Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Yi; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Xue-Ming

    2009-08-19

    We have made a thorough theoretical investigation of the interplay of spin-orbit interactions (SOIs) resulting from Rashba, Dresselhaus and the lateral parabolic confining potential on the energy dispersion relation of the spin subbands in a parabolic quantum wire. The influence of an applied external magnetic field is also discussed. We show the interplay of different types of SOI, as well as the Zeeman effect, leads to rather complex and intriguing electrosubbands for different spin branches. The effect of different coupling strengths and different magnetic field strengths is also investigated.

  14. Plasma Waves Dispersion Relation at Near of the Cosmological Black Holes in an Expanding Universe Dominated by Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani-Arani, R.; Mirzaee, A. R.; Abdoli-Arani, A.

    2015-09-01

    Propagation of waves in the relativistic plasma at near of the horizon of black holes embedded in Friedman-Robertson-Walker cosmologies is investigated. The metric of the class of black holes, cosmological black holes, is obtained by performing conformal transformation on isotropic black hole space-time. Here we use the Maxwell's equations and relativistic two-fluid plasma in 3 + 1 formulation in Rindler coordinates system. By calculation of the time evolution of scale factor, the dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves near of the cosmological black holes horizon is obtained.

  15. Gelatin/graphene systems for low cost energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, Giovanni; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore; Neitzert, Heinz C.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we introduce the possibility to use a low cost, biodegradable material for temporary energy storage devices. Here, we report the use of biologically derived organic electrodes composed of gelatin ad graphene. The graphene was obtained by mild sonication in a mixture of volatile solvents of natural graphite flakes and subsequent centrifugation. The presence of exfoliated graphene sheets was detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The homogeneous dispersion in gelatin demonstrates a good compatibility between the gelatin molecules and the graphene particles. The electrical characterization of the resulting nanocomposites suggests the possible applications as materials for transient, low cost energy storage device.

  16. Gelatin/graphene systems for low cost energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Neitzert, Heinz C.; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we introduce the possibility to use a low cost, biodegradable material for temporary energy storage devices. Here, we report the use of biologically derived organic electrodes composed of gelatin ad graphene. The graphene was obtained by mild sonication in a mixture of volatile solvents of natural graphite flakes and subsequent centrifugation. The presence of exfoliated graphene sheets was detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The homogeneous dispersion in gelatin demonstrates a good compatibility between the gelatin molecules and the graphene particles. The electrical characterization of the resulting nanocomposites suggests the possible applications as materials for transient, low cost energy storage device.

  17. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  18. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  19. Intrinsically high-Q dynamic AFM imaging in liquid with a significantly extended needle tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-06-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially available tapping-mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operational frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic material properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments.

  20. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  1. An AFM/Rotaxane Molecular Reading Head for Sequence-Dependent DNA Structure**

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Brian A.; Spadola, Quinn; Qamar, Shahid; Zhang, Peiming; Kada, Gerald; Bension, Rouvain

    2008-01-01

    A nanomechanical molecular “tape reader” is assembled and tested by threading a β-cyclodextrin ring onto a DNA oligomer and pulling it along with an AFM tip. The formation and mechanical operation of the system is confirmed by measuring the forces required to unfold secondary structures in the form of hairpins. Unfolding induced by this 0.7 nm aperture requires 40 times more force than that reported for pulling on the ends of the DNA. A kinetic analysis shows that much less strain is required to destabilize the double helix in this geometry. Consequently, much more force is required to provide the free energy needed for opening. DNA secondary structure may prove to be a significant obstacle both for enzymes that process DNA though an orifice, and for the passage through nanopores proposed for some novel sequencing schemes. PMID:18680093

  2. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching.

  3. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction potentiality in the field of cultural heritage: simultaneous structural and elemental analysis of various artefacts.

    PubMed

    Caponetti, Eugenio; Caminiti, Ruggero; Chillura Martino, Delia; Saladino, Maria Luisa

    2007-07-01

    The applicability of an Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffractometer to some technical questions in the field of Cultural Heritage is presented. This diffractometer, equipped with a white source, has been utilized for the structural and elemental analysis of some items having different nature. Given its design, the instrument allows to collect data from samples as big as a book or a little more. Samples, without collection of any portion and without any preliminary preparation, have been placed in the instrument and spectra have been collected in a wide energy range that contains X-ray fluorescence and diffraction features. In all cases, data acquired in air and in a non destructive way were reliable and their collection was fast. Fluorescence and X-ray diffraction information, when possible, have been compared with those obtained by XRF micro-analysis and by an Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffractometer equipped with a Cu X-ray source. By using the last two techniques, data have been collected from small areas of the samples.

  4. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  5. Corrosion under argon irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range: A study coupling AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Ngoc-Long; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Bérerd, Nicolas; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Gorse-Pomonti, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on a recent study of the corrosion under argon ion irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range (1-9 MeV), associating AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. Irradiation with MeV Arn+ (n = 1, 3) ions produces damages on the titanium surface. Large craters form on the oxidized titanium surface whose characteristics vary as a function of the argon energy between 2 and 9 MeV. The superficial oxide grows thicker under irradiation over the same energy range, especially near 3 MeV. It is suggested that collisions cascades play a significant role in the overall damage process.

  6. Mechanical properties study of SW480 cells based on AFM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Song, Zhengxun; Qu, Yingmin; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Zuobin

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM), it has been widely applied in biomedicine. One of the most important applications is used as an indenter tool to do the indentation experiment in order to get the mechanical properties of cells. In this paper, SW480 cells were used as the test subjects. Through the analysis of the contact and indentation, Young's modulus (E), which is an important parameter of cancer cells, has been estimated. Experimental results show that different mechanical models should be chosen to calculate the E in different indentation depths. Here, the E of SW480 cells was (2.5 ± 0.8) KPa at the indentation depth of 99 nm.

  7. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  8. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  9. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  10. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  11. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  12. Study of pluronic F68 molecules on silicon with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retamal, M. J.; Volkmann, U. G.; Samith, V. D.

    2011-03-01

    The triblock copolymer pluronic F68 belongs to a class of amphiphilic nonionic surfactants, relevant for applications in medicine, which includes transport of drugs to selective targets in the human body. In the present work, pluronic F68 films have been deposited on Si/SiO2 substrates. Previous to deposition, Si/SiO2 substrates were cleaned in acid and afterwards rinsed with ultra pure water. This cleaning method leaves intact the silicon oxide layer and provides a hydrophilic surface. The aliquots were prepared from aqueous solutions, obtaining different concentrations, which were deposited on the substrates and dried at room temperature. Each of these dispersions is in the range from 0.5 x 10-4 M to 10.0 x 10-4 M. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows changes in the morphology of the films, caused by the gradual increase of concentration. These changes occur in a narrow range of concentrations, attributed to the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Supramolecular structures (clusters) coexist at the CMC and above, forming 3D structures such as ``dendritics.'' The percentage of F68 coverage on the substrate depends on the increase in molar concentration. In a ``coverage vs. molar concentration'' plot we obtain a curve with an inflection point that coincides with the CMC reported for a variety of techniques and conditions.

  13. AFM characterization of spin coated carboxylated polystyrene nanospheres/xyloglucan layers on mica and silicon.

    PubMed

    Lubambo, Adriana F; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Petzhold, Cesar L; Sierakowski, Maria-R; Schreiner, Wido H; Saul, Cyro K

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled nano-arrays have a potential application as solid-phase diagnostics in many biomedical devices. The easiness of its production is directly connected to manufacture cost reduction. In this work, we present self-assembled structures starting from spin coated thin films of carboxylated polystyrene (PSC) and xyloglucan (XG) mixtures on both mica and silicon substrates. AFM images showed PSC nanospheres on top of a homogeneous layer of XG, for both substrates. The average nanosphere diameter fluctuated for a constant speed and it was likely to be independent of the component proportions on the mixture within a range of 30-50% (v/v) PSC. It was also observed that the largest diameters were found at the center of the sample and the smallest at the border. The detected nanospheres were also more numerous at the border. This behavior presents a similarity to spin coated colloidal dispersions. We observed that the average nanosphere diameter on mica substrates was bigger than the nanosphere diameters obtained on top of silicon substrates, under the same conditions. This result seems to be possibly connected to different mixture-surface interactions. PMID:23465925

  14. Adhesion of B. subtilis spores and vegetative cells onto stainless steel--DLVO theories and AFM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Zhong, Shaoping; Lim, Chwee-Teck; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (either as vegetative cells or as spores) and stainless steel 316 (SS-316) surfaces were quantified using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and extended DLVO (xDLVO) approach in conjunction with live force spectroscopy using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The xDLVO approach accounts for acid-base (polar) interactions that are not considered in the classical DLVO theory. AFM results revealed that spores manifested stronger attraction interactions to stainless steel compared to their vegetative cells counterparts due to lower energy barrier as predicted by both the theoretical approaches as well as the higher hydrophobicity on the spore surfaces. Both DLVO and xDLVO theories predict that vegetative cells manifest weaker attachment on the surfaces compared to spores. Results of AFM force measurement corroborate these findings; spores recorded significantly higher adhesion force (2.92±0.4 nN) compared to vegetative cells (0.65±0.2 nN). The adhesion of spores presents greater challenges in biofilm control owing to its stronger attachment and persistence when the spores are formed under adverse environmental conditions. PMID:23777862

  15. Adhesion of B. subtilis spores and vegetative cells onto stainless steel--DLVO theories and AFM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Zhong, Shaoping; Lim, Chwee-Teck; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (either as vegetative cells or as spores) and stainless steel 316 (SS-316) surfaces were quantified using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and extended DLVO (xDLVO) approach in conjunction with live force spectroscopy using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The xDLVO approach accounts for acid-base (polar) interactions that are not considered in the classical DLVO theory. AFM results revealed that spores manifested stronger attraction interactions to stainless steel compared to their vegetative cells counterparts due to lower energy barrier as predicted by both the theoretical approaches as well as the higher hydrophobicity on the spore surfaces. Both DLVO and xDLVO theories predict that vegetative cells manifest weaker attachment on the surfaces compared to spores. Results of AFM force measurement corroborate these findings; spores recorded significantly higher adhesion force (2.92±0.4 nN) compared to vegetative cells (0.65±0.2 nN). The adhesion of spores presents greater challenges in biofilm control owing to its stronger attachment and persistence when the spores are formed under adverse environmental conditions.

  16. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions. PMID:23721486

  17. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device.

    PubMed

    Abboud, A; Kirchlechner, C; Send, S; Micha, J S; Ulrich, O; Pashniak, N; Strüder, L; Keckes, J; Pietsch, U

    2014-11-01

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  18. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Pashniak, N.; Pietsch, U.; Kirchlechner, C.; Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-15

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots’ energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the “3D detector method” as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  19. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    atomic resolution, the investigation of near-surface electronic states, the quantification of adhesion forces, and the lateral mapping of surface potentials. The origin of energy dissipation, which is closely related to an in-depth understanding of tip-surface interactions and imaging mechanisms, was the subject of an ongoing discussion and addressed by various theoretical, computational, and experimental contributions. A characteristic of the NC-AFM conference series is the lively and friendly atmosphere, which year after year stimulates scientific discussions between the participants. This time, the programme included 5 invited talks, 84 contributed presentations, and 113 participants; furthermore, three educational lectures were given as part of a pre-conference workshop targeted at NC-AFM newcomers, which was attended by 30 participants. I would like to thank the members of the international steering committee and the programme committee for their continued effort in organizing the meeting. Special thanks go to the chair of the programme and local organizing committees S Fain and the conference manager J Kvamme for making the meeting a success. Financial support is acknowledged from the corporate sponsors MikroMasch USA, Nanonis GmbH, Nanosurf AG, Omicron Nanotechnology, PSIA, Inc., and RHK Technology, as well as from the institutional sponsors National Science Foundation and PNNL/UW Joint Institute for Nanoscience. Finally, I would like to express my gratitude to everyone who participated in assembling this special issue including the authors, the reviewers, and, in particular, the excellent and experienced journal team from the Institute of Physics Publishing headed by Nina Couzin, for devoting their time and efforts so that we could make this issue a useful representation of the progress in NC-AFM while maintaining our tight publication schedule. In conclusion, I would like to mention that the Seattle conference was the first one of the NC-AFM series that took

  20. SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force

  1. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of EUX3 (E=N, P, CH; X=H, F, Cl).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-10

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [EUX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of UN bond in [NUF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate UN vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP>revPBE>BP86>PW91>TPSS>PBE>M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the UE bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [EUX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [EUF3] to [EUCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for UE bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The UE bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-Ldispersion energy contributions to the total bond dissociation energies are rather small. Compared to the Grimme's D3(BJ) corrections, the Corminboeuf's dispersion corrections are larger with metaGGA functionals (TPSS, M06-L) while smaller with GGA functionals. PMID:25014545

  2. Pulsing frequency induced change in optical constants and dispersion energy parameters of WO3 films grown by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punitha, K.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we present the pulsing frequency induced change in the structural, optical, vibrational, and luminescence properties of tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films deposited on microscopic glass and fluorine doped tin oxide (SnO2:F) coated glass substrates by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering technique. The WO3 films deposited on SnO2:F substrate belongs to monoclinic phase. The pulsing frequency has a significant influence on the preferred orientation and crystallinity of WO3 film. The maximum optical transmittance of 85% was observed for the film and the slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with increasing pulsing frequency revealed the systematic reduction in optical energy band gap (3.78 to 3.13 eV) of the films. The refractive index (n) of films are found to decrease (1.832 to 1.333 at 550 nm) with increasing pulsing frequency and the average value of extinction coefficient (k) is in the order of 10-3. It was observed that the dispersion data obeyed the single oscillator of the Wemple-Didomenico model, from which the dispersion energy (Ed) parameters, dielectric constants, plasma frequency, oscillator strength, and oscillator energy (Eo) of WO3 films were calculated and reported for the first time due to variation in pulsing frequency during deposition by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The Eo is change between 6.30 and 3.88 eV, while the Ed varies from 25.81 to 7.88 eV, with pulsing frequency. The Raman peak observed at 1095 cm-1 attributes the presence of W-O symmetric stretching vibration. The slight shift in photoluminescence band is attributed to the difference in excitons transition. We have made an attempt to discuss and correlate these results with the light of possible mechanisms underlying the phenomena.

  3. Effects of density functionals and dispersion interactions on geometries, bond energies and harmonic frequencies of Etbnd UX3 (E = N, P, CH; X = H, F, Cl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Krishna Kumar; Patidar, Pankaj; Patidar, Sunil Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations have been performed to evaluate the geometries, bonding nature and harmonic frequencies of the compounds [Etbnd UX3] at DFT, DFT-D3, DFT-D3(BJ) and DFT-dDSc levels using different density functionals BP86, BLYP, PBE, revPBE, PW91, TPSS and M06-L. The stretching frequency of Utbnd N bond in [Ntbnd UF3] calculated with DFT/BLYP closely resembles with the experimental value. The performance of different density functionals for accurate Utbnd N vibrational frequencies follows the order BLYP > revPBE > BP86 > PW91 > TPSS > PBE > M06-L. The BLYP functional gives accurate value of the Utbnd E bond distances. The uranium atom in the studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] is positively charged. Upon going from [Etbnd UF3] to [Etbnd UCl3], the partial Hirshfeld charge on uranium atom decreases because of the lower electronegativity of chlorine compared to flourine. The Gopinathan-Jug bond order for Utbnd E bonds ranges from 2.90 to 3.29. The Utbnd E bond dissociation energies vary with different density functionals as M06-L < TPSS < BLYP < revPBE < BP86 < PBE ≈ PW91. The orbital interactions ΔEorb, in all studied compounds [Etbnd UX3] are larger than the electrostatic interaction ΔEelstat, which means the Utbnd N bonds in these compound have greater degree of covalent character (in the range 63.8-77.2%). The Usbnd E σ-bonding interaction is the dominant bonding interaction in the nitride and methylidyne complexes while it is weaker in [Ptbnd UX3]. The dispersion energy contributions to the total bond dissociation energies are rather small. Compared to the Grimme's D3(BJ) corrections, the Corminboeuf's dispersion corrections are larger with metaGGA functionals (TPSS, M06-L) while smaller with GGA functionals.

  4. Spin-wave energy dispersion of a frustrated spin-½ Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a stacked square lattice.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Kingshuk

    2011-03-23

    The effects of interlayer coupling and spatial anisotropy on the spin-wave excitation spectra of a three-dimensional spatially anisotropic, frustrated spin-½ Heisenberg antiferromagnet (HAFM) are investigated for the two ordered phases using second-order spin-wave expansion. We show that the second-order corrections to the spin-wave energies are significant and find that the energy spectra of the three-dimensional HAFM have similar qualitative features to the energy spectra of the two-dimensional HAFM on a square lattice. We also discuss the features that can provide experimental measures for the strength of the interlayer coupling, spatial anisotropy parameter, and magnetic frustration.

  5. Fabrication of electric papers of graphene nanosheet shelled cellulose fibres by dispersion and infiltration as flexible electrodes for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yan-Ru; Li, Ya-Li; Hou, Feng; Wen, Yang-Yang; Su, Dong

    2012-05-01

    An electrically conductive and electrochemically active composite paper of graphene nanosheet (GNS) coated cellulose fibres was fabricated via a simple paper-making process of dispersing chemically synthesized GNS into a cellulose pulp, followed by infiltration. The GNS nanosheet was deposited onto the cellulose fibers, forming a coating, during infiltration. It forms a continuous network through a bridge of interconnected cellulose fibres at small GNS loadings (3.2 wt%). The GNS/cellulose paper is as flexible and mechanically tough as the pure cellulose paper. The electrical measurements show the composite paper has a sheet resistance of 1063 Ω □-1 and a conductivity of 11.6 S m-1. The application of the composite paper as a flexible double layer supercapacitor in an organic electrolyte (LiPF6) displays a high capacity of 252 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 with respect to GNS. Moreover, the paper can be used as the anode in a lithium battery, showing distinct charge and discharge performances. The simple process for synthesising the GNS functionalized cellulose papers is attractive for the development of high performance papers for electrical, electrochemical and multifunctional applications.An electrically conductive and electrochemically active composite paper of graphene nanosheet (GNS) coated cellulose fibres was fabricated via a simple paper-making process of dispersing chemically synthesized GNS into a cellulose pulp, followed by infiltration. The GNS nanosheet was deposited onto the cellulose fibers, forming a coating, during infiltration. It forms a continuous network through a bridge of interconnected cellulose fibres at small GNS loadings (3.2 wt%). The GNS/cellulose paper is as flexible and mechanically tough as the pure cellulose paper. The electrical measurements show the composite paper has a sheet resistance of 1063 Ω □-1 and a conductivity of 11.6 S m-1. The application of the composite paper as a flexible double layer supercapacitor

  6. Development of high-energy amorphous solid dispersion of nanosized nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, with improved oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Uchida, Atsushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Seto, Yoshiki; Kawabata, Yohei; Ogawa, Kazunori; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2011-09-01

    Nobiletin (NOB), a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, attracts attention because of a wide range of pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammation, anticancer, and most notably ameliorative actions on memory impairment and β-amyloid pathology. However, clinical use of NOB could be partly limited due to its poor solubility and bioavailability, which might necessitate high doses in order to reach therapeutic plasma concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS) after oral administration. In the present study, amorphous solid dispersion (SD) of nanosized NOB (NOB/SD) was prepared by wet-milling technique with the aim of improving dissolution behavior and pharmacokinetic properties of NOB. Physicochemical properties of the NOB/SD were characterized with focus on surface morphology, particle size distribution, dissolution, and crystallinity assessment. Wet-milled NOB particles in NOB/SD appeared to be amorphous with a diameter of approximately 270 nm, and there was marked improvement in the dissolution behavior compared with that of crystalline NOB. After oral administration of NOB/SD, higher exposure of NOB was observed with increases of bioavailability and CNS distribution by 13- and sevenfold, respectively, compared with those of crystalline NOB. These findings suggest that an amorphous, nanosized SD could be a viable option for enhancing the bioavailability and CNS delivery of NOB.

  7. Fabrication of electric papers of graphene nanosheet shelled cellulose fibres by dispersion and infiltration as flexible electrodes for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Ru; Li, Ya-Li; Hou, Feng; Wen, Yang-Yang; Su, Dong

    2012-05-21

    An electrically conductive and electrochemically active composite paper of graphene nanosheet (GNS) coated cellulose fibres was fabricated via a simple paper-making process of dispersing chemically synthesized GNS into a cellulose pulp, followed by infiltration. The GNS nanosheet was deposited onto the cellulose fibers, forming a coating, during infiltration. It forms a continuous network through a bridge of interconnected cellulose fibres at small GNS loadings (3.2 wt%). The GNS/cellulose paper is as flexible and mechanically tough as the pure cellulose paper. The electrical measurements show the composite paper has a sheet resistance of 1063 Ω□(-1) and a conductivity of 11.6 S m(-1). The application of the composite paper as a flexible double layer supercapacitor in an organic electrolyte (LiPF(6)) displays a high capacity of 252 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) with respect to GNS. Moreover, the paper can be used as the anode in a lithium battery, showing distinct charge and discharge performances. The simple process for synthesising the GNS functionalized cellulose papers is attractive for the development of high performance papers for electrical, electrochemical and multifunctional applications.

  8. Fabrication of electric papers of graphene nanosheet shelled cellulose fibres by dispersion and infiltration as flexible electrodes for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Ru; Li, Ya-Li; Hou, Feng; Wen, Yang-Yang; Su, Dong

    2012-05-21

    An electrically conductive and electrochemically active composite paper of graphene nanosheet (GNS) coated cellulose fibres was fabricated via a simple paper-making process of dispersing chemically synthesized GNS into a cellulose pulp, followed by infiltration. The GNS nanosheet was deposited onto the cellulose fibers, forming a coating, during infiltration. It forms a continuous network through a bridge of interconnected cellulose fibres at small GNS loadings (3.2 wt%). The GNS/cellulose paper is as flexible and mechanically tough as the pure cellulose paper. The electrical measurements show the composite paper has a sheet resistance of 1063 Ω□(-1) and a conductivity of 11.6 S m(-1). The application of the composite paper as a flexible double layer supercapacitor in an organic electrolyte (LiPF(6)) displays a high capacity of 252 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) with respect to GNS. Moreover, the paper can be used as the anode in a lithium battery, showing distinct charge and discharge performances. The simple process for synthesising the GNS functionalized cellulose papers is attractive for the development of high performance papers for electrical, electrochemical and multifunctional applications. PMID:22535335

  9. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  10. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  11. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  12. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  13. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  14. Ionic Liquids as a Reference Material Candidate for the Quick Performance Check of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometers for the Low Energy Range below 1 keV

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are proposed as simple and efficient test materials to evaluate the performance of energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS) in the low energy range below 1 keV. By only one measurement, C Kα, N Kα, O Kα, and F Kα X-ray lines can be excited. Additionally, the S Kα line at 2.3 keV and, particularly, the S L series at 149 eV complete the picture with X-ray lines offered by the selected ILs. The well-known (certifiable) elemental composition of the ILs selected in the present study can be used to check the accuracy of results produced with the available EDS quantification routines in the low energy range, simultaneously, for several low atomic number elements. A comparison with other reference materials in use for testing the performance of EDS in the low energy range is included. PMID:27336962

  15. Use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDXA) in identification of foreign material on bullets.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, V J; Dana, S E; Taylor, W E; Ondrusek, J

    1987-01-01

    The authors report two cases in which examination of foreign material embedded in or adherent to bullets provided critical information in the reconstruction of a crime scene. Analysis of small particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) can be accomplished without destruction or injury of the particles. In one case, the detection and identification of mineral fragments embedded near the nose of a bullet provided conclusive evidence that the bullet had ricocheted from a fireplace before striking the victim. In the second case, analysis of particles from two bullets identified them as them as bone fragments, thus proving which shots fired from a police officer's gun had killed a suspected burglar. SEM-EDXA has not been widely used to identify such material on bullets, but should be considered a potentially powerful tool in forensic science. PMID:3819687

  16. A false report of product tampering involving a rodent and soft drink can: light microscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Platek, F; Ranieri, N; Wolnik, K A

    1997-11-01

    The "Pepsi Tamperings" of 1993 resulted in a large number of cases involving foreign objects reportedly found inside canned soft drinks. Although the majority of cases involved medical syringes and metallic objects, one case involved the report of a mouse found inside a can of Caffeine-Free Diet Pepsi. Using light and polarized light microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis, trace evidence and tooth structure from the suspect mouse were matched to scratches and indentions on the suspect can. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were used to compare and match particles of gnawed metal from the lid of the suspect can to other particles recovered from the muzzle and stomach of the suspect mouse. The forensic analyses in this case proved the mouse could not have been canned in the soft drink product and refuted the defendant's sworn statements.

  17. Effects of Pamidronate on Dental Enamel Formation Assessed by Light Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Microhardness Testing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana P; do Espírito Santo, Renan F; Line, Sérgio R P; Pinto, Maria das G F; Santos, Pablo de M; Toralles, Maria Betania P; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory-stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical properties of mature enamel of upper incisors from adult rats that had been treated with pamidronate disodium (0.5 mg/kg/week for 56 days), using transmitted polarizing and bright-field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness testing. BFLM showed no morphological changes of the EOECM in pamidronate and control groups, but TPLM revealed a statistically significant reduction in optical retardation values of birefringence brightness of pamidronate-treated rats when compared with control animals (p0.05). The present study indicates that pamidronate can affect birefringence of the secretory-stage EOECM, which does not seem to be associated with significant changes in morphological and/or mechanical properties of mature enamel. PMID:27212049

  18. Effects of Pamidronate on Dental Enamel Formation Assessed by Light Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Microhardness Testing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana P; do Espírito Santo, Renan F; Line, Sérgio R P; Pinto, Maria das G F; Santos, Pablo de M; Toralles, Maria Betania P; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory-stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical properties of mature enamel of upper incisors from adult rats that had been treated with pamidronate disodium (0.5 mg/kg/week for 56 days), using transmitted polarizing and bright-field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness testing. BFLM showed no morphological changes of the EOECM in pamidronate and control groups, but TPLM revealed a statistically significant reduction in optical retardation values of birefringence brightness of pamidronate-treated rats when compared with control animals (p0.05). The present study indicates that pamidronate can affect birefringence of the secretory-stage EOECM, which does not seem to be associated with significant changes in morphological and/or mechanical properties of mature enamel.

  19. Liver concentrations of copper, zinc, iron and molybdenum in sheep and goats from northern Greece, determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papachristodoulou, Christina; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Tsakos, Panagiotis; Vougidou, Christina; Vozikis, Vasileios; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Ioannides, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc, iron and molybdenum in the liver of 76 sheep and goats from the regions of Macedonia-Thrace, northern Greece. In general, metal concentrations were in the adequate range, with one main exception of Cu-deficiency observed in all of the examined goat liver samples and Cu-toxicity found in 4 % of the sheep liver samples. One-way analysis of variance was carried out to determine significant differences among means depending on animal species, sex and age. Pearson correlation analysis was used to explore correlations between metal concentrations. The results obtained in the present study are discussed in the framework of diagnostic ranges, suggested for classifying the metal status of sheep and goats, and are compared with liver metal concentrations reported world-wide.

  20. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2014-05-01

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ˜0.9 nms-1. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  1. Liver concentrations of copper, zinc, iron and molybdenum in sheep and goats from northern Greece, determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papachristodoulou, Christina; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Tsakos, Panagiotis; Vougidou, Christina; Vozikis, Vasileios; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy; Ioannides, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of copper (Cu), zinc, iron and molybdenum in the liver of 76 sheep and goats from the regions of Macedonia-Thrace, northern Greece. In general, metal concentrations were in the adequate range, with one main exception of Cu-deficiency observed in all of the examined goat liver samples and Cu-toxicity found in 4 % of the sheep liver samples. One-way analysis of variance was carried out to determine significant differences among means depending on animal species, sex and age. Pearson correlation analysis was used to explore correlations between metal concentrations. The results obtained in the present study are discussed in the framework of diagnostic ranges, suggested for classifying the metal status of sheep and goats, and are compared with liver metal concentrations reported world-wide. PMID:25694162

  2. Remineralization of demineralized enamel by toothpastes: a scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and three-dimensional stereo-micrographic study.

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta S; Nicholson, John W; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija M

    2013-06-01

    Remineralization of hard dental tissues is thought to be a tool that could close the gap between prevention and surgical procedures in clinical dentistry. The purpose of this study was to examine the remineralizing potential of different toothpaste formulations: toothpastes containing bioactive glass, hydroxyapatite, or strontium acetate with fluoride, when applied to demineralized enamel. Results obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SEM/energy dispersive X-ray analyses proved that the hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass-containing toothpastes were highly efficient in promoting enamel remineralization by formation of deposits and a protective layer on the surface of the demineralized enamel, whereas the toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate and 1040 ppm fluoride as NaF had little, if any, remineralization potential. In conclusion, the treatment of demineralized teeth with toothpastes containing hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass resulted in repair of the damaged tissue. PMID:23659606

  3. Analysis of Catalonian silver coins from the Spanish War of Independence period (1808-1814) by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, A.; Queralt, I.; Alvarez-Perez, A.

    2011-02-01

    Between the years 1808 and 1814, the Spanish War of Independence took place. This period, locally known as "Guerra del Francès", generated the need for money and consequently five mints were opened around the Catalan territory. To mark the 200th anniversary of the beginning of the war, an extensive campaign of Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence measurements of some of these "emergency coins" was carried out. Apart from the silver (major constituent of all the studied coins) it has been possible to recognize copper as main metal alloying element. Likewise, the presence of zinc, tin, lead, gold, platinum, antimony, nickel and iron has been also identified. The obtained results have been useful not only for the characterization of the alloys, but also to determine the differences and analogies between the emissions and for historical explanations.

  4. An in situ synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction study of the hydration of oilwell cement systems under high temperature/autoclave conditions up to 130 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, Sally L.; Barnes, Paul . E-mail: p.barnes@bbk.ac.uk; Jupe, Andrew C.; Jacques, Simon D.M.; Hall, Christopher; Livesey, Paul; Dransfield, John; Meller, Nicola; Maitland, Geoffrey C.

    2005-12-15

    The technique of synchrotron energy dispersive diffraction has been developed for in situ studies of cement hydration under autoclave conditions. This has been applied to oilwell cements hydrating at typical oilwell temperatures up to 130 deg. C. The results show clearly the detailed interplay between 11 detectable phases, from which a phase transformation scheme has been derived; this illustrates the progression of hydration up to 130 deg. C for two extreme cases, with and without conservation of water content and autoclave pressure. The monosulphate hydrate phases are found to exhibit different stability bounds, with a surprising sequence of the 14-water, 10-water then 12-water monosulphate as temperature/time increases; the latter form is particularly associated with conditions of water/pressure loss. The effect of retarders on C{sub 3}S dissolution and CH formation is negligible above 70 deg. C, whereas the effect on the calcium sulphoaluminate hydrates is more complex, and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  5. Determination of heavy metals in suspended waste water collected from Oued El Harrach Algiers River by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouziane, S.; Amokrane, A.; Toumert, I.

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary study of the atmospheric pollution in the centre of Algiers is one of the important fields of applications in the environmental science. Nowadays, we need to evaluate the level of the contamination which has an unfavourable effect on physicochemical properties of soils and plants and namely also on human health. In the present work, water samples collected from Oued El-Harrach Algiers River, have been filtered in 0.45 μm Millipore filters to be analysed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence technique using 109Cd radioisotope source. Concentrations of the toxic elements like heavy metals are determined and compared with the published ones values by Yoshida [1] and those obtained using PIXE and NAA techniques [6].

  6. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2014-05-15

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ∼0.9 nms{sup −1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  7. Airborne particles in the Miyagi Museum of Art in Sendai, Japan, studied by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Injuk, Jasna; Osán, Janos; Van Grieken, René; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2002-05-01

    The presented work provides baseline data on the existing airborne conditions in the Miyagi Museum of Art in Sendai, Japan, during the summer of 2000. The chemical composition, size and indoor and outdoor origin of the suspended particulate matter were identified using a number of advanced X-ray techniques, such as Electron Probe X-Ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (EDXRF). Our results, to the best of our knowledge, represent the first detailed study of the chemical nature of the indoor particulate matter in a Japanese museum and, as such, may contribute to future improvements of the air quality inside museums and to the lasting conservation of works of art.

  8. Characterization of Japanese color sticks by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Valadas, S.; Pessanha, S.; Guilherme, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    This work comprises the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques for the study of the composition of twentieth century traditional Japanese color sticks. By using the combination of analytical techniques it was possible to obtain information on inorganic and organic pigments, binders and fillers present in the sticks. The colorant materials identified in the sticks were zinc and titanium white, chrome yellow, yellow and red ochre, vermillion, alizarin, indigo, Prussian and synthetic ultramarine blue. The results also showed that calcite and barite were used as inorganic mineral fillers while Arabic gum was the medium used. EDXRF offered great potential for such investigations since it allowed the identification of the elements present in the sample preserving its integrity. However, this information alone was not enough to clearly identify some of the materials in study and therefore it was necessary to use XRD and FTIR techniques.

  9. Oxide dispersion strengthened steel irradiation with helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouchon, M. A.; Chen, J.; Döbeli, M.; Hoffelner, W.

    2006-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are investigated as possible structural material for the future generation of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors. ODS-steels are considered to replace other high temperature materials for tubing or structural parts. The oxide particles serve for interfacial pinning of moving dislocations. Therefore, the creep resistance is improved. In case of the usage of these materials in reactors, the behavior under irradiation must be further clarified. In this paper the effects induced by 4He2+ implantation into a ferritic ODS steel are investigated. The fluence ranges from 1016 to 1017 cm-2 and the energy from 1 to 2 MeV. The induced swelling is investigated for implantations at room temperature and 470 K. It is derived from the irradiation induced surface displacement, which is measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM). With a displacement damage of 0.6 dpa, a volume increase of 0.65% is observed at room temperature and 0.33% at 470 K. A cross-sectional cut is performed by focused ion beam and investigated by transmission electron microcopy (TEM). The defect density observed on the TEM micrographs agrees well with the computational simulation (TRIM) of the damage profile.

  10. Conductive probe AFM measurements of conjugated molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Mizutani, Wataru; Liang, Tien-Tzu; Azehara, Hiroaki; Miyake, Koji; Sasaki, Shinya; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    The electrical conduction of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made from conjugated molecules was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), with a focus on the molecular structural effect on conduction. First, the electrical conduction of SAMs made from phenylene oligomer SAMs was measured. The resistances through the monolayers increased exponentially with an increase in molecular length and the decay constants of transconductance beta were about 0.45 to 0.61 A(-1) measured at lower bias region. We further investigated the influence of applied load on the resistances. The resistances through terphenyl SAMs increased with an increase in the applied load up to 14 nN. Second, using an insertion technique into insulating alkanethiol SAMs, the electrical conduction of single conjugated terphenyl methanethiol and oligo(para-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) molecules embedded into insulating alkanethiol SAMs were measured. Electrical currents through these single molecules of OPVs were estimated to be larger than those through single terphenyl molecules, suggesting that the OPV structure can increase the electrical conduction of single molecules. Third, apparent negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed at higher bias measurements of SAMs. The appearance of NDR might be related to roughness of SAM surface, because apparent NDR was often observed on rough surfaces. In any case, the tip-molecule contact condition strongly affected carrier transport through metal tip/SAM/metal junction.

  11. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  12. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  15. High-Energy-Density Fuel Blending Strategies and Drop Dispersion for Fuel Cost Reduction and Soot Propensity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1998-01-01

    The idea that low soot propensity of high-energy-density (HED) liquid sooting fuels and cost reduction of a multicomponent energetic fuel can be achieved by doping a less expensive, less sooting liquid fuel with HED is tested through numerical simulations.

  16. Electrostatic Dispersion and Evaporation of Dense and Dilute Clusters of Drops of High-Energy Fuel For Soot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Harstad, K.

    1997-01-01

    The high-energy-density (HED) fuels developed under U.S. Navy sponsorship as a replacement for conventional liquid fuels, in its missile propulsion systems have the drawback of high soot propensity: this makes misiles visible and thus strategically unacceptabel.

  17. The Analysis of Particles at Low Accelerating Voltages (≤ 10 kV) With Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS).

    PubMed

    Small, J A

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, there have been a series of advancements in electron beam instruments and x-ray detectors which may make it possible to improve significantly the quality of results from the quantitative electron-probe analysis of individual particles. These advances include: (1) field-emission gun electron beam instruments such as scanning electron microscopes (FEG-SEMs) that have high brightness electron guns with excellent performance at low beam energies, E 0 ≤ 10 keV and (2) high-resolution energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometers, like the microcalorimeter detector, that provide high-resolution (< 10 eV) parallel x-ray collection. These devices make it possible to separate low energy (< 4 keV) x-ray lines including the K lines of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen and the L and M lines for elements with atomic numbers in the range of 25 to 83. In light of these advances, this paper investigates the possibility of using accelerating voltages ≤ 10 kV, as a method to improve the accuracy of elemental analysis for micrometer-sized particles.

  18. Misidentification of Major Constituents by Automatic Qualitative Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis: A Problem that Threatens the Credibility of the Analytical Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury*, Dale E.

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium rhodium alloys, platinum chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, K[alpha] (K-L2,3) K[beta] (K-M2,3); L[alpha] (L3-M4,5) L[beta] (L2-M4) L[gamma] (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur.

  19. Porous titania films fabricated via sol gel rout - Optical and AFM characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasiński, Paweł; Gondek, Ewa; Drewniak, Sabina; Kajzer, Anita; Waczyńska-Niemiec, Natalia; Basiaga, Marcin; Izydorczyk, Weronika; Kouari, Youssef E. L.

    2016-06-01

    Mesoporous titania films of low refractive index ∼1.72 and thickness within the range of 57-96 nm were fabricated via sol-gel rout and dip-coating technique on a soda-lime glass substrate. Tetrabutylorthotitanate Ti(OBu)4 was used as a titania precursor. High porosity and consequently low refractive index were achieved using the polyethylene glycol (PEG 1100) as a template. Based on transmittance, using Tauc's relations, the optical energy band gaps and the Urbach energy were determined. The research shows that in the fabricated titania films there are two types of optical energy band gaps, connected with direct and indirect electron transitions and brought about by the presence of amorphous and crystalline phase respectively. Based on the quantum size effect, the diameters of nanocrystals versus film thickness were determined. AFM studies of the titania films have demonstrated that there are changes of surface morphology taking place with the change of thickness. We have demonstrated that the surface morphology of titania films has influence on wettability.

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPILLED OILS, FUELS, AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS: 2A. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS DATA FOR A SUITE OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS - THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE, VOLATILIZATION, AND ENERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical dispersants are used in oil spill response operations to enhance the dispersion of oil slicks at sea as small oil droplets in the water column. To assess the impacts of dispersant usage on oil spills, US EPA is developing a simulation model called the EPA Research Object...

  1. Probing molecular interaction in ionic liquids by low frequency spectroscopy: Coulomb energy, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Fumino, Koichi; Reimann, Sebastian; Ludwig, Ralf

    2014-10-28

    Ionic liquids are defined as salts composed solely of ions with melting points below 100 °C. These remarkable liquids have unique and fascinating properties and offer new opportunities for science and technology. New combinations of ions provide changing physical properties and thus novel potential applications for this class of liquid materials. To a large extent, the structure and properties of ionic liquids are determined by the intermolecular interaction between anions and cations. In this perspective we show that far infrared and terahertz spectroscopy are suitable methods for studying the cation-anion interaction in these Coulomb fluids. The interpretation of the measured low frequency spectra is supported by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. We present results for selected aprotic and protic ionic liquids and their mixtures with molecular solvents. In particular, we focus on the strength and type of intermolecular interaction and how both parameters are influenced by the character of the ions and their combinations. We show that the total interaction between cations and anions is a result of a subtle balance between Coulomb forces, hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces. For protic ionic liquids we could measure distinct vibrational modes in the low frequency spectra indicating clearly the cation-anion interaction characterized by linear and medium to strong hydrogen bonds. Using isotopic substitution we have been able to dissect frequency shifts related to pure interaction strength between cations and anions and to different reduced masses only. In this context we also show how these different types of interaction may influence the physical properties of ionic liquids such as the melting point, viscosity or enthalpy of vaporization. Furthermore we demonstrate that low frequency spectroscopy can also be used for studying ion speciation. Low vibrational features can be assigned to contact ion pairs and solvent separated

  2. Dissolution of uranophane: An AFM, XPS, SEM and ICP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Michael; Freund, Michael; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Burns, Peter C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2009-05-01

    Dissolution experiments on single crystals of uranophane and uranophane-β, Ca(H 2O) 5[(UO 2)(SiO 3(OH)] 2, from the Shinkolobwe mine of the Democratic Republic of Congo, were done in an aqueous HCl solution of pH 3.5 for 3 h, in HCl solutions of pH 2 for 5, 10 and 30 min, and in Pb 2+-, Ba-, Sr-, Ca- and Mg-HCl solutions of pH 2 for 30 min. The basal surfaces of the treated uranophane crystals were examined using atomic-force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solutions after dissolution experiments on single crystals and synthetic powders were analysed with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The morphology of the observed etch pits (measured by AFM) were compared to the morphology, predicted on the basis of the bond-valence deficiency of polyhedron chains along the edges of the basal surface. Etch pits form in HCl solutions of pH 2. Their decrease in depth with the duration of the dissolution experiment is explained with the stepwave dissolution model, which describes the lowering of the surrounding area of an etch pit with continuous waves of steps emanated from the etch pit into the rest of the crystal surface. Hillocks form in an HCl solution of pH 3.5, and the chemical composition of the surface (as indicated by XPS) shows that these hillocks are the result of the precipitation of a uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phase. Well-orientated hillocks form on the surface of uranophane in a SrCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2. They are part of an aged silica coating of composition Si 2O 2(OH) 4(H 2O) n. An amorphous layer forms on the surface of uranophane in a MgCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2, which has a composition and structure similar to silicic acid. Small crystallites of uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phases form on the surface of uranophane after treatment in Pb(NO 3) 2-HCl and BaCl 2-HCl solutions of pH 2. Dissolution experiments on synthetic uranophane powders

  3. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  4. Probing Ternary Solvent Effect in High V(oc) Polymer Solar Cells Using Advanced AFM Techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ding, Yi; Soliman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton V; Gesquiere, Andre J; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high V(oc) low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with V(oc) more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor-acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Finally, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing. PMID:26807919

  5. Pulsing frequency induced change in optical constants and dispersion energy parameters of WO{sub 3} films grown by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Punitha, K.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-03-21

    In this work, we present the pulsing frequency induced change in the structural, optical, vibrational, and luminescence properties of tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films deposited on microscopic glass and fluorine doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}:F) coated glass substrates by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering technique. The WO{sub 3} films deposited on SnO{sub 2}:F substrate belongs to monoclinic phase. The pulsing frequency has a significant influence on the preferred orientation and crystallinity of WO{sub 3} film. The maximum optical transmittance of 85% was observed for the film and the slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region with increasing pulsing frequency revealed the systematic reduction in optical energy band gap (3.78 to 3.13 eV) of the films. The refractive index (n) of films are found to decrease (1.832 to 1.333 at 550 nm) with increasing pulsing frequency and the average value of extinction coefficient (k) is in the order of 10{sup −3}. It was observed that the dispersion data obeyed the single oscillator of the Wemple-Didomenico model, from which the dispersion energy (E{sub d}) parameters, dielectric constants, plasma frequency, oscillator strength, and oscillator energy (E{sub o}) of WO{sub 3} films were calculated and reported for the first time due to variation in pulsing frequency during deposition by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The E{sub o} is change between 6.30 and 3.88 eV, while the E{sub d} varies from 25.81 to 7.88 eV, with pulsing frequency. The Raman peak observed at 1095 cm{sup −1} attributes the presence of W-O symmetric stretching vibration. The slight shift in photoluminescence band is attributed to the difference in excitons transition. We have made an attempt to discuss and correlate these results with the light of possible mechanisms underlying the phenomena.

  6. Quantifying Energy-Time Dispersion of Relativistic Electron Microbursts to Constrain Their Generation Mechanism: Coordinated Studies Using FIREBIRD, Van Allen Probes, and BARREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Crew, A. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Klumpar, D. M.; Larsen, B.; Millan, R. M.; Miyoshi, Y.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Reeves, G. D.; Smith, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we quantify properties of relativistic electron precipitation at low altitudes in order to constrain the mechanism(s) for microburst loss occurring in Earth's radiation belt. Though studied for decades, the physical mechanism(s) responsible for the loss of radiation belt particles through microburst precipitation to the atmosphere remains uncertain, and, unquantified in a global sense. Accordingly, we appeal to new measurements from the NSF FIREBIRD (Focused Investigation of Relativistic Electron Burst Intensity Range and Dynamics) mission. FIREBIRD comprises two 1.5U CubeSats launched in early 2015 into identical coplanar polar low altitude orbits; a small spring imparted a slow separation between the two spacecraft upon orbit insertion. Over the course of the mission, the orbits of the two identically-instrumented spacecraft slowly evolve, sampling spatial scales of electron precipitation measured simultaneously at separations of 10's to 1000's of kilometers. FIREBIRD provides electron energy spectra from ~250 keV to > 1MeV, with both high spectral resolution (6 to 12 energy channels) and high temporal resolution (principally operated at ~18 millisecond sampling). To do so, FIREBIRD employs two solid-state detectors on each CubeSat, one an uncollimated detector with a large geometric factor (optimized for weak events) and the other a collimated detector (optimized for intense events). While the primary goal of FIREBIRD is to establish the spatial/temporal coherence of microburst precipitation, it also provides the capability of quantifying on each spacecraft the dispersive properties of microbursts. In this work, we report on the energy-time dispersive qualities of individual bursts, which in turn provide a means for testing models and constraining where and how the bursts are generated. To test these models, we use measurements made near the magnetic equator by the Van Allen Probes mission during times when the two FIREBIRD and two Van Allen

  7. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  8. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm2 presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 μm, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues.

  9. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Anto Nia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2009-01-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80x60 points with steps of 20 mum were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the CaP ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  10. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Soares, Luís Eduardo; Do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima Antônia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abraha~O.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80×60 points with steps of 20 μm were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the Ca/P ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  11. High-throughput and time-resolved energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) study of the formation of CAU-1-(OH)2: microwave and conventional heating.

    PubMed

    Ahnfeldt, Tim; Moellmer, Jens; Guillerm, Vincent; Staudt, Reiner; Serre, Christian; Stock, Norbert

    2011-05-27

    Aluminium dihydroxyterephthalate [Al(8)(OH)(4)(OCH(3))(8)(BDC(OH)(2))(6)]⋅x H(2)O (denoted CAU-1-(OH)(2)) was synthesized under solvothermal conditions and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, IR spectroscopy, sorption measurements, as well as thermogravimetric and elemental analysis. CAU-1-(OH)(2) is isoreticular to CAU-1 and its pores are lined with OH groups. It is stable under ambient conditions and in water, and it exhibits permanent porosity and two types of cavities with effective diameters of approximately 1 and 0.45 nm. The crystallization of CAU-1-(OH)(2) was studied by in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) experiments in the 120-145 °C temperature range. Two heating methods-conventional and microwave-were investigated. The latter leads to shorter induction periods as well as shorter reaction times. Whereas CAU-1-(OH)(2) is formed at all investigated temperatures using conventional heating, it is only observed below 130 °C using microwave heating. The calculation of the activation energy of the crystallization of CAU-1-(OH)(2) exhibits similar values for microwave and conventional synthesis.

  12. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  13. Light dispersion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    Considering an idea of F. Arago in 1853 regarding light dispersion through the light ether in the interstellar space, this paper presents a new idea on an alternative interpretation of the cosmological red shift of the galaxies in the universe. The model is based on an analogy with the temporal material dispersion that occurs with light in the optical fiber core. Since intergalactic space is transparent, according to the model, this phenomenon is related to the gravitational potential existing in the whole space. Thus, it is possible to find a new interpretation to Hubble's constant. In space, light undergoes a dispersion process in its path, which is interpreted by a red shift equation of the type Δz = HL, since H = (d2n/dλ2 Δv Δλ), where H means the Hubble constant, n is the refractive index of the intergalactic space, Δλ is the spectral width of the extragalactic source, and Δv is the variation of the speed of light caused by the gravitational potential. We observe that this "constant" is governed by three new parameters. Light traveling the intergalactic space undergoes red shift due to this mechanism, while light amplitude decreases with time, and the wavelength always increases, thus producing the same type of behavior given by Hubble's Law. It can be demonstrated that the dark matter phenomenon is produced by the apparent speed of light of the stars on the periphery of the galaxies, without the existence of dark energy. Based on this new idea, the model of the universe is static, lacking expansion. Other phenomena may be interpreted based on this new model of the universe. We have what we call temporal gravitational dispersion of light in space produced by the variations of the speed of light, due to the presence of the gravitational potential in the whole space.

  14. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  15. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters. PMID:26412415

  16. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters.

  17. Inhibition of cold rolled steel corrosion by Tween-20 in sulfuric acid: weight loss, electrochemical and AFM approaches.

    PubMed

    Mu, Guannan; Li, Xianghong

    2005-09-01

    The inhibiting action of a nonionic surfactant of Tween-20 on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 0.5-7.0 M sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) was studied by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Atomic force microscope (AFM) provided the surface conditions. The results show that inhibition efficiency increases with the inhibitor concentration, while it decreases with the sulfuric acid concentration. The adsorption of inhibitor on the cold rolled steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. Effect of immersion time was studied and discussed. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of cold rolled steel was also studied at four temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 degrees C, the thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption heat, adsorption free energy, and adsorption entropy were calculated. The results revealed that the adsorption was physisorption mechanism. A kinetic study of cold rolled steel in uninhibited and inhibited acid was also discussed. The kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, rate constant, and reaction constant were calculated for the reactions of corrosion. The inhibition effect is satisfactorily explained by both thermodynamic and kinetic models. Polarization curves show that Tween-20 is a cathodic-type inhibitor in sulfuric acid. The results obtained from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization are in good agreement, and the Tween-20 inhibition action could also be evidenced by surface AFM images.

  18. Identifying individual chemical bonds in single-molecule chemical reaction products using nc-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; de Oteyza, Dimas G.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Riss, Alexander; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Gorman, Patrick; Etkin, Grisha; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Perez, Alejandro; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F.; Fischer, Felix R.

    2014-03-01

    Determining reaction pathways and products is an integral part of chemical synthesis. Ensemble measurements are commonly used, but identifying products of complex reactions at surfaces presents a significant challenge. Here we present a non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) study to directly address this issue. We followed the change of the chemical structures, from reactants to products of enediyne cyclization reactions on metal surfaces. Thermal annealing of enediynes induced a series of cyclization cascades leading to radical species and the formation of dimers. Atomically resolved nc-AFM images reveal the precise chemical structure and the formation of chemical bonds between single molecular units. With the support of DFT calculations, we identified the underlying chemical pathways and barriers, demonstrating the potential of this atomically resolved AFM technique to study unknown reaction products in surface chemistry at the single-molecule level.

  19. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  20. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  1. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  2. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  3. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  4. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  5. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  6. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Musawi, R. S. J.; Brousseau, E. B.; Geng, Y.; Borodich, F. M.

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves.

  7. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  8. Fabrication of carbon nanotube AFM probes using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kang, Won-Seok; Choi, Bung-Sam; Choi, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have shown a significant potential for obtaining high-resolution imaging of nanostructure and biological materials. In this paper, we report a simple method to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanoprobes for AFM using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Thiophenyl-modified SWNTs (SWNT-SHs) through amidation of SWNTs in chloroform allowed to be spread and form a stable Langmuir monolayer at the water/air interface. A simple two-step transfer process was used: (1) dipping conventional AFM probes into the Langmuir monolayer and (2) lifting the probes from the water surface. This results in the attachment of SWNTs onto the tips of AFM nanoprobes. We found that the SWNTs assembled on the nanoprobes were well-oriented and robust enough to maintain their shape and direction even after successive scans. AFM measurements of a nano-porous alumina substrate and deoxyribonucleic acid using SWNT-modified nanoprobes revealed that the curvature diameter of the nanoprobes was less than 3 nm and a fine resolution was obtained than that from conventional AFM probes. We also demonstrate that the LB method is a scalable process capable of simultaneously fabricating a large number of SWNT-modified nanoprobes.

  9. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  10. Surface change of root canal dentin after the use of irrigation activation protocols: electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Capar, Ismail Davut; Aydinbelge, Hale Ari

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluated the mineral contents of root-canal dentin after treatment with different irrigation activation protocols. One hundred and eight maxillary lateral incisor teeth were randomly divided into eight experimental groups and one control group. Root canals were prepared using ProTaper rotary files, with the exception of the Self-Adjusting File (SAF) group. Canals were irrigated with 2 mL of 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) at each instrument change, and received a final flush with 10 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 10 mL of 5% NaOCl for 1 min. The control group was irrigated with distilled water. Group I (GI): Needle syringe irrigation; Group II (GII): NaviTip FX; Group III (GIII): CanalBrush; Group IV (GIV): Manual dynamic activation with gutta-percha; Group V (GV): Passive ultrasonic irrigation; Group VI (GVI): EndoActivator; Group VII (GVII): EndoVac; Group VIII (GVIII): SAF. The level of elemental composition was analyzed by a scanning electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) system. The results were then statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Ca/P ratio was changed after treatment with SAF and EndoActivator. The Ca, P, Mg, and S level changes were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Final irrigation activation protocols did not alter the mineral level of root dentin surface.

  11. Design of exceptionally strong and conductive Cu alloys beyond the conventional speculation via the interfacial energy-controlled dispersion of γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeon Han, Seung; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kang, Joonhee; Joh, Hongrae; Kim, Sang Min; Ahn, Jee Hyuk; Lee, Jehyun; Lim, Sung Hwan; Han, Byungchan

    2015-01-01

    The development of Cu-based alloys with high-mechanical properties (strength, ductility) and electrical conductivity plays a key role over a wide range of industrial applications. Successful design of the materials, however, has been rare due to the improvement of mutually exclusive properties as conventionally speculated. In this paper, we demonstrate that these contradictory material properties can be improved simultaneously if the interfacial energies of heterogeneous interfaces are carefully controlled. We uniformly disperse γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles over Cu matrix, and then we controlled atomic level morphology of the interface γ-Al2O3//Cu by adding Ti solutes. It is shown that the Ti dramatically drives the interfacial phase transformation from very irregular to homogeneous spherical morphologies resulting in substantial enhancement of the mechanical property of Cu matrix. Furthermore, the Ti removes impurities (O and Al) in the Cu matrix by forming oxides leading to recovery of the electrical conductivity of pure Cu. We validate experimental results using TEM and EDX combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which all consistently poise that our materials are suitable for industrial applications. PMID:26616045

  12. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous and Nonosseous Materials Using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and Multivariate Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    Identification of osseous materials is generally established on gross anatomical features. However, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic and may require chemical analysis. This research was designed to assess the use of scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), elemental analysis, and multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis) for discrimination of osseous and nonosseous materials of similar chemical composition. Sixty samples consisting of osseous (human and nonhuman bone and dental) and non-osseous samples were assessed. After outliers were removed a high overall correct classification of 97.97% was achieved, with 99.86% correct classification for osseous materials. In addition, a blind study was conducted using 20 samples to assess the applicability for using this method to classify unknown materials. All of the blind study samples were correctly classified resulting in 100% correct classification, further demonstrating the efficiency of SEM/EDX and statistical analysis for differentiation of osseous and nonosseous materials. PMID:26234321

  13. A standards-based method for compositional analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using multivariate statistical analysis: application to multicomponent alloys.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Monika; Ahrenkiel, S P; Carapella, J J; Wanlass, M W

    2013-02-01

    Given an unknown multicomponent alloy, and a set of standard compounds or alloys of known composition, can one improve upon popular standards-based methods for energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry to quantify the elemental composition of the unknown specimen? A method is presented here for determining elemental composition of alloys using transmission electron microscopy-based EDX with appropriate standards. The method begins with a discrete set of related reference standards of known composition, applies multivariate statistical analysis to those spectra, and evaluates the compositions with a linear matrix algebra method to relate the spectra to elemental composition. By using associated standards, only limited assumptions about the physical origins of the EDX spectra are needed. Spectral absorption corrections can be performed by providing an estimate of the foil thickness of one or more reference standards. The technique was applied to III-V multicomponent alloy thin films: composition and foil thickness were determined for various III-V alloys. The results were then validated by comparing with X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis, demonstrating accuracy of approximately 1% in atomic fraction. PMID:23298470

  14. An Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and Monte Carlo simulation study of Iron-Age Nuragic small bronzes ("Navicelle") from Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavon, Nick; de Palmas, Anna; Bulla, Claudio; Piga, Giampaolo; Brunetti, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    A spectrometric protocol combining Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry with Monte Carlo simulations of experimental spectra using the XRMC code package has been applied for the first time to characterize the elemental composition of a series of famous Iron Age small scale archaeological bronze replicas of ships (known as the "Navicelle") from the Nuragic civilization in Sardinia, Italy. The proposed protocol is a useful, nondestructive and fast analytical tool for Cultural Heritage sample. In Monte Carlo simulations, each sample was modeled as a multilayered object composed by two or three layers depending on the sample: when all present, the three layers are the original bronze substrate, the surface corrosion patina and an outermost protective layer (Paraloid) applied during past restorations. Monte Carlo simulations were able to account for the presence of the patina/corrosion layer as well as the presence of the Paraloid protective layer. It also accounted for the roughness effect commonly found at the surface of corroded metal archaeological artifacts. In this respect, the Monte Carlo simulation approach adopted here was, to the best of our knowledge, unique and enabled to determine the bronze alloy composition together with the thickness of the surface layers without the need for previously removing the surface patinas, a process potentially threatening preservation of precious archaeological/artistic artifacts for future generations.

  15. A case of hut lung: scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis of a domestically acquired form of pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Gujral, Manmeet; Abraham, Jerrold L; Scalzetti, Ernest M; Iannuzzi, Michael C

    2013-07-01

    Hut lung is a pneumoconiosis caused by exposure to smoke derived from biomass fuels used for cooking in poorly ventilated huts. We report, to our knowledge, the first analysis of the dust deposited in the lungs in hut lung by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). A Bhutanese woman presented with shortness of breath and an abnormal chest radiograph. Chest CT scan showed innumerable tiny bilateral upper lobe centrilobular nodules. Transbronchial biopsy revealed mild interstitial fibrosis with heavy interstitial deposition of black dust. SEM/EDS showed that the dust was carbonaceous, with smaller yet substantial numbers of silica and silicate particles. Additional history revealed use of a wood/coal-fueled stove in a small, poorly ventilated hut for 45 years. The possibility of hut lung should be considered in women from countries where use of biomass-fueled stoves for cooking is common. Our findings support the classification of this condition as a mixed-dust pneumoconiosis.

  16. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, S.; Otto, M.; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M.; Bro¿żek-Mucha, Z.; Biegstraaten, J.; Horváth, R.

    2007-09-01

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry analysis of reciprocating and continuous rotary nickel-titanium instruments following root canal retreatment.

    PubMed

    Kalyoncuoğlu, Elif; Keskin, Cangül; Uzun, İsmail; Bengü, Aydın S; Guler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate superficial defects and the composition of Reciproc R25 and ProTaper Retreatment file systems (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) used for retreatment. A total of 100 maxillary incisor teeth were randomly divided into the following two groups: Reciproc R25 (n = 25) and ProTaper Retreatment instrument (n = 75) groups. The nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) compositions of the files before and after use were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDX). Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the data. ProTaper Retreatment instrument group showed a significantly higher number of defects than the Reciproc group (P < 0.05). No instrument fracture was detected. The presence of debris was observed in both groups before use, although the level was significantly higher in the ProTaper Retreatment group, which consisted of metals (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between new and used instruments with regard to Ni-Ti composition (P < 0.05). EDX analysis showed that both the Reciproc and ProTaper Retreatment instruments had a Ni-Ti composition that was within the standards specified by the American Society of Testing and Materials. This study confirmed the use of both the Reciproc R25 file and ProTaper Retreatment file system for root canal filling removal in straight root canals as a safe procedure. (J Oral Sci 58, 401-406, 2016). PMID:27665980

  18. Chain-length dependent growth dynamics of n-alkanes on silica investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity in situ and in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Frank, C.; Bommel, S.; Rukat, T.; Leitenberger, W.; Schäfer, P.; Schreiber, F.; Kowarik, S.

    2012-05-01

    We compare the growth dynamics of the three n-alkanes C36H74, C40H82, and C44H90 on SiO2 using real-time and in situ energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity. All molecules investigated align in an upright-standing orientation on the substrate and exhibit a transition from layer-by-layer growth to island growth after about 4 monolayers under the conditions employed. Simultaneous fits of the reflected intensity at five distinct points in reciprocal space show that films formed by longer n-alkanes roughen faster during growth. This behavior can be explained by a chain-length dependent height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier. Further x-ray diffraction measurements after growth indicate that films consisting of longer n-alkanes also incorporate more lying-down molecules in the top region. While the results reveal behavior typical for chain-like molecules, the findings can also be useful for the optimization of organic field effect transistors where smooth interlayers of n-alkanes without coexistence of two or more molecular orientations are required.

  19. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  20. [Chemical composition analysis of early neolithic pottery unearthed from Xiaohuangshang site, Zhejiang Province and Jiahu site, Henan Province by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Yang, Yu-Zhang; Zhang, Ju-Zhong; Cui, Wei

    2011-11-01

    The major elements in the early neolithic potteries unearthed from Xiaohuangshan site, Zhejiang Province and Jiahu site, Henan Province were determined by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The results show that the chemical compositions of the potteries from these two sites possess obvious regional features respectively. Compared with the specimen from Jiahu site, the potteries from Xiaohuangshan site have the common feature of ancient Chinese southern ceramics with high silicon and low aluminum contents. Simultaneously, the chemical composition of Xiaohuangshan pottery samples nearly unchanged from its early stage to the last stage. This phenomenon indicates that the source of the ceramic raw materials of Xiaohuangshan site was stable, and the continuous improvement of its pottery quality was mainly due to the progress in sintering techniques. However, the chemical composition of Jiahu potteries changed a lot in its three different periods. This change occurred because a large number of admixtures were added to the pottery bodies to improve their operating performances. These results also show that the improvements of pottery making techniques in different Chinese areas may have their own evolution directions respectively for the different geographical environments.

  1. Alterations of the intracellular water and ion concentrations in brain and liver cells during aging as revealed by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of bulk specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Lustyik, G.; Nagy, I.

    1985-01-01

    Age dependence of the intracellular concentrations of monovalent ions (Na+, K+ and Cl-) was examined in 1, 11 and 25-month-old rat brain and liver cells by using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The in vivo concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions were calculated from two different measurements: The elemental concentrations were measured in freeze-dried tissue pieces, and the intracellular water content was determined by means of a recently developed X-ray microanalytic method, using frozen-hydrated and fractured bulk specimens as well as subsequent freeze-drying. All the single monovalent ion concentrations and consequently, also the total monovalent ion content showed statistically significant increases during aging in brain cortical neurons. A 3-6% loss of the intracellular water content was accompanied by a 25-45% increase of the monovalent ionic strengths by the age of 25 months. A membrane protective OH radical scavenger (centrophenoxine) reversed the dehydration in the nerve cells of old animals, resulting in a decrease of the intracellular ion concentrations. Aging has a less prominent effect on the water and ion contents of the hepatocytes. The degree of water loss of cytoplasm exceeds that of the nuclei in the liver, suggesting that dominantly the translational steps can be involved in the general age altered slowing down of the protein synthetic machinery, predicted by the membrane hypothesis of aging.

  2. Generation of high-quality parabolic pulses with optimized duration and energy by use of dispersive frequency-to-time mapping.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeonghyun; Azaña, José

    2015-10-19

    We propose and demonstrate a novel linear-optics method for high-fidelity parabolic pulse generation with durations ranging from the picosecond to the sub-nanosecond range. This method is based on dispersion-induced frequency-to-time mapping combined with spectral shaping in order to overcome constraints of previous linear shaping approaches. Temporal waveform distortions associated with the need to satisfy a far-field condition are eliminated by use of a virtual time-lens process, which is directly implemented in the linear spectral shaping stage. Using this approach, the generated parabolic pulses are able to maintain most energy spectrum available from the input pulse frequency bandwidth, regardless of the target pulse duration, which is not anymore limited by the finest spectral resolution of the optical pulse spectrum shaper. High-quality parabolic pulses, with durations from 25ps to 400ps and output powers exceeding 4dBm before amplification, have been experimentally synthesized from a picosecond mode-locked optical source using a commercial optical pulse shaper with a frequency resolution >10GHz. In particular, we report the synthesis of full-duty cycle parabolic pulses that match up almost exactly with an ideal fitting over the entire pulse period.

  3. In situ strain profiling of elastoplastic bending in Ti-6Al-4V alloy by synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, M.; Shukla, V.; Akdogan, E. K.; Sadangi, R.; Ignatov, A.; Balarinni, L.; Tsakalakos, T.; Jisrawi, N.; Zhong, Z.; Horvath, K.

    2009-05-01

    Elastic and plastic strain evolution under four-point bending has been studied by synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction. Measured strain profiles across the specimen thickness showed an increasing linear elastic strain gradient under increasing four-point bending load up to approx2 kN. The bulk elastic modulus of Ti-6Al-4V was determined as 118 GPa. The onset of plastic deformation was found to set in at a total in-plane strain of approx0.008, both under tension and compression. Plastic deformation under bending is initiated in the vicinity of the surface and at a stress of 1100 MPa, and propagates inward, while a finite core region remains elastically deformed up to 3.67 kN loading. The onset of the plastic regime and the plastic regime itself has been verified by monitoring the line broadening of the (100) peak of alpha-Ti. The effective compression/tension stress-strain curve has been obtained from the scaling collapse of strain profile data taken at seven external load levels. A similar multiple load scaling collapse of the plastic strain variation has also been obtained. The level of precision in strain measurement reported herein was evaluated and found to be 1.5x10{sup -5} or better.

  4. Energy-dispersive x-Ray Analysis of Phosphorus, Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium in Globoid Crystals in Protein Bodies from Different Regions of Cucurbita maxima Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Lott, John N. A.; Greenwood, John S.; Vollmer, Catherine M.; Buttrose, Mark S.

    1978-01-01

    The seeds of Cucurbita maxima contain protein bodies with electrondense globoid crystals. Because of their density globoid crystals are ideal material for energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis studies of elemental composition. Fixation trials were carried out to test globoid crystal extraction during glutaraldehyde fixation, water washing, and ethanol dehydration. Glutaraldehyde fixation without subsequent washing or dehydration alone produced no significant changes in elemental composition of cotyledon globoid crystals. If glutaraldehyde fixation was followed by water washes or ethanol dehydration there was some loss of the major globoid crystal elements but the relative percentages of the elements P, K, Ca, and Mg remained relatively unchanged. In this paper results of a study of the P, K, Mg, and Ca content of globoid crystals in different tissues of squash embryos are presented. The globoid crystals in the radicle were found to be the least dense in the embryo. Globoid crystals from all embryo regions contained P, K, and Mg. In the various embryo regions P and Mg maintained relatively constant proportions of the globoid crystal composition while K and Ca varied. Of particular significance is the distribution of Ca which is generally an immobile element. Calcium was found in highest amounts in the globoid crystals of the radicle and stem regions while globoid crystals in much of the cotyledon contained little, if any, Ca. The Ca storage thus seems to be spatially arranged in a manner that would aid early growth of the root-shoot axis. PMID:16660439

  5. A standards-based method for compositional analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using multivariate statistical analysis: application to multicomponent alloys.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Monika; Ahrenkiel, S P; Carapella, J J; Wanlass, M W

    2013-02-01

    Given an unknown multicomponent alloy, and a set of standard compounds or alloys of known composition, can one improve upon popular standards-based methods for energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry to quantify the elemental composition of the unknown specimen? A method is presented here for determining elemental composition of alloys using transmission electron microscopy-based EDX with appropriate standards. The method begins with a discrete set of related reference standards of known composition, applies multivariate statistical analysis to those spectra, and evaluates the compositions with a linear matrix algebra method to relate the spectra to elemental composition. By using associated standards, only limited assumptions about the physical origins of the EDX spectra are needed. Spectral absorption corrections can be performed by providing an estimate of the foil thickness of one or more reference standards. The technique was applied to III-V multicomponent alloy thin films: composition and foil thickness were determined for various III-V alloys. The results were then validated by comparing with X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis, demonstrating accuracy of approximately 1% in atomic fraction.

  6. Non-invasive identification of chemical compounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, combined with chemometric methods of data evaluation.

    PubMed

    Henrich, A; Hoffmann, P; Ortner, H M; Greve, T; Itzel, H

    2000-01-01

    Chemicals from customers' returns have to be analyzed before they can be reused as raw materials in production. A procedure for non-invasive qualitative analysis of compounds in a closed container based on energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry is described. EDXRF was chosen as method for noninvasive analysis of chemicals through PE bottle walls without opening the bottle. This analysis aims for a quick proof of correspondence between the declaration of a reagent on the label of the bottle and its content. This analytical result cannot be achieved by a mere evaluation of characteristic element lines in EDXRF-spectra in combination with the method of matrix correction or the method of mean atomic number. These methods take into account only a small part of the total information available in an X-ray spectrum. It is shown here that valuable additional information is extractable from the spectral ranges of the Compton-scattering and Rayleigh-scattering areas by the use of methods of multivariate data analysis, especially by principle component analysis (PCA). Regularized discriminant analysis (RDA) was employed to establish a classification scheme for unknown samples.

  7. Evaluation of the Forensic Utility of Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry for Printing Ink Examinations.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Ruthmara; Subedi, Kiran; Trejos, Tatiana; Almirall, José R

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in printing technology have exacerbated the problem of document counterfeiting, prompting the need for analytical techniques that better characterize inks for forensic analysis and comparisons. In this study, 319 printing inks (toner, inkjet, offset, and Intaglio) were analyzed directly on the paper substrate using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). As anticipated, the high sensitivity of LA-ICP-MS pairwise comparisons resulted in excellent discrimination (average of ~ 99.6%) between different ink samples from each of the four ink types and almost 100% correct associations between ink samples known to originate from the same source. SEM-EDS analysis also resulted in very good discrimination for different toner and intaglio inks (>97%) and 100% correct association for samples from the same source. SEM-EDS provided complementary information to LA-ICP-MS for certain ink types but showed limited utility for the discrimination of inkjet and offset inks.

  8. Morphological and chemical changes in dentin after using endodontic agents: Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Santo, Ana Maria do Espírito; Martin, Airton Abraha~o.; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2012-07-01

    We examine the morphological and chemical changes in the pulp chamber dentin after using endodontic agents by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μEDXRF). Thirty teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and divided by six groups (n=5): NT-no treatment; CHX-2% chlorhexidine; CHXE-2% chlorhexidine+17% EDTA E-17% EDTA; SH5-5.25% NaOCl; SH5E-5.25% NaOCl+17% EDTA. The inorganic and organic content was analyzed by FT-Raman. μEDXRF examined calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content as well as Ca/P ratio. Impressions of specimens were evaluated by SEM. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Differences were observed among groups for the 960 cm-1 peak. Ca and P content differences were significant (SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE). CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The SEM images in the EDTA-treated groups had the highest number of open tubules. Erosion in the tubules was observed in CHX and SH5E groups. Endodontic agents change the inorganic and organic content of pulp chamber dentin. NaOCl used alone, or in association with EDTA, was the most effective agent considering chemical and morphological approaches.

  9. Role of trace elements (Zn, Sr, Fe) in bone development: energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence study of rat bone and tooth tissue.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Karina; Drzazga, Zofia; Kaszuba, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common debilitating disease around the world and it is more and more established among young people. There are well known recommendations for nutrition of newborns and children concerning adequate calcium and vitamin D intake in order to maintain proper bone density. Nevertheless, important role in structure and function of a healthy bone tissue is played by an integration between all constituents including elements other than Ca, like trace elements, which control vital processes in bone tissue. It is important from scientific point of view as well as prevention of bone diseases, to monitor the mineralization process considering changes of the concentration of minerals during first stage of bone formation. This work presents studies of trace element (zinc, strontium, and iron) concentration in bones and teeth of Wistar rats at the age of 7, 14, and 28 days. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to examine mandibles, skulls, femurs, tibiae, and incisors. The quantitative analysis was performed using fundamental parameters method (FP). Zn and Sr concentrations were highest for the youngest individuals and decreased with age of rats, while Fe content was stable in bone matrix for most studied bones. Our results reveal the necessity of monitoring concentration of not only major, but also minor elements, because the trace elements play special role in the first period of bone development. PMID:24615876

  10. Ultrastructure and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis of cartilage after rapid freezing, low temperature freeze drying, and embedding in Spurr's resin

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, J.; Lyon, R.; Swindin, K.J.; Chesters, J.

    1985-10-01

    In order to undertake meaningful high-resolution x-ray microanalysis of tissues, methods should be used that minimize the introduction of artefacts produced by loss or translocation of ions. The most ideal method is rapid freezing but the subsequent sectioning of frozen tissues is technically difficult. An alternative method is to freeze dry the tissues at a low temperature, and then embed them in resin. This facilitates the rapid production of reproducible thin sections. With freeze-dried, embedded hypertrophic cartilage, the morphology was similar to that seen using aqueous fixatives even when no additional electron density is introduced by the use of osmium vapor. Energy-dispersive analysis of specific areas show that little or no loss or migration of ions occurs from structures such as mitochondria. Mitochondrial granules consisting of calcium and phosphorus precipitates were not observed except where the cells were damaged as a result of the freezing process. This may suggest that these granules only appear when tissue is damaged because of inadequate preservation.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry for quick detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengjun; Jiang, Fenghua; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Yanzhen; Yin, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Ding, Haibing

    2016-03-01

    Detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria has largely been dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation, which usually takes from days to months to carry out. This clearly does not meet the requirements of analysis for time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements in a sample, including sulfur, with minimal sample treatment, this technology was applied to detect sulfur-oxidizing bacteria using their high sulfur content within the cell. This article describes the application of scanning electron microscopy imaging coupled with EDS mapping for quick detection of sulfur oxidizers in contaminated environmental water samples, with minimal sample handling. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the existence of dense granules within the bacterial cells, while EDS identified large amounts of sulfur within them. EDS mapping localized the sulfur to these granules. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the bacteria detected in our samples belonged to the genus Chromatium, which are sulfur oxidizers. Thus, EDS mapping made it possible to identify sulfur oxidizers in environmental samples based on localized sulfur within their cells, within a short time (within 24 h of sampling). This technique has wide ranging applications for detection of sulfur bacteria in environmental water samples.

  12. Quick Detection of Sulfur Bacteria in Environmental Water Sample with SEM(scanning electron microscopy) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Ding, H.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, F.; Li, X.; Gao, W.; Yin, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria play important roles in global sulfur cycle. Sulfur bacteria detection has been largely dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation which usually takes from days to months to finish. This cannot meet the requirements of some time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements including sulfur in a sample with minimal sample treatment, the technology was applied to detect sulfur bacteria through the high sulfur content in the bacteria cell. We report the application of SEM (scanning electron microscopy) imaging coupled with EDS mapping for direct and quick detection of sulfur oxidizer in contaminated environmental water samples. The presence of sulfur bacteria can be confirmed within 24 hours after sampling. Subsequent 16S RNA gene sequencing results found the bacteria detected had over 99% similarity to Chromatium Okenii, confirming the bacterium was a sulfur oxidizer. The developed technique made it possible to quickly detect sulfur oxidizer in environmental sample and could have wide applications in sulfur bacteria detection in environmental water samples.

  13. Pre-Columbian alloys from the royal tombs of Sipán; energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis with a portable equipment.

    PubMed

    Cesareo, R; Calza, C; Dos Anjos, M; Lopes, R T; Bustamante, A; Fabian S, J; Alva, W; Chero Z, L

    2010-01-01

    On the north coast of present-day Peru flourished approximately between 50 and 700 AD, the Moche civilization. It was an advanced culture and the Moche were sophisticated metalsmiths, so that they are considered as the finest producers of jewels and artefacts of the region. The Moche metalworking ability was impressively demonstrated by the objects discovered by Walter Alva and coworkers in 1987, in the excavations of the "Tumbas Reales de Sipán". About 50 metal objects from these excavations, now at the namesake Museum, in Lambayeque, north of Peru, were analyzed with a portable equipment using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence. This portable equipment is mainly composed of a small size X-ray tube and a thermoelectrically cooled X-ray detector. Standard samples of gold and silver alloys were employed for quantitative analysis. It was determined that the analyzed artefacts from the "Tumbas Reales de Sipán" are mainly composed of gold, silver and copper alloys, of gilded copper and of tumbaga, the last being a poor gold alloy enriched at the surface by depletion gilding, i.e. removing copper from the surface. PMID:19819709

  14. Metastable phase diagram of Bi probed by single-energy x-ray absorption detection and angular dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Principi, E.; Minicucci, M.; Di Cicco, A.; Trapananti, A.; De Panfilis, S.; Poloni, R.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we report the results of a detailed experimental study of samples composed of micrometric Bi droplets providing an insight into the metastable phase diagram of Bi. To this purpose we have used the single-energy x-ray absorption detection technique in combination with angular dispersive x-ray diffraction available at the BM29 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This unconventional approach has given proof of being a different and reliable tool for detecting subtle structural modifications in condensed matter. The investigation has revealed a large variety of metastable Bi polymorphs in a broad range of pressures and temperatures (25-500 deg. C, 0-6 GPa) and the occurrence of a Bi crystalline structure isomorphic to the {beta}-tin structure. We have shown that the range of undercooling of liquid Bi strongly depends upon pressure and the underlying solid stable and metastable phases. As a final result a Bi-phase diagram including metastable phases is proposed, which takes into account all structural information obtained from this experiment.

  15. Exposure and analysis of microparticles embedded in silica aerogel keystones using NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aiden A.; Lin, Ting; Toth, Milos; Westphal, Andrew J.; Vicenzi, Edward P.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Silver, Eric H.

    2016-07-01

    In 2006, NASA's Stardust spacecraft delivered to Earth dust particles collected from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2, with the goal of furthering the understanding of solar system formation. Stardust cometary samples were collected in a low-density, nanoporous silica aerogel making their study technically challenging. This article demonstrates the identification, exposure, and elemental composition analysis of particles analogous to those collected by NASA's Stardust mission using in-situ SEM techniques. Backscattered electron imaging is shown by experimental observation and Monte Carlo simulation to be suitable for locating particles of a range of sizes relevant to Stardust (down to submicron diameters) embedded within silica aerogel. Selective removal of the silica aerogel encapsulating an embedded particle is performed by cryogenic NF3-mediated electron beam-induced etching. The porous, low-density nature of the aerogel results in an enhanced etch rate compared with solid material, making it an effective, nonmechanical method for the exposure of particles. After exposure, elemental composition of the particle was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using a high spectral resolution microcalorimeter. Signals from fluorine contamination are shown to correspond to nonremoved silica aerogel and only in residual concentrations.

  16. Microsecond time-resolved energy-dispersive EXAFS measurement and its application to film the thermolysis of (NH4)2[PtCl6

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingyu; Baudelet, Francois; Han, Jun; Chagnot, Sebastien; Barthe, Laurent; Headspith, Jon; Goldsbrough, Roger; Picca, Frederic E.; Spalla, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Microsecond (μs) time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) has been developed using an energy-dispersive EXAFS (EDE) setup equipped with a silicon Quantum Detector ULTRA. The feasibility was investigated with a prototypical thermally driven redox reaction, the thermal decomposition of (NH4)2[PtCl6]. EXAFS data were collected with snapshots every 60 μs during the course of the thermolysis reaction, then averaged for 100 times along the reaction to get better signal to noise ratio which reduces the time resolution to 6 millisecond (ms). Our results provide direct structural evidence of cis-PtCl2(NH3)2 as the intermediate, together with continuous electronic and geometric structure dynamics of the reactant, intermediate and final product during the course of the thermolysis of (NH4)2[PtCl6]. The thermal effect on EXAFS signals at high temperatures is considered in the data analysis, which is essential to follow the reaction process correctly. This method could also be applied to other reaction dynamics. PMID:23264880

  17. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy for Characterization of Detrital Minerals in Karst Cave Speleothems.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Nina; Miler, Miloš; Šebela, Stanka; Jarc, Simona

    2016-02-01

    Micro-scale observations in karst caves help to identify different processes that shaped local morphology. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy inspection of speleothems from two karst caves in Slovenia, Predjama and Črna Jama, confirmed the presence of sub-angular to sub-rounded detrital fragments of clay minerals, feldspars, quartz, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, rutile and Nb-rutile, xenotime, kassite, allanite, fluorapatite, epidote, ilmenite, monazite, sphene, and zircon, between 2 and 50 μm across. These occur in porous layers separating calcite laminae in the clayey coating on the layer below the surface of the speleothems, and are also incorporated within actual crystals. It is likely that they are derived from the weathered rocks of the Eocene flysch. Probably they were first transported into the caves by floodwaters forming cave sediments. Later, depending upon the climate conditions, they were moved by air currents or by water to the surface of active speleothems. They might also be redeposited from overlying soils enriched with wind-transported minerals from the flysch, or from higher passages filled with weathered flysch sediment, by drip water percolating through the fissured limestone. As some of the identified minerals are carriers of rare earth elements, Ti and Zr, their presence could affect any palaeoclimatic interpretations that are based upon the geochemical composition of the speleothems. PMID:26914996

  18. Elemental relationships in rock varnish as seen with SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray) elemental line profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of rock varnish requires a thorough survey of elemental and mineralogic compositions before relating chemical variability of rock varnish to past geochemical environments. Elemental relationships in rock varnish can be examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with an elemental line profiling routine using semi-quantitative, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. Results of SEM/EDX analysis suggest: variations in cation concentrations used in varnish cation ratio dating relate more specifically to variations in detritus within the varnish than to element mobility as defined by weathering indices; Mn concentration rather than Mn:Fe ratios may be a more appropriate indicator of paleoclimatic fluctuations; and the Mn-oxide phase existing in varnish is most likely a Ba-enriched phase rather than birnessite. Element line profiling offers great potential for gaining insights into geochemical processes affecting the deposition and diagenesis of rock varnish and for testing hypotheses relating to its chemical variability. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  19. In situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction for the synthesis optimization and scale-up of the porous zirconium terephthalate UiO-66.

    PubMed

    Ragon, Florence; Horcajada, Patricia; Chevreau, Hubert; Hwang, Young Kyu; Lee, U-Hwang; Miller, Stuart R; Devic, Thomas; Chang, Jong-San; Serre, Christian

    2014-03-01

    The synthesis optimization and scale-up of the benchmarked microporous zirconium terephthalate UiO-66(Zr) were investigated by evaluating the impact of several parameters (zirconium precursors, acidic conditions, addition of water, and temperature) over the kinetics of crystallization by time-resolved in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. Both the addition of hydrochloric acid and water were found to speed up the reaction. The use of the less acidic ZrOCl2·8H2O as the precursor seemed to be a suitable alternative to ZrCl4·xH2O, avoiding possible reproducibility issues as a consequence of the high hygroscopic character of ZrCl4. ZrOCl2·8H2O allowed the formation of smaller good quality UiO-66(Zr) submicronic particles, paving the way for their use within the nanotechnology domain, in addition to higher reaction yields, which makes this synthesis route suitable for the preparation of UiO-66(Zr) at a larger scale. In a final step, UiO-66(Zr) was prepared using conventional reflux conditions at the 0.5 kg scale, leading to a rather high space-time yield of 490 kg m(-3) day(-1), while keeping physicochemical properties similar to those obtained from smaller scale solvothermally prepared batches.

  20. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy for Characterization of Detrital Minerals in Karst Cave Speleothems.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Nina; Miler, Miloš; Šebela, Stanka; Jarc, Simona

    2016-02-01

    Micro-scale observations in karst caves help to identify different processes that shaped local morphology. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy inspection of speleothems from two karst caves in Slovenia, Predjama and Črna Jama, confirmed the presence of sub-angular to sub-rounded detrital fragments of clay minerals, feldspars, quartz, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, rutile and Nb-rutile, xenotime, kassite, allanite, fluorapatite, epidote, ilmenite, monazite, sphene, and zircon, between 2 and 50 μm across. These occur in porous layers separating calcite laminae in the clayey coating on the layer below the surface of the speleothems, and are also incorporated within actual crystals. It is likely that they are derived from the weathered rocks of the Eocene flysch. Probably they were first transported into the caves by floodwaters forming cave sediments. Later, depending upon the climate conditions, they were moved by air currents or by water to the surface of active speleothems. They might also be redeposited from overlying soils enriched with wind-transported minerals from the flysch, or from higher passages filled with weathered flysch sediment, by drip water percolating through the fissured limestone. As some of the identified minerals are carriers of rare earth elements, Ti and Zr, their presence could affect any palaeoclimatic interpretations that are based upon the geochemical composition of the speleothems.

  1. Elemental concentration analysis in soil contaminated with recyclable urban garbage by tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.; Jesus, E. F. O.; Assis, J. T.; Cesareo, R.; Barroso, R. C.; Barradas, C. A. A.

    2002-11-01

    Soil and radish (Raphanus Sp) samples from areas treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage were quantitatively analyzed by using tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. Soils treated with 10, 20 and 30 t/ha of recyclable urban garbage and control soil were analyzed. The layer soils were collected at 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40, 40-60 cm depth. It was possible simultaneously to determine the elemental concentration of various elements: K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in recyclable urban garbage, soil treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage and radish plants cultivated in these soils. The elemental concentration of K, Ca, Ti and Fe were determined at percent level (macro-elements) and the other elements at ppm level (micro-elements). It was also possible to observe a significant increase in the contents of K, Ca, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in the soil treated in comparison with the control soil and it was also verified whether the transport of these elements to radish plants cultivated in these soils occurred.

  2. Experimental evidence of ultrathin polymer film stratification by AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Nicolas; Chebil, Mohamed Souheib; Vignaud, Guillaume; Le Houerou, Vincent; Bardeau, Jean-François; Busselez, Rémi; Gibaud, Alain; Grohens, Yves

    2015-06-01

    By performing Atomic Force Microscopy measurements of pull-off force as a function of the temperature, we were able to probe the dynamic of supported thin polystyrene (PS) films. Thermal transitions induce modifications in the surface energy, roughness and surface modulus that are clearly detected by AFM and related to PS chain relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrated the existence of three transition temperatures that can be associated to the relaxation of polymer chains located at different depth regions within the polymer film. Independently of the film thickness, we have confirmed the presence of a region of high mobility for the polymer chains at the free interface. The thickness of this region is estimated to be above 7nm. The detection of a transition only present for film thicker than the gyration radius Rg is linked to the dynamics of polymer chains in a bulk conformation (i.e. not in contact with the free interface). We claim here that our results demonstrate, in agreement with other techniques, the stratification of thin polymer film depth profile in terms of relaxation behavior. PMID:26087914

  3. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  4. Tip-surface interactions at redox responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) interface by AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hong Jing; Song, Jing; Vancso, G. Julius

    2009-05-01

    Poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) belong to the class of redox responsive organometallic polymers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used earlier to study single chain PFS response and redox energy driven single chain PFS molecular motors. Here we present further AFM investigations of force interactions between tip and a grafted PFS surface under potential control in electrochemical redox cycles. Typical tip-Au interaction is considered as reference in the force measurements. First the electrostatic component in the diffused double layer (DL) in NaClO 4 electrolyte environment was considered for a "grafted to" PFS, which dominated the interplay between the tip and sample surface. The DL forces can also hinder the physisorption of PFS chain onto the tip when the voltage was applied at -0.1 V. On the other hand, if the tip contacted the PFS surface prior to the electrochemical process, physisorption of PFS chains governed the overall interaction regardless of subsequently applied surface potential. In addition, prolonged contact time, tc, may also contribute to the stability of tip-PFS bridging and detection of electrostatic forces between the tip-PFS interface. The results showed that tip-substrate interaction forces without PFS grafts have negligibly small force contributions under similar, electrochemically controlled, conditions used in single PFS chain based molecular motors.

  5. In-Situ AFM Investigation of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation and Failure Mechanisms in Lithium -Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas; Kumar, Ravi; Tokranov, Anton; Huang, Teddy; Li, Chunzeng; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian

    The formation and evolution of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is critical for lifetime and performance of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), particularly for LIBs with high energy density materials such as silicon. Si has almost ten time theoretical specific capacity vs graphite, but its volume changes during cycling (up to 400%) put enormous strains on the SEI layer, resulting in continuous capacity loss. In this study we report in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation on the formation and failure mechanisms of SEI layer using patterned Si island structures. Due to the shear lag effect, patterned Si islands go through lateral expansion and Contraction, putting the SEI layer in tension and compression during lithiation and delithiation, respectively. Experimentally, we performed the studies in a glovebox with <1 ppm O2 and H2O, using PeakForce Tapping to image the extremely fragile SEI layer. We show for the first time the in operando cracking of SEI layer. To understand the mechanics of the SEI layer, the critical strain for cracking was derived from a progression of the AFM images. Our studies provide new insight into SEI formation, evolution and its mechanical response, and offer guidance to tailor passivation layers for optimal performance.

  6. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gowthami, T; Kurra, Narendra; Raina, Gargi

    2014-04-18

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84-88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns.

  7. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gowthami, T; Kurra, Narendra; Raina, Gargi

    2014-04-18

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84-88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. PMID:24651210

  8. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  9. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  10. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  11. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  12. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  13. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS ON OIL SPILLS - EMPIRICAL CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a dispersant is applied to an oil slick, its effectiveness in dispersing the spilled oil depends on various factors such as oil properties, wave mixing energy, temperature of both oil and water, and salinity of the water. Estuaries represent water with varying salinities. In...

  14. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors, such as Si-PIN, Si-drift, Cd1-xZnxTe and HgI 2, coupled to miniaturized low-power X-ray tubes, are well suited in portable systems for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), analysis of archaeological samples. The Si-PIN detector is characterized by a thickness of about 300 μm, an area of about 2×3 mm 2, an energy resolution of about 200-250 eV at 5.9 keV and an entrance window of 25-75 μm. The Si-drift detector has approximately the same area and thickness, but an energy resolution of 155 eV at 5.9 keV. The efficiency of these detectors is around 100% from 4 to 10 keV, and then decreases versus energy, reaching ˜9% at 30 keV. Coupled to a miniaturized 10 kV, 0.1 mA, Ca-anode or to a miniaturized 30 kV, 0.1 mA, W-anode X-ray tubes, portable systems can be constructed, which are able to analyse K-lines of elements up to about silver, and L-lines of heavy elements. The Cd 1- xZn xTe detector has an area of 4 mm 2 and a thickness of 3 mm. It has an energy resolution of about 300 eV at 5.9 keV, and an efficiency of 100% over the whole range of X-rays. Finally the HgI 2 detector has an efficiency of about 100% in the whole range of X-rays, and an energy resolution of about 200 eV at 5.9 keV. Coupled to a small 50-60 kV, 1 mA, W-anode X-ray tube, portable systems can be constructed, for the analysis of practically all elements. These systems were applied to analysis in the field of archaeometry and in all applications for which portable systems are needed or at least useful (for example X-ray transmission measurements, X-ray microtomography and so on). Results of in-field use of these detectors and a comparison among these room temperature detectors in relation to concrete applications are presented. More specifically, concerning EDXRF analysis, ancient gold samples were analysed in Rome, in Mexico City and in Milan, ancient bronzes in Sassari, in Bologna, in Chieti and in Naples, and sulfur (due to pollution

  15. Toward an uncertainty budget for measuring nanoparticles by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvallée, A.; Feltin, N.; Ducourtieux, S.; Trabelsi, M.; Hochepied, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on the evaluation of an uncertainty budget associated with the measurement of the mean diameter of a nanoparticle (NP) population by Atomic Force Microscopy. The measurement principle consists in measuring the height of a spherical-like NP population to determine the mean diameter and the size distribution. This method assumes that the NPs are well-dispersed on the substrate and isolated enough to avoid measurement errors due to agglomeration phenomenon. Since the measurement is directly impacted by the substrate roughness, the NPs have been deposited on a mica sheet presenting a very low roughness. A complete metrological characterization of the instrument has been carried out and the main error sources have been evaluated. The measuring method has been tested on a population of SiO2 NPs. Homemade software has been used to build the height distribution histogram taking into account only isolated NP. Finally, the uncertainty budget including main components has been established for the mean diameter measurement of this NP population. The most important components of this uncertainty budget are the calibration process along Z-axis, the scanning speed influence and then the vertical noise level.

  16. Determination of inorganic elements in poppy straw by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry as a means of ascertaining origin.

    PubMed

    Copur, E; Göger, N G; Orbey, T; Sener, B

    2005-01-01

    Cultivation of poppy as a source of opium alkaloids for legitimate medical purposes has a long tradition in Turkey. The main products are poppy straw and concentrate of poppy straw, obtained from dried poppy capsules. The aims of the study reported in the present article were to establish inorganic element profiles for the poppy-growing provinces of Turkey by means of x-ray analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) and to explore the potential of the technique for determination of origin. Ten elements (sodium, magnesium, silicon, phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, potassium, calcium, copper and zinc) were analysed in poppy straw samples from 67 towns in nine provinces. As regards the determination of origin, the most significant finding was the presence of copper and zinc in the poppy straw samples from 8 of the 15 towns in Afyon Province. Since those elements are not normally found in soil, it is assumed that their presence is the result of environmental (industrial) contamination. Differences in the samples from the other eight provinces were less significant, possibly a result of their geographical proximity. Nevertheless, differences in the samples were apparent. Because the findings are relative rather than absolute in terms of presence or absence of individual inorganic elements, further research is required to convert them into operationally usable results. The inorganic element profiles generated in the study have been used to form the basis for the development of a comprehensive database on poppy straw samples, which may be used in comparing samples and determining their origin.

  17. Quantitative determinations and imaging in different structures of buried human bones from the XVIII-XIXth centuries by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence - Postmortem evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, D; Dias, A A; Carvalho, M; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P; Henriques, F R; Curate, F; Pessanha, S

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a non-commercial triaxial geometry energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) setup and a benchtop µ-XRF system were used to identify postmortem contamination in buried bones. For two of the individuals, unusually high concentrations of Cu and Pb, but also Zn (in one individual) were observed. The pigments of the burial shroud coverings have been identified as the source of contamination. Accurate and precise quantitative results were obtained by nondestructive process using fundamental parameters method taking into account the matrix absorption effects. A total of 30 bones from 13 individuals, buried between the mid-XVIIIth to early XIXth centuries, were analyzed to study the elemental composition and elemental distribution. The bones were collected from a church in Almada (Portugal), called Ermida do Espírito Santo, located near the Tagus River and at the sea neighbourhood. The triaxial geometry setup was used to quantify Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr and Pb of powder pressed bone pellets (n=9 for each bone). Cluster analysis was performed considering the elemental concentrations for the different bones. There was a clear association between some bones regarding Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb content but not a categorization between cortical and trabecular bones. The elemental distribution of Cu, Zn and Pb were assessed by the benchtop μ-analysis, the M4 Tornado, based on a polycapillary system which provides multi-elemental 2D maps. The results showed that contamination was mostly on the surface of the bone confirming that it was related to the burial shroud covering the individuals. PMID:27216663

  18. Direct rapid analysis of trace bioavailable soil macronutrients by chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaniu, M I; Angeyo, K H; Mwala, A K; Mangala, M J

    2012-06-01

    Precision agriculture depends on the knowledge and management of soil quality (SQ), which calls for affordable, simple and rapid but accurate analysis of bioavailable soil nutrients. Conventional SQ analysis methods are tedious and expensive. We demonstrate the utility of a new chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering (EDXRFS) spectroscopy method we have developed for direct rapid analysis of trace 'bioavailable' macronutrients (i.e. C, N, Na, Mg, P) in soils. The method exploits, in addition to X-ray fluorescence, the scatter peaks detected from soil pellets to develop a model for SQ analysis. Spectra were acquired from soil samples held in a Teflon holder analyzed using (109)Cd isotope source EDXRF spectrometer for 200 s. Chemometric techniques namely principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were utilized for pattern recognition based on fluorescence and Compton scatter peaks regions, and to develop multivariate quantitative calibration models based on Compton scatter peak respectively. SQ analyses were realized with high CMD (R(2)>0.9) and low SEP (0.01% for N and Na, 0.05% for C, 0.08% for Mg and 1.98 μg g(-1) for P). Comparison of predicted macronutrients with reference standards using a one-way ANOVA test showed no statistical difference at 95% confidence level. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that an XRF method has demonstrated utility in trace analysis of macronutrients in soil or related matrices.

  19. In Vitro assessment of dentin erosion after immersion in acidic beverages: surface profile analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Jeronymo, Raffaela Di Iorio; Di Nicoló, Rebeca; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of some acidic drinks on dentin erosion, using methods of surface profile (SP) analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). One hundred standardized dentin slabs obtained from bovine incisor roots were used. Dentin slabs measuring 5x5 mm were ground flat, polished and half of each specimen surface was protected with nail polish. For 60 min, the dentin surfaces were immersed in 50 mL of 5 different drinks (Gatorade®, Del Valle Mais orange juice®, Coca-Cola®, Red Bull® and white wine), 20 blocks in each drink. The pH of each beverage was measured. After the erosive challenge, the nail polish was removed and SP was analyzed. The mineral concentration of dentin surfaces was determined by means of EDXRF. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). SP analysis showed that Red-Bull had the highest erosive potential (p<0.05). EDXRF results exhibited a decrease in phosphate in the groups immersed in Red-Bull, orange juice and white wine (p<0.05), and no significant difference in calcium content between the reference surface and eroded surface. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that all studied beverages promoted erosion on root dentin and Red Bull had the highest erosive potential. There was no correlation between pH of beverages and their erosive potential and only the P content changed after erosive challenge. PMID:23207852

  20. Quantitative determinations and imaging in different structures of buried human bones from the XVIII-XIXth centuries by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence - Postmortem evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, D; Dias, A A; Carvalho, M; Carvalho, M L; Santos, J P; Henriques, F R; Curate, F; Pessanha, S

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a non-commercial triaxial geometry energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) setup and a benchtop µ-XRF system were used to identify postmortem contamination in buried bones. For two of the individuals, unusually high concentrations of Cu and Pb, but also Zn (in one individual) were observed. The pigments of the burial shroud coverings have been identified as the source of contamination. Accurate and precise quantitative results were obtained by nondestructive process using fundamental parameters method taking into account the matrix absorption effects. A total of 30 bones from 13 individuals, buried between the mid-XVIIIth to early XIXth centuries, were analyzed to study the elemental composition and elemental distribution. The bones were collected from a church in Almada (Portugal), called Ermida do Espírito Santo, located near the Tagus River and at the sea neighbourhood. The triaxial geometry setup was used to quantify Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr and Pb of powder pressed bone pellets (n=9 for each bone). Cluster analysis was performed considering the elemental concentrations for the different bones. There was a clear association between some bones regarding Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb content but not a categorization between cortical and trabecular bones. The elemental distribution of Cu, Zn and Pb were assessed by the benchtop μ-analysis, the M4 Tornado, based on a polycapillary system which provides multi-elemental 2D maps. The results showed that contamination was mostly on the surface of the bone confirming that it was related to the burial shroud covering the individuals.

  1. In Vitro assessment of dentin erosion after immersion in acidic beverages: surface profile analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Jeronymo, Raffaela Di Iorio; Di Nicoló, Rebeca; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of some acidic drinks on dentin erosion, using methods of surface profile (SP) analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). One hundred standardized dentin slabs obtained from bovine incisor roots were used. Dentin slabs measuring 5x5 mm were ground flat, polished and half of each specimen surface was protected with nail polish. For 60 min, the dentin surfaces were immersed in 50 mL of 5 different drinks (Gatorade®, Del Valle Mais orange juice®, Coca-Cola®, Red Bull® and white wine), 20 blocks in each drink. The pH of each beverage was measured. After the erosive challenge, the nail polish was removed and SP was analyzed. The mineral concentration of dentin surfaces was determined by means of EDXRF. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). SP analysis showed that Red-Bull had the highest erosive potential (p<0.05). EDXRF results exhibited a decrease in phosphate in the groups immersed in Red-Bull, orange juice and white wine (p<0.05), and no significant difference in calcium content between the reference surface and eroded surface. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that all studied beverages promoted erosion on root dentin and Red Bull had the highest erosive potential. There was no correlation between pH of beverages and their erosive potential and only the P content changed after erosive challenge.

  2. Determination of heavy metals concentrations in airborne particulates matter (APM) from Manjung district, Perak using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Nursyairah; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Airborne particulates trace metals are considered as public health concern as it can enter human lungs through respiratory system. Generally, any substance that has been introduced to the atmosphere that can cause severe effects to living things and the environment is considered air pollution. Manjung, Perak is one of the development districts that is active with industrial activities. There are many industrial activities surrounding Manjung District area such as coal fired power plant, quarries and iron smelting which may contribute to the air pollution into the environment. This study was done to measure the concentrations of Hg, U, Th, K, Cu, Fe, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Pb and Cd in the Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) collected at nine locations in Manjung District area within 15 km radius towards three directions (North, North-East and South-East) in 5 km intervals. The samples were collected using mini volume air sampler with cellulose filter through total suspended particulate (TSP). The sampler was set up for eight hours with the flow rate of 5 L/min. The filter was weighed before and after sample collection using microbalance, to get the amount of APM and kept in desiccator before analyzing. The measurement was done using calibrated Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The air particulate concentrations were found below the Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for TSP (260 µg/m3). All of the metals concentrations were also lower than the guidelines set by World Health Organization (WHO), Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Argonne National Laboratory, USA NCRP (1975). From the concentrations, the enrichment factor were calculated.

  3. AFM probes fabricated with masked maskless combined anisotropic etching and p+ surface doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianqiang; Li, Xinxin; Bao, Haifei; Zuo, Guomin; Wang, Yuelin; Feng, Fei; Yu, Zhenyin; Ge, Xiaohong

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents a newly developed high-yield micro-fabrication technology for single-crystalline silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. Both the tips and the cantilevers are simultaneously formed by a masked-maskless combined anisotropic etching process. Compared to a conventional tip-to-cantilever sequential fabrication scheme, this tip-and-cantilever simultaneous formation can effectively increase fabrication yield by avoiding the tips damaged during the following processed photolithographic steps for defining the cantilevers. By heavy boron doping at the surface, the conductive AFM probe provides an electrical path to the electric ground of the AFM that helps to eliminate the electrostatic accumulation of charges and, therefore, eliminate undesirable electrostatic forces between the probes and the samples. A fabrication yield as high as 90% has been obtained for the AFM probes for 4 inch wafers. The tips after oxidation-sharpening treatment generally have a radius of 10-30 nm. The cantilever spring constant can be well controlled in the range of 0.025-40 N m-1. High-quality sample scanning results with the formed AFM probes are obtained with a slightly better resolution than that from commercial probes without surface conductive treatment.

  4. AFM Bio-Mechanical Investigation of the Taxol Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dylan; Patel, Dipika; Monjaraz, Fernando; Park, Soyeun

    2009-10-01

    Cancerous cells are known to be softer and easier to deform than normal cells. Changes in mechanical properties originate from the alteration of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of cancer treatment using Taxol is related to the stabilization of microtubules. It has been shown that Taxol binds to polymerized tublin, stabilizes it against disassembly, and consequently inhibits cell division. An accurate quantitative study still lacks to relate the microtubule stabilizing effect with the cellular mechanical properties. We utilized our AFM to study changes in elastic properties of treated breast cancer cells. The AFM has several advantages for precise force measurements on a localized region with nanometer lateral dimension. In previous AFM studies, measurable contributions from the underlying hard substrate have been an obstacle to accurately determine the properties on thin samples. We modified our AFM tip to obtain the exact deformation profile as well as reducing the high stresses produced. We have probed depth profiles of mechanical properties of the taxol-treated and untreated cells by varying the indentation depth of the AFM-nanoindenting experiments.

  5. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  6. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  7. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  8. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  9. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  10. Advanced light element and low energy X-ray line analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Palasse, L.; Berlin, J.; Hansen, B.; Terborg, R.; Falke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Characterization at the micro- to nano-scale is crucial for understanding many processes in earth, planetary, material and biological sciences. The composition of thin electron transparent samples can be analyzed in the nm-range using transmission electron microscopes (TEM) or, specific sample holders provided, in the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Nevertheless both methods often require complex sample preparation. An alternative method is to analyze bulk samples with a FE-SEM. In order to decrease the excitation volume for generated X-rays, low accelerating voltages (HV<10) are required. Consequently, only low to intermediate energy X-ray lines can be evaluated and many peak overlaps have to be deconvoluted since the high energy range is not available. Methods: A BRUKER Quantax EDS system with an XFlash Silicon Drift Detector acquired EDS spectra in spectrum images. To separate overlapping peaks, an extended atomic database [1] was used. For single channel EDS the electron beam current, solid angle, take-off angle and exposure time can be optimized to investigate the element composition. Multiple SDD setups ensure an even higher efficiency and larger collection angles for the X-ray analysis than single channel detectors. Shadowing effects are minimized in element distribution maps so that samples can be investigated quickly and sometimes in a close to natural state, with little preparation. A new type of EDS detector, the annular four channel SDD (XFlash 5060F), is placed between the pole piece and sample. It covers a very large solid angle (1.1 sr) and allows sufficient data collection at low beam currents on beam sensitive samples with substantial surface topography. Examples of applications: Results demonstrate that SDD-based EDS analysis contributes essential information on the structure at the micro- to nano scale of the investigated sample types. These include stardust analogue impact experiments [2], Chicxulub asteroid

  11. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  12. Quantitative atomic resolution force imaging on epitaxial graphene with reactive and nonreactive AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Boneschanscher, Mark P; van der Lit, Joost; Sun, Zhixiang; Swart, Ingmar; Liljeroth, Peter; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2012-11-27

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of graphene and graphite show contrast with atomic periodicity. However, the contrast patterns vary depending on the atomic termination of the AFM tip apex and the tip-sample distance, hampering the identification of the atomic positions. Here, we report quantitative AFM imaging of epitaxial graphene using inert (carbon-monoxide-terminated) and reactive (iridium-terminated) tips. The atomic image contrast is markedly different with these tip terminations. With a reactive tip, we observe an inversion from attractive to repulsive atomic contrast with decreasing tip-sample distance, while a nonreactive tip only yields repulsive atomic contrast. We are able to identify the atoms with both tips at any tip-sample distance. This is a prerequisite for future structural and chemical analysis of adatoms, defects, and the edges of graphene nanostructures, crucial for understanding nanoscale graphene devices.

  13. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Gumí-Audenis, B; Carlà, F; Vitorino, M V; Panzarella, A; Porcar, L; Boilot, M; Guerber, S; Bernard, P; Rodrigues, M S; Sanz, F; Giannotti, M I; Costa, L

    2015-11-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  14. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  15. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  16. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  17. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, David P.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R. J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kerper, P. S.; Warmack, R. J.

    1995-04-01

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 104, we demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS+) or two (pMP32) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in our preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  18. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  19. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  20. Polymer coatings on conductive polypyrroles surface characterization by XPS, ToFSIMS, inverse gas chromatography and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Chehimi, M.M.; Abel, M.; Delamar, M.; Watts, J.F.; Zhdan, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of PMMA adsorption on some conducting polypyrroles (PPys) using a variety of surface analytical techniques is reported. PMMA adsorption was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). XPS and ToF-SIMS permit to determine the surface composition of PMMA-coated PPy surfaces vs the solvent nature, temperature and the PPy dopant anion. Both techniques show that acid-base interactions may govern PMMA adsorption. IGC was used to determine the coating morphology by monitoring the surface energy of the coated PPy powders. It is suggested that homogeneity of PMMA coatings increases with decreasing solvent power. Preliminary atomic force microscopy (AFM) results on PMMA films cast on flat PPy surfaces confirm the IGC observation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}