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Sample records for afm measurements revealed

  1. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  2. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results.

  3. Measurement of Fibrin Fiber Strength using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawerth, Louise; Falvo, Mchael; Canning, Anthony; Matthews, Garrett; Superfine, Richard; Guthold, Martin

    2003-11-01

    Blood clots usually form in the event of injury or damage to blood vessels to prevent the loss of blood. Moreover, as we age, blood clots often form in undesired locations, i.e. in blood vessels around the heart or brain, or in uninjured vessels resulting in heart attacks or strokes. Fibrin fibers, the skeleton of a blood clot, essentially perform the mechanical task of creating a blockage that stems blood flow. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanical properties of these fibers, such as the tensile strength and Young's modulus, will enhance our understanding of blood clots. For quantitative stress and strain measurements, we need to image the deformation of the fiber and measure the applied force simultaneously. For this reason, we are combining fluorescent microscopy with atomic force microscopy. Fibrin fibers were fluorescently labeled with streptavidin-coated quantum dots and deposited on a functionalized glass substrate, imaged and manipulated under buffer. We will describe our progress in obtaining quantitative lateral force measurements under buffer simultaneous with strain measurements from optical microscope images.

  4. Elastic modulus of polypyrrole nanotubes: AFM measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Polypyrrole nanotubes were electrochemically synthesized within the pores of nanoporous track-etched membranes. After dissolution of the template membrane, they were dispersed on PET membranes. Their tensile elastic modulus was measured by probing them in three points bending using an atomic force microscope. The elastic modulus was deduced from force-curve measurements. In this communication, the effect of the synthesis temperature and of the nanotube diameter will be presented. Especially it will be shown that the elastic modulus strongly increases when the nanotube outer diameter is reduced from 160 nm down to 35 nm. These results are in good agreement with previous results showing that the electrical conductivity of polypyrrole nanotubes increases by more than one order of magnitude when the diameter decreases in the same range. These behaviors could be explained by a larger ratio of well-oriented defect-free polymer chains in smaller tubes.

  5. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  6. Conductive probe AFM measurements of conjugated molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Mizutani, Wataru; Liang, Tien-Tzu; Azehara, Hiroaki; Miyake, Koji; Sasaki, Shinya; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    The electrical conduction of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made from conjugated molecules was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), with a focus on the molecular structural effect on conduction. First, the electrical conduction of SAMs made from phenylene oligomer SAMs was measured. The resistances through the monolayers increased exponentially with an increase in molecular length and the decay constants of transconductance beta were about 0.45 to 0.61 A(-1) measured at lower bias region. We further investigated the influence of applied load on the resistances. The resistances through terphenyl SAMs increased with an increase in the applied load up to 14 nN. Second, using an insertion technique into insulating alkanethiol SAMs, the electrical conduction of single conjugated terphenyl methanethiol and oligo(para-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) molecules embedded into insulating alkanethiol SAMs were measured. Electrical currents through these single molecules of OPVs were estimated to be larger than those through single terphenyl molecules, suggesting that the OPV structure can increase the electrical conduction of single molecules. Third, apparent negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed at higher bias measurements of SAMs. The appearance of NDR might be related to roughness of SAM surface, because apparent NDR was often observed on rough surfaces. In any case, the tip-molecule contact condition strongly affected carrier transport through metal tip/SAM/metal junction.

  7. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  8. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  9. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  10. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  11. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  12. Study on the AFM Force Spectroscopy method for elastic modulus measurement of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichelis, A.; Pavarelli, S.; Mortati, L.; Sassi, G.; Sassi, M.

    2013-09-01

    The cell elasticity gives information about its pathological state and metastatic potential. The aim of this paper is to study the AFM Force Spectroscopy technique with the future goal of realizing a reference method for accurate elastic modulus measurement in the elasticity range of living cells. This biological range has not been yet explored with a metrological approach. Practical hints are given for the realization of a Sylgard elasticity scale. Systematic effects given by the sample curing thickness and nanoindenter geometry have been found with regards of the measured elastic modulus. AFM measurement reproducibility better than 20% is obtained in the entire investigated elastic modulus scale of 101 - 104 kPa.

  13. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  14. Toward an uncertainty budget for measuring nanoparticles by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvallée, A.; Feltin, N.; Ducourtieux, S.; Trabelsi, M.; Hochepied, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on the evaluation of an uncertainty budget associated with the measurement of the mean diameter of a nanoparticle (NP) population by Atomic Force Microscopy. The measurement principle consists in measuring the height of a spherical-like NP population to determine the mean diameter and the size distribution. This method assumes that the NPs are well-dispersed on the substrate and isolated enough to avoid measurement errors due to agglomeration phenomenon. Since the measurement is directly impacted by the substrate roughness, the NPs have been deposited on a mica sheet presenting a very low roughness. A complete metrological characterization of the instrument has been carried out and the main error sources have been evaluated. The measuring method has been tested on a population of SiO2 NPs. Homemade software has been used to build the height distribution histogram taking into account only isolated NP. Finally, the uncertainty budget including main components has been established for the mean diameter measurement of this NP population. The most important components of this uncertainty budget are the calibration process along Z-axis, the scanning speed influence and then the vertical noise level.

  15. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  16. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  17. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-01

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (<100 nm) oscillations are readily measured with AFM. Resonance oscillation frequencies were measured for drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops.

  18. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  19. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  20. AFM-porosimetry: density and pore volume measurements of particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Malin H; Valle-Delgado, Juan J; Corkery, Robert W; Rutland, Mark W; Alberius, Peter C

    2008-06-01

    We introduced the novel technique of AFM-porosimetry and applied it to measure the total pore volume of porous particles with a spherical geometry. The methodology is based on using an atomic force microscope as a balance to measure masses of individual particles. Several particles within the same batch were measured, and by plotting particle mass versus particle volume, the bulk density of the sample can be extracted from the slope of the linear fit. The pore volume is then calculated from the densities of the bulk and matrix materials, respectively. In contrast to nitrogen sorption and mercury porosimetry, this method is capable of measuring the total pore volume regardless of pore size distribution and pore connectivity. In this study, three porous samples were investigated by AFM-porosimetry: one ordered mesoporous sample and two disordered foam structures. All samples were based on a matrix of amorphous silica templated by a block copolymer, Pluronic F127, swollen to various degrees with poly(propylene glycol). In addition, the density of silica spheres without a template was measured by two independent techniques: AFM and the Archimedes principle. PMID:18503284

  1. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  2. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  3. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  4. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the 'footprint' of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7. PMID:27454881

  5. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7.

  6. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force–distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7–9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6–9.7.

  7. Functionalized AFM probes for force spectroscopy: eigenmode shapes and stiffness calibration through thermal noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-06-01

    The functionalization of an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever with a colloidal bead is a widely used technique when the geometry between the probe and the sample must be controlled, particularly in force spectroscopy. But some questions remain: how does a bead glued at the end of a cantilever influence its mechanical response? And more importantly for quantitative measurements, can we still determine the stiffness of the AFM probe with traditional techniques?In this paper, the influence of the colloidal mass loading on the eigenmode shape and resonant frequency is investigated by measuring the thermal noise on rectangular AFM microcantilevers with and without beads attached at their extremities. The experiments are performed with a home-made ultra-sensitive AFM, based on differential interferometry. The focused beam from the interferometer probes the cantilever at different positions and the spatial shapes of the modes are determined up to the fifth resonance, without external excitation. The results clearly demonstrate that the first eigenmode is almost unchanged by mass loading. However the oscillation behavior of higher resonances presents a marked difference: with a particle glued at its extremity, the nodes of the modes are displaced towards the free end of the cantilever. These results are compared to an analytical model taking into account the mass and inertial moment of the load in an Euler-Bernoulli framework, where the normalization of the eigenmodes is explicitly worked out in order to allow a quantitative prediction of the thermal noise amplitude of each mode. A good agreement between the experimental results and the analytical model is demonstrated, allowing a clean calibration of the probe stiffness.

  8. Multiparametric AFM reveals turgor-responsive net-like peptidoglycan architecture in live streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar Dover, Ron; Bitler, Arkady; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-05-01

    Cell-wall peptidoglycan (PG) of Gram-positive bacteria is a strong and elastic multi-layer designed to resist turgor pressure and determine the cell shape and growth. Despite its crucial role, its architecture remains largely unknown. Here using high-resolution multiparametric atomic force microscopy (AFM), we studied how the structure and elasticity of PG change when subjected to increasing turgor pressure in live Group B Streptococcus. We show a new net-like arrangement of PG, which stretches and stiffens following osmotic challenge. The same structure also exists in isogenic mutants lacking surface appendages. Cell aging does not alter the elasticity of the cell wall, yet destroys the net architecture and exposes single segmented strands with the same circumferential orientation as predicted for intact glycans. Together, we show a new functional PG architecture in live Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Multiparametric AFM reveals turgor-responsive net-like peptidoglycan architecture in live streptococci.

    PubMed

    Dover, Ron Saar; Bitler, Arkady; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-01-01

    Cell-wall peptidoglycan (PG) of Gram-positive bacteria is a strong and elastic multi-layer designed to resist turgor pressure and determine the cell shape and growth. Despite its crucial role, its architecture remains largely unknown. Here using high-resolution multiparametric atomic force microscopy (AFM), we studied how the structure and elasticity of PG change when subjected to increasing turgor pressure in live Group B Streptococcus. We show a new net-like arrangement of PG, which stretches and stiffens following osmotic challenge. The same structure also exists in isogenic mutants lacking surface appendages. Cell aging does not alter the elasticity of the cell wall, yet destroys the net architecture and exposes single segmented strands with the same circumferential orientation as predicted for intact glycans. Together, we show a new functional PG architecture in live Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Comparison of CD measurements of an EUV photomask by EUV scatterometry and CD-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholze, Frank; Soltwisch, Victor; Dai, Gaoliang; Henn, Mark-Alexander; Gross, Hermann

    2013-09-01

    EUV scatterometry is a potential high-throughput measurement method for the characterization of EUV photomask structures. We present a comparison of angle resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) scatterometry and critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) as a reference metrology for measurements of geometrical parameters like line width (CD), height and sidewall angle of EUV photomask structures. The structures investigated are dense and semidense bright and dark lines with different nominal CDs between 140 nm and 540 nm. The results show excellent linearity of the critical dimension measured with both methods within a range of only 1.8 nm and an offset of the absolute values below 3 nm. A maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method is used to reconstruct the shape parameters and to estimate their uncertainties from the measured scattering efficiencies. The newly developed CD-AFM at PTB allows versatile measurements of parameters such as height, CD, sidewall angle, line edge/width roughness, corner rounding, and pitch. It applies flared tips to probe steep and even undercut sidewalls and employs a new vector approaching probing (VAP) strategy which enables very low tip wear and high measurement flexibility. Its traceability is ensured by a set of calibrated step-height and reference CD standards.

  11. New insights into morphology of high performance BHJ photovoltaics revealed by high resolution AFM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Feng; Yagihashi, Noritoshi; Nakaya, Masafumi; Ferdous, Sunzida; Liang, Xiaobin; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Nakajima, Ken; Russell, Thomas P

    2014-10-01

    Direct imaging of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin film morphology in polymer-based solar cells is essential to understand device function and optimize efficiency. The morphology of the BHJ active layer consists of bicontinuous domains of the donor and acceptor materials, having characteristic length scales of several tens of nanometers, that reduces charge recombination, enhances charge separation, and enables electron and hole transport to their respective electrodes. Direct imaging of the morphology from the molecular to macroscopic level, though, is lacking. Though transmission electron tomography provides a 3D, real-space image of the morphology, quantifying the structure is not possible. Here we used high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping and nanomechanical modes to investigate the BHJ active layer morphology that, when combined with Ar(+) etching, provided unique insights with unparalleled spatial resolution. PCBM was seen to form a network that interpenetrated into the fibrillar network of the hole-conducting polymer, both being imbedded in a mixture of the two components. The free surface was found to be enriched with polymer crystals having a "face-on" orientation and the morphology at the anode interface was markedly different.

  12. Measurement of Cationic and Intracellular Modulation of Integrin Binding Affinity by AFM-Based Nanorobot

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kevin C.; Yang, Ruiguo; Zeng, Bixi; Song, Bo; Wang, Shouye; Xi, Ning; Basson, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrins are dynamic transmembrane cation-dependent heterodimers that both anchor cells in position and transduce signals into and out of cells. We used an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanorobotic system to measure integrin-binding forces in intact human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The AFM-based nanorobot enables human-directed, high-accuracy probe positioning and site-specific investigations. Functionalizing the AFM probe with an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-containing sequence (consensus binding sequence for integrins) allowed us to detect a series of peptide-cell membrane interactions with a median binding force of 115.1 ± 4.9 pN that were not detected in control interactions. Chelating divalent cations from the culture medium abolished these interactions, as did inhibiting intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using Y15. Adding 1 mM Mg2+ to the medium caused a rightward shift in the force-binding curve. Adding 1 mM Ca2+ virtually abolished the RGD-membrane specific interactions and blocked the Mg2+ effects. Cell adhesion assays demonstrated parallel effects of divalent cations and the FAK inhibitor on cell adhesion. These results demonstrate direct modulation of integrin-binding affinity by both divalent cations and intracellular signal inhibition. Additionally, three binding states (nonspecific, specific inactivated, and specific activated) were delineated from affinity measurements. Although other research has assumed that this process of integrin conformational change causes altered ligand binding, in this work we directly measured these three states in individual integrins in a physiologically based study. PMID:23823222

  13. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Sánchez, Paula; Bodensiek, Kai; Li, Sai; Simons, Mikael; Schaap, Iwan A T

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components. PMID:23028915

  14. Unspecific membrane protein-lipid recognition: combination of AFM imaging, force spectroscopy, DSC and FRET measurements.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Jordi H; Montero, M Teresa; Morros, Antoni; Domènech, Òscar

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we will describe in quantitative terms the unspecific recognition between lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, a polytopic model membrane protein, and one of the main components of the inner membrane of this bacterium. Supported lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) (3:1, mol/mol) in the presence of Ca(2+) display lateral phase segregation that can be distinguished by atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as force spectroscopy. LacY shows preference for fluid (Lα) phases when it is reconstituted in POPE : POPG (3:1, mol/mol) proteoliposomes at a lipid-to-protein ratio of 40. When the lipid-to-protein ratio is decreased down to 0.5, two domains can be distinguished by AFM. While the upper domain is formed by self-segregated units of LacY, the lower domain is constituted only by phospholipids in gel (Lβ) phase. On the one hand, classical differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements evidenced the segregation of a population of phospholipids and point to the existence of a boundary region at the lipid-protein interface. On the other hand, Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements in solution evidenced that POPE is selectively recognized by LacY. A binary pseudophase diagram of POPE : POPG built from AFM observations enables to calculate the composition of the fluid phase where LacY is inserted. These results are consistent with a model where POPE constitutes the main component of the lipid-LacY interface segregated from the fluid bulk phase where POPG predominates.

  15. Nanostructure of Porosity (and Entrapped Solvent Effects) in Laboratory-Grown Crystals of RDX as Revealed by an AFM*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Coffey, C. S.; Armstrong, R. W.; Elban, W. L.

    1999-06-01

    Internal porosity within laboratory-grown crystals of RDX has been investigated by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in extension of previous work [1]. The crystals were cleaved along 001 planes so as to provide cross-sections of numerous complex morphologies. The nano-caverns ranged in size from 50 nm to a few micrometers. Rather shallow pond-like structures, only 10-200 nm deep, with strange and complicated shapes and tentacle-like arms were observed. It is speculated that the complex shapes arise from thermal influences and associated redistribution of solvent and solute. Commercial cleaved crystals of sucrose were also examined and failed to show such defects consistent with greater solubility characteristics. The sucrose crystals showed a terraced structure with numerous steps of unit cell height, reminiscent of those observed in calcite, mica, and TATB. *Supported by the Office of Naval Research. 1. J. Sharma, C.S. Coffey, R.W. Armstrong, and W.L. Elban, "Nanostructure of Hot Spots as Revealed by an AFM," in 11th International Detonation Symposium, in print.

  16. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  17. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  18. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  19. A Model for Step Height, Edge Slope and Linewidth Measurements Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Fu, Joseph; Song, John; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2003-09-01

    Nano-scale linewidth measurements are performed in semiconductor manufacturing and in the data storage industry and will become increasingly important in micro-mechanical engineering. With the development of manufacturing technology in recent years, the sizes of linewidths are steadily shrinking and are in the range of hundreds of nanometers. As a result, it is difficult to achieve accurate measurement results for nanometer scale linewidth, primarily because of the interaction volume of electrons in materials for an SEM probe or the tip size of an AFM probe. However, another source of methods divergence is the mathematical model of the line itself. In order to reduce the methods divergences caused by different measurement methods and instruments for an accurate determination of nanometer scale linewidth parameters, a metrological model and algorithm are proposed for linewidth measurements with AFM. The line profile is divided into 5 parts with 19 sections and 20 key derived points. Each section is fitted by a least squares straight line, so that the profile can be represented by a set of straight lines and 6 special points, or by a 20×2 matrix of fitted points and a 6×2 matrix of starter points. According to the algorithm, WT and WTF, WM and WMF, WB and WBF represent the widths at the top, the middle and the bottom of the line profile before and after the least squares fitting, respectively. AL and AR represent the left and right sidewall angles, and H represents the step height of the line profile. Based on this algorithm, software has been developed using MATLAB for the calculation of width and height parameters of the line profile. A NIST nanometer scale linewidth artifact developed at NIST's Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory (EEEL) was measured using a commercial AFM with nanotube tips. The measured linewidth profiles are analyzed using our model, algorithm and software. The model developed in this paper is straightforward to understand, and

  20. Measuring cell wall elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Melissa; Venkataraman, Sankar; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P

    2006-07-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria.

  1. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  2. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  3. Cellular mechanoadaptation to substrate mechanical properties: contributions of substrate stiffness and thickness to cell stiffness measurements using AFM.

    PubMed

    Vichare, Shirish; Sen, Shamik; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2014-02-28

    Mechanosensing by adherent cells is usually studied by quantifying cell responses on hydrogels that are covalently linked to a rigid substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) represents a convenient way of characterizing the mechanoadaptation response of adherent cells on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Since AFM measurements reflect the effective cell stiffness, therefore, in addition to measuring real cytoskeletal alterations across different conditions, these measurements might also be influenced by the geometry and physical properties of the substrate itself. To better understand how the physical attributes of the gel influence AFM stiffness measurements of cells, we have used finite element analysis to simulate the indentation of cells of various spreads resting on hydrogels of varying stiffness and thickness. Consistent with experimental results, our simulation results indicate that for well spread cells, stiffness values are significantly over-estimated when experiments are performed on cells cultured on soft and thin gels. Using parametric studies, we have developed scaling relationships between the effective stiffness probed by AFM and the bulk cell stiffness, taking cell and tip geometry, hydrogel properties, nuclear stiffness and cell contractility into account. Finally, using simulated mechanoadaptation responses, we have demonstrated that a cell stiffening response may arise purely due to the substrate properties. Collectively, our results demonstrate the need to take hydrogel properties into account while estimating cell stiffness using AFM indentation. PMID:24651595

  4. Mechanical properties of in situ demineralised human enamel measured by AFM nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Manuela; Hughes, Julie A.; Parker, David M.; Jandt, Klaus D.

    2001-10-01

    Diet-induced demineralisation is one of the key factors in surface changes of tooth enamel, with soft drinks being a significant etiological agent. The first step in this dissolution process is characterised by a change in the mechanical properties of the enamel and a roughening of the surface. The objective of this pilot study was to measure early stages of in situ induced hardness changes of polished human enamel surfaces with high accuracy using a nanoindenter attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Human unerupted third molars were cleaned, sterilised with sodium hypochlorite, sectioned and embedded in epoxy resin. The outer enamel surface was polished and the samples partly covered with a tape, allowing a 2-mm-wide zone to be exposed to the oral environment. Samples were fitted in an intra-oral appliance, which was worn from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for one day. During this time the volunteer sipped 250 ml of a drink over 10 min periods at 9.00, 11.00, 13.00 and 15.00 h. Three different drinks, mineral water, orange juice and the prototype of a blackcurrant drink with low demineralisation potential were used in this study. At the end of the experiment the samples were detached from the appliance, the tape removed and the surfaces chemically cleaned. The surface hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the exposed and unexposed areas of each sample were determined. In addition, high resolution topographical AFM images were obtained. This study shows that by determining the hardness and reduced Young's modulus, the difference in demineralisation caused by the drinks can be detected and quantified before statistically significant changes in surface topography could be observed with the AFM. The maximum decrease in surface hardness and Young's modulus occurred in the samples exposed to orange juice, followed by those exposed to the blackcurrant drink, while exposure to water led to the same values as unexposed areas. A one-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant

  5. Combining AFM and Acoustic Probes to Reveal Changes in the Elastic Stiffness Tensor of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Zhao, Xuegen; Carisey, Alex; Ballestrem, Christoph; Derby, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how the elastic stiffness of a cell affects its communication with its environment is of fundamental importance for the understanding of tissue integrity in health and disease. For stiffness measurements, it has been customary to quote a single parameter quantity, e.g., Young’s modulus, rather than the minimum of two terms of the stiffness tensor required by elasticity theory. In this study, we use two independent methods (acoustic microscopy and atomic force microscopy nanoindentation) to characterize the elastic properties of a cell and thus determine two independent elastic constants. This allows us to explore in detail how the mechanical properties of cells change in response to signaling pathways that are known to regulate the cell’s cytoskeleton. In particular, we demonstrate that altering the tensioning of actin filaments in NIH3T3 cells has a strong influence on the cell's shear modulus but leaves its bulk modulus unchanged. In contrast, altering the polymerization state of actin filaments influences bulk and shear modulus in a similar manner. In addition, we can use the data to directly determine the Poisson ratio of a cell and show that in all cases studied, it is less than, but very close to, 0.5 in value. PMID:25296302

  6. 3D force and displacement sensor for SFA and AFM measurements.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Kai; McGuiggan, Patricia; Carver, Greg; Meinhart, Carl; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2008-02-19

    A new device has been designed, and a prototype built and tested, that can simultaneously measure the displacements and/or the components of a force in three orthogonal directions. The "3D sensor" consists of four or eight strain gauges attached to the four arms of a single cross-shaped force-measuring cantilever spring. Finite element modeling (FEM) was performed to optimize the design configuration to give desired sensitivity of force, displacement, stiffness, and resonant frequency in each direction (x, y, and z) which were tested on a "mesoscale" device and found to agree with the predicted values to within 4-10%. The device can be fitted into a surface forces apparatus (SFA), and a future smaller "microscale" microfabricated version can be fitted into an atomic force microscope (AFM) for simultaneous measurements of the normal and lateral (friction) forces between a tip (or colloidal bead probe) and a surface, and the topography of the surface. Results of the FEM analysis are presented, and approximate equations derived using linear elasticity theory are given for the sensitivity in each direction. Initial calibrations and measurements of thin film rheology (lubrication forces) using the "mesoscale" prototype show the device to function as expected.

  7. Direct and quantitative AFM measurements of the concentration and temperature dependence of the hydrophobic force law at nanoscopic contacts.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-05-15

    By virtue of its importance for self-organization of biological matter the hydrophobic force law and the range of hydrophobic interactions (HI) have been debated extensively over the last 40 years. Here, we directly measure and quantify the hydrophobic force-distance law over large temperature and concentration ranges. In particular, we study the HI between molecularly smooth hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers, and similarly modified gold-coated AFM tips (radii∼8-50 nm). We present quantitative and direct evidence that the hydrophobic force is both long-ranged and exponential down to distances of about 1-2 nm. Therefore, we introduce a self-consistent radius-normalization for atomic force microscopy data. This approach allows quantitative data fitting of AFM-based experimental data to the recently proposed Hydra-model. With a statistical significance of r(2)⩾0.96 our fitting and data directly reveal an exponential HI decay length of 7.2±1.2 Å that is independent of the salt concentration up to 750 mM. As such, electrostatic screening does not have a significant influence on the HI in electrolyte concentrations ranging from 1 mM to 750 mM. In 1 M solutions the observed instability during approach shifts to longer distances, indicating ion correlation/adsorption effects at high salt concentrations. With increasing temperature the magnitude of HI decreases monotonically, while the range increases slightly. We compare our results to the large body of available literature, and shed new light into range and magnitude of hydrophobic interactions at very close distances and over wide temperature and concentration regimes. PMID:25678158

  8. AFM mapping of the elastic properties of brain tissue reveals kPa μm(-1) gradients of rigidity.

    PubMed

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Meyer, Mikaël; Gaude, Christophe; Gay, Emmanuel; Ratel, David; Nicolas, Alice

    2016-07-20

    It is now well established that the mechanical environment of the cells in tissues deeply impacts cellular fate, including life cycle, differentiation and tumor progression. Designs of biomaterials already include the control of mechanical parameters, and in general, their main focus is to control the rheological properties of the biomaterials at a macroscopic scale. However, recent studies have demonstrated that cells can stress their environment below the micron scale, and therefore could possibly respond to the rheological properties of their environment at this micron scale. In this context, probing the mechanical properties of physiological cellular environments at subcellular scales is becoming critical. To this aim, we performed in vitro indentation measurements using AFM on sliced human pituitary gland tissues. A robust methodology was implemented using elasto-adhesive models, which shows that accounting for the adhesion of the probe on the tissue is critical for the reliability of the measurement. In addition to quantifying for the first time the rigidity of normal pituitary gland tissue, with a geometric mean of 9.5 kPa, our measurements demonstrated that the mechanical properties of this tissue are far from uniform at subcellular scales. Gradients of rigidity as large as 12 kPa μm(-1) were observed. This observation suggests that physiological rigidity can be highly non-uniform at the micron-scale. PMID:27377831

  9. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  10. Recombinant albumin adsorption on mica studied by AFM and streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Kujda, Marta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Morga, Maria; Sofińska, Kamila

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in monomeric state is widely used in pharmaceutical industry as a drug excipient and for preparing coatings for medical devices. In this work the adsorption process of rHSA on model mica surface at pH 3.5 was studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. The kinetics of albumin adsorption was determined by a direct enumeration of single molecules over various substrate areas. These results were consistent with streaming potential measurements carried out for the parallel-plate channel flow and with theoretical predictions derived from the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Desorption kinetics of albumin under flow conditions was also evaluated via the streaming potential measurements. In this way, the amount of irreversibly bound albumin was quantitatively evaluated to be 0.64 and 1.2 mg m(-2) for ionic strength of 0.01 and 0.15 M, respectively. This agrees with previous results obtained for HSA and theoretical calculations derived from the RSA model. Additionally, it was demonstrated that there existed a fraction of reversibly bound albumin that can be fully eluted within a few hours. The binding energy of these fraction of molecules was -18 kT that is consistent with the electrostatic controlled adsorption mechanism of albumin at this pH. It was concluded that the rHSA monolayers of well-defined coverage can find applications for quantitatively analyzing ligand binding and for performing efficient biomaterials and immunological tests.

  11. Recombinant albumin adsorption on mica studied by AFM and streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Kujda, Marta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Morga, Maria; Sofińska, Kamila

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in monomeric state is widely used in pharmaceutical industry as a drug excipient and for preparing coatings for medical devices. In this work the adsorption process of rHSA on model mica surface at pH 3.5 was studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. The kinetics of albumin adsorption was determined by a direct enumeration of single molecules over various substrate areas. These results were consistent with streaming potential measurements carried out for the parallel-plate channel flow and with theoretical predictions derived from the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Desorption kinetics of albumin under flow conditions was also evaluated via the streaming potential measurements. In this way, the amount of irreversibly bound albumin was quantitatively evaluated to be 0.64 and 1.2 mg m(-2) for ionic strength of 0.01 and 0.15 M, respectively. This agrees with previous results obtained for HSA and theoretical calculations derived from the RSA model. Additionally, it was demonstrated that there existed a fraction of reversibly bound albumin that can be fully eluted within a few hours. The binding energy of these fraction of molecules was -18 kT that is consistent with the electrostatic controlled adsorption mechanism of albumin at this pH. It was concluded that the rHSA monolayers of well-defined coverage can find applications for quantitatively analyzing ligand binding and for performing efficient biomaterials and immunological tests. PMID:25679491

  12. Dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode: overview and challenges in revealing the appropriate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Makasheva, K; Villeneuve-Faure, C; Laurent, C; Despax, B; Boudou, L; Teyssedre, G

    2015-07-24

    The study of charge distribution on the surface and in the bulk of dielectrics is of great scientific interest because of the information gained on the storage and transport properties of the medium. Nevertheless, the processes at the nanoscale level remain out of the scope of the commonly used diagnostic methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is currently applied for both injection and imaging of charges on dielectric thin films at the nanoscale level to answer the increasing demand for characterization of miniaturized components used in microelectronics, telecommunications, electrophotography, electrets, etc. However, the mechanisms for dielectric charging by AFM are not well documented, and an analysis of the literature shows that inappropriate mechanisms are sometimes presented. It is shown here that corona discharge, frequently pointed out as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode, cannot develop in such small distances. Furthermore, a review of different mechanisms surmised to be at the origin of dielectric charging at the nanoscale level is offered. Field electron emission enhanced by thermionic emission is identified as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging at the nanoscale level. Experimental validation of this mechanism is obtained for typical electric field strengths in AFM. PMID:26133237

  13. Dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode: overview and challenges in revealing the appropriate mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makasheva, K.; Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Laurent, C.; Despax, B.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2015-07-01

    The study of charge distribution on the surface and in the bulk of dielectrics is of great scientific interest because of the information gained on the storage and transport properties of the medium. Nevertheless, the processes at the nanoscale level remain out of the scope of the commonly used diagnostic methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is currently applied for both injection and imaging of charges on dielectric thin films at the nanoscale level to answer the increasing demand for characterization of miniaturized components used in microelectronics, telecommunications, electrophotography, electrets, etc. However, the mechanisms for dielectric charging by AFM are not well documented, and an analysis of the literature shows that inappropriate mechanisms are sometimes presented. It is shown here that corona discharge, frequently pointed out as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode, cannot develop in such small distances. Furthermore, a review of different mechanisms surmised to be at the origin of dielectric charging at the nanoscale level is offered. Field electron emission enhanced by thermionic emission is identified as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging at the nanoscale level. Experimental validation of this mechanism is obtained for typical electric field strengths in AFM.

  14. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  15. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGES

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  16. A new nano-accuracy AFM system for minimizing Abbe errors and the evaluation of its measuring uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongmin; Lee, Dong Yeon; Gweon, Dae Gab

    2007-01-01

    A new AFM system was designed for the establishment of a standard technique of nano-length measurement in a 2D plane. In a long range (about several tens of micrometers), measurement uncertainty is dominantly affected by the Abbe error of the XY scanning stage. No linear stage is perfectly straight; in other words, every scanning stage is subject to tilting, pitch and yaw motions. In this paper, an AFM system with minimum offsets of XY sensing is designed. Moreover, the XY scanning stage is designed to minimize the rotation angle, as Abbe errors occur through multiple combination of the offset and the rotation angle. To minimize the rotation angle, an optimal design is performed by maximizing the ratio of the stiffness of the parasitic direction to the motion direction of each stage. This paper describes a design scheme of a full AFM system, in particular, the XY scanner. The full range of a fabricated XY scanner is 100 microm x 100 microm. The tilting, pitch and yaw motions are measured by an autocollimator to evaluate the performance of the XY stage. The results show that the XY scanner have a 0.75 arcsec parasitic rotation about the maximum range, thus the uncertainty in terms of the Abbe errors are very small relative to other standard equipment. Using this AFM system, a 3mum pitch specimen was measured. The measurement uncertainty of the total system was evaluated especially about pitch length. For a 1D evaluation, Abbe errors are the most dominant factor, and the expanded combined uncertainty (k = 2) of system was square root (4.13)(2)+(5.07 x 10(-5)xp)(2)(nm). For a 2D evaluation, mirror non-orthogonality and Abbe errors are dominant factors, and expanded combined uncertainty (k = 2) of the system was square root (4.13)(2)+(1.228 x 10(-4)xp)(2) in the X direction, and square root (6.28)(2)+(1.266 x 10(-4)xp)(2) in the Y direction (the unit is nanometers), where p is the measured length in nm.

  17. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  18. Utilization of profilometry, SEM, AFM and contact angle measurements in describing surfaces of plastic floor coverings and explaining their cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuisma, R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Saarikoski, I.; Sjöberg, A.-M.; Hautala, M.

    2005-06-01

    The tendency to soil and cleanability of ten commercial plastic floor coverings: eight vinyl (PVC) floor coverings, one vinyl composite tile and one plastic composite tile, were examined. Floor coverings were soiled with inorganic, organic and biological soil. The cleanability was measured both by bioluminescence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and colorimetrically. The surface topography was studied by AFM, SEM and with a profilometer. From the 2D- and 3D-profilometric measurements several characteristic parameters of the surface profiles were extracted. The tendency to soil and cleanability were compared with the characteristics of the surface. A weak correlation was found between roughness and soilability but no correlation between roughness and cleanability. Roughness had no correlation with contact angle.

  19. Application of the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model in AFM-based mechanical measurements on cells and gel.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Yu M; Bagrov, D V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V

    2015-10-01

    The force-distance curves (FCs) obtained by the atomic force microscope (AFM) with colloid probes contain information about both the viscoelastic properties and adhesion of a sample. Here, we processed both the approach and retraction parts of FCs obtained on polyacrylamide gels (in water or PBS) and Vero cells (in a culture medium). The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model was applied to the retraction curves to account for the adhesion. The effects of loading rate, holding time and indentation depth on adhesion force and Young's modulus, calculated from approach and retraction curves, were studied. It was shown that both bulk and local interfacial viscoelasticity can affect the observed approach-retraction hysteresis and measured parameters. The addition of 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) decreased adhesion of the probe to the PAA gel surface, so interfacial viscoelasticity effects were diminished. On the contrary, the adhesiveness of Vero cells increased after BSA addition, indicating the complex nature of the cell-probe interaction.

  20. Direct measurement of electrostatic fields using single Teflon nanoparticle attached to AFM tip

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A single 210-nm Teflon nanoparticle (sTNP) was attached to the vertex of a silicon nitride (Si3N4) atomic force microscope tip and charged via contact electrification. The charged sTNP can then be considered a point charge and used to measure the electrostatic field adjacent to a parallel plate condenser using 30-nm gold/20-nm titanium as electrodes. This technique can provide a measurement resolution of 250/100 nm along the X- and Z-axes, and the minimum electrostatic force can be measured within 50 pN. PACS 07.79.Lh, 81.16.-c, 84.37. + q PMID:24314111

  1. Local mechanical properties of bladder cancer cells measured by AFM as a signature of metastatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidine, Y.; Laurent, V. M.; Michel, R.; Duperray, A.; Verdier, C.

    2015-10-01

    The rheological properties of bladder cancer cells of different invasivities have been investigated using a microrheological technique well adapted in the range [1-300Hz] of interest to understand local changes in the cytoskeleton microstructure, in particular actin fibres. Drugs disrupting actin and acto-myosin functions were used to study the resistance of such cancer cells. Results on a variety of cell lines were fitted with a model revealing the importance of two parameters, the elastic shear plateau modulus G N 0 as well as the glassy transition frequency f T. These parameters are good markers for invasiveness, with the notable exception of the cell periphery, which is stiffer for less invasive cells, and could be of importance in cancer metastasis.

  2. Direct AFM force measurements between air bubbles in aqueous monodisperse sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) solutions.

    PubMed

    Browne, Christine; Tabor, Rico F; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    Structural forces play an important role in the rheology, processing and stability of colloidal systems and complex fluids, with polyelectrolytes representing a key class of structuring colloids. Here, we explore the interactions between soft colloids, in the form of air bubbles, in solutions of monodisperse sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) as a model polyelectrolyte. It is found that by self-consistently modelling the force oscillations due to structuring of the polymer chains along with deformation of the bubbles, it is possible to precisely predict the interaction potential between approaching bubbles. In line with polyelectrolyte scaling theory, two distinct regimes of behaviour are seen, corresponding to dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions. It is also seen that by blending monodisperse systems to give a bidisperse sample, the interaction forces between soft colloids can be controlled with a high degree of precision. At increasing bubble collision velocity, it is revealed that hydrodynamic flow overwhelms oscillatory structural interactions, showing the important disparity between equilibrium behaviour and dynamic interactions.

  3. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  4. Iterative control approach to high-speed force-distance curve measurement using AFM: time-dependent response of PDMS example.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Soo; Lin, Zhiqun; Shrotriya, Pranav; Sundararajan, Sriram; Zou, Qingze

    2008-08-01

    Force-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely used in a broad range of areas. However, currently force-curve measurements are hampered the its low speed of AFM. In this article, a novel inversion-based iterative control technique is proposed to dramatically increase the speed of force-curve measurements. Experimental results are presented to show that by using the proposed control technique, the speed of force-curve measurements can be increased by over 80 times--with no loss of spatial resolution--on a commercial AFM platform and with a standard cantilever. High-speed force curve measurements using this control technique are utilized to quantitatively study the time-dependent elastic modulus of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The force-curves employ a broad spectrum of push-in (load) rates, spanning two-order differences. The elastic modulus measured at low-speed compares well with the value obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) test, and the value of the elastic modulus increases as the push-in rate increases, signifying that a faster external deformation rate transitions the viscoelastic response of PDMS from that of a rubbery material toward a glassy one. PMID:18467033

  5. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility.

  6. AFM force measurements of the gp120-sCD4 and gp120 or CD4 antigen-antibody interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Zeng, Gucheng; Chen, Sherry Shiyi; Feng, Qian; Chen, Zheng Wei

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} The unbinding force of sCD4-gp120 interaction was 25.45 {+-} 20.46 pN. {yields} The unbinding force of CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was 51.22 {+-} 34.64 pN. {yields} The unbinding force of gp120 antigen-antibody interaction was 89.87 {+-} 44.63 pN. {yields} The interaction forces between various HIV inhibitors and the target molecules are significantly different. {yields} Functionalizing on AFM tip or substrate of an interaction pair caused different results. -- Abstract: Soluble CD4 (sCD4), anti-CD4 antibody, and anti-gp120 antibody have long been regarded as entry inhibitors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy. However, the interactions between these HIV entry inhibitors and corresponding target molecules are still poorly understood. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was utilized to investigate the interaction forces among them. We found that the unbinding forces of sCD4-gp120 interaction, CD4 antigen-antibody interaction, and gp120 antigen-antibody interaction were 25.45 {+-} 20.46, 51.22 {+-} 34.64, and 89.87 {+-} 44.63 pN, respectively, which may provide important mechanical information for understanding the effects of viral entry inhibitors on HIV infection. Moreover, we found that the functionalization of an interaction pair on AFM tip or substrate significantly influenced the results, implying that we must perform AFM force measurement and analyze the data with more caution.

  7. Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to reveal the coexistence of coupled antiferromagnetic (AFM)/ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) orders in multiferroic TbMnO3 films, which can guide researchers in creating new kinds of multiferroic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jingbo; Zhu, Jianxin; Trugman, Stuart A.; Taylor, Antoinette; Jia, Quanxi; Prasankumar, Rohit

    2012-07-06

    , experimental techniques capable of dynamically unraveling the interplay between these degrees of freedom on an ultrafast timescale are needed. Here, we use ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal coexisting coupled magnetic orders in epitaxial TMO thin films grown on (001)-STO, which were not observed in previous work. Our temperature (T)-dependent transient differential reflectivity ({Delta}R/R) measurements show clear signatures of sinusoidal AFM, spiral AFM (FE) and FM phases developing as the film thickness changes. We carry out first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations to explain the coupling between AFM/FE and FM orders. These results reveal that the coupling between different magnetic orders observed in our multiferroic TMO thin films may offer greater control of functionality as compared to bulk single crystal multiferroics.

  8. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  9. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  10. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  11. Study of the corrosion products formed on a multiphase CuAlBe alloy in a sodium chloride solution by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, S.; Simison, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    The corrosion products formed on a multiphase Cu-11.40Al-0.55Be (wt.%) alloy in 3.5% NaCl at open circuit potential, and their evolution with immersion time were studied mainly by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements. The aluminium content of each phase affects the formation of the corrosion products on them. After 1 day of immersion, γ 2 precipitates were more susceptible to dealuminization, while α' phase exhibited a high corrosion stability. The corrosion products evolved with immersion time, and CuCl 2 and a Cu 2O/CuO double layer film were the stable products formed on all the phases after long times.

  12. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  13. AFM cantilever vibration detection with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; Wagner, Ryan; Keller, Robert; Killgore, Jason

    Cantilever oscillations for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are conventionally measured with an optical lever system. The speed of AFM cantilevers can be increased by decreasing the size of the cantilever; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the current optical lever approach. Here we demonstrate an electron detection scheme in an SEM for detecting AFM cantilever oscillations. An oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to the propagation direction of a stationary ~ 1 nm diameter electron probe, and the oscillatory change in electron scattering resulting from the changing thickness of the electron irradiated area of the AFM tip is detected with a transmitted electron detector positioned below the AFM tip. We perform frequency sweep and ring-down experiments to determine the first resonant frequency and Q factor of an AFM cantilever.

  14. Identifying individual chemical bonds in single-molecule chemical reaction products using nc-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; de Oteyza, Dimas G.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Riss, Alexander; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Gorman, Patrick; Etkin, Grisha; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Perez, Alejandro; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F.; Fischer, Felix R.

    2014-03-01

    Determining reaction pathways and products is an integral part of chemical synthesis. Ensemble measurements are commonly used, but identifying products of complex reactions at surfaces presents a significant challenge. Here we present a non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) study to directly address this issue. We followed the change of the chemical structures, from reactants to products of enediyne cyclization reactions on metal surfaces. Thermal annealing of enediynes induced a series of cyclization cascades leading to radical species and the formation of dimers. Atomically resolved nc-AFM images reveal the precise chemical structure and the formation of chemical bonds between single molecular units. With the support of DFT calculations, we identified the underlying chemical pathways and barriers, demonstrating the potential of this atomically resolved AFM technique to study unknown reaction products in surface chemistry at the single-molecule level.

  15. Contact Angle Measurements by AFM on Droplets of Intermediate-Length Alkanes Adsorbed on SiO2 Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M.; Taub, H.; Knorr, K.; Volkmann, U. G.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2007-03-01

    We have recently discovered that films of intermediate-length alkanes (n-CnH2n+2; 24 < n < 40) do not completely wet a SiO2 surface on a nanometer length scale [2]. In a narrow temperature range near the bulk melting point Tb, we observe a single layer of molecules oriented with their long axis perpendicular to the surface. On heating just above Tb, these molecules undergo a delayering transition to three-dimensional droplets that remain present up to their evaporation point. Here we report measurements by noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy of the contact angle of these droplets for a film of hexatriacontane (n-C36H74 or C36). Our preliminary measurements indicate that there is a weak maximum in the contact angle at ˜Tb + 3 C. Further measurements are planned to investigate whether the weak maximum in the contact angle is consistent with the droplets supporting a surface freezing effect as at the bulk fluid/air interface. ^2M. Bai, K. Knorr, M. J. Simpson, S. Trogisch, H. Taub, S. N. Ehrlich, H. Mo, U. G. Volkmann, F. Y. Hansen, cond-mat/0611497.

  16. Measurement of membrane binding between recoverin, a calcium-myristoyl switch protein, and lipid bilayers by AFM-based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Desmeules, Philippe; Grandbois, Michel; Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Yamazaki, Akio; Salesse, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Myristoyl switch is a feature of several peripheral membrane proteins involved in signal transduction pathways. This unique molecular property is best illustrated by the "Ca(2+)-myristoyl switch" of recoverin, which is a Ca(2+)-binding protein present in retinal rod cells of vertebrates. In this transduction pathway, the Ca(2+)-myristoyl switch acts as a calcium sensor involved in cell recovery from photoactivation. Ca(2+) binding by recoverin induces the extrusion of its myristoyl group to the solvent, which leads to its translocation from cytosol to rod disk membranes. Force spectroscopy, based on atomic force microscope (AFM) technology, was used to determine the extent of membrane binding of recoverin in the absence and presence of calcium, and to quantify this force of binding. An adhesion force of 48 +/- 5 pN was measured between recoverin and supported phospholipid bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+). However, no binding was observed in the absence of Ca(2+). Experiments with nonmyristoylated recoverin confirmed these observations. Our results are consistent with previously measured extraction forces of lipids from membranes. PMID:12023256

  17. The role of confinement and corona crystallinity on the bending modulus of copolymer micelles measured directly by AFM flexural tests.

    PubMed

    Jennings, L; Glazer, P; Laan, A C; de Kruijff, R M; Waton, G; Schosseler, F; Mendes, E

    2016-09-21

    We present an approach which makes it possible to directly determine the bending modulus of single elongated block copolymer micelles. This is done by forming arrays of suspended micelles onto microfabricated substrates and by performing three-point bending flexural tests, using an atomic force microscope, on their suspended portions. By coupling the direct atomic force microscopy measurements with differential scanning calorimetry data, we show that the presence of a crystalline corona strongly increases the modulus of the copolymer elongated micelles. This large increase suggests that crystallites in the corona are larger and more uniformly oriented due to confinement effects. Our findings together with this hypothesis open new interesting avenues for the preparation of core-templated polymer fibres with enhanced mechanical properties. PMID:27506248

  18. Enabling the measurement of in-situ, atomic scale mineral transformation rates in supercritical CO2 through development of a high pressure AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, S.; Higgins, S. R.; Knauss, K. G.; Rosso, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Capture and storage of carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations represents one promising scenario for minimizing the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. The ability to demonstrate that CO2 will remain stored in the geological formation over the long-term is needed in support of widespread implementation decisions, and knowledge of mineral-fluid chemical transformation rates is an essential aspect. The majority of previous research on mineral-fluid interactions has focused primarily on the reactivity of minerals in aqueous solutions containing various amounts of dissolved CO2. Long-term caprock integrity, however, could also be dictated by mineral transformations occurring in low-water environments dominated by the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluid phase, which is expected to slowly displace or dessicate residual aqueous solution at the caprock-fluid interface. Many of the mechanisms of mineral interfacial reactions with hydrated or water-saturated scCO2 are unknown and there are unique challenges to obtain kinetic and thermodynamic data for mineral transformation reactions in these fluids. We are developing a high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that will enable in-situ, atomic scale measurements of metal carbonate nucleation and growth rates on mineral surfaces in contact with hydrated scCO2 fluids. This apparatus is based on the hydrothermal AFM that was developed by Higgins et al.1, but includes some enhancements and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 bar. The noise in our optically-based cantilever deflection detection scheme is subject to perturbations in the density (due to index of refraction dependence) of the compressible supercritical fluid. Consequently, variations in temperature and pressure within the fluid cell are a primary technical challenge with possible significant impact in imaging resolution. We demonstrate with our test fluid cell that the equivalent rms noise in the deflection signal is similar to (and in some cases

  19. Fabrication of carbon nanotube AFM probes using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kang, Won-Seok; Choi, Bung-Sam; Choi, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have shown a significant potential for obtaining high-resolution imaging of nanostructure and biological materials. In this paper, we report a simple method to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanoprobes for AFM using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Thiophenyl-modified SWNTs (SWNT-SHs) through amidation of SWNTs in chloroform allowed to be spread and form a stable Langmuir monolayer at the water/air interface. A simple two-step transfer process was used: (1) dipping conventional AFM probes into the Langmuir monolayer and (2) lifting the probes from the water surface. This results in the attachment of SWNTs onto the tips of AFM nanoprobes. We found that the SWNTs assembled on the nanoprobes were well-oriented and robust enough to maintain their shape and direction even after successive scans. AFM measurements of a nano-porous alumina substrate and deoxyribonucleic acid using SWNT-modified nanoprobes revealed that the curvature diameter of the nanoprobes was less than 3 nm and a fine resolution was obtained than that from conventional AFM probes. We also demonstrate that the LB method is a scalable process capable of simultaneously fabricating a large number of SWNT-modified nanoprobes.

  20. Confocal Raman-AFM, A New Tool for Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ute

    2005-03-01

    Characterization of heterogeneous systems, e.g. polymers, on the nanometer scale continues to grow in importance and to impact key applications in the field of materials science, nanotechnology and catalysis. The development of advanced polymeric materials for such applications requires detailed information about the physical and chemical properties of these materials on the nanometer scale. However, some details about the phase-separation process in polymers are difficult to study with conventional characterization techniques due to the inability of these methods to chemically differentiate materials with good spatial resolution, without damage, staining or preferential solvent washing. The CR-AFM is a breakthrough in microscopy. It combines three measuring techniques in one instrument: a high resolution confocal optical microscope, an extremely sensitive Raman spectroscopy system, and an Atomic Force Microscope. Using this instrument, the high spatial and topographical resolution obtained with an AFM can be directly linked to the chemical information gained by Confocal Raman spectroscopy. To demonstrate the capabilities of this unique combination of measuring techniques, polymer blend films, spin coated on glass substrates, have been characterized. AFM measurements reveal the structural and mechanical properties of the films, whereas Raman spectral images show the chemical composition of the blends.

  1. AFM-based measurement of the mechanical properties of thin polymer films and determination of the optical path length of nearly index-matched cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Christopher F.

    2008-10-01

    Two technologies, immersion and imprint lithography, represent important stepping stones for the development of the next generation of lithography tools. However, although the two approaches offer important advantages, both pose many significant technological challenges that must be overcome before they can be successfully implemented. For imprint lithography, special care must be taken when choosing an etch barrier because studies have indicated that some physical material properties may be size dependent. Additionally, regarding immersion lithography, proper image focus requires that the optical path length between the lens and substrate be maintained during the entire writing process. The work described in this document was undertaken to address the two challenges described above. A new mathematical model was developed and used in conjunction with AFM nano-indentation techniques to measure the elastic modulus of adhesive, thin polymer films as a function of the film thickness. It was found that the elastic modulus of the polymer tested did not change appreciably from the value determined using bulk measurement techniques in the thickness range probed. Additionally, a method for monitoring and controlling the optical path length within the gap of a nearly index-matching cavity based on coherent broadband interference was developed. In this method, the spectrum reflected for a cavity illuminated with a modelocked Ti:Sapphire laser was collected and analyzed using Fourier techniques. It was found that this method could determine the optical path length of the cavity, quickly and accurately enough to control a servo-based feedback system to correct deviations in the optical path length in real time when coupled with special computation techniques that minimized unnecessary operations.

  2. High-Bandwidth AFM-Based Rheology Reveals that Cartilage is Most Sensitive to High Loading Rates at Early Stages of Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Bozchalooi, Iman S.; Li, Yang; Han, Lin; Hung, Han-Hwa; Frank, Eliot; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a newly developed atomic-force-microscopy-based wide-frequency rheology system, we measured the dynamic nanomechanical behavior of normal and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-depleted cartilage, the latter representing matrix degradation that occurs at the earliest stages of osteoarthritis. We observed unique variations in the frequency-dependent stiffness and hydraulic permeability of cartilage in the 1 Hz-to-10 kHz range, a frequency range that is relevant to joint motions from normal ambulation to high-frequency impact loading. Measurement in this frequency range is well beyond the capabilities of typical commercial atomic force microscopes. We showed that the dynamic modulus of cartilage undergoes a dramatic alteration after GAG loss, even with the collagen network still intact: whereas the magnitude of the dynamic modulus decreased two- to threefold at higher frequencies, the peak frequency of the phase angle of the modulus (representing fluid-solid frictional dissipation) increased 15-fold from 55 Hz in normal cartilage to 800 Hz after GAG depletion. These results, based on a fibril-reinforced poroelastic finite-element model, demonstrated that GAG loss caused a dramatic increase in cartilage hydraulic permeability (up to 25-fold), suggesting that early osteoarthritic cartilage is more vulnerable to higher loading rates than to the conventionally studied “loading magnitude”. Thus, over the wide frequency range of joint motion during daily activities, hydraulic permeability appears the most sensitive marker of early tissue degradation. PMID:23561529

  3. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    and burr formations through intermittent cutting. Combining the AFM probe based machining with vibration-assisted machining enhanced nano mechanical machining processes by improving the accuracy, productivity and surface finishes. In this study, several scratching tests are performed with a single crystal diamond AFM probe to investigate the cutting characteristics and model the ploughing cutting forces. Calibration of the probe for lateral force measurements, which is essential, is also extended through the force balance method. Furthermore, vibration-assisted machining system is developed and applied to fabricate different materials to overcome some of the limitations of the AFM probe based single point nano mechanical machining. The novelty of this study includes the application of vibration-assisted AFM probe based nano scale machining to fabricate micro/nano scale features, calibration of an AFM by considering different factors, and the investigation of the nano scale material removal process from a different perspective.

  4. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  5. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    PubMed

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  6. On CD-AFM bias related to probe bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, V. A.; Orji, N. G.; Vorburger, T. V.; Dixson, R. G.; Fu, J.; Silver, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Critical Dimension AFM (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, very small and flexible probes, often 15 nm to 20 nm in diameter, are now frequently used. Several recent publications have reported on uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements [1,2]. Results obtained in this work suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and thus potentially can explain much of the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe bias variation. We have developed and experimentally tested one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) models to describe the bending of cylindrical probes. An earlier 1D bending model reported by Watanabe et al. [3] was refined. Contributions from several new phenomena were considered, including: probe misalignment, diameter variation near the carbon nanotube tip (CNT) apex, probe bending before snapping, distributed van der Waals-London force, etc. The methodology for extraction of the Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe bending data was developed. To overcome limitations of the 1D model, a new 2D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Comparison of the new model with the 1D single point force (SPF) model revealed about 27 % difference in probe bending bias between the two. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1D SPF and 2D DF models was found. This finding simplifies use of the advanced 2D DF model of probe bending in various CD-AFM applications. New 2D and three-dimensional (3D) CDAFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  7. Review and perspectives of AFM application on the study of deformable drop/bubble interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Kai; Ma, Mengyu; Jin, Hang; Angeli, Panagiota; Gong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The applications of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on the study of dynamic interactions and film drainage between deformable bodies dispersed in aqueous solutions are reviewed in this article. Novel experimental designs and recent advances in experimental methodologies are presented, which show the advantage of using AFM as a tool for probing colloidal interactions. The effects of both DLVO and non-DLVO forces on the colloid stabilization mechanism are discussed. Good agreement is found between the force - drop/bubble deformation behaviour revealed by AFM measurements and the theoretical modeling of film drainage process, giving a convincing explanation of the occurrence of certain phenomenon. However, the behaviour and shape of deformable drops as they approach or retract is still not well resolved. In addition, when surfactants are present further research is needed on the absorption of surfactant molecules into the interfaces, their mobility and the effects on interfacial film properties.

  8. Study of Thin Oxide Films with NC-AFM: Atomically Resolved Imaging and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, M.; Simon, G. H.; König, T.

    Results presented in the following show structural analysis of metaloxide surfaces and the extraction of physical quantities from the force field above such a surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). The measurements have been performed with our dual mode NC-AFM/STM in ultrahigh vacuum at 5 K. The introduction will be followed by a description of the experimental setup, including the ultrahigh vacuum cryogenic environment and our tuning fork tunneling current and force sensor. The sensor parameters affecting the measurements are given together with an amplitude characterization method. In the next section, a structure determination of ultrathin Alumina/NiAl(110) is shown. Atomic resolution could be achieved throughout both reflection domain unit cells. NC-AFM reveals details of morphological features, interconnections to substrate-film interactions, and comparability to theory also with respect to topographic height. In the last section, we present measurements beyond imaging, namely spectroscopy data taken on thin MgO films grown on Ag(001). Force-distance measurements based on atomically resolved NC-AFM images of these films have been taken. Inequivalent sites could be resolved and their effect on nucleation and adsorption processes is debated. Furthermore, work function shift measurements on different MgO film thicknesses grown on Ag(001) are studied and the impact of this shift on the catalytic properties of adsorbed metal species is discussed.

  9. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  10. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  11. Atom-specific forces and defect identification on surface-oxidized Cu(100) with combined 3D-AFM and STM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Todorović, Milica; Mönig, Harry; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Ünverdi, Özhan; Rodrigo, Lucia; Altman, Eric I.; Pérez, Rubén; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2013-04-01

    The influence of defects on the local structural, electronic, and chemical properties of a surface oxide on Cu(100) were investigated using atomic resolution three-dimensional force mapping combined with tunneling current measurements and ab initio density functional theory. Results reveal that the maximum attractive force between tip and sample occurs above the oxygen atoms; theory indicates that the tip, in this case, terminates in a Cu atom. Meanwhile, simultaneously acquired tunneling current images emphasize the positions of Cu atoms, thereby, providing species-selective contrast in the two complementary data channels. One immediate outcome is that defects due to the displacement of surface copper are exposed in the current maps, even though force maps only reflect a well-ordered oxygen sublattice. The exact nature of the defects is confirmed by the simulations, which also reveal that the arrangement of the oxygen atoms is not disrupted by the copper displacement. In addition, the experimental force maps uncover a position-dependent modulation of the attractive forces between the surface oxygen and the copper-terminated tips, which is found to reflect the surface's inhomogeneous chemical and structural environment. As a consequence, the demonstrated method has the potential to directly probe how defects affect surface chemical interactions.

  12. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  13. Polyethylene glycol and divalent salt-induced DNA reentrant condensation revealed by single molecule measurements.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chao; Jia, Jun-Li; Ran, Shi-Yong

    2015-05-21

    In this study, we investigated the DNA condensation induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) with different molecular weights (PEG 600 and PEG 6000) in the presence of NaCl or MgCl2 by using magnetic tweezers (MT) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The MT measurements show that with increasing NaCl concentration, the critical condensation force in the PEG 600-DNA or PEG 6000-DNA system increased approximately linearly. PEG 6000 solution has a larger critical force than PEG 600 solution at a given NaCl concentration. In comparison, a parabolic trend of the critical condensation force was observed with increasing MgCl2 concentration, indicating that DNA undergoes a reentrant condensation. The AFM results show that the morphologies of the compacted DNA-PEG complexes depended on the salt concentration and were consistent with the MT results.

  14. Nonclassical light revealed by the joint statistics of simultaneous measurements.

    PubMed

    Luis, Alfredo

    2016-04-15

    Nonclassicality cannot be a single-observable property, since the statistics of any quantum observable is compatible with classical physics. We develop a general procedure to reveal nonclassical behavior of light states from the joint statistics arising in the practical measurement of multiple observables. Beside embracing previous approaches, this protocol can disclose nonclassical features for standard examples of classical-like behavior, such as SU(2) and Glauber coherent states. When combined with other criteria, this would imply that every light state is nonclassical.

  15. CD-AFM reference metrology at NIST and SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Fu, Joseph; Orji, Ndubuisi; Guthrie, William; Allen, Richard; Cresswell, Michael

    2005-05-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and SEMATECH have been working together to improve the traceability of critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) dimensional metrology in semiconductor manufacturing. A major component of this collaboration has been the implementation of a Reference Measurement System (RMS) at SEMATECH using a current generation CD-AFM. An earlier tool, originally used at SEMATECH, has now been installed at NIST. Uncertainty budgets were developed for pitch, height, and CD measurements using both tools. At present, the standard uncertainties are approximately 0.2 % for pitch measurements and 0.4% for step height measurements. Prior to the current work, CD AFM linewidth measurements were limited to a standard uncertainty of about 5 nm. However, this limit can now be significantly reduced. This reduction results from the completion of the NIST/SEMATECH collaboration on the development of single crystal critical dimension reference materials (SCDDRM). A new generation of these reference materials was released to SEMATECH Member Companies during late 2004. The SEMATECH RMS was used to measure the linewidths of selected features on the distributed specimens. To reduce the uncertainty in tip width calibration, a separate transfer experiment was performed in which samples were measured by CD-AFM and then sent for high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In this manner, CD-AFM could be used to transfer the HRTEM width information to the distributed samples. Consequently, we are now able to reduce the limit on the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of CD-AFM width measurements to 1 nm.

  16. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  17. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  18. The NTA-His6 bond is strong enough for AFM single-molecular recognition studies.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Claire; Gruber, Hermann J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2007-01-01

    There is a need in current atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecular recognition studies for generic methods for the stable, functional attachment of proteins on tips and solid supports. In the last few years, the site-directed nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-polyhistidine (Hisn) system has been increasingly used towards this goal. Yet, a crucial question in this context is whether the NTA-Hisn bond is sufficiently strong for ensuring stable protein immobilization during force spectroscopy measurements. Here, we measured the forces between AFM tips modified with NTA-terminated alkanethiols and solid supports functionalized with His6-Gly-Cys peptides in the presence of Ni2+. The force histogram obtained at a loading rate of 6600 pN s(-1) showed three maxima at rupture forces of 153 +/- 57 pN, 316 +/- 50 pN and 468 +/- 44 pN, that we attribute primarily to monovalent and multivalent interactions between a single His6 moiety and one, two and three NTA groups, respectively. The measured forces are well above the 50-100 pN unbinding forces typically observed by AFM for receptor-ligand pairs. The plot of adhesion force versus log (loading rate) revealed a linear regime, from which we deduced a kinetic off-rate constant of dissociation, k(off) approximately 0.07 s(-1). This value is in the range of that estimated for the multivalent interaction involving two NTA, using fluorescence measurements, and may account for an increased binding stability of the NTA-His6 bond. We conclude that the NTA-His6 system is a powerful, well-suited platform for the stable, oriented immobilization of proteins in AFM single-molecule studies. PMID:17712775

  19. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  20. Direct AFM force measurements between air bubbles in aqueous polydisperse sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) solutions: effect of collision speed, polyelectrolyte concentration and molar mass.

    PubMed

    Browne, Christine; Tabor, Rico F; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2015-07-01

    Interactions between colliding air bubbles in aqueous solutions of polydisperse sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) (NaPSS) using direct force measurements were studied. The forces measured with deformable interfaces were shown to be more sensitive to the presence of the polyelectrolytes when compared to similar measurements using rigid interfaces. The experimental factors that were examined were NaPSS concentration, bubble collision velocity and polyelectrolyte molar mass. These measurements were then compared with an analytical model based on polyelectrolyte scaling theory in order to explain the effects of concentration and bubble deformation on the interaction between bubbles. Typically structural forces from the presence of monodisperse polyelectrolyte between interacting surfaces may be expected, however, it was found that the polydispersity in molar mass resulted in the structural forces to be smoothed and only a depletion interaction was able to be measured between interacting bubbles. It was found that an increase in number density of NaPSS molecules resulted in an increase in the magnitude of the depletion interaction. Conversely this interaction was overwhelmed by an increase in the fluid flow in the system at higher bubble collision velocities. Polymer molar mass dispersity plays a significant role in the interactions present between the bubbles and has implications that also affect the polyelectrolyte overlap concentration of the solution. Further understanding of these implications can be expected to play a role in the improvement in operations in such fields as water treatment and mineral processing where polyelectrolytes are used extensively.

  1. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  2. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  3. Measurement of the interaction forces at various pH levels by using AFM for the interpretation of DNA adsorption on silanized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Pil; Suga, Kosaku; Fujihara, Masamichi; Park, Byung-Eun

    2014-09-01

    Various surfaces have been used for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) immobilization, one example being a silanized surface. This is useful for determining DNA lengths and, thus, locating specific gene sequences in DNA by using fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. In this study, we deposited DNA by using the molecular combing method and, we used fluorescence microscopy to study how the chain lengths of n-alkylsilanes affected the surface density of DNA deposited on the silanized surfaces in a tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer. The forces between a cleaned silicon-nitride (Si3N4) tip and each substrate surface in aqueous buffers at various pH levels (1.0 ~ 9.0) were also studied by using atomic force microscopy to measure the force-distance curves. We explain why the density of lambda bacteriophage DNA (λ-DNA) deposited by using the molecular combing method at pH 8 was lower on the silanized surface with the shorter alkyl chain than it was on the silanized surface with the longer alkyl chain in terms of the electrical double layer (EDL) and the adhesive force.

  4. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  5. Thermo-magnetic behaviour of AFM-MFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Arinero, R.; Bergez, W.; Tordjeman, Ph

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the behaviour of AFM cantilevers under an external magnetic field B and temperature field produced by a coil with an iron core. Four cantilever types were studied. Forces were measured for different B values and at various coil-to-cantilever separation distances. The results were analysed on the basis of a phenomenological model. This model contains the contribution of two terms, one monopole-monopole interaction at short distance, and one apparent paramagnetic interaction in \

  6. Drought sensitivity of Amazonian carbon balance revealed by atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Gatti, L V; Gloor, M; Miller, J B; Doughty, C E; Malhi, Y; Domingues, L G; Basso, L S; Martinewski, A; Correia, C S C; Borges, V F; Freitas, S; Braz, R; Anderson, L O; Rocha, H; Grace, J; Phillips, O L; Lloyd, J

    2014-02-01

    Feedbacks between land carbon pools and climate provide one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our predictions of global climate. Estimates of the sensitivity of the terrestrial carbon budget to climate anomalies in the tropics and the identification of the mechanisms responsible for feedback effects remain uncertain. The Amazon basin stores a vast amount of carbon, and has experienced increasingly higher temperatures and more frequent floods and droughts over the past two decades. Here we report seasonal and annual carbon balances across the Amazon basin, based on carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide measurements for the anomalously dry and wet years 2010 and 2011, respectively. We find that the Amazon basin lost 0.48 ± 0.18 petagrams of carbon per year (Pg C yr(-1)) during the dry year but was carbon neutral (0.06 ± 0.1 Pg C yr(-1)) during the wet year. Taking into account carbon losses from fire by using carbon monoxide measurements, we derived the basin net biome exchange (that is, the carbon flux between the non-burned forest and the atmosphere) revealing that during the dry year, vegetation was carbon neutral. During the wet year, vegetation was a net carbon sink of 0.25 ± 0.14 Pg C yr(-1), which is roughly consistent with the mean long-term intact-forest biomass sink of 0.39 ± 0.10 Pg C yr(-1) previously estimated from forest censuses. Observations from Amazonian forest plots suggest the suppression of photosynthesis during drought as the primary cause for the 2010 sink neutralization. Overall, our results suggest that moisture has an important role in determining the Amazonian carbon balance. If the recent trend of increasing precipitation extremes persists, the Amazon may become an increasing carbon source as a result of both emissions from fires and the suppression of net biome exchange by drought.

  7. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  8. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  9. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  11. High-speed AFM for Studying Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Biological molecules show their vital activities only in aqueous solutions. It had been one of dreams in biological sciences to directly observe biological macromolecules (protein, DNA) at work under a physiological condition because such observation is straightforward to understanding their dynamic behaviors and functional mechanisms. Optical microscopy has no sufficient spatial resolution and electron microscopy is not applicable to in-liquid samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize molecules in liquids at high resolution but its imaging rate was too low to capture dynamic biological processes. This slow imaging rate is because AFM employs mechanical probes (cantilevers) and mechanical scanners to detect the sample height at each pixel. It is quite difficult to quickly move a mechanical device of macroscopic size with sub-nanometer accuracy without producing unwanted vibrations. It is also difficult to maintain the delicate contact between a probe tip and fragile samples. Two key techniques are required to realize high-speed AFM for biological research; fast feedback control to maintain a weak tip-sample interaction force and a technique to suppress mechanical vibrations of the scanner. Various efforts have been carried out in the past decade to materialize high-speed AFM. The current high-speed AFM can capture images on video at 30-60 frames/s for a scan range of 250nm and 100 scan lines, without significantly disturbing week biomolecular interaction. Our recent studies demonstrated that this new microscope can reveal biomolecular processes such as myosin V walking along actin tracks and association/dissociation dynamics of chaperonin GroEL-GroES that occurs in a negatively cooperative manner. The capacity of nanometer-scale visualization of dynamic processes in liquids will innovate on biological research. In addition, it will open a new way to study dynamic chemical/physical processes of various phenomena that occur at the liquid-solid interfaces.

  12. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  13. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  14. Radioactive waste reality as revealed by neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    To comprehend certain aspects of the contents of a radioactive waste container is not a trivial matter, especially if one is not allowed to open the container and peer inside. One of the suite of tools available to a practioner in the art of nondestructive assay is based upon neutron measurements. Neutrons, both naturally occuring and induced, are penertrating radiations that can be detected external to the waste container. The practioner should be skilled in applying the proper technique(s) to selected waste types. Available techniques include active and passive neutron measurements, each with their own strengths and weaknesses. The waste material itself can compromise the assay results by occluding a portion of the mass of fissile material present, or by multiplying the number of neutrons produced by a spontaneously fissioning mass. This paper will discuss the difficult, but albeit necessary marriage, between radiioactive waste types and alternative neutron measurement techniques.

  15. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  16. Lyin' eyes: ocular-motor measures of reading reveal deception.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anne E; Hacker, Douglas J; Webb, Andrea K; Osher, Dahvyn; Kristjansson, Sean D; Woltz, Dan J; Kircher, John C

    2012-09-01

    Our goal was to evaluate an alternative to current methods for detecting deception in security screening contexts. We evaluated a new cognitive-based test of deception that measured participants' ocular-motor responses (pupil responses and reading behaviors) while they read and responded to statements on a computerized questionnaire. In Experiment 1, participants from a university community were randomly assigned to either a "guilty" group that committed one of two mock crimes or an "innocent" group that only learned about the crime. Participants then reported for testing, where they completed the computer-administered questionnaire that addressed their possible involvement in the crimes. Experiment 2 also manipulated participants' incentive to pass the test and difficulty of statements on the test. In both experiments, guilty participants had increased pupil responses to statements answered deceptively; however, they spent less time fixating on, reading, and rereading those statements than statements answered truthfully. These ocular-motor measures were optimally weighted in a discrimination function that correctly classified 85% of participants as either guilty or innocent. Findings from Experiment 2 indicated that group discrimination was improved with greater incentives to pass the test and the use of statements with simple syntax. The present findings suggest that two cognitive processes are involved in deception-vigilance and strategy-and that these processes are reflected in different ocular-motor measures. The ocular-motor test reported here represents a new approach to detecting deception that may fill an important need in security screening contexts.

  17. Lyin’ Eyes: Ocular-motor Measures of Reading Reveal Deception

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Anne E.; Hacker, Douglas J.; Webb, Andrea K.; Osher, Dahvyn; Kristjansson, Sean; Woltz, Dan J.; Kircher, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate an alternative to current methods for detecting deception in security screening contexts. We evaluated a new cognitive-based test of deception that measured participants’ ocular-motor responses (pupil responses and reading behaviors) while they read and responded to statements on a computerized questionnaire. In Experiment 1, participants from a university community were randomly assigned to either a “guilty” group that committed one of two mock crimes or an “innocent” group that only learned about the crime. Participants then reported for testing, where they completed the computer-administered questionnaire that addressed their possible involvement in the crimes. Experiment 2 also manipulated participants’ incentive to pass the test and difficulty of statements on the test. In both experiments, guilty participants had increased pupil responses to statements answered deceptively; however, they spent less time fixating on, reading, and re-reading those statements than statements answered truthfully. These ocular-motor measures were optimally weighted in a discrimination function that correctly classified 85% of participants as either guilty or innocent. Findings from Experiment 2 indicated that group discrimination was improved with greater incentives to pass the test and the use of statements with simple syntax. The present findings suggest that two cognitive processes are involved in deception -- vigilance and strategy -- and that these processes are reflected in different ocular-motor measures. The ocular-motor test reported here represents a new approach to detecting deception that may fill an important need in security screening contexts. PMID:22545928

  18. Probing Ternary Solvent Effect in High V(oc) Polymer Solar Cells Using Advanced AFM Techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ding, Yi; Soliman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton V; Gesquiere, Andre J; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high V(oc) low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with V(oc) more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor-acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Finally, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing. PMID:26807919

  19. Partial radiogenic heat model for Earth revealed by geoneutrino measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamland Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Decowski, M. P.

    2011-09-01

    The Earth has cooled since its formation, yet the decay of radiogenic isotopes, and in particular uranium, thorium and potassium, in the planet's interior provides a continuing heat source. The current total heat flux from the Earth to space is 44.2+/-1.0TW, but the relative contributions from residual primordial heat and radiogenic decay remain uncertain. However, radiogenic decay can be estimated from the flux of geoneutrinos, electrically neutral particles that are emitted during radioactive decay and can pass through the Earth virtually unaffected. Here we combine precise measurements of the geoneutrino flux from the Kamioka Liquid-Scintillator Antineutrino Detector, Japan, with existing measurements from the Borexino detector, Italy. We find that decay of uranium-238 and thorium-232 together contribute TW to Earth's heat flux. The neutrinos emitted from the decay of potassium-40 are below the limits of detection in our experiments, but are known to contribute 4TW. Taken together, our observations indicate that heat from radioactive decay contributes about half of Earth's total heat flux. We therefore conclude that Earth's primordial heat supply has not yet been exhausted.

  20. In situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration of AFM colloidal probes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sangjin; Franck, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to sense lateral forces applied to the AFM probe tip. Recent advances in tissue engineering and functional biomaterials have shown a need for the surface characterization of their material and biochemical properties under the application of lateral forces. LFM equipped with colloidal probes of well-defined tip geometries has been a natural fit to address these needs but has remained limited to provide primarily qualitative results. For quantitative measurements, LFM requires the successful determination of the lateral force or torque conversion factor of the probe. Usually, force calibration results obtained in air are used for force measurements in liquids, but refractive index differences between air and liquids induce changes in the conversion factor. Furthermore, in the case of biochemically functionalized tips, damage can occur during calibration because tip-surface contact is inevitable in most calibration methods. Therefore, a nondestructive in situ lateral force calibration is desirable for LFM applications in liquids. Here we present an in situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method for AFM colloidal probes. In this method, the laterally scanned substrate surface generated a creeping Couette flow, which deformed the probe under torsion. The spherical geometry of the tip enabled the calculation of tip drag forces, and the lateral torque conversion factor was calibrated from the lateral voltage change and estimated torque. Comparisons with lateral force calibrations performed in air show that the hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method enables quantitative lateral force measurements in liquid using colloidal probes.

  1. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer.

  2. Probing correlated current and force effects of nanoparticle charge states by hybrid STM-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Y.; Trudeau, P.-E.; Dhirani, A.-A.

    2002-12-01

    By using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever as a substrate for a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we can simultaneously probe currents I and forces F in a tunnel junction as a function of bias voltage V. Measurements performed using gold-nanoparticle (NP) coated cantilevers under ambient conditions reveal correlated kinks in both I-V and F-V curves. Changes in background charge distributions, which have been problematic in controlling single charges in such systems, can be readily detected by the hybrid STM-AFM. To test whether we can statistically attribute observed kinks to Coulomb staircase phenomena, we have performed measurements using NP’s of different sizes. NP’s 4.8 and 2.5 nm in diameter exhibit kinks spaced on average 0.22 and 0.52 V apart, respectively. These values are in good agreement with a metallic sphere flat surface model for the STM tip NP capacitance and the orthodox model for single-electron tunneling.

  3. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  4. Nano-scale modification of electrical and magnetic properties on Fe3O4 thin film by AFM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirooka, Motoyuki; Vilquin, Bertrand; Li, Runwei; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2004-03-01

    We report the nano-patterning of the Fe3O4(111) epitaxial ultrathin film with room temperature ferromagnetism using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fe3O4 thin film with atomically flat surface were grown along the 'q111' rdirection using laser-molecular beam epitaxy on MgAl2O4(111) single crystal substrate. The nano-wires were constructed on Fe3O4 thin film by applying electric field between an AFM conductive tip and the surface of the film. The minimum width and height in the resulting nano-wire are 48 nm and 2 nm, respectively. The patterned region shows 105 times higher resistance than the unpatterned region of Fe3O4 film. Furthermore, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements by phase detection also revealed that magnetization of the patterned region are strongly suppressed. Remarkably, phase shift became almost zero in the patterned region, including no magnetic field was detected. We consider that magnetization is decreased in the patterned region by AFM lithography.

  5. Adhesion of B. subtilis spores and vegetative cells onto stainless steel--DLVO theories and AFM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Zhong, Shaoping; Lim, Chwee-Teck; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (either as vegetative cells or as spores) and stainless steel 316 (SS-316) surfaces were quantified using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and extended DLVO (xDLVO) approach in conjunction with live force spectroscopy using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The xDLVO approach accounts for acid-base (polar) interactions that are not considered in the classical DLVO theory. AFM results revealed that spores manifested stronger attraction interactions to stainless steel compared to their vegetative cells counterparts due to lower energy barrier as predicted by both the theoretical approaches as well as the higher hydrophobicity on the spore surfaces. Both DLVO and xDLVO theories predict that vegetative cells manifest weaker attachment on the surfaces compared to spores. Results of AFM force measurement corroborate these findings; spores recorded significantly higher adhesion force (2.92±0.4 nN) compared to vegetative cells (0.65±0.2 nN). The adhesion of spores presents greater challenges in biofilm control owing to its stronger attachment and persistence when the spores are formed under adverse environmental conditions. PMID:23777862

  6. Adhesion of B. subtilis spores and vegetative cells onto stainless steel--DLVO theories and AFM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Zhong, Shaoping; Lim, Chwee-Teck; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (either as vegetative cells or as spores) and stainless steel 316 (SS-316) surfaces were quantified using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and extended DLVO (xDLVO) approach in conjunction with live force spectroscopy using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The xDLVO approach accounts for acid-base (polar) interactions that are not considered in the classical DLVO theory. AFM results revealed that spores manifested stronger attraction interactions to stainless steel compared to their vegetative cells counterparts due to lower energy barrier as predicted by both the theoretical approaches as well as the higher hydrophobicity on the spore surfaces. Both DLVO and xDLVO theories predict that vegetative cells manifest weaker attachment on the surfaces compared to spores. Results of AFM force measurement corroborate these findings; spores recorded significantly higher adhesion force (2.92±0.4 nN) compared to vegetative cells (0.65±0.2 nN). The adhesion of spores presents greater challenges in biofilm control owing to its stronger attachment and persistence when the spores are formed under adverse environmental conditions.

  7. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  8. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  9. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  10. Using 2D Correlation Analysis to Enhance Spectral Information Available from Highly Spatially Resolved AFM-IR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Boskey, Adele; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The recent combination of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) has led to the ability to obtain IR spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution, nearly two orders-of-magnitude better than conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. This advanced methodology can lead to significantly sharper spectral features than are typically seen in conventional IR spectra of inhomogeneous materials, where a wider range of molecular environments are coaveraged by the larger sample cross section being probed. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis is used to examine position sensitive spectral variations in datasets of closely spaced AFM-IR spectra. This analysis can reveal new key insights, providing a better understanding of the new spectral information that was previously hidden under broader overlapped spectral features. Two examples of the utility of this new approach are presented. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of a set of AFM-IR spectra were collected at 200-nm increments along a line through a nucleation site generated by remelting a small spot on a thin film of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). There are two different crystalline carbonyl band components near 1720 cm(-1) that sequentially disappear before a band at 1740 cm(-1) due to more disordered material appears. In the second example, 2D correlation analysis of a series of AFM-IR spectra spaced every 1 micrometer of a thin cross section of a bone sample measured outward from an osteon center of bone growth. There are many changes in the amide I and phosphate band contours, suggesting changes in the bone structure are occurring as the bone matures.

  11. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  12. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  13. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  14. AFM nanoindentations of diatom biosilica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Losic, Dusan; Short, Ken; Mitchell, James G; Lal, Ratnesh; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2007-04-24

    Diatoms have intricately and uniquely nanopatterned silica exoskeletons (frustules) and are a common target of biomimetic investigations. A better understanding of the diatom frustule structure and function at the nanoscale could provide new insights for the biomimetic fabrication of nanostructured ceramic materials and lightweight, yet strong, scaffold architectures. Here, we have mapped the nanoscale mechanical properties of Coscinodiscus sp. diatoms using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation. Mechanical properties were correlated with the frustule structures obtained from high-resolution AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Significant differences in the micromechanical properties for the different frustule layers were observed. A comparative study of other related inorganic material including porous silicon films and free-standing membranes as well as porous alumina was also undertaken.

  15. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  16. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  17. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  18. The Retrocausal Nature of Quantum Measurement Revealed by Partial and Weak Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Elitzur, Avshalom C.; Cohen, Eliahu

    2011-11-29

    Quantum measurement is sometimes more effective when its result is not definite. Partial measurement turns the initial superposition not into a certain state but to a greater probability for it, enabling probing the quantum state in cases where complete measurement makes the noncommuting variables inaccessible. It also enables full quantum erasure that, unlike prevailing method, can be carried out even on recorded results. Aharonov's weak measurement is another method of imprecisely measuring quantum variables, outsmarting the uncertainty principle in even subtler ways. Happily, the two methods complement and corroborate one another in several interesting ways. We gedankenly apply these measurements to the EPR case. A pair of entangled particles undergoes more than one pair of partial and weak measurements, which, unlike complete measurements, leave them partially correlated. Their erasure is then shown to be as nonlocal as measurement itself. Surprisingly, the temporal relations between such measurements in the EPR setting do not follow the temporal sequence perceived by an external observer. For each particle, the measurements performed on the other operate as if they occurred (with signs reversed) in its own past, and in reversed order. This fully accords with Cramer's transactional interpretation and Aharonov's two state-vector formalism.

  19. AFM and electroanalytical studies of synthetic oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chiorcea Paquim, A-M; Diculescu, V C; Oretskaya, T S; Oliveira Brett, A M

    2004-11-15

    The first and most important step in the development and manufacture of a sensitive DNA-biosensor for hybridization detection is the immobilization procedure of the nucleic acid probe on the transducer surface, maintaining its mobility and conformational flexibility. MAC Mode AFM images were used to demonstrate that oligonucleotide (ODN) molecules adsorb spontaneously at the electrode surface. After adsorption, the ODN layers were formed by molecules with restricted mobility, as well as by superposed molecules, which can lead to reduced hybridization efficiency. The images also showed the existence of pores in the adsorbed ODN film that revealed large parts of the electrode surface, and enabled non-specific adsorption of other ODNs on the uncovered areas. Electrostatic immobilization onto a clean glassy carbon electrode surface was followed by hybridization with complementary sequences and by control experiments with non-complementary sequences, studied using differential pulse voltammetry. The data obtained showed that non-specific adsorption strongly influenced the results, which depended on the sequence of the ODNs. In order to reduce the contribution of non-specific adsorbed ODNs during hybridization experiments, the carbon electrode surface was modified. After modification, the AFM images showed an electrode completely covered by the ODN probe film, which prevented the undesirable binding of target ODN molecules to the electrode surface. The changes of interfacial capacitance that took place after hybridization or control experiments showed the formation of a mixed multilayer that strongly depended on the local environment of the immobilized ODN.

  20. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  1. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  2. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  3. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  4. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  5. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  6. Study of the influence of the acrylic acid plasma parameters on silicon and polyurethane substrates using XPS and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilani, C.; Weibel, D. E.; Zamora, R. R. M.; Habert, A. C.; Achete, C. A.

    2007-10-01

    XPS and AFM have been used to investigate surface modifications produced by acrylic acid (AA) vapor plasma treatment of silicon (Si)(1 0 0) substrates and polyurethanes (PUs) membranes. XPS analyses of Si and PUs treated substrates at low plasma power (5-20 W) revealed the formation of a thin film on the surfaces, which chemically resembles the poly(acrylic acid) film conventionally synthesised. No signal of the Si substrate could be seen under these low plasma power applications on silicon. However, when the plasma power is higher than 30 W one can clearly see XPS silicon signatures. AFM measurements of silicon substrates treated with AA plasma at low power (5-20 W) showed the formation of a thin polymer film of about 220-55 nm thickness. Further, applications of high plasma power (30-100 W) displayed a marked difference from low plasma modifications and it was found sputtering of the silicon substrate. Pervaporation results of AA plasma treated PUs membranes revealed that the selectivity for the separation of methanol from methyl- t-butyl ether is higher at 100 W and 1 min treatment time, than the other conditions studied. This last finding is discussed concerning the surface modifications produced on plasma treated silicon substrates and PU membranes.

  7. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  8. Cells mechanics with AFM: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia

    2012-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to study mechanics of cells. Cell is far from being a homogeneous medium. This creates a number of problems which will be discussed as well as the ways to solve them. We will focus on the following problems: 1. Cellular surface brush (microvilli, glycocalyx..) surrounds cells. A simple model to separate the brush and cell deformation will be overviewed. 2. Problem of nonlinearity of stress-strain relation. Although unsolved, this may indirectly tested: the rigidity modulus should be reasonably independent of penetration. We will show that it can be achieved when using relatively dull AFM probes (the radii of microns) only. 3. Heterogeneity of cell surface. Cells are not homogeneous over the surface. We will discuss the question how many points is enough to characterize the cell. We will exemplify the above with human cervical epithelial cells. We will demonstrate that without proper consideration of the above problems, the error in defining the modulus of rigidity can easily reach an order of magnitude.

  9. Probing the PEDOT:PSS/cell interface with conductive colloidal probe AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Zhang, H.; Kranz, C.; Wallace, G. G.; Higgins, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical information e.g., oxygen reduction can be obtained simultaneously. Conductive colloid AFM-SECM probes modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are used for single cell force measurements in mouse fibroblasts and single cell interactions are investigated as a function of the applied potential.Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical

  10. AFM Bio-Mechanical Investigation of the Taxol Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dylan; Patel, Dipika; Monjaraz, Fernando; Park, Soyeun

    2009-10-01

    Cancerous cells are known to be softer and easier to deform than normal cells. Changes in mechanical properties originate from the alteration of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of cancer treatment using Taxol is related to the stabilization of microtubules. It has been shown that Taxol binds to polymerized tublin, stabilizes it against disassembly, and consequently inhibits cell division. An accurate quantitative study still lacks to relate the microtubule stabilizing effect with the cellular mechanical properties. We utilized our AFM to study changes in elastic properties of treated breast cancer cells. The AFM has several advantages for precise force measurements on a localized region with nanometer lateral dimension. In previous AFM studies, measurable contributions from the underlying hard substrate have been an obstacle to accurately determine the properties on thin samples. We modified our AFM tip to obtain the exact deformation profile as well as reducing the high stresses produced. We have probed depth profiles of mechanical properties of the taxol-treated and untreated cells by varying the indentation depth of the AFM-nanoindenting experiments.

  11. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  12. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  13. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  14. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  15. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  16. Force measurements on natural membrane nanovesicles reveal a composition-independent, high Young's modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Reguera, David; Oncins, Gerard; Persuy, Marie-Annick; Sanz, Guenhaël; Lobasso, Simona; Corcelli, Angela; Pajot-Augy, Edith; Gomila, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in spite of their different lipid compositions, especially on what concerns the ergosterol content. These results point towards an important structural role of membrane proteins in the mechanical response of natural membrane vesicles and open the perspective to their potential use as robust nanocontainers for bioapplications.Mechanical properties of nano-sized vesicles made up of natural membranes are crucial to the development of stable, biocompatible nanocontainers with enhanced functional, recognition and sensing capabilities. Here we measure and compare the mechanical properties of plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles ~80 nm in diameter obtained from disrupted yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. We provide evidence of a highly deformable behaviour for these vesicles, able to support repeated wall-to-wall compressions without irreversible deformations, accompanied by a noticeably high Young's modulus (~300 MPa) compared to that obtained for reconstituted artificial liposomes of similar size and approaching that of some virus particles. Surprisingly enough, the results are approximately similar for plasma and inner membrane nanovesicles, in

  17. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  19. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell.

  20. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  2. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. AFM studies of semicrystalline polymer/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this work are to elucidate the effects of interaction strength on the crystallization of a polymer near an inorganic surface; connect filler induced polymer crystallinity with resulting property changes, especially for strongly interacting (i.e. hydrogen bonding) systems; and to devise atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods for probing the crystallinity and properties of polymer/layered silicate systems at the nanometer level. Three inorganically filled systems were studied: (1) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), (2) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), and (3) polypropylene (PP). Since it has the strongest, interactions, the PVA system is investigated first. AFM is used in conjunction with x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to show that strong polymer/filler interactions can promote a different crystalline structure and a different morphology than those seen in the bulk. The study then proceeds to the weakly interacting PEO/inorganic system where it is found that the inorganic layers disrupt crystalline morphology, but do not change the crystal structure. Furthermore, crystallization always occurs in volumes away from the inorganic filler. The third system (neutral interactions), PP/inorganic is then discussed. The three systems are compared with each other, and is found that the crystalline morphology and structure is highly dependent upon the strength of interaction between the polymer and filler. Due to its far-reaching morphology changes, the strongly interacting system was chosen for property studies. The composite structure study revealed a coexistence of exfoliated and intercalated MMT layers, especially for low and moderate silicate loadings. The inorganic layers promote a new crystalline phase different than the one of the respective neat PVA, characterized by higher melting temperature and a different crystal structure. This new crystal phase reflects on the composite materials properties, which have mechanical, thermal, and water

  4. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  5. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets.

  6. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. PMID:26972765

  7. Accurate calibration and uncertainty estimation of the normal spring constant of various AFM cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-03-10

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke's law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  8. Structural and Mechanical Mechanisms of Ocular Tissues Probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Rico, Felix; Moy, Vincent T.

    In recent years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become an important tool in ophthalmic research. It has gained popularity largely because AFM is not restricted by the diffraction limits of light microscopy and can be applied to resolve images with molecular resolution. AFM is a minimally invasive technique and can be used to visualize molecular structures under near-physiological conditions. In addition, the AFM can be employed as a force apparatus to characterize the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials on the micron level and at the level of individual proteins. In this article, we summarize recent AFM studies of ocular tissues, while highlighting the great potential of AFM technology in ophthalmic research. Previous research demonstrates the versatility of the AFM as high resolution imaging technique and as a sensitive force apparatus for probing the mechanical properties of ocular tissues. The structural and mechanical properties of ocular tissues are of major importance to the understanding of the optomechanical functions of the human eye. In addition, AFM has played an important role in the development and characterization of ocular biomaterials, such as contact lenses and intraocular lenses. Studying ocular tissues using Atomic Force Microscopy has enabled several advances in ophthalmic research.

  9. Mechanism of immonoglobulin G adsorption on mica-AFM and electrokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Dąbkowska, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    Adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) from aqueous NaCl solutions of the concentration 10(-3)-0.15M on mica was studied. Initially, the kinetics was evaluated at pH 3.5 by direct AFM imaging. A monotonic increase in the maximum coverage of IgG with NaCl concentration was observed. These results were interpreted in terms of the theoretical model postulating an irreversible adsorption of the protein governed by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Additionally, IgG adsorption and desorption was studied under in situ conditions, with streaming potential measurements. These measurements revealed that the maximum coverage of irreversibly adsorbed IgG varies from 0.37mgm(-2) for 10(-3)M, NaCl to 1.2mgm(-2) for 0.15M, NaCl. The significant role of ionic strength was attributed to the lateral electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed IgG molecules, positively charged at this pH value. These experimental results confirmed that monolayers of irreversibly bound IgG can be produced by adjusting ionic strength of the protein solution. In further experiments the stability and acid base properties of such monolayers were studied using the streaming potential method. It revealed that the monolayers were stable against pH cycling for the range from 3.5 to 9.5. The isoelectric point of mica supported IgG monolayers was 5.9, similar to derived from the micro-electrophoretic measurements in the bulk (5.8). Beside significance for basic sciences, the results indicate that thorough characteristics of IgG can be acquired via streaming potential measurements using microgram quantities of the protein.

  10. Influence of smectite suspension structure on sheet orientation in dry sediments: XRD and AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L

    2010-06-15

    The structure-building phenomena within clay aggregates are governed by forces acting between clay particles. Measurements of such forces are important to understand in order to manipulate the aggregate structure for applications such as dewatering of mineral processing tailings. A parallel particle orientation is required when conducting XRD investigation on the oriented samples and conduct force measurements acting between basal planes of clay mineral platelets using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate how smectite clay platelets were oriented on silicon wafer substrate when dried from suspension range of methods like SEM, XRD and AFM were employed. From these investigations, we conclude that high clay concentrations and larger particle diameters (up to 5 microm) in suspension result in random orientation of platelets in the substrate. The best possible laminar orientation in the clay dry film, represented in the XRD 001/020 intensity ratio of 47 was obtained by drying thin layers from 0.02 wt.% clay suspensions of the natural pH. Conducted AFM investigations show that smectite studied in water based electrolytes show very long-range repulsive forces lower in strength than electrostatic forces from double-layer repulsion. It was suggested that these forces may have structural nature. Smectite surface layers rehydrate in water environment forms surface gel with spongy and cellular texture which cushion approaching AFM probe. This structural effect can be measured in distances larger than 1000 nm from substrate surface and when probe penetrate this gel layer, structural linkages are forming between substrate and clay covered probe. These linkages prevent subsequently smooth detachments of AFM probe on way back when retrieval. This effect of tearing new formed structure apart involves larger adhesion-like forces measured in retrieval. It is also suggested that these effect may be enhanced by the nano-clay particles interaction.

  11. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  12. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  13. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  14. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N.; Naik, Vikrant V.; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E.; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-01

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details with synthesis and characterization of compounds. Procedures for modifications of Au surfaces and AFM tips. AFM images and full PM-IRRAS spectra of modified surfaces. Detailed procedure for QCM measurement. A table showing ligand-receptor interaction probability. NMR, IR and MS charts. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01495f

  15. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  17. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. PMID:26517548

  18. AFM imaging of functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, C; Danzberger, J; Lukanov, P; Tîlmaciu, C-M; Galibert, A-M; Soula, B; Flahaut, E; Gruber, H J; Hinterdorfer, P; Ebner, A; Kienberger, F

    2009-07-01

    We present a comparative study of several non-covalent approaches to disperse, debundle and non-covalently functionalize double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs). We investigated the ability of bovine serum albumin (BSA), phospholipids grafted onto amine-terminated polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG(2000)-NH(2)), as well as a combination thereof, to coat purified DWNTs. Topographical imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to assess the coating of individual DWNTs and the degree of debundling and dispersion. Topographical images showed that functionalized DWNTs are better separated and less aggregated than pristine DWNTs and that the different coating methods differ in their abilities to successfully debundle and disperse DWNTs. Height profiles indicated an increase in the diameter of DWNTs depending on the functionalization method and revealed adsorption of single molecules onto the nanotubes. Biofunctionalization of the DWNT surface was achieved by coating DWNTs with biotinylated BSA, providing for biospecific binding of streptavidin in a simple incubation step. Finally, biotin-BSA-functionalized DWNTs were immobilized on an avidin layer via the specific avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19375857

  19. A Genetic Strategy to Measure Circulating Drosophila Insulin Reveals Genes Regulating Insulin Production and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangbin; Alfa, Ronald W.; Topper, Sydni M.; Kim, Grace E. S.; Kockel, Lutz; Kim, Seung K.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a major regulator of metabolism in metazoans, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest a genetic basis for reductions of both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, phenotypes commonly observed in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To identify molecular functions of genes linked to T2DM risk, we developed a genetic tool to measure insulin-like peptide 2 (Ilp2) levels in Drosophila, a model organism with superb experimental genetics. Our system permitted sensitive quantification of circulating Ilp2, including measures of Ilp2 dynamics during fasting and re-feeding, and demonstration of adaptive Ilp2 secretion in response to insulin receptor haploinsufficiency. Tissue specific dissection of this reduced insulin signaling phenotype revealed a critical role for insulin signaling in specific peripheral tissues. Knockdown of the Drosophila orthologues of human T2DM risk genes, including GLIS3 and BCL11A, revealed roles of these Drosophila genes in Ilp2 production or secretion. Discovery of Drosophila mechanisms and regulators controlling in vivo insulin dynamics should accelerate functional dissection of diabetes genetics. PMID:25101872

  20. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  1. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  2. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  3. Fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms at the gold substrate revealed by QCM-D measurements and RSA modeling.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a gold substrate at various pHs was thoroughly studied using the QCM-D method. The experimental were interpreted in terms of theoretical calculations performed according to the random sequential adsorption model (RSA). In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated at various pHs. It was revealed that for the lower range of fibrinogen coverage the hydration function were considerably lower than previously obtained for the silica sensor [33]. The lower hydration of fibrinogen monolayers on the gold sensor was attributed to its higher roughness. However, for higher fibrinogen coverage the hydration functions for both sensors became identical exhibiting an universal behavior. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γd vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.6mgm(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.5mgm(-2) at pH 7.4 (for ionic strength of 0.15M). These results agree with theoretical eRSA modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data. These results allow one to develop a method for preparing fibrinogen monolayers of well-controlled coverage and molecule orientation.

  4. Accurate and precise calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Pratt, Jon R

    2012-09-21

    Accurate cantilever spring constants are important in atomic force microscopy both in control of sensitive imaging and to provide correct nanomechanical property measurements. Conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) spring constant calibration techniques are usually performed in an AFM. They rely on significant handling and often require touching the cantilever probe tip to a surface to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of the configuration. This can damage the tip. The thermal calibration technique developed for laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) can be used to calibrate cantilevers without handling or touching the tip to a surface. Both flexural and torsional spring constants can be measured. Using both Euler-Bernoulli modeling and an SI traceable electrostatic force balance technique as a comparison we demonstrate that the LDV thermal technique is capable of providing rapid calibrations with a combination of ease, accuracy and precision beyond anything previously available.

  5. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application.

  6. Force measurements reveal how small binders perturb the dissociation mechanisms of DNA duplex sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Fresch, Barbara; Sluysmans, Damien; de Pauw, Edwin; Remacle, Françoise; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2016-06-01

    The force-driven separation of double-stranded DNA is crucial to the accomplishment of cellular processes like genome transactions. Ligands binding to short DNA sequences can have a local stabilizing or destabilizing effect and thus severely affect these processes. Although the design of ligands that bind to specific sequences is a field of intense research with promising biomedical applications, so far, their effect on the force-induced strand separation has remained elusive. Here, by means of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy, we show the co-existence of two different mechanisms for the separation of a short DNA duplex and demonstrate how they are perturbed by small binders. With the support of Molecular Dynamics simulations, we evidence that above a critical pulling rate one of the dissociation pathways becomes dominant, with a dramatic effect on the rupture forces. Around the critical threshold, we observe a drop of the most probable rupture forces for ligand-stabilized duplexes. Our results offer a deep understanding of how a stable DNA-ligand complex behaves under force-driven strand separation.The force-driven separation of double-stranded DNA is crucial to the accomplishment of cellular processes like genome transactions. Ligands binding to short DNA sequences can have a local stabilizing or destabilizing effect and thus severely affect these processes. Although the design of ligands that bind to specific sequences is a field of intense research with promising biomedical applications, so far, their effect on the force-induced strand separation has remained elusive. Here, by means of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy, we show the co-existence of two different mechanisms for the separation of a short DNA duplex and demonstrate how they are perturbed by small binders. With the support of Molecular Dynamics simulations, we evidence that above a critical pulling rate one of the dissociation pathways becomes dominant, with a dramatic effect

  7. Multimodal and Multi-tissue Measures of Connectivity Revealed by Joint Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Josef; Caprihan, Arvind; Calhoun, Vince D.; Jung, Rex E.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2009-01-01

    The human brain functions as an efficient system where signals arising from gray matter are transported via white matter tracts to other regions of the brain to facilitate human behavior. However, with a few exceptions, functional and structural neuroimaging data are typically optimized to maximize the quantification of signals arising from a single source. For example, functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) is typically used as an index of gray matter functioning whereas diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to determine white matter properties. While it is likely that these signals arising from different tissue sources contain complementary information, the signal processing algorithms necessary for the fusion of neuroimaging data across imaging modalities are still in a nascent stage. In the current paper we present a data-driven method for combining measures of functional connectivity arising from gray matter sources (FMRI resting state data) with different measures of white matter connectivity (DTI). Specifically, a joint independent component analysis (J-ICA) was used to combine these measures of functional connectivity following intensive signal processing and feature extraction within each of the individual modalities. Our results indicate that one of the most predominantly used measures of functional connectivity (activity in the default mode network) is highly dependent on the integrity of white matter connections between the two hemispheres (corpus callosum) and within the cingulate bundles. Importantly, the discovery of this complex relationship of connectivity was entirely facilitated by the signal processing and fusion techniques presented herein and could not have been revealed through separate analyses of both data types as is typically performed in the majority of neuroimaging experiments. We conclude by discussing future applications of this technique to other areas of neuroimaging and examining potential limitations of the

  8. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. New Aspects of Photocurrent Generation at Graphene pn Junctions Revealed by Ultrafast Optical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aivazian, Grant; Sun, Dong; Jones, Aaron; Ross, Jason; Yao, Wang; Cobden, David; Xu, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    The remarkable electrical and optical properties of graphene make it a promising material for new optoelectronic applications. However, one important, but so far unexplored, property is the role of hot carriers in charge and energy transport at graphene interfaces. Here we investigate the photocurrent (PC) dynamics at a tunable graphene pn junction using ultrafast scanning PC microscopy. Pump-probe measurements show a temperature dependent relaxation time of photogenerated carriers that increases from 1.5ps at 290K to 4ps at 20K; while the amplitude of the PC is independent of the lattice temperature. These observations imply that it is hot carriers, not phonons, which dominate ultrafast energy transport. Gate dependent measurements show many interesting features such as pump induced saturation, enhancement, and sign reversal of probe generated PC. These observations reveal that the underlying PC mechanism is a combination of the thermoelectric and built-in electric field effects. Our results enhance the understanding of non-equilibrium electron dynamics, electron-electron interactions, and electron-phonon interactions in graphene. They also determine fundamental limits on ultrafast device operation speeds (˜500 GHz) for graphene-based photodetectors.

  10. Force measurements reveal how small binders perturb the dissociation mechanisms of DNA duplex sequences.

    PubMed

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Fresch, Barbara; Sluysmans, Damien; De Pauw, Edwin; Remacle, Françoise; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2016-06-01

    The force-driven separation of double-stranded DNA is crucial to the accomplishment of cellular processes like genome transactions. Ligands binding to short DNA sequences can have a local stabilizing or destabilizing effect and thus severely affect these processes. Although the design of ligands that bind to specific sequences is a field of intense research with promising biomedical applications, so far, their effect on the force-induced strand separation has remained elusive. Here, by means of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy, we show the co-existence of two different mechanisms for the separation of a short DNA duplex and demonstrate how they are perturbed by small binders. With the support of Molecular Dynamics simulations, we evidence that above a critical pulling rate one of the dissociation pathways becomes dominant, with a dramatic effect on the rupture forces. Around the critical threshold, we observe a drop of the most probable rupture forces for ligand-stabilized duplexes. Our results offer a deep understanding of how a stable DNA-ligand complex behaves under force-driven strand separation. PMID:27221618

  11. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for investigating protein crystal growth. Earlier AFM studies were among the first to demonstrate that these crystals grew by dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms [1]. These investigations were restricted to the micron range where only surface features, such as dislocation hillocks and 2D islands are visible. Most AFM instruments can scan at higher resolutions and have the potential to resolve individual protein molecules at nanometer ranges. Such scans are essential for determining the molecular packing arrangements on crystal faces and for probing the growth process at the molecular level. However, at this resolution the AFM tip influences the image produced, with the resulting image being a convolution of the tip shape and the surface morphology [2]. In most studies this problem is resolved by deconvoluting the image to obtain the true surface morphology. Although deconvolution routines work reasonably well for simple one- dimensional shapes, for complex surfaces this approach does not produce accurate results. In this study we devised a new approach which takes advantage of the precise molecular order of crystal surfaces, combined with the knowledge of individual molecular shapes from the crystallographic data of the protein and the AFM tip shape. This information is used to construct expected theoretical AFM images by convoluting the tip shape with the constructed crystal surface shape for a given surface packing arrangement. By comparing the images from actual AFM scans with the constructed ones for different possible surface packing arrangements, the correct packing arrangement can be conclusively determined. This approach was used in this study to determine the correct one from two possible packing arrangements on (I 10) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Another novel AFM technique was also devised to measure the dimension of individual growth units of the crystal faces

  12. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  13. A novel dog-bone oscillating AFM probe with thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  14. Nanoscopic imaging of mechanical properties of metal films with magnetic-force-controlled AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.-I.; Yamada, H.; Matsushige, K.; Ishida, T.; Mizutani, W.; Tokumoto, H.

    1999-08-01

    We have succeeded in measuring the Young's moduli of inorganic films with a diamond tip of 160-200 nm in diameter using magnetic-force-controlled atomic force microscopy (MFC-AFM). The measurement of Young's moduli was carried out by detecting the tip amplitude on the sample with an applied force of 20 nN. This technique was applied successfully to obtain Young's moduli mapping of gold islands with 1 nm thickness and nickel films with 10 nm thickness. We obtained an effective spring constant of 3000 N m -1 on gold and 21 000 N m -1 on nickel using MFC-AFM. We could normalize the effective area of the contact radius between the tip and the sample. A value of 350 GPa was derived for the Young's modulus of the nickel film, indicative of the elasticity of native nickel oxide (NiO 2). This shows that the MFC-AFM technique measures the mechanical properties of a thin layer on top of the sample.

  15. A novel dog-bone oscillating AFM probe with thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-10-31

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments.

  16. Direct observation of hydration of TiO 2 on Ti using electrochemical AFM: freely corroding versus potentiostatically held

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Orme, Christine A.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2001-10-01

    Hydration of titanium/titanium oxide surfaces under freely corroding and potentiostatically held conditions has been characterized using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC AFM). In contrast to conventional high vacuum techniques, AFM enables measurement of morphological surface structure in the in situ hydrated state. Electrochemical probes in the imaging environment further enable acquisition of electrical characteristics during AFM imaging. Experiments were performed on etched, electropolished commercially pure titanium. As noted by direct observation and corroborated by power spectral density (Fourier analysis) measurements, oxide domes cover the titanium surface and grow laterally during hydration. Applied potential altered the growth rate. Under open circuit potential conditions, growth proceeded approximately six times faster than under a -1 V applied voltage ( 1098±52 nm2/ min ± versus 184.84±19 nm2/min). Film growth increased electrical resistance and lowered interfacial capacitance based on step polarization impedance spectroscopy tests.

  17. Calcification and measurements of net proton and oxygen flux reveal subcellular domains in Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, K A; Porterfield, D M; Smith, P J; Mandoli, D F

    2000-09-01

    Vegetative adults of Acetabularia acetabulum (L.) Silva were studied as a model system for subcellular patterning in plants, and a description of several phenotypic and physiological characteristics that reveal patterns of subcellular differentiation in this unicellular macroalga was undertaken. Initially, calcification patterns were studied. Under favorable conditions, the rhizoid and most of the stalk calcified. Only the apical 10-20% of the stalk and a small region adjacent to the rhizoid remained uncalcified. Calcification in algae has been reported to result from a biologically mediated local increase in alkalinity. To test this model extracellular pH and extracellular hydrogen ion gradients were examined with ion-selective, self-referencing, electrodes. In the light, A. acetabulum displayed a general pattern of extracellular alkalinity around the entire alga, although in some individuals the region near the rhizoid and the rhizoid itself displayed extracellular acidity. Acetabularia acetabulum also displayed net hydrogen ion influx at the rhizoid and the apical half of the stalk, variable flux in the lower part of the stalk, and net hydrogen ion efflux at the base of the stalk next to the rhizoid. The lack of complete correlation between external pH patterns and calcification suggests that other factors contribute to the control of calcification in this alga. To examine whether net hydrogen ion flux patterns correlated with photosynthetic or respiration patterns, oxygen flux was measured along the stalk using self-referencing O2 electrodes. Photosynthetic oxygen evolution occurred at comparable levels throughout the stalk, with less evolution in the rhizoid. Respiration mainly occurred near and in the rhizoid, with less O2 consumption occurring more apically along the stalk. Our studies of calcification patterns, net hydrogen ion flux and O2 flux revealed several overlapping patterns of subcellular differentiation in A. acetabulum.

  18. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  19. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  20. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid

  1. Measuring the Elasticity of Clathrin-Coated Vesicles via Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Albert J.; Prasad, Kondury; Smith, Paul D.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Nossal, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Using a new scheme based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigate mechanical properties of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). CCVs are multicomponent protein and lipid complexes of ∼100 nm diameter that are implicated in many essential cell-trafficking processes. Our AFM imaging resolves clathrin lattice polygons and provides height deformation in quantitative response to AFM-substrate compression force. We model CCVs as multilayered elastic spherical shells and, from AFM measurements, estimate their bending rigidity to be 285 ± 30 kBT, i.e., ∼20 times that of either the outer clathrin cage or inner vesicle membrane. Further analysis reveals a flexible coupling between the clathrin coat and the membrane, a structural property whose modulation may affect vesicle biogenesis and cellular function. PMID:16473913

  2. Surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres: An AFM-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; D'Haese, Cécile; Nysten, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) electrical modes were used to study the surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres. The surface electrical conductivity was studied by current sensing AFM and I-V spectroscopy. Kelvin probe force microscopy was used to measure the surface contact potential. The oxide film, known as passivation layer, covering the fibre surface gives rise to the observation of an apparently semiconducting behaviour. The passivation layer generally exhibits a p-type semiconducting behaviour, which is attributed to the predominant formation of chromium oxide on the surface of the stainless steel fibres. At the nanoscale, different behaviours are observed from points to points, which may be attributed to local variations of the chemical composition and/or thickness of the passivation layer. I-V curves are well fitted with an electron tunnelling model, indicating that electron tunnelling may be the predominant mechanism for electron transport.

  3. Mode coupling in a hanging-fiber AFM used as a rheological probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, C.; Laurent, J.; Steinberger, A.; Bellon, L.; Ciliberto, S.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the advantages and drawbacks of a method which measures the viscosity of liquids at microscales, using a thin glass fiber fixed on the tip of a cantilever of an ultra-low-noise Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When the fiber is dipped into a liquid, the dissipation of the cantilever-fiber system, which is linked to the liquid viscosity, can be computed from the power spectral density of the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever deflection. The high sensitivity of the AFM allows us to show the existence and to develop a model of the coupling between the dynamics of the fiber and that of the cantilever. This model, which accurately fits the experimental data, gives also more insights into the dynamics of coupled microdevices in a viscous environment.

  4. Characterization of the polycaprolactone melt crystallization: complementary optical microscopy, DSC, and AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Speranza, V; Sorrentino, A; De Santis, F; Pantani, R

    2014-01-01

    The first stages of the crystallization of polycaprolactone (PCL) were studied using several techniques. The crystallization exotherms measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were analyzed and compared with results obtained by polarized optical microscopy (POM), rheology, and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results suggest a strong influence of the observation scale. In particular, the AFM, even if limited on time scale, appears to be the most sensitive technique to detect the first stages of crystallization. On the contrary, at least in the case analysed in this work, rheology appears to be the least sensitive technique. DSC and POM provide closer results. This suggests that the definition of induction time in the polymer crystallization is a vague concept that, in any case, requires the definition of the technique used for its characterization.

  5. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  6. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ferat; Yablon, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization. PMID:26665072

  7. Interaction Mechanism of Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Asphaltenes Determined Using Droplet Probe AFM.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zhang, Ling; Xie, Lei; Lu, Xi; Liu, Qingxia; Mantilla, Cesar A; van den Berg, Frans G A; Zeng, Hongbo

    2016-03-15

    Emulsions with interface-active components at the oil/water interface have long been of fundamental and practical interest in many fields. In this work, the interaction forces between two oil droplets in water in the absence/presence of asphaltenes were directly measured using droplet probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed using a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effects of disjoining pressure. It was revealed that the interaction forces measured between two pristine oil droplets (i.e., toluene) could be well described by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, while an additional steric interaction should be included in the presence of asphaltenes in the oil. The surface interaction and the stability of oil droplets in aqueous solution were demonstrated to be significantly influenced by the asphaltenes concentration in oil, salt concentration, pH, and presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) in water. Adsorbed asphaltenes at the oil/water interface led to more negative surface potential of the oil/water interface and also induced steric repulsion between oil droplets, inhibiting the drop coalescence and stabilizing the oil-in-water emulsion. Lower pH of aqueous solution could lead to less negative surface potential and weaken the repulsion between oil droplets. Addition of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) was found to disrupt the protecting effects of adsorbed asphaltenes at oil/water interface and induce coalescence of oil droplets. Our results provide a useful methodology for quantifying the interaction forces and investigating the properties of asphaltenes at the oil/water interfaces and provide insights into the stabilization mechanism of oil-in-water emulsions due to asphaltenes in oil production and water treatment.

  8. Examination of dentin surface using AFM (our experience).

    PubMed

    Zapletalová, Zdenka; Kubínek, Roman; Vůjtek, Milan; Novotný, Radko

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as one the technique of Scanning Probe Microscopy is useful for imaging of surface structure. This method can yield three-dimensional high-resolution topographic images of sample surfaces by using a scanning technique for conductors and insulators on atomic scale. It is based upon mapping of atomic-forces on a surface of an investigated sample. The method is useful not only in physics and chemistry; it can be also applied in biological fields. Special construction of AFM scanner enables to follow biological samples in liquid environments. Artifacts caused by dehydration of samples are removed this way. Dentin of human teeth is a vital hydrated tissue. It is strongly sensitive to dehydration and drying that are commonly used in preparation of samples in examinations by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We describe our experience in examination of dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using contact method of AFM under moist conditions.

  9. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  10. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  11. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  12. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  13. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  14. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  15. BOREAS AFM-3 NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Shanot, Al; Oncley, Steven P.; Cooper, Al; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-3 team used the NCAR Electra aircraft data to make measurements of the fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide, and ozone over the entire BOREAS region to tie together measurements made in both the SSA and the NSA in 1994. These data were also used to study the planetary boundary layer using both in situ and remote sensing measurements. This data set contains both the aircraft flux and the moving window data. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. Seismic measurements to reveal short-term variations in the elastic properties of the Earth crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, Davide; Zaccarelli, Lucia; Pastori, Marina; Margheriti, Lucia; Pio Lucente, Francesco; De Gori, Pasquale; Faenza, Licia; Soldati, Gaia

    2013-04-01

    Since the late the late '60s-early '70s era seismologists started developed theories that included variations of the elastic property of the Earth crust and the state of stress and its evolution crust prior to the occurrence of a large earthquake. Among the others the theory of the dilatancy (Scholz et al., 1973): when a rock is subject to stress, the rock grains are shifted generating micro-cracks, thus the rock itself increases its volume. Inside the fractured rock, fluid saturation and pore pressure play an important role in earthquake nucleation, by modulating the effective stress. Thus measuring the variations of wave speed and of anisotropic parameter in time can be highly informative on how the stress leading to a major fault failure builds up. In 80s and 90s such kind of research on earthquake precursor slowed down and the priority was given to seismic hazard and ground motions studies, which are very important since these are the basis for the building codes in many countries. Today we have dense and sophisticated seismic networks to measure wave-fields characteristics: we archive continuous waveform data recorded at three components broad-band seismometers, we almost routinely obtain high resolution earthquake locations. Therefore we are ready to start to systematically look at seismic-wave propagation properties to possibly reveal short-term variations in the elastic properties of the Earth crust. One seismological quantity which, since the '70s, is recognized to be diagnostic of the level of fracturation and/or of the pore pressure in the rock, hence of its state of stress, is the ratio between the compressional (P-wave) and the shear (S-wave) seismic velocities, the Vp/Vs (Nur, 1972; Kisslinger and Engdahl, 1973). Variations of this ratio have been recently observed and measured during the preparatory phase of a major earthquake (Lucente et al. 2010). In active fault areas and volcanoes, tectonic stress variation influences fracture field orientation

  17. Concentration-Discharge Patterns Revealed from High Resolution Nitrate Measurements in Agricultural Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, S. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2012-12-01

    Riverine export of nutrients is a major component of nutrient cycles, particularly with respect to nitrogen; ~ 25 percent of terrestrially applied nitrogen (N) is removed via riverine export. Understanding the patterns in N export during a storm event is critical for developing a conceptual model of the dominant processes and pathways of N transformation, and designing appropriate management strategies to mitigate N pollution in streams and receiving water bodies. Most studies however, are limited by the lack of high-resolution water quality data to elucidate these pathways and mechanisms. We explored concentration-discharge relationships using high-resolution (15 minute) discharge (Q) and nitrate concentration (C) data (measured using an in-situ Nitratax Sonde) at multiple nested scales (from 151.3 km2 to 8900 km2) in two watersheds in Iowa: Clear Creek Watershed and the Raccoon River watershed. Three distinct regimes of nitrate transport were revealed: (1) a linear regime in which C increases with increasing Q, (2) a saturation regime in which C remains constant against increasing Q, and (3) a dilution regime in which concentration decreases as Q increases. The tight clustering of the data along these patterns is indicative of emergent behavior in such human-dominated systems. All three regimes were apparent in the Raccoon River Watershed, while only the saturation and dilution regimes were apparent in the Clear Creek Watershed. We hypothesize that surface flow is dominant in the Clear Creek Watershed leading to a saturation/dilution regimes, while subsurface flow is dominant in the more heavily tile-drained Raccoon River Watershed, leading to the occurrence of all three regimes. A parsimonious model was developed to test the hypothesis and develop C-Q patterns as a function of the partitioning of flow through the different pathways.

  18. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  19. Cell secretion machinery: studies using the AFM.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    A new field in biology, 'nano-cell biology', has emerged from the successful use of force microscopy in understanding the structure and dynamics of cells and biomolecules, at nm resolution and in real time. Atomic force microscopy, in combination with conventional tools and approaches (electron microscopy, electrophysiology, X-ray diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology), has revealed for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells. Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them, dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures called Porosome, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling, and the fusion of opposing bilayers, i.e., the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, has also been resolved.

  20. Single-cycle-PLL detection for real-time FM-AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Benedikt; Dukic, Maja; Erickson, Blake; Ortmanns, Maurits; Fantner, Georg; Anders, Jens

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present a novel architecture for phase-locked loop (PLL) based high-speed demodulation of frequency-modulated (FM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) signals. In our approach, we use single-sideband (SSB) frequency upconversion to translate the AFM signal from the position sensitive detector to a fixed intermediate frequency (IF) of 10 MHz. In this way, we fully benefit from the excellent noise performance of PLL-based FM demodulators still avoiding the intrinsic bandwidth limitation of such systems. In addition, the upconversion to a fixed IF renders the PLL demodulator independent of the cantilever's resonance frequency, allowing the system to work with a large range of cantilever frequencies. To investigate if the additional noise introduced by the SSB upconverter degrades the system noise figure we present a model of the AM-to-FM noise conversion in PLLs incorporating a phase-frequency detector. Using this model, we can predict an upper corner frequency for the demodulation bandwidth above which the converted noise from the single-sideband upconverter becomes the dominant noise source and therefore begins to deteriorate the overall system performance. The approach is validated by both electrical and AFM measurements obtained with a PCB-based prototype implementing the proposed demodulator architecture.

  1. Statistical analysis of AFM topographic images of self-assembled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sevriuk, V. A.; Brunkov, P. N. Shalnev, I. V.; Gutkin, A. A.; Klimko, G. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Konnikov, S. G.

    2013-07-15

    To obtain statistical data on quantum-dot sizes, AFM topographic images of the substrate on which the dots under study are grown are analyzed. Due to the nonideality of the substrate containing height differences on the order of the size of nanoparticles at distances of 1-10 {mu}m and the insufficient resolution of closely arranged dots due to the finite curvature radius of the AFM probe, automation of the statistical analysis of their large dot array requires special techniques for processing topographic images to eliminate the loss of a particle fraction during conventional processing. As such a technique, convolution of the initial matrix of the AFM image with a specially selected matrix is used. This makes it possible to determine the position of each nanoparticle and, using the initial matrix, to measure their geometrical parameters. The results of statistical analysis by this method of self-assembled InAs quantum dots formed on the surface of an AlGaAs epitaxial layer are presented. It is shown that their concentration, average size, and half-width of height distribution depend strongly on the In flow and total amount of deposited InAs which are varied within insignificant limits.

  2. Structure and Permeability of Ion-channels by Integrated AFM and Waveguide TIRF Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Patel, Nirav R.; Quist, Arjan P.; Cohen, Daniel A.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) for high resolution imaging and molecular transport measurement. Significantly, membranes over the nanopore were stable for repeated AFM imaging. We studied structure-activity relationship of gap junction hemichannels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Individual hemichannels in the membrane overlying the nanopore were resolved and transport of hemichannel-permeant LY dye was visualized when the hemichannel was opened by lowering calcium in the medium. This integrated technique will allow direct structure-permeability relationship of many ion channels and receptors. PMID:24651823

  3. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  4. In situ monitoring of the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold using electrochemical AFM.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-03-11

    The lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold (NPG) is observed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging coupled with potentiostatic measurement. Dense Li2O2 nanoparticles form a film at 2.5 V, which is decomposed at 3.8-4.0 V in an ether-based electrolyte.

  5. In situ monitoring of the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold using electrochemical AFM.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-03-11

    The lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold (NPG) is observed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging coupled with potentiostatic measurement. Dense Li2O2 nanoparticles form a film at 2.5 V, which is decomposed at 3.8-4.0 V in an ether-based electrolyte. PMID:24469227

  6. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Dissolution of uranophane: An AFM, XPS, SEM and ICP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Michael; Freund, Michael; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Burns, Peter C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2009-05-01

    Dissolution experiments on single crystals of uranophane and uranophane-β, Ca(H 2O) 5[(UO 2)(SiO 3(OH)] 2, from the Shinkolobwe mine of the Democratic Republic of Congo, were done in an aqueous HCl solution of pH 3.5 for 3 h, in HCl solutions of pH 2 for 5, 10 and 30 min, and in Pb 2+-, Ba-, Sr-, Ca- and Mg-HCl solutions of pH 2 for 30 min. The basal surfaces of the treated uranophane crystals were examined using atomic-force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solutions after dissolution experiments on single crystals and synthetic powders were analysed with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The morphology of the observed etch pits (measured by AFM) were compared to the morphology, predicted on the basis of the bond-valence deficiency of polyhedron chains along the edges of the basal surface. Etch pits form in HCl solutions of pH 2. Their decrease in depth with the duration of the dissolution experiment is explained with the stepwave dissolution model, which describes the lowering of the surrounding area of an etch pit with continuous waves of steps emanated from the etch pit into the rest of the crystal surface. Hillocks form in an HCl solution of pH 3.5, and the chemical composition of the surface (as indicated by XPS) shows that these hillocks are the result of the precipitation of a uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phase. Well-orientated hillocks form on the surface of uranophane in a SrCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2. They are part of an aged silica coating of composition Si 2O 2(OH) 4(H 2O) n. An amorphous layer forms on the surface of uranophane in a MgCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2, which has a composition and structure similar to silicic acid. Small crystallites of uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phases form on the surface of uranophane after treatment in Pb(NO 3) 2-HCl and BaCl 2-HCl solutions of pH 2. Dissolution experiments on synthetic uranophane powders

  8. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  9. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  10. A tetravalent bispecific TandAb (CD19/CD3), AFM11, efficiently recruits T cells for the potent lysis of CD19+ tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Uwe; Duell, Johannes; Ellwanger, Kristina; Herbrecht, Carmen; Knackmuss, Stefan HJ; Fucek, Ivica; Eser, Markus; McAleese, Fionnuala; Molkenthin, Vera; Le Gall, Fabrice; Topp, Max; Little, Melvyn; Zhukovsky, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    To harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells for the treatment of CD19+ malignancies, we constructed AFM11, a humanized tetravalent bispecific CD19/CD3 tandem diabody (TandAb) consisting solely of Fv domains. The molecule exhibits good manufacturability and stability properties. AFM11 has 2 binding sites for CD3 and 2 for CD19, an antigen that is expressed from early B cell development through differentiation into plasma cells, and is an attractive alternative to CD20 as a target for the development of therapeutic antibodies to treat B cell malignancies. Comparison of the binding and cytotoxicity of AFM11 with those of a tandem scFv bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) molecule targeting the same antigens revealed that AFM11 elicited more potent in vitro B cell lysis. Though possessing high affinity to CD3, the TandAb mediates serial-killing of CD19+ cells with little dependence of potency or efficacy upon effector:target ratio, unlike the BiTE. The advantage of the TandAb over the BiTE was most pronounced at lower effector:target ratios. AFM11 mediated strictly target-dependent T cell activation evidenced by CD25 and CD69 induction, proliferation, and cytokine release, notwithstanding bivalent CD3 engagement. In a NOD/scid xenograft model, AFM11 induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of Raji tumors in vivo, and radiolabeled TandAb exhibited excellent localization to tumor but not to normal tissue. After intravenous administration in mice, half-life ranged from 18.4 to 22.9 h. In a human ex vivo B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia study, AFM11 exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity in an autologous setting. Thus, AFM11 may represent a promising therapeutic for treatment of CD19+ malignancies with an advantageous safety risk profile and anticipated dosing regimen. PMID:25875246

  11. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes.We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the

  12. Linking of Sensor Molecules with Amino Groups to Amino-Functionalized AFM Tips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The measuring tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be upgraded to a specific biosensor by attaching one or a few biomolecules to the apex of the tip. The biofunctionalized tip is then used to map cognate target molecules on a sample surface or to study biophysical parameters of interaction with the target molecules. The functionality of tip-bound sensor molecules is greatly enhanced if they are linked via a thin, flexible polymer chain. In a typical scheme of tip functionalization, reactive groups are first generated on the tip surface, a bifunctional cross-linker is then attached with one of its two reactive ends, and finally the probe molecule of interest is coupled to the free end of the cross-linker. Unfortunately, the most popular functional group generated on the tip surface is the amino group, while at the same time, the only useful coupling functions of many biomolecules (such as antibodies) are also NH2 groups. In the past, various tricks or detours were applied to minimize the undesired bivalent reaction of bifunctional linkers with adjacent NH2 groups on the tip surface. In the present study, an uncompromising solution to this problem was found with the help of a new cross-linker (“acetal-PEG-NHS”) which possesses one activated carboxyl group and one acetal-protected benzaldehyde function. The activated carboxyl ensures rapid unilateral attachment to the amino-functionalized tip, and only then is the terminal acetal group converted into the amino-reactive benzaldehyde function by mild treatment (1% citric acid, 1–10 min) which does not harm the AFM tip. As an exception, AFM tips with magnetic coating become demagnetized in 1% citric acid. This problem was solved by deprotecting the acetal group before coupling the PEG linker to the AFM tip. Bivalent binding of the corresponding linker (“aldehyde-PEG-NHS”) to adjacent NH2 groups on the tip was largely suppressed by high linker concentrations. In this way, magnetic AFM tips could be

  13. Bacteria attachment to surfaces--AFM force spectroscopy and physicochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2011-12-01

    Understanding bacterial adhesion to surfaces requires knowledge of the forces that govern bacterial-surface interactions. Biofilm formation on stainless steel 316 (SS316) by three bacterial species was investigated by examining surface force interaction between the cells and metal surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Bacterial-metal adhesion force was quantified at different surface delay time from 0 to 60s using AFM tip coated with three different bacterial species: Gram-negative Massilia timonae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The results revealed that bacterial adhesion forces on SS316 surface by Gram-negative bacteria is higher (8.53±1.40 nN and 7.88±0.94 nN) when compared to Gram-positive bacteria (1.44±0.21 nN). Physicochemical analysis on bacterial surface properties also revealed that M. timonae and P. aeruginosa showed higher hydrophobicity and surface charges than B. subtilis along with the capability of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The higher hydrophobicity, surface charges, and greater propensity to form EPS by M. timonae and P. aeruginosa led to high adhesive force on the metal surface. PMID:21889162

  14. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-03-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels.

  15. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels. PMID:24663394

  16. Simultaneous AFM nano-patterning and imaging for photomask repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Tamer, Mehmet S.; van Es, Maarten H.; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a new AFM based nano-patterning technique that can be used for fast defect repairing of high resolution photomasks and possibly other high-speed nano-patterning applications. The proposed method works based on hammering the sample with tapping mode AFM followed by wet cleaning of the residuals. On the area where a specific pattern should be written, the tip-sample interaction force is tuned in a controlled manner by changing the excitation frequency of the cantilever without interrupting the imaging process. Using this method several patterns where transferred to different samples with imaging speed. While the pattern was transferred to the sample in each tracing scan line, the patterned sample was imaged in retracing scan line, thus the outcome was immediately visible during the experiment.

  17. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  19. MDI: integrity index of cytoskeletal fibers observed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Massimo; Bruni, Luca; Croci, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    The Modified Directional Index (MDI) is a form factor of the angular spectrum computed from the 2D Fourier transform of an image marking the prevalence of rectilinear features throughout the picture. We study some properties of the index and we apply it to AFM images of cell cytoskeleton regions featuring patterns of rectilinear nearly parallel actin filaments as in the case of microfilaments grouped in bundles. The analysis of AFM images through MDI calculation quantifies the fiber directionality changes which could be related to fiber damages. This parameter is applied to the images of Hs 578Bst cell line, non-tumoral and not immortalized human epithelial cell line, irradiated with X-rays at doses equivalent to typical radiotherapy treatment fractions. In the reported samples, we could conclude that the damages are mainly born to the membrane and not to the cytoskeleton. It could be interesting to test the parameter also using other kinds of chemical or physical agents.

  20. Differences in Fidelity of Implementation Measures: What Videos and Surveys Reveal about Algebra Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Kelley; Pollack, Courtney; Star, Jon R.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    The current paper investigated the following research questions regarding measures of fidelity: (1) Is there a significant relationship between two different measures of fidelity of implementation: a survey of instructional practices and coded videos of classroom lessons? Does the strength of this relationship differ between treatment and control…

  1. Nanoscale fabrication of a peptide layer using an AFM probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Chie; Obataya, Ikuo; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Miyake, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been applied in many studies to manipulate atoms or molecules. In particular, force spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool to elucidate intermolecular or intramolecular interactions and provide mechanical information. If enzymes could retain their activity when immobilized on probes, not only could enzyme-substrate interactions be investigated but also the probes could be used for precise biomolecular manipulation at the nano-scale. In our study, a method based on "Enzymatic Nanolithography" was successfully performed in a buffered solution using Staphylococcal serine V8 protease and AFM. To estimate the fabricating activity of the protease immobilized on the AFM tip to peptides immobilized on a substrate, we designed and synthesized peptides that showed enzymatic action specific to the protease. When the protease digested the reporter peptide a quencher residue was released from the main flame of the peptide and resulted in fluorescence. In the designed 9 mer peptides, TAMRA functioned as a good quencher for FAM. After contact of the protease-immobilized tip to the reporter peptide layer, a fluorescent area was observed by microscopic imaging.

  2. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  3. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  4. Lateral Tip Control Effects in CD-AFM Metrology: The Large Tip Limit

    PubMed Central

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Goldband, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    Sidewall sensing in critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) usually involves continuous lateral dithering of the tip or the use of a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. Understanding the influence and dependence of the effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip can improve the measurement accuracy and uncertainty estimation for CD-AFM measurements. Since CD-AFM typically uses tips that range from 15 nm to 850 nm in geometrical width, the behavior of effective tip width throughout this range should be understood. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. For tip widths of 130 nm and lower, which also have lower lateral stiffness, the response of the effective tip width to lateral dither is greater than for larger tips. However, we have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To validate that our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness are valid for large CD-tips, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm

  5. Using regression to measure holistic face processing reveals a strong link with face recognition ability.

    PubMed

    DeGutis, Joseph; Wilmer, Jeremy; Mercado, Rogelio J; Cohan, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Although holistic processing is thought to underlie normal face recognition ability, widely discrepant reports have recently emerged about this link in an individual differences context. Progress in this domain may have been impeded by the widespread use of subtraction scores, which lack validity due to their contamination with control condition variance. Regressing, rather than subtracting, a control condition from a condition of interest corrects this validity problem by statistically removing all control condition variance, thereby producing a specific measure that is uncorrelated with the control measure. Using 43 participants, we measured the relationships amongst the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) and two holistic processing measures, the composite task (CT) and the part-whole task (PW). For the holistic processing measures (CT and PW), we contrasted the results for regressing vs. subtracting the control conditions (parts for PW; misaligned congruency effect for CT) from the conditions of interest (wholes for PW; aligned congruency effect for CT). The regression-based holistic processing measures correlated with each other and with CFMT, supporting the idea of a unitary holistic processing mechanism that is involved in skilled face recognition. Subtraction scores yielded weaker correlations, especially for the PW. Together, the regression-based holistic processing measures predicted more than twice the amount of variance in CFMT (R(2)=.21) than their respective subtraction measures (R(2)=.10). We conclude that holistic processing is robustly linked to skilled face recognition. In addition to confirming this theoretically significant link, these results provide a case in point for the inappropriateness of subtraction scores when requiring a specific individual differences measure that removes the variance of a control task.

  6. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  7. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments.

    PubMed

    Dague, E; Jauvert, E; Laplatine, L; Viallet, B; Thibault, C; Ressier, L

    2011-09-30

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  8. Assembly of live micro-organisms on microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for AFM bio-experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dague, E.; Jauvert, E.; Laplatine, L.; Viallet, B.; Thibault, C.; Ressier, L.

    2011-09-01

    Immobilization of live micro-organisms on solid substrates is an important prerequisite for atomic force microscopy (AFM) bio-experiments. The method employed must immobilize the cells firmly enough to enable them to withstand the lateral friction forces exerted by the tip during scanning but without denaturing the cell interface. In this work, a generic method for the assembly of living cells on specific areas of substrates is proposed. It consists in assembling the living cells within the patterns of microstructured, functionalized poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps using convective/capillary deposition. This versatile approach is validated by applying it to two systems of foremost importance in biotechnology and medicine: Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and Aspergillus fumigatus fungal spores. We show that this method allows multiplexing AFM nanomechanical measurements by force spectroscopy on S. cerevisiae yeasts and high-resolution AFM imaging of germinated Aspergillus conidia in buffer medium. These two examples clearly demonstrate the immense potential of micro-organism assembly on functionalized, microstructured PDMS stamps by convective/capillary deposition for performing rigorous AFM bio-experiments on living cells.

  9. Quantitative measures to reveal coordinated cytoskeleton-nucleus reorganization during in vitro invasion of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Liron; Nissim, Ronen; Alvarez-Elizondo, Martha B.; Weihs, Daphne

    2015-04-01

    Metastasis formation is a major cause of mortality in cancer patients and includes tumor cell relocation to distant organs. A metastatic cell invades through other cells and extracellular matrix by biochemical attachment and mechanical force application. Force is used to move on or through a 2- or 3-dimensional (3D) environment, respectively, or to penetrate a 2D substrate. We have previously shown that even when a gel substrate is impenetrable, metastatic breast cancer cells can still indent it by applying force. Cells typically apply force through the acto-myosin network, which is mechanically connected to the nucleus. We develop a 3D image-analysis to reveal relative locations of the cell elements, and show that as cells apply force to the gel, a coordinated process occurs that involves cytoskeletal remodeling and repositioning of the nucleus. Our approach shows that the actin and microtubules reorganize in the cell, bringing the actin to the leading edge of the cell. In parallel, the nucleus is transported behind the actin, likely by the cytoskeleton, into the indentation dimple formed in the gel. The nucleus volume below the gel surface correlates with indentation depth, when metastatic breast cancer cells indent gels deeply. However, the nucleus always remains above the gel in benign cells, even when small indentations are observed. Determining mechanical processes during metastatic cell invasion can reveal how cells disseminate in the body and can uncover targets for diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Adsorption Studies with AFM of Human Plasma Fibrinogen on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gause, Sheena; Kong, Wendy; Rowe

    2007-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FGN) plays an important role in the clotting of blood. Human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) is a protein that readily adsorbs on biomaterial surfaces. The purpose of this experiment was to use the Atomic Force Microscope to study the adsorption of HPF molecules or FGN onto several silicon surfaces with different orientations and resistivities. The size of the FGN molecules found to be somewhat different of Si(111), (100) and (110) were compared to the size of the FGN molecules in solution (45 nm in length, the end dynodes measures to be 6.5 nm in diameter, and the middle dynode measures to be 5 nm in diameter. For this study, the CPR (Thermo-microscope) Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was used to observe the amount of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed by Si (111) with a resistance of .0281-.0261 φ cm, Si (111) with a resistance of 1 φ cm, Si (100), and Si (110) surfaces. In finding any single fibrinogen molecules, the appropriate image scans and measurements were taken. After collection and analysis of the data, it was found from AFM that the fibrinogen molecules found on Si (110) mostly resembled fibrinogen molecules found in solution. The other images showed that the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on Silicon substrates is significantly greater (˜10-20 %) than those in solution.

  11. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pariona, Moises Meza; Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela; Riva, Rudimar

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  12. Nucleotide pocket thermodynamics measured by EPR reveal how energy partitioning relates myosin speed to efficiency.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Thomas J; Naber, Nariman; Franks-Skiba, Kathy; Dunn, Alexander R; Eldred, Catherine C; Berger, Christopher L; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Spudich, James A; Swank, Douglas M; Pate, Edward; Cooke, Roger

    2011-03-18

    We have used spin-labeled ADP to investigate the dynamics of the nucleotide-binding pocket in a series of myosins, which have a range of velocities. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that the pocket is in equilibrium between open and closed conformations. In the absence of actin, the closed conformation is favored. When myosin binds actin, the open conformation becomes more favored, facilitating nucleotide release. We found that faster myosins favor a more closed pocket in the actomyosin•ADP state, with smaller values of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0), even though these myosins release ADP at a faster rate. A model involving a partitioning of free energy between work-generating steps prior to rate-limiting ADP release explains both the unexpected correlation between velocity and opening of the pocket and the observation that fast myosins are less efficient than slow myosins.

  13. Revealing amphiphilic nanodomains of anti-biofouling polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Amadei, Carlo A; Yang, Rong; Chiesa, Matteo; Gleason, Karen K; Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be ∼1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry. PMID:24617757

  14. Revealing Amphiphilic Nanodornains of Anti-Biofouling Polymer Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Amadei, CA; Yang, R; Chiesa, M; Gleason, KK; Santos, S

    2014-04-09

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be similar to 1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  15. Revealing amphiphilic nanodomains of anti-biofouling polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Amadei, Carlo A; Yang, Rong; Chiesa, Matteo; Gleason, Karen K; Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be ∼1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  16. Your Mind Wanders Weakly, Your Mind Wanders Deeply: Objective Measures Reveal Mindless Reading at Different Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schad, Daniel J.; Nuthmann, Antje; Engbert, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Time Factors (Learning);When the mind wanders, attention turns away from the external environment and cognitive processing is decoupled from perceptual information. Mind wandering is usually treated as a dichotomy (dichotomy-hypothesis), and is often measured using self-reports. Here, we propose the levels of inattention hypothesis, which…

  17. Ductile strain rates measurements reveal continental crust long-term deformation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Leloup, P. H.; Sassier, C.; Gardien, V.; Ricard, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Any discussion on the long-term crustal rheology is hindered by our poor knowledge of deformation rates in the deep crust. These rates have only been estimated to be ≤10-15 and ≥10-13 s-1 in the "stable" and highly deforming zones respectively, and measured in a few peculiar cases. Because quartz ribbons are ubiquitous in continental shear zones, the quartz-strain-rate-metry (QRS) method, based on experimentally calibrated quartz piezometers and ductile flow laws, could provide deformation rates measurements in many geological contexts. However, the results are highly sensitive on the deformation temperature that is difficult to measure. Furthermore, results vary by three orders of magnitude depending on the chosen piezometer and rheological law. If recent technical progress allow measuring more precisely the deformation temperature, it is still not clear what is the most accurate piezometer - rheological law association. We solved that dilemma by comparing strain rates measured by the QRS method with a reference one measured with another method on the same outcrop of the Ailao Shan - Red River (ASRR) shear zone. At site C1, by combining dating of syntectonic dykes and measurements of their deformation, the strain rate is calculated between 3 and 4 x10-14 s-1 between 29 to 22 Ma, (Sassier et al., JGR, 2009). Quartz ribbons sampled in site C1 show large grains recrystallized by grain boundary migration (GBM), themselves recrystallized at lower temperature by sub-grain rotation (SGR). The mean recrystallized quartz grain size for the SGR event range between 74.0 and 79.3 μm. The associated stresses, measured with Shimizu (JSG, 2008) piezometer, range between 35.2 and 38.1 MPa. Conditions of deformation of P≈ 1.5 kbar and T≈ 430°C were inferred by combining several thermobarometers on quartz, such as TitaniQ, fluid inclusions microthermometry and crystallographic fabrics. The calculated strain rate with five flow laws and three piezometers range between 3

  18. Nanomechanics of new materials — AFM and computer modelling studies of trichoptera silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Janusz; Strzelecka, Joanna; Mikulska, Karolina; Tszydel, Mariusz; Balter, Aleksander; Nowak, Wiesław

    2011-04-01

    Caddisfly (Trichopera) can glue diverse material underwater with a silk fiber. This makes it a particularly interesting subject for biomimetcs. Better understanding of silk composition and structure could lead to an adhesive capable to close bleeding wounds or to new biomaterials. However, while spiderweb or silkworm secretion is well researched, caddisfly silk is still poorly understood. Here we report a first nanomechanical analysis of H. Angustipennis caddisfly silk fiber. An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) imaging shows dense 150 nm bumps on silk surface, which can be identified as one of features responsible for its outstanding adhesive properties. AFM force spectroscopy at the fiber surface showed, among others, characteristic saw like pattern. This pattern is attributed to sacrificial bond stretching and enhances energy dissipation in mechanical deformation. Similarities of some force curves observed on Tegenaria domestica spiderweb and caddisfly silk are also discussed. Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed that the strength of short components of Fib-H HA species molecules, abundant in Trichoptera silk is critically dependent on calcium presence.

  19. Structural changes of polysulfone membrane use for hemodialysis in the consecutive regime: nanometric analysis by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batina, Nikola; Acosta García, Ma. Cristina; Avalos Pérez, Angélica; Alberto Ramírez, Mario; Franco, Martha; Pérez Gravas, Héctor; Cadena Méndez, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the hemodialytic treatment of patients with either acute or chronic renal failure has been improved by promoting biocompatibility in the use of new materials and improve membrane surface characteristics. Low and high flux polysulfone membranes (PM) used in dialysis and ultra filtration have been studied in order to understand the geometry and surface chemistry of the pores at inner (nanometric) and outer (micrometric) membrane parts. The surface changes of polysulfone cartridge membrane (PM) during different number of consecutive reuse trials: after 1st, 10th and 23th times of use. The morphology of the hollow fibers surfaces was studied by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and the surface roughness analysis. The roughness of both inner and outer part of PM surface increases with numbers of reuse trails. Thus, small and medium size pores were wiped out when the number of uses changed from zero to 23 on the outer surface. The pore density decreases. The inner part of membrane shows some nanometric size deformation in forms of new openings and raptures. The AFM analysis show differences in the PM morphology at the nanometric level, not previously revealed, which could be important in the evaluation of the PM.

  20. AFM Observation of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films on GaAs (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hirotaka; Motomatsu, Makoto; Mizutani, Wataru; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    1995-02-01

    We have confirmed that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film of octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, can be formed on a cleaved GaAs (110) surface, by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Circular depressions were observed on the surface after film formation. The area of the circular depressions increased with immersion time, indicating that the solution oxidized the interface between ODT molecules and the GaAs surface, resulting in removal of ODT molecules. The oxidation was considerably faster in pure ethanol solution than that in ODT solution, demonstrating that the SAM film protects the GaAs surface from oxidation. High-resolution lateral force microscope (LFM) images revealed a periodic structure that had two types of lines: periodic lines 0.57 nm apart and lines rotated 55° with respect to them. A structural model of the SAM successfully explained both the features in high-resolution LFM images and the depression depth observed in AFM images.

  1. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  2. Geochemistry of the lunar highlands as revealed by measurements of thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Beck, Andrew W.; Lawrence, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal neutron emissions from the lunar surface provide a direct measure of bulk elemental composition that can be used to constrain the chemical properties of near-surface (depth <1 m) lunar materials. We present a new calibration of the Lunar Prospector thermal neutron map, providing a direct link between measured count rates and bulk elemental composition. The data are used to examine the chemical and mineralogical composition of the lunar surface, with an emphasis on constraining the plagioclase concentration across the highlands. We observe that the regions of lowest neutron absorption, which correspond to estimated plagioclase concentrations of >85%, are generally associated with large impact basins and are colocated with clusters of nearly pure plagioclase identified with spectral reflectance data.

  3. Gas Nonideality at One Atmosphere Revealed through Speed of Sound Measurements and Heat Capacity Determinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Arthur M.; Liu, Allen

    2008-01-01

    Using an easy-to-make cylindrical resonator, students can measure the speed of sound in a gas, u, with sufficiently high precision (by locating standing-wave Lissajous patterns on an oscilloscope) to observe real gas properties at one atmosphere and 300 K. For CO[subscript 2] and SF[subscript 6], u is found to be 268.83 and 135.25 m s[superscript…

  4. Eigencentrality based on dissimilarity measures reveals central nodes in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Socorro, A. J.; Herrera-Almarza, G. C.; González-Díaz, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important problems in complex network’s theory is the location of the entities that are essential or have a main role within the network. For this purpose, the use of dissimilarity measures (specific to theory of classification and data mining) to enrich the centrality measures in complex networks is proposed. The centrality method used is the eigencentrality which is based on the heuristic that the centrality of a node depends on how central are the nodes in the immediate neighbourhood (like rich get richer phenomenon). This can be described by an eigenvalues problem, however the information of the neighbourhood and the connections between neighbours is not taken in account, neglecting their relevance when is one evaluates the centrality/importance/influence of a node. The contribution calculated by the dissimilarity measure is parameter independent, making the proposed method is also parameter independent. Finally, we perform a comparative study of our method versus other methods reported in the literature, obtaining more accurate and less expensive computational results in most cases. PMID:26603652

  5. Microhardness, chemical etching, SEM, AFM and SHG studies of novel nonlinear optical crystal -L-threonine formate

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumantha Rao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness studies of novel LTF crystal reported first time in the literature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface studies are done by AFM, chemical etching and SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From SHG studies, it is known that LTF is potential NLO crystal. -- Abstract: The crystal L-threonine formate, an organic NLO crystal was synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystal surface has been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis reveals pyramidal shaped minute crystallites on the growth surface. The etching study indicates the occurrence of etch pit patterns like striations and step like pattern. The mechanical properties of LTF crystals were evaluated by mechanical testing which reveals certain mechanical characteristics like elastic stiffness constant (C{sub 11}) and young's modulus (E). The Vickers and Knoop microhardness studies have been carried out on LTF crystals over a range of 10-50 g. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal. AFM image shows major hillock on growth surface. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency has been tested by the Kurtz powder technique using Nd:YAG laser and found to be about 1.21 times in comparison with standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals.

  6. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. PMID:27474579

  7. In situ Stiffness Adjustment of AFM Probes by Two Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, Marcel Lambertus Cornelis; Pérez Garza, Héctor Hugo; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The choice on which type of cantilever to use for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) depends on the type of the experiment being done. Typically, the cantilever has to be exchanged when a different stiffness is required and the entire alignment has to be repeated. In the present work, a method to adjust the stiffness in situ of a commercial AFM cantilever is developed. The adjustment is achieved by changing the effective length of the cantilever by electrostatic pull-in. By applying a voltage between the cantilever and an electrode (with an insulating layer at the point of contact), the cantilever snaps to the electrode, reducing the cantilever’s effective length. An analytical model was developed to find the pull-in voltage of the system. Subsequently, a finite element model was developed to study the pull-in behavior. The working principle of this concept is demonstrated with a proof-of-concept experiment. The electrode was positioned close to the cantilever by using a robotic nanomanipulator. To confirm the change in stiffness, the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever was measured for varying electrode positions. The results match with the theoretical expectations. The stiffness was adjusted in situ in the range of 0.2 N/m to 27 N/m, covering two orders of magnitude in one single cantilever. This proof-of-concept is the first step towards a micro fabricated prototype, that integrates the electrode positioning system and cantilever that can be used for actual AFM experiments. PMID:27077863

  8. Repeated sampling reveals differential variability in measures of species richness and community composition in planktonic protists.

    PubMed

    Dolan, John R; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2011-12-01

    Diversity metrics and descriptors of protistan community structure were calculated from 12 samples of 10 l each collected from the Bay of Villefranche in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Variability of the sampling was on scales of minutes and meters. The individual samples were compared with each other and compared with a pooled data set from the total volume of 120 l, considered as the 'true' community. We focused on a single group of planktonic protists, tintinnids, a coherent functional and phylogenetic group in which morpho-species identifications by light microscopy are unambiguous. Tintinnid abundance in the samples ranged from 217 to 321 cells of 16-21 species with the number of rare species in a sample (< 1% of abundance) positively related to species richness of the sample. Rarefaction estimates of total species richness in the 12 samples ranged from 21 ± 3.5 to 37 ± 3.6 compared with the 34 species of the pooled data set. The measures of similarity reflected the differences between samples in both the numbers and identities of the least abundant or rare species. The species abundance distribution using pooled data was best fit by a log-series or geometric distribution; eight species accounted for about 90% of total cells and most species, the remaining 22 out of 34, were 'rare' (concentration < 1% of total cells). Among the samples, 5 were best fit by a geometric model, 1 by a log-series distribution, 2 by a log-normal or log-series model, and 4 could not be clearly assigned a particular distribution. Our results suggest that single sample estimates of species richness are relatively robust compared with measures of taxonomic similarity and species abundance distribution. When measuring differences among populations sample variability should be considered.

  9. One-neutron removal measurement reveals 24O as a new doubly magic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, R; Nociforo, C; Prochazka, A; Aumann, T; Boutin, D; Cortina-Gil, D; Davids, B; Diakaki, M; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Gernhäuser, R; Gerl, J; Janik, R; Jonson, B; Kindler, B; Knöbel, R; Krücken, R; Lantz, M; Lenske, H; Litvinov, Y; Lommel, B; Mahata, K; Maierbeck, P; Musumarra, A; Nilsson, T; Otsuka, T; Perro, C; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Sun, B; Szarka, I; Tanihata, I; Utsuno, Y; Weick, H; Winkler, M

    2009-04-17

    The first measurement of the momentum distribution for one-neutron removal from (24)O at 920A MeV performed at GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The observed distribution has a width (FWHM) of 99 +/- 4 MeV/c in the projectile rest frame and a one-neutron removal cross section of 63 +/- 7 mb. The results are well explained with a nearly pure 2s_{1/2} neutron spectroscopic factor of 1.74 +/- 0.19 within the eikonal model. This large s-wave probability shows a spherical shell closure thereby confirming earlier suggestions that (24)O is a new doubly magic nucleus.

  10. One-neutron removal measurement reveals 24O as a new doubly magic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, R; Nociforo, C; Prochazka, A; Aumann, T; Boutin, D; Cortina-Gil, D; Davids, B; Diakaki, M; Farinon, F; Geissel, H; Gernhäuser, R; Gerl, J; Janik, R; Jonson, B; Kindler, B; Knöbel, R; Krücken, R; Lantz, M; Lenske, H; Litvinov, Y; Lommel, B; Mahata, K; Maierbeck, P; Musumarra, A; Nilsson, T; Otsuka, T; Perro, C; Scheidenberger, C; Sitar, B; Strmen, P; Sun, B; Szarka, I; Tanihata, I; Utsuno, Y; Weick, H; Winkler, M

    2009-04-17

    The first measurement of the momentum distribution for one-neutron removal from (24)O at 920A MeV performed at GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The observed distribution has a width (FWHM) of 99 +/- 4 MeV/c in the projectile rest frame and a one-neutron removal cross section of 63 +/- 7 mb. The results are well explained with a nearly pure 2s_{1/2} neutron spectroscopic factor of 1.74 +/- 0.19 within the eikonal model. This large s-wave probability shows a spherical shell closure thereby confirming earlier suggestions that (24)O is a new doubly magic nucleus. PMID:19518623

  11. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand.

    PubMed

    Parreira, P; Shi, Q; Magalhaes, A; Reis, C A; Bugaytsova, J; Borén, T; Leckband, D; Martins, M C L

    2014-12-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Le(b)), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor-ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Le(b) structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion.

  12. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  13. On the molecular interaction between albumin and ibuprofen: An AFM and QCM-D study.

    PubMed

    Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Etxebarria, Juan; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on surfaces often results in a change of their structural behavior and consequently, a loss of bioactivity. One experimental method to study interactions on a molecular level is single molecular force spectroscopy that permits to measure forces down to the pico-newton range. In this work, the binding force between human serum albumin (HSA), covalently immobilized on glutaraldehyde modified gold substrates, and ibuprofen sodium salt was studied by means of single molecular force spectroscopy. First of all, a protocol was established to functionalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips with ibuprofen. The immobilization protocol was additionally tested by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and contact angle measurements. AFM was used to characterize the adsorption of HSA on gold substrates, which lead to a packed monolayer of thickness slightly lower than the reported value in solution. Finally, single molecule spectroscopy results were used to characterize the binding force between albumin and ibuprofen and calculate the distance of the transition state (0.6 nm) and the dissociation rate constant (0.055 s(-1)). The results might indicate that part of the adsorbed protein still preserves its functionality upon adsorption.

  14. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  15. Enamel crystals of mice susceptible or resistant to dental fluorosis: an AFM study

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; BARBOSA, Carolina Silveira; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHANG, Sywe-Ren; LIU, Jun; CZAJKA-JAKUBOWSKA, Agata; CLARKSON, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the overall apatite crystals profile in the enamel matrix of mice susceptible (A/J strain) or resistant (129P3/J strain) to dental fluorosis through analyses by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Material and Methods Samples from the enamel matrix in the early stages of secretion and maturation were obtained from the incisors of mice from both strains. All detectable traces of matrix protein were removed from the samples by a sequential extraction procedure. The purified crystals (n=13 per strain) were analyzed qualitatively in the AFM. Surface roughness profile (Ra) was measured. Results The mean (±SD) Ra of the crystals of A/J strain (0.58±0.15 nm) was lower than the one found for the 129P3/J strain (0.66±0.21 nm) but the difference did not reach statistical significance (t=1.187, p=0.247). Crystals of the 129P3/J strain (70.42±6.79 nm) were found to be significantly narrower (t=4.013, p=0.0013) than the same parameter measured for the A/J strain (90.42±15.86 nm). Conclusion Enamel crystals of the 129P3/J strain are narrower, which is indicative of slower crystal growth and could interfere in the occurrence of dental fluorosis. PMID:25025555

  16. On the molecular interaction between albumin and ibuprofen: An AFM and QCM-D study.

    PubMed

    Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Etxebarria, Juan; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on surfaces often results in a change of their structural behavior and consequently, a loss of bioactivity. One experimental method to study interactions on a molecular level is single molecular force spectroscopy that permits to measure forces down to the pico-newton range. In this work, the binding force between human serum albumin (HSA), covalently immobilized on glutaraldehyde modified gold substrates, and ibuprofen sodium salt was studied by means of single molecular force spectroscopy. First of all, a protocol was established to functionalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips with ibuprofen. The immobilization protocol was additionally tested by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and contact angle measurements. AFM was used to characterize the adsorption of HSA on gold substrates, which lead to a packed monolayer of thickness slightly lower than the reported value in solution. Finally, single molecule spectroscopy results were used to characterize the binding force between albumin and ibuprofen and calculate the distance of the transition state (0.6 nm) and the dissociation rate constant (0.055 s(-1)). The results might indicate that part of the adsorbed protein still preserves its functionality upon adsorption. PMID:26218522

  17. Atmospheric CO2 measurements reveal strong drought sensitivity of Amazonian carbon balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. B.; Gatti, L.; Gloor, M.; Doughty, C.; Malhi, Y.; Domingues, L. G.; Basso, L. S.; Martinewski, A.; Correia, C.; Borges, V.; Freitas, S. R.; Braz, R.; Anderson, L.; Rocha, H.; Grace, J.; Phillips, O.; Lloyd, J.

    2013-12-01

    Potential feedbacks between land carbon pools and climate are one of the largest sources of uncertainty for predicting future global climate, but estimates of their sensitivity to climate anomalies in the tropics and determination of underlying mechanisms are either incomplete or strongly model-based. Amazonia alone stores ~150-200 Pg of labile carbon, and has experienced an increasing trend in temperature and extreme floods and droughts over the last two decades. Here we report the first Amazon Basin-wide seasonal and annual carbon balances based on tropospheric greenhouse gas sampling, during an anomalously dry and a wet year, 2010 and 2011, providing the first whole-system assessment of sensitivity to such conditions. During 2010, the Amazon Basin lost 0.5×0.2 PgCyr-1 while in 2011 it was approximately carbon neutral (0.06×0.1 PgCyr-1). Carbon loss via fire was 0.5×0.1 PgCyr-1 in 2010 and 0.3×0.1 PgCyr-1 in 2011, as derived from Basin-wide carbon monoxide (CO) enhancements. Subtracting fire emissions from total carbon flux to derive Basin net biome exchange (NBE) reveals that in 2010 the non-fire regions of the Basin were carbon neutral; in 2011 they were a net carbon sink of -0.3×0.1 PgC yr-1, roughly consistent with a three-decade long intact-forest biomass sink of ~ -0.5×0.3 PgCyr-1 estimated from forest censuses. Altogether, our results suggest that if the recent trend of precipitation extremes persists, the Amazon region may become an increasing carbon source as a result of both emissions from fires and suppression of NBE by drought.

  18. Water revealed as molecular mirror when measuring low concentrations of sugar with near infrared light.

    PubMed

    Bázár, György; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tanaka, Mariko; Furukawa, Akane; Nagai, Airi; Osawa, Manami; Itakura, Yukari; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2015-10-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy is an overtone spectroscopy regarded as a quick and non-destructive method that provides analytical solutions for components that represent approximately 1% or more of the total mass of the investigated composite samples. Aquaphotomics offers the possibility for disentanglement of information remaining hidden in the spectra when conventional data evaluation methods are used, since this concept utilizes changes of the water structure induced by the measured solute as specific molecular vibrations at water bands. Here, near infrared technique and aquaphotomics are applied for non-destructive identification and quantification of mono- and di-saccharide solutes at 100-0.02 mM concentration that is accepted as unachievable with near infrared spectroscopy. The results presented in this study support the aquaphotomics' water molecular mirror concept that explores spectral changes related to water molecular rearrangements caused by minute changes of the solutes in the aqueous systems. The method provides quick and accurate alternative for classical analytical measurements of saccharides even at millimolar concentration levels.

  19. Torque measurements reveal sequence-specific cooperative transitions in supercoiled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Oberstrass, Florian C.; Fernandes, Louis E.; Bryant, Zev

    2012-01-01

    B-DNA becomes unstable under superhelical stress and is able to adopt a wide range of alternative conformations including strand-separated DNA and Z-DNA. Localized sequence-dependent structural transitions are important for the regulation of biological processes such as DNA replication and transcription. To directly probe the effect of sequence on structural transitions driven by torque, we have measured the torsional response of a panel of DNA sequences using single molecule assays that employ nanosphere rotational probes to achieve high torque resolution. The responses of Z-forming d(pGpC)n sequences match our predictions based on a theoretical treatment of cooperative transitions in helical polymers. “Bubble” templates containing 50–100 bp mismatch regions show cooperative structural transitions similar to B-DNA, although less torque is required to disrupt strand–strand interactions. Our mechanical measurements, including direct characterization of the torsional rigidity of strand-separated DNA, establish a framework for quantitative predictions of the complex torsional response of arbitrary sequences in their biological context. PMID:22474350

  20. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10−11 to 10−10 cm3 s−1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V−1 s−1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  1. Carbon-depleted outer core revealed by sound velocity measurements of liquid iron–carbon alloy

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoichi; Imada, Saori; Hirose, Kei; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Haruka; Tateno, Shigehiko; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2015-01-01

    The relative abundance of light elements in the Earth's core has long been controversial. Recently, the presence of carbon in the core has been emphasized, because the density and sound velocities of the inner core may be consistent with solid Fe7C3. Here we report the longitudinal wave velocity of liquid Fe84C16 up to 70 GPa based on inelastic X-ray scattering measurements. We find the velocity to be substantially slower than that of solid iron and Fe3C and to be faster than that of liquid iron. The thermodynamic equation of state for liquid Fe84C16 is also obtained from the velocity data combined with previous density measurements at 1 bar. The longitudinal velocity of the outer core, about 4% faster than that of liquid iron, is consistent with the presence of 4–5 at.% carbon. However, that amount of carbon is too small to account for the outer core density deficit, suggesting that carbon cannot be a predominant light element in the core. PMID:26596912

  2. Measurement on isolated lithium iron phosphate particles reveals heterogeneity in material properties distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden, Michael E.; Dayeh, Malak; Payne, Nicholas A.; Gervais, Simon; Mauzeroll, Janine; Schougaard, Steen B.

    2016-09-01

    We present herein localized galvanostatic and potentiodynamic measurements on lithium iron phosphate (LFP) particles, using the combination of a scanning micropipette contact method (SMCM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The proposed technique allows small substrate areas (∼10 μm in diameter) decorated with LFP particles to be probed within a lithium electrolyte solution in organic carbonate solvents (0.1 M LiClO4 in propylene carbonate in the present study). SEM images of the scanned area allow the correlation of each electrochemical response to the number, and volume of the probed particles. Under favorable conditions, single particles are found within the measurement areas, thus enabling the determination of single particle properties in an anaerobic environment without the additional complications arising from the presence of binders and electronically conductive fillers. The ability to analyze a material with complementary experimental techniques at the single particle level should create new opportunities for fundamental studies and for the quality control of granular materials.

  3. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X. -Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10–11 to 10–10 cm3 s–1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V–1 s–1). Measured here,more » steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. As a result, we suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.« less

  4. Inertial range physics of solar wind turbulence as revealed by 3 second plasma measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    2006-10-01

    The 3DP instrument on-board the Wind spacecraft provides the highest time resolution plasma measurements currently available with a time resolution of 3 seconds. This instrument enables almost the entire inertial range to be probed using both velocity and magnetic field data although the dissipation range of the velocity fluctuations is still beyond reach. Analysis of power spectra and structure functions have shown that while the magnetic energy spectrum of the solar wind is a power law with an exponent near 5/3, the velocity or kinetic energy spectrum often exhibits an exponent near 3/2. Another important discovery is that the Elsasser ratio, the ratio of energy in the two Elsasser fields, approaches unity at the smallest measurable scales. Thus, as the energy and cross-helicity cascade through the inertial range the fluctuations in the two Elsasser fields evolve toward a state of equipartition, a process called dynamic mixing as opposed to dynamic alignment. These and other results that are improving our knowledge of solar wind turbulence shall be discussed.

  5. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Wu, X.; Haroldson, R.; Gartstein, Y. N.; Rodionov, Y. I.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, X.-Y.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-08-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10-11 to 10-10 cm3 s-1) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm2 V-1 s-1). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles.

  6. Extended carrier lifetimes and diffusion in hybrid perovskites revealed by Hall effect and photoconductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Yi, H T; Wu, X; Haroldson, R; Gartstein, Y N; Rodionov, Y I; Tikhonov, K S; Zakhidov, A; Zhu, X-Y; Podzorov, V

    2016-01-01

    Impressive performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells reported in recent years still awaits a comprehensive understanding of its microscopic origins. In this work, the intrinsic Hall mobility and photocarrier recombination coefficient are directly measured in these materials in steady-state transport studies. The results show that electron-hole recombination and carrier trapping rates in hybrid perovskites are very low. The bimolecular recombination coefficient (10(-11) to 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)) is found to be on par with that in the best direct-band inorganic semiconductors, even though the intrinsic Hall mobility in hybrid perovskites is considerably lower (up to 60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Measured here, steady-state carrier lifetimes (of up to 3 ms) and diffusion lengths (as long as 650 μm) are significantly longer than those in high-purity crystalline inorganic semiconductors. We suggest that these experimental findings are consistent with the polaronic nature of charge carriers, resulting from an interaction of charges with methylammonium dipoles. PMID:27477058

  7. Leaf Phenology of Amazonian Canopy Trees as Revealed by Spectral and Physiochemical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavana-Bryant, C.; Gerard, F. F.; Malhi, Y.; Enquist, B. J.; Asner, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    The phenological dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems reflect the response of the Earth's biosphere to inter- and intra-annual dynamics of climatic and hydrological regimes. Some Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (GDVMs) have predicted that by 2050 the Amazon rainforest will begin to dieback (Cox et al. 2000, Nature) or that the ecosystem will become unsustainable (Salazar et al. 2007, GRL). One major component in DGVMs is the simulation of vegetation phenology, however, modelers are challenged with the estimation of tropical phenology which is highly complex. Current modeled phenology is based on observations of temperate vegetation and accurate representation of tropical phenology is long overdue. Remote sensing (RS) data are a key tool in monitoring vegetation dynamics at regional and global scales. Of the many RS techniques available, time-series analysis of vegetation indices (VIs) has become the most common approach in monitoring vegetation phenology (Samanta et al. 2010, GRL; Bradley et al. 2011, GCB). Our research focuses on investigating the influence that age related variation in the spectral reflectance and physiochemical properties of leaves may have on VIs of tropical canopies. In order to do this, we collected a unique leaf and canopy phenological dataset at two different Amazonian sites: Inselberg, French Guyana (FG) and Tambopata, Peru (PE). Hyperspectral reflectance measurements were collected from 4,102 individual leaves sampled to represent different leaf ages and vertical canopy positions (top, mid and low canopy) from 20 different canopy tree species (8 in FG and 12 in PE). These leaf spectra were complemented with 1) leaf physical measurements: fresh and dry weight, area and thickness, LMA and LWC and 2) leaf chemical measurements: %N, %C, %P, C:N and d13C. Canopy level observations included top-of-canopy reflectance measurements obtained using a multispectral 16-band radiometer, leaf demography (tot. number and age distribution) and branch

  8. Tapping mode AFM evidence for an amorphous reticular phase in a condensation-cured hybrid elastomer: alpha,omega-dihydroxypoly(dimethylsiloxane)/poly(diethoxysiloxane)/fumed silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Bertolucci, Massimo; Galli, Giancarlo; Chiellini, Emo; Chujo, Yoshiki; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2004-10-01

    A new surface phenomenon is reported for hybrid nanocomposites comprising (1) a low Tg poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) phase cross-linked by (2) a siliceous phase (SP) generated by in situ hydrolysis/condensation of poly(diethoxysiloxane) (PDES), and (3) fumed silica nanoparticles (FSN). After ambient temperature cure, tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) easily reveals near-surface FSN. For nanocomposites with higher PDES content, FSN surprisingly "disappear" after a further cure at 100 degrees C. The observation is explained by further condensation of extant siliceous fragments creating an amorphous reticular phase, which acts as a mechanical barrier between the FSN and the AFM tip. PMID:15453759

  9. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  10. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  11. One-Neutron Removal Measurement Reveals {sup 24}O as a New Doubly Magic Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kanungo, R.; Perro, C.; Nociforo, C.; Aumann, T.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Kindler, B.; Litvinov, Y.; Lommel, B.; Mahata, K.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sun, B.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.; Prochazka, A.; Farinon, F.; Knoebel, R.; Boutin, D.; Lenske, H.; Cortina-Gil, D.

    2009-04-17

    The first measurement of the momentum distribution for one-neutron removal from {sup 24}O at 920A MeV performed at GSI, Darmstadt is reported. The observed distribution has a width (FWHM) of 99{+-}4 MeV/c in the projectile rest frame and a one-neutron removal cross section of 63{+-}7 mb. The results are well explained with a nearly pure 2s{sub 1/2} neutron spectroscopic factor of 1.74{+-}0.19 within the eikonal model. This large s-wave probability shows a spherical shell closure thereby confirming earlier suggestions that {sup 24}O is a new doubly magic nucleus.

  12. Planetary science. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury's ancient crustal field.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Catherine L; Phillips, Roger J; Purucker, Michael E; Anderson, Brian J; Byrne, Paul K; Denevi, Brett W; Feinberg, Joshua M; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Philpott, Lydia C; Siegler, Matthew A; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Solomon, Sean C

    2015-05-22

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury's crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury's history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data. PMID:25953822

  13. Planetary science. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury's ancient crustal field.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Catherine L; Phillips, Roger J; Purucker, Michael E; Anderson, Brian J; Byrne, Paul K; Denevi, Brett W; Feinberg, Joshua M; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Philpott, Lydia C; Siegler, Matthew A; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Solomon, Sean C

    2015-05-22

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury's crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury's history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data.

  14. Characteristics of global precipitable water in ENSO events revealed by COSMIC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Wen-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Yuang; Ho, Shu-Peng; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Zhou, Xin-Jia

    2013-08-01

    Precipitable water (PW) retrievals from FORMOSAT-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements were analyzed and compared with those derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) during the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events from 2007 to 2011. For the three ENSO events in 2007-2011, monthly mean binned COSMIC PW results are in a very high correlation (up to 0.98) with those of SSM/I and AMSR-E over the ocean, generally with root-mean-square differences less than 4 mm. PW retrievals from the three satellites are also of similar latitudinal variations. However, the PW is slightly underestimated by GPS RO, in particular, in the tropical regions. This underestimate may be caused partially by the fact that not all RO measurements can reach the surface. Inter-satellite PW anomaly comparisons for the winter months in the ENSO events, with respect to those during the neutral (non-ENSO) months, show consistent ENSO signals with major PW anomaly near the central Pacific in the warm event and near the Indonesian region and east of Australia in the two cold events. However, the 2007/2008 La Niña is somewhat less correlated for COSMIC with AMSR-E and SSM/I. For the stronger 2010/2011 La Niña, their PW anomalies are in higher correlations of about 0.8.

  15. In situ measures of foraging success and prey encounter reveal marine habitat-dependent search strategies.

    PubMed

    Thums, Michele; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Hindelli, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    Predators are thought to reduce travel speed and increase turning rate in areas where resources are relatively more abundant, a behavior termed "area-restricted search." However, evidence for this is rare, and few empirical data exist for large predators. Animals exhibiting foraging site fidelity could also be spatially aware of suitable feeding areas based on prior experience; changes in movement patterns might therefore arise from the anticipation of higher prey density. We tested the hypothesis that regions of area-restricted search were associated with a higher number of daily speed spikes (a proxy for potential prey encounter rate) and foraging success in southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina), a species exhibiting both area-restricted searches and high interannual foraging site fidelity. We used onshore morphological measurements and diving data from archival tags deployed during winter foraging trips. Foraging success was inferred from in situ changes in relative lipid content derived from measured changes in buoyancy, and first-passage time analysis was used to identify area-restricted search behavior. Seals exhibited relatively direct southerly movement on average, with intensive search behavior predominantly located at the distal end of tracks. The probability of being in search mode was positively related to changes in relative lipid content; thus, intensively searched areas were associated with the highest foraging success. However, there was high foraging success during the outward transit even though seals moved through quickly without slowing down and increasing turning rate to exploit these areas. In addition, the probability of being in search mode was negatively related to the number of daily speed spikes. These results suggest that movement patterns represent a response to prior expectation of the location of predictable and profitable resources. Shelf habitat was 4-9 times more profitable than the other habitats, emphasizing the importance

  16. Microvascular pressure measurement reveals a coronary vascular waterfall in arterioles larger than 110 microm.

    PubMed

    Versluis, J P; Heslinga, J W; Sipkema, P; Westerhof, N

    2001-11-01

    Pressure-flow relationships at the entrance of the coronary circulation in the diastolic myocardium exhibit a zero-flow pressure intercept (P(int)). We tested whether this intercept is the same throughout the vascular bed. Microvascular pressure-flow relationships were therefore measured in vessels of various sizes of the maximally dilated vasculature of perfused unstimulated papillary muscle using the servo-null technique. From these relationships, P(int) were calculated with nonlinear regression. The P(int) at the level of the septal artery (diameter, 150-250 microm) was 23.2 +/- 4.4 cmH2O (n = 12). In arterioles with a diameter range between 24 and 110 microm, P(int) was 1.7 +/- 0.5 cmH2O (n = 6, P < 0.01), significantly lower than in the septal artery but significantly higher than zero, and not dependent on vessel size. In venules with the same diameters, P(int) was 1.1 +/- 1.1 cmH2O (n = 4), which was not different from zero. We conclude that, in the dilated vascular bed of the papillary muscle, two vascular waterfalls are found. The first waterfall is located in arterioles between 150 and 110 microm. The second waterfall is probably located in the small postcapillary venules. PMID:11668051

  17. Gel-expanded to gel-condensed transition in neurofilament networks revealed by direct force measurements.

    PubMed

    Beck, Roy; Deek, Joanna; Jones, Jayna B; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2010-01-01

    Neurofilaments (NF)--the principal cytoskeletal constituent of myelinated axons in vertebrates--consist of three molecular-weight subunit proteins NF-L (low), NF-M (medium) and NF-H (high), assembled to form mature filaments with protruding unstructured C-terminus side arms. Liquid-crystal gel networks of side-arm-mediated neurofilament assemblies have a key role in the mechanical stability of neuronal processes. Disruptions of the neurofilament network, owing to neurofilament over-accumulation or incorrect side-arm interactions, are a hallmark of motor-neuron diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using synchrotron X-ray scattering, we report on a direct measurement of forces in reconstituted neurofilament gels under osmotic pressure (P). With increasing pressure near physiological salt and average phosphorylation conditions, NF-LMH, comprising the three subunits near in vivo composition, or NF-LH gels, undergo for P > P(c) approximately 10 kPa, an abrupt non-reversible gel-expanded to gel-condensed transition. The transition indicates side-arm-mediated attractions between neurofilaments consistent with an electrostatic model of interpenetrating chains. In contrast, NF-LM gels remain in a collapsed state for P < P(c) and transition to the gel-condensed state at P > P(c). These findings, which delineate the distinct roles of NF-M and NF-H in regulating neurofilament interactions, shed light on possible mechanisms for disruptions of optimal mechanical network properties. PMID:19915555

  18. Nematic quantum criticality in FeSe1-x Sx revealed by elastoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Suguru; Matsuura, Kohei; Wang, Hao; Ishida, Kousuke; Mizukami, Yuta; Watashige, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yuji; Shibauchi, Takasada

    Electronic nematicity and its connection to the high-temperature superconductivity is one of the central issues in iron-based superconductors. Among them, FeSe is unique in that it exhibits a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition but no antiferromagnetic order, which enables us to study the nematicity without the effect of magnetism. Here we report on elastoresistance measurements in FeSe1- x Sx evidencing a nonmagnetic nematic quantum critical point near x ~ 0.2. When the Se site is substituted by the isovalent S, the structural transition temperature is reduced gradually and it vanishes above x ~ 0.2. From the changes in in-plane resistivity induced by anisotropic strain, we evaluate the nematic susceptibility which shows Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. We find that with increasing x the Weiss temperature changes its sign indicating a quantum critical point, while there is no sign of antiferromagnetism for all samples. The superconducting transition temperature does not show a significant change with S concentration, suggesting that the nonmagnetic nematic quantum criticality does not help to enhance superconductivity in this system.

  19. Fluorescence measurements reveal stoichiometry of K+ channels formed by modulatory and delayed rectifier alpha-subunits.

    PubMed

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel; Soto, Florentina; Stocker, Martin

    2005-04-26

    Modulatory alpha-subunits, which comprise one-fourth of all voltagegated K(+) channel (Kv) alpha-subunits, do not assemble into homomeric channels, but selectively associate with delayed rectifier Kv2 subunits to form heteromeric channels of unknown stoichiometry. Their distinct expression patterns and unique functional properties have made these channels candidate molecular correlates for a broad set of native K(+) currents. Here, we combine FRET and electrophysiological measurements to determine the stoichiometry and geometry of heteromeric channels composed of the delayed rectifier Kv2.1 subunit and the modulatory Kv9.3 alpha-subunit. Kv channel alpha-subunits were fused with GFP variants, and heteromerization of different combinations of tagged and untagged alpha-subunits was studied. FRET, evaluated by acceptor photobleaching, was only observed upon formation of functional channels. Our results, obtained from two independent experimental paradigms, suggest the formation of heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels of fixed stoichiometry consisting of three Kv2.1 subunits and one Kv9.3 subunit. Strikingly, despite this uneven stoichiometry, we find that heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels maintain a pseudosymmetric arrangement of subunits around the central pore. PMID:15827117

  20. Fluorescence measurements reveal stoichiometry of K+ channels formed by modulatory and delayed rectifier α-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel; Soto, Florentina; Stocker, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Modulatory α-subunits, which comprise one-fourth of all voltagegated K+ channel (Kv) α-subunits, do not assemble into homomeric channels, but selectively associate with delayed rectifier Kv2 subunits to form heteromeric channels of unknown stoichiometry. Their distinct expression patterns and unique functional properties have made these channels candidate molecular correlates for a broad set of native K+ currents. Here, we combine FRET and electrophysiological measurements to determine the stoichiometry and geometry of heteromeric channels composed of the delayed rectifier Kv2.1 subunit and the modulatory Kv9.3 α-subunit. Kv channel α-subunits were fused with GFP variants, and heteromerization of different combinations of tagged and untagged α-subunits was studied. FRET, evaluated by acceptor photobleaching, was only observed upon formation of functional channels. Our results, obtained from two independent experimental paradigms, suggest the formation of heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels of fixed stoichiometry consisting of three Kv2.1 subunits and one Kv9.3 subunit. Strikingly, despite this uneven stoichiometry, we find that heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels maintain a pseudosymmetric arrangement of subunits around the central pore. PMID:15827117

  1. Microvascular pressure measurement reveals a coronary vascular waterfall in arterioles larger than 110 microm.

    PubMed

    Versluis, J P; Heslinga, J W; Sipkema, P; Westerhof, N

    2001-11-01

    Pressure-flow relationships at the entrance of the coronary circulation in the diastolic myocardium exhibit a zero-flow pressure intercept (P(int)). We tested whether this intercept is the same throughout the vascular bed. Microvascular pressure-flow relationships were therefore measured in vessels of various sizes of the maximally dilated vasculature of perfused unstimulated papillary muscle using the servo-null technique. From these relationships, P(int) were calculated with nonlinear regression. The P(int) at the level of the septal artery (diameter, 150-250 microm) was 23.2 +/- 4.4 cmH2O (n = 12). In arterioles with a diameter range between 24 and 110 microm, P(int) was 1.7 +/- 0.5 cmH2O (n = 6, P < 0.01), significantly lower than in the septal artery but significantly higher than zero, and not dependent on vessel size. In venules with the same diameters, P(int) was 1.1 +/- 1.1 cmH2O (n = 4), which was not different from zero. We conclude that, in the dilated vascular bed of the papillary muscle, two vascular waterfalls are found. The first waterfall is located in arterioles between 150 and 110 microm. The second waterfall is probably located in the small postcapillary venules.

  2. SANS measurements of semiflexible xyloglucan polysaccharide chains in water reveal their self-avoiding statistics.

    PubMed

    Muller, François; Manet, Sabine; Jean, Bruno; Chambat, Gérard; Boué, François; Heux, Laurent; Cousin, Fabrice

    2011-09-12

    We explored the behavior and the characteristics of xyloglucan polysaccharide chains extracted from tamarind seeds in aqueous media. The initial solubilization is achieved by using a 0.01 M NaOH solution. The absence of compact aggregates in the solution and the average molecular mass of the individual chains were unambiguously demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering detection. The composition and the stability of the solution were quantitatively checked over weeks by using liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance with DMSO as internal standard. The conformational characteristics of the chains were measured using nondestructive small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The unambiguous determination of the Flory exponent (ν = 0.588) by SANS enabled us to directly prove that xyloglucan chains in water behave like semiflexible worm-like chains with excluded volume statistics (good solvent), contrary to most of the neutral water-soluble polymer chains that rather exhibit Gaussian statistics (θ-solvent). In addition to the Flory exponent, the persistence length l(p) and the cross section of the chains were also determined by SANS with utmost precision, with values of 80 and of 7 Å, respectively, which provides a complete description of the conformational characteristics of XG chains at all relevant length scales.

  3. SANS measurements of semiflexible xyloglucan polysaccharide chains in water reveal their self-avoiding statistics.

    PubMed

    Muller, François; Manet, Sabine; Jean, Bruno; Chambat, Gérard; Boué, François; Heux, Laurent; Cousin, Fabrice

    2011-09-12

    We explored the behavior and the characteristics of xyloglucan polysaccharide chains extracted from tamarind seeds in aqueous media. The initial solubilization is achieved by using a 0.01 M NaOH solution. The absence of compact aggregates in the solution and the average molecular mass of the individual chains were unambiguously demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering detection. The composition and the stability of the solution were quantitatively checked over weeks by using liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance with DMSO as internal standard. The conformational characteristics of the chains were measured using nondestructive small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The unambiguous determination of the Flory exponent (ν = 0.588) by SANS enabled us to directly prove that xyloglucan chains in water behave like semiflexible worm-like chains with excluded volume statistics (good solvent), contrary to most of the neutral water-soluble polymer chains that rather exhibit Gaussian statistics (θ-solvent). In addition to the Flory exponent, the persistence length l(p) and the cross section of the chains were also determined by SANS with utmost precision, with values of 80 and of 7 Å, respectively, which provides a complete description of the conformational characteristics of XG chains at all relevant length scales. PMID:21806009

  4. Gel-expanded to gel-condensed transition in neurofilament networks revealed by direct force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Roy; Deek, Joanna; Jones, Jayna B.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2010-01-01

    Neurofilaments (NF)-the principal cytoskeletal constituent of myelinated axons in vertebrates-consist of three molecular-weight subunit proteins NF-L (low), NF-M (medium) and NF-H (high), assembled to form mature filaments with protruding unstructured C-terminus side arms. Liquid-crystal gel networks of side-arm-mediated neurofilament assemblies have a key role in the mechanical stability of neuronal processes. Disruptions of the neurofilament network, owing to neurofilament over-accumulation or incorrect side-arm interactions, are a hallmark of motor-neuron diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using synchrotron X-ray scattering, we report on a direct measurement of forces in reconstituted neurofilament gels under osmotic pressure (P). With increasing pressure near physiological salt and average phosphorylation conditions, NF-LMH, comprising the three subunits near in vivo composition, or NF-LH gels, undergo for P>Pc~10kPa, an abrupt non-reversible gel-expanded to gel-condensed transition. The transition indicates side-arm-mediated attractions between neurofilaments consistent with an electrostatic model of interpenetrating chains. In contrast, NF-LM gels remain in a collapsed state for PPc. These findings, which delineate the distinct roles of NF-M and NF-H in regulating neurofilament interactions, shed light on possible mechanisms for disruptions of optimal mechanical network properties.

  5. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  6. Gas-driven lava lake fluctuations at Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) revealed by MODIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergniolle, Sylvie; Bouche, Emmanuella

    2016-09-01

    The long-lived lava lake of Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) is remotely monitored by moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometers (MODIS) installed on satellites. The Normalised Thermal Index (NTI) (Wright et al. Remote Sens Environ 82:135-155 2002) is shown to be proportional to the volume of the lava lake based on visual observations. The lava lake's variable level can be plausibly related to a stable foam, i.e. a mixture composed of densely packed non-coalescing bubbles in suspension within a liquid. This foam is trapped at the top of the magma reservoir, and its thickness changes in response to the gas flux feeding the foam being successively turned on and off. The temporal evolution of the foam thickness, and the resulting variation of the volume of the lava lake, is calculated numerically by assuming that the gas flux feeding the foam, initially constant and homogeneous since December 9, 2002, is suddenly stopped on December 13, 2002 and not restarted before May 2003. The best fit between the theoretical foam thickness and the level of the lava lake deduced from the NTI provides an estimate of both the reservoir radius, 155-170 m, and the gas flux feeding the foam, 5.5×10-3-7.2×10-3 m 3 s -1 when existing. This is in agreement with previous estimates from acoustic measurements (Bouche et al. Earth Planet Sci Lett 295:37-48 2010). The very good agreement between the theoretical foam thickness and that deduced from MODIS data shows for the first time the existence of a regime based on the behaviour of a stable foam, whose spreading towards the conduit ("wide" conduit condition), can explain the long-lived activity. Our predictive model, which links the gas flux at the vent to the foam spreading, could potentially be used on any volcano with a long-lived activity. The underlying gas flux and the horizontal surface area of the magma reservoir can then be deduced by combining modelling to continuous measurements of gas flux. The lava lake, when high, often shows

  7. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Andrew K.; Thompson, David R.; Hulley, Glynn; Kort, Eric Adam; Vance, Nick; Borchardt, Jakob; Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Bue, Brian D.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Hook, Simon; Green, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit ∼ 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through ∼ 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. With the observed confirmation of a lognormal emission distribution, this airborne observing strategy and its ability to locate previously unknown point sources in real time provides an efficient and effective method to identify and mitigate major emissions contributors over a wide geographic area. With improved instrumentation, this capability scales to spaceborne applications [Thompson DR, et al. (2016) Geophys Res Lett 43(12):6571–6578]. Further illustration of this potential is demonstrated with two detected, confirmed, and repaired pipeline leaks during the campaign. PMID:27528660

  8. Airborne methane remote measurements reveal heavy-tail flux distribution in Four Corners region.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Christian; Thorpe, Andrew K; Thompson, David R; Hulley, Glynn; Kort, Eric Adam; Vance, Nick; Borchardt, Jakob; Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Sweeney, Colm; Conley, Stephen; Bue, Brian D; Aubrey, Andrew D; Hook, Simon; Green, Robert O

    2016-08-30

    Methane (CH4) impacts climate as the second strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gas and air quality by influencing tropospheric ozone levels. Space-based observations have identified the Four Corners region in the Southwest United States as an area of large CH4 enhancements. We conducted an airborne campaign in Four Corners during April 2015 with the next-generation Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (near-infrared) and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (thermal infrared) imaging spectrometers to better understand the source of methane by measuring methane plumes at 1- to 3-m spatial resolution. Our analysis detected more than 250 individual methane plumes from fossil fuel harvesting, processing, and distributing infrastructures, spanning an emission range from the detection limit [Formula: see text] 2 kg/h to 5 kg/h through [Formula: see text] 5,000 kg/h. Observed sources include gas processing facilities, storage tanks, pipeline leaks, and well pads, as well as a coal mine venting shaft. Overall, plume enhancements and inferred fluxes follow a lognormal distribution, with the top 10% emitters contributing 49 to 66% to the inferred total point source flux of 0.23 Tg/y to 0.39 Tg/y. With the observed confirmation of a lognormal emission distribution, this airborne observing strategy and its ability to locate previously unknown point sources in real time provides an efficient and effective method to identify and mitigate major emissions contributors over a wide geographic area. With improved instrumentation, this capability scales to spaceborne applications [Thompson DR, et al. (2016) Geophys Res Lett 43(12):6571-6578]. Further illustration of this potential is demonstrated with two detected, confirmed, and repaired pipeline leaks during the campaign. PMID:27528660

  9. DNA-coated AFM cantilevers for the investigation of cell adhesion and the patterning of live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Sonny C.; Crow, Ailey K.; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of receptor adhesion strength requires the precise manipulation of single cells on a contact surface. To attach live cells to a moveable probe, DNA sequences complementary to strands displayed on the plasma membrane are introduced onto AFM cantilevers (see picture, bp=base pairs). The strength of the resulting linkages can be tuned by varying the length of DNA strands, allowing for controlled transport of the cells.

  10. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  11. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  12. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  13. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  14. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Asproudis, I.; Tsoutsi, D.; Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV ( λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  15. Conductive-probe AFM characterization of graphene sheets bonded to gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauquier, Fanny; Alamarguy, David; Viel, Pascal; Noël, Sophie; Filoramo, Arianna; Huc, Vincent; Houzé, Frédéric; Palacin, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) has been used to perform mechanical and electrical experiments on graphene layers bonded to polyaminophenylene (PAP) films grafted on gold substrates. This technique is a new approach for the characterization of graphene sheets and represents a complementary tool to Raman spectroscopy. The combination of friction and electrical imaging reveals that different stacked graphene sheets have been successfully distinguished from each other and from the underlying PAP films. Lateral force microscopy has shown that the friction is greatly reduced on graphene sheets in comparison with the organic coating. The electrical resistance images show very different local conduction properties which can be linked to the number of underlying graphene sheets. The resistance decreases very slowly when the normal load increases. Current-voltage curves display characteristics of metal-molecule-metal junctions.

  16. In situ AFM study of interlayer spacing during anion intercalation into HOPG in aqueous electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Alliata, D.; Koetz, R.; Haas, O.; Siegenthaler, H.

    1999-11-23

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was studied as a model in aqueous electrolytes to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation into graphite. The local time-dependent dimensional changes of the host material occurring during the electrochemical intercalation processes were investigated on the nanometer scale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, was used as an in situ analytical tool during the intercalation of perchlorate and hydrogen sulfate ions into and their expulsion from the HOPG electrodes. For the first time, a reproducible, quantitative estimate of the interlayer spacing in HOPG with intercalated perchlorate and hydrogen sulfate ions could be obtained by in situ AFM measurements. The experimental values are in agreement with theoretical expectations, only for relatively low stacks of graphene layers. After formation of stage IV, HOPG expansion upon intercalation typically amounts to 32% when tens of layers are involved but to only 14% when thousands of layers are involved. Blister formation and more dramatic changes in morphology were observed, depending on the kind of electrolyte used, at higher levels of anion intercalation.

  17. Dry powder inhaler: influence of humidity on topology and adhesion studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Bérard, V; Lesniewska, E; Andrès, C; Pertuy, D; Laroche, C; Pourcelot, Y

    2002-01-31

    In the dry powder inhalers (DPIs), the adhesion results of the interactions between the active substance and the excipient. The carrier and the micronized drug particle morphologies are believed to affect the delivery of the drug. In this work, the couple studied was the lactose monohydrate and micronized zanamivir, used for the treatment of influenza. In a first approach, observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have shown that the relative humidity (RH) greatly influenced the zanamivir amount fixed on the lactose monohydrate surface. This paper deals with the direct measurement in controlled atmosphere by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the forces and the interaction ranges between a zanamivir probe and a lactose substrate. Selected zanamivir crystals were attached to the standard AFM probe. Different RH have been used in order to determine influent parameters permitting to identify the nature of adhesion forces between them. This study demonstrated that the increase of RH modified progressively the surface topology of the two components and increased the adhesion force.

  18. XRD and AFM characterization of epitaxial Nb films before and after hydrogen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Monica; Heuser, Brent; Durfee, Curtis

    2001-03-01

    Epitaxial Nb films have been characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after hydrogenation at 100 C and 760 Torr. Two 1000 Angstrom epitaxial Nb films were grown on a-plane sapphire with two different miscut angles, 0.08 and 1.4 degrees. Both Nb films were capped with a 100 Angstrom thick Pd layer to facilitate molecular hydrogen dissociation. While the as-grow film mosaic did not depend on miscut angle, the surface morphology was significantly different. In particular, the high miscut film exhibited a fingered topography that was absent in the low miscut film. Hydrogen absorption under the conditions stated above induce a complete conversion of Nb to the alpha prime hydride phase. The Nb hydride phase transformation process is known to create dislocations as incoherent phase boundaries pass through the lattice. The surface morphology and lattice mosaic from post-hydrogen AFM and XRD measurements, respectively, show the extreme effect of the phase transformation process. Discussion will focus on the lattice mosaic broadening, residual strain, and surface features after hydrogen exposure.

  19. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Seung-Ho-Baek

    2004-12-19

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  20. AFM Studies on Liquid Superlubricity between Silica Surfaces Achieved with Surfactant Micelles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Xinchun; Wang, Weiqi; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-06-01

    By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we showed that the liquid superlubricity with a superlow friction coefficient of 0.0007 can be achieved between two silica surfaces lubricated by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) solution. There exists a critical load that the lubrication state translates from superlow friction to high friction reversibly. To analyze the superlow friction mechanism and the factors influencing the critical load, we used AFM to measure the structure of adsorbed C16TAB molecules and the normal force between two silica surfaces. Experimental results indicate that the C16TAB molecules are firmly adsorbed on the two silica surfaces by electrostatic interaction, forming cylinder-like micelles. Meanwhile, the positively charged headgroups exposed to solution produce the hydration and double layer repulsion to bear the applied load. By controlling the concentration of C16TAB solution, it is confirmed that the critical load of superlow friction is determined by the maximal normal force produced by the hydration layer. Finally, the superlow friction mechanism was proposed that the adsorbed micellar layer forms the hydration layer, making the two friction surfaces be in the repulsive region and meanwhile providing excellent fluidity without adhesion between micelles. PMID:27192019

  1. Comparison of the Identation and Elasticity of E.coli and its Spheroplasts by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Venkataraman, Sankar; Retterer, Scott T; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2007-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a unique opportunity to study live individual bacteria at the nanometer scale. In addition to providing accurate morphological information, AFM can be exploited to investigate membrane protein localization and molecular interactions on the surface of living cells. A prerequisite for these studies is the development of robust procedures for sample preparation. While such procedures are established for intact bacteria, they are only beginning to emerge for bacterial spheroplasts. Spheroplasts are useful research models for studying mechanosensitive ion channels, membrane transport, lipopolysaccharide translocation, solute uptake, and the effects of antimicrobial agents on membranes. Furthermore, given the similarities between spheroplasts and cell wall-deficient (CWD) forms of pathogenic bacteria, spheroplast research could be relevant in biomedical research. In this paper, a new technique for immobilizing spheroplasts on mica pretreated with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde is described. Using this mounting technique, the indentation and cell elasticity of glutaraldehyde-fixed and untreated spheroplasts of E. coli in liquid were measured. These values are compared to those of intact E. coli. Untreated spheroplasts were found to be much softer than the intact cells and the silicon nitride cantilevers used in this study.

  2. Performance improvement of a large range metrological AFM through parasitic interference feedback artifacts removing by using laser multimode modulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Gao, Sitian; Li, Wei; Lu, Mingzhen; Shi, Yushu

    2013-05-01

    A large range multi-functional metrological atomic force microscope based on optical beam deflection method has been set up at NIM one year ago. Being designed intended to make a traceable measurement of standard samples, the machine uses three axes stacked piezoceramic actuators, each axis with a pair of push-pull piezo operated at opposite phases to make orthogonal scanning with maximized dimensional up to 50×50×2mm3. The stage displacement is measured by homodyne interferometer framework in x,y,z direction, from which beams are aligned to intersect at cantilever tip to avoid Abbe error, an eight times optical path multiplier interferometer mirror is researched to enhance fringe resolution. There is also a new compact AFM head integrated with LD, quadrant PD, cantilever, optical path and microscope, the head uses special track lens group to guarantee laser spot focused and static on the back of the cantilever, no matter whether or not the cantilever have lateral movements; similarly, reflect beam also focused and static in the center of quadrant detector through convergence lens group, assumed no cantilever bending on vertical direction. Attribute to above design, the AFM have a resolution up to 0.5nm. In the paper, further improvement is described to reduce the influence of parasitic interference caused by reflection from sample surface using laser multimode modulation, the results shows metrological AFM have a better performance in measuring step, lateral pitch, line width, nanoroughness and other nanoscale structures.

  3. Measure for Measure: What Combining Diverse Measures Reveals about Children's Understanding of the Equal Sign as An Indicator of Mathematical Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Percival; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; McEldoon, Katherine; Taylor, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the equal sign as an indicator of mathematical equality is foundational to children's mathematical development and serves as a key link between arithmetic and algebra. The current findings reaffirmed a past finding that diverse items can be integrated onto a single scale, revealed the wide variability in children's knowledge of the…

  4. Application of the Discrete Wavelet Transform to SEM and AFM Micrographs for Quantitative Analysis of Complex Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Workman, Michael J; Serov, Alexey; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2015-05-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has found significant utility in process monitoring, filtering, and feature isolation of SEM, AFM, and optical images. Current use of the DWT for surface analysis assumes initial knowledge of the sizes of the features of interest in order to effectively isolate and analyze surface components. Current methods do not adequately address complex, heterogeneous surfaces in which features across multiple size ranges are of interest. Further, in situations where structure-to-property relationships are desired, the identification of features relevant for the function of the material is necessary. In this work, the DWT is examined as a tool for quantitative, length-scale specific surface metrology without prior knowledge of relevant features or length-scales. A new method is explored for determination of the best wavelet basis to minimize variation in roughness and skewness measurements with respect to change in position and orientation of surface features. It is observed that the size of the wavelet does not directly correlate with the size of features on the surface, and a method to measure the true length-scale specific roughness of the surface is presented. This method is applied to SEM and AFM images of non-precious metal catalysts, yielding new length-scale specific structure-to-property relationships for chemical speciation and fuel cell performance. The relationship between SEM and AFM length-scale specific roughness is also explored. Evidence is presented that roughness distributions of SEM images, as measured by the DWT, is representative of the true surface roughness distribution obtained from AFM.

  5. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM.

    PubMed

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young's modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young's modulus. PMID:26602631

  6. Investigation of Oxidation Profile in PMR-15 Polyimide using Atomic Microscope (AFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnson, Lili L.; Eby, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Nanoindentation measurements are made on thermosetting materials using cantiever deflection vs. piezoelectric scanner position behavior determined by AFM. The spring model is used to determine mechanical properties of materials. The generalized Sneddon's equation is utilized to calculate Young's moduli for thermosetting materials at ambient conditions. Our investigations show that the force-penetration depth curves during unloading in these materials can be described accurately by a power law relationship. The results show that the accuracy of the measurements can be controlled within 7%. The above method is used to study oxidation profiles in Pl\\1R-15 polyimide. The thermo-mechanical profiles ofPNIR-15 indicate that the elastic modulus at the surface portion of the specimen is different from that at the interior of the material. It is also shown that there are two zones within the oxidized portion of the samples. Results confirm that the surface layer and the core material have substantially different properties.

  7. Nanomechanical characterization of nanostructured bainitic steel: Peak Force Microscopy and Nanoindentation with AFM

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Rivas, Lucia; González-Orive, Alejandro; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Hernández-Creus, Alberto; Caballero, Francisca G.; Vázquez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The full understanding of the deformation mechanisms in nanostructured bainite requires the local characterization of its mechanical properties, which are expected to change from one phase, bainitic ferrite, to another, austenite. This study becomes a challenging process due to the bainitic nanostructured nature and high Young’s modulus. In this work, we have carried out such study by means of the combination of AFM-based techniques, such as nanoindentation and Peak Force Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PF-QNM) measurements. We have addressed critically the limits and advantages of these techniques and been able to measure some elastoplastic parameters of both phases. Specifically, we have analyzed by PF-QNM two nanostructured bainitic steels, with a finer and a coarser structure, and found that both phases have a similar Young’s modulus. PMID:26602631

  8. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  9. Intrinsically high-Q dynamic AFM imaging in liquid with a significantly extended needle tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-06-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially available tapping-mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operational frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic material properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments.

  10. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  11. In situ Electrochemical-AFM Study of LiFePO4 Thin Film in Aqueous Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaxiong; Cai, Wei; Shang, Guangyi

    2016-04-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have been widely used in various kinds of electronic devices in our daily life. The use of aqueous electrolyte in Li-ion battery would be an alternative way to develop low cost and environmentally friendly batteries. In this paper, the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) thin film cathode for the aqueous rechargeable Li-ion battery is prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering deposition method. The XRD, SEM, and AFM results show that the film is composed of LiFePO4 grains with olivine structure and the average size of 100 nm. Charge-discharge measurements at current density of 10 μAh cm-2 between 0 and 1 V show that the LiFePO4 thin film electrode is able to deliver an initial discharge capacity of 113 mAh g-1. Specially, the morphological changes of the LiFePO4 film electrode during charge and discharge processes were investigated in aqueous environment by in situ EC-AFM, which is combined AFM with chronopotentiometry method. The changes in grain area are measured, and the results show that the size of the grains decreases and increases during the charge and discharge, respectively; the relevant mechanism is discussed.

  12. Implementation of a four quadrant optic fibre bundle as a deflection sensor to get rid of heat sources in an AFM head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukellal, Younes; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2015-09-01

    In the frame of developing a thermally passive atomic force microscope head, a new kind of 2D displacement sensor based on a four quadrant optic fibre bundle has been implemented. The aim is to replace the quad cell photodiode used in the optical beam deflection method to detect cantilever deflection. The use of the bundle as a position sensor has already been modelled and experimentally evaluated in a previous work. This article reports on the implementation of the bundle as a deflection sensor for atomic force microscopy. The main motivation for such a development was to reduce the heat sources in the instrument. To reach this goal the photodiode and its conditioning circuit used for the measurement of cantilever deflection has been externalized from the AFM head. For the same reason, the laser diode and its electronic driver have been deported using optic fibre. To test the AFM head prototype in real conditions, approach curves and AFM images have been performed. The results show that the bundle is very well suited for AFM applications that require very low heat sources such as metrological AFM where each error source has to be managed.

  13. AFM of the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of lipid-raft-disrupted and/or cold-treated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gan, Chaoye; Li, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2014-02-01

    The nonionic detergent extraction at 4 °C and the cholesterol-depletion-induced lipid raft disruption are the two widely used experimental strategies for lipid raft research. However, the effects of raft disruption and/or cold treatment on the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of cells are still unclear. Here, we evaluated the effects of raft disruption and/or cold (4 °C) treatment on these properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At first, the cholesterol-depletion-induced raft disruption was visualized by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent quantum dots. Next, the cold-induced cell contraction and the formation of end-branched filopodia were observed by confocal microscopy and AFM. Then, the cell-surface ultrastructures were imaged by AFM, and the data showed that raft disruption and cold treatment induced opposite effects on cell-surface roughness (a significant decrease and a significant increase, respectively). Moreover, the cell-surface mechanical properties (stiffness and adhesion force) of raft-disrupted- and/or cold-treated HUVECs were measured by the force measurement function of AFM. We found that raft disruption and cold treatment induced parallel effects on cell stiffness (increase) or adhesion force (decrease) and that the combination of the two treatments caused dramatically strengthened effects. Finally, raft disruption was found to significantly impair cell migration as previously reported, whereas temporary cold treatment only caused a slight but nonsignificant decrease in cell migration performed at physiological temperature. Although the mechanisms for causing these results might be complicated and more in-depth studies will be needed, our data may provide important information for better understanding the effects of raft disruption or cold treatment on cells and the two strategies for lipid raft research.

  14. Mechanical properties study of SW480 cells based on AFM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Song, Zhengxun; Qu, Yingmin; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Zuobin

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM), it has been widely applied in biomedicine. One of the most important applications is used as an indenter tool to do the indentation experiment in order to get the mechanical properties of cells. In this paper, SW480 cells were used as the test subjects. Through the analysis of the contact and indentation, Young's modulus (E), which is an important parameter of cancer cells, has been estimated. Experimental results show that different mechanical models should be chosen to calculate the E in different indentation depths. Here, the E of SW480 cells was (2.5 ± 0.8) KPa at the indentation depth of 99 nm.

  15. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  16. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  17. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions. PMID:23721486

  18. Nanoscience of single polymer chains revealed by nanofishing.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ken; Nishi, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    The invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) enabled us to study the statistical properties of single polymer chains by a method called "nanofishing," which stretches a single polymer chain adsorbed on a substrate with its one end by picking it at the other end. A force-extension curve obtained for a single polystyrene chain in a Theta solvent (cyclohexane) shows good agreement with a worm-like chain model and, therefore, gives microscopic information about entropic elasticity. Furthermore, the nanofishing technique can be used for dynamic viscoelastic measurement of single polymer chains. An AFM cantilever is mechanically oscillated at its resonant frequency during the stretching process. This technique enables the estimation of quantitative and simultaneous elongation-dependent changes of stiffness and viscosity of a single chain with the use of a phenomenological model. In this study, the effect of solvent on viscosity in low extension regions reveals that the viscosity is attributed to monomer-solvent friction. Thus, static and dynamic nanofishing techniques are shown to give powerful experimental proofs for several basic questions in polymer physics. The techniques are expected to reveal hidden properties of polymer chains or polymer solutions by any types of macroscopic measurements in the future. PMID:17099889

  19. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    PubMed

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes.

  20. An implicit measure of olfactory performance for non-human primates reveals aversive and pleasant odor conditioning.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Uri; Paz, Rony

    2010-09-30

    We have little understanding of how odorants are processed in neural networks of the primate brain. Because chemo-stimuli are harder to control than physical stimuli (e.g. vision, audition), such research was limited by the temporal resolution, accuracy, and reliability of olfactometers (odor producing machines). Recent advances were able to create olfactometers that overcome these limitations, allowing their use together with neuroimaging techniques in humans. From the behavioral point of view, olfaction research requires a behavioral measure that can be used to quantify olfactory performance. This becomes a real problem when working with animals, where, unlike humans, explicit measures are harder to obtain. Furthermore, because odorants are powerful primitive reinforcers, such implicit measures can be beneficial to use in learning paradigms. Here we describe an olfactometer suitable for use in non-human primates, and an end-port design that allows the accurate measure of real-time respiratory modulations that are elicited in response to odor presentation. We demonstrate that this implicit measure is differentially modulated when experiencing pleasant or aversive odors. We then present an experimental paradigm in which monkeys learn to associate tones with odors, and show that the time delay from the conditioned stimuli to the next breath can be used to measure learning and memory expression in this paradigm. Using this construct, we reveal olfactory performance during acquisition and extinction of odor conditioning. These techniques can be used in electrophysiological recordings from relevant brain areas to shed light on neural networks involved in odor processing and reinforcement-learning.

  1. In Situ AFM Imaging of Solid Electrolyte Interfaces on HOPG with Ethylene Carbonate and Fluoroethylene Carbonate-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cai; Wang, Shuwei; Jin, Yan; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-11-18

    Chemical and morphological structure of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays a vital role in lithium-ion battery (LIB), especially for its cyclability and safety. To date, research on SEI is quite limited because of the complexity of SEI and lack of effective in situ characterization techniques. Here, we present real-time views of SEI morphological evolution using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM). Complemented by an ex situ XPS analysis, fundamental differences of SEI formation from ethylene carbonate (EC) and fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolytes during first lithiation/delithiation cycle on HOPG electrode surface were revealed.

  2. An AFM/Rotaxane Molecular Reading Head for Sequence-Dependent DNA Structure**

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, Brian A.; Spadola, Quinn; Qamar, Shahid; Zhang, Peiming; Kada, Gerald; Bension, Rouvain

    2008-01-01

    A nanomechanical molecular “tape reader” is assembled and tested by threading a β-cyclodextrin ring onto a DNA oligomer and pulling it along with an AFM tip. The formation and mechanical operation of the system is confirmed by measuring the forces required to unfold secondary structures in the form of hairpins. Unfolding induced by this 0.7 nm aperture requires 40 times more force than that reported for pulling on the ends of the DNA. A kinetic analysis shows that much less strain is required to destabilize the double helix in this geometry. Consequently, much more force is required to provide the free energy needed for opening. DNA secondary structure may prove to be a significant obstacle both for enzymes that process DNA though an orifice, and for the passage through nanopores proposed for some novel sequencing schemes. PMID:18680093

  3. Determination and simulation of nanoscale energy dissipation processes in amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos J; Garcia, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    We develop a theoretical framework that explains the use of amplitude modulation AFM to measure and identify energy dissipation processes at the nanoscale. The variation of the dissipated energy on a surface by a vibrating tip as a function of its amplitude has a shape that singles out the dissipative process. The method is illustrated by calculating the dynamic-dissipation curves for surface adhesion energy hysteresis, long-range interfacial interactions and viscoelastic processes. We also show that by diving the dissipated energy by its maximum value, the dynamic-dissipation curves become independent of the experimental parameters. In particular, for long-range dissipative processes we have derived an analytical relationship that shows the independence of the normalized dynamic-dissipation curves with respect the free amplitude, cantilever constant or quality factor.

  4. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  5. Measuring Young's modulus of biological objects in a liquid medium using an atomic force microscope with a special probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, D. V.; Chuklanov, A. P.; Bukharaev, A. A.; Druzhinina, O. S.

    2009-04-01

    A special probe with a 5-μm-diameter ball fixed at the end is developed for an atomic force microscope (AFM), with the use of which it is possible to obtain more correct values of the Young’s moduli of biological objects in liquid media and eliminate the risk of damaging the sample surface. In particular, the AFM measurements with this probe in situ revealed an increase in the Young’s modulus of rat blood vessel under the action of chlorhexidine.

  6. Ultrafast energy transfer in LHC-II revealed by three-pulse photon echo peak shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, R.; Krueger, B.P.; Scholes, G.D.; Yang, M.; Yom, J.; Mets, L.; Fleming, G.R.

    2000-04-06

    The authors report the results of three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) measurements on the light-harvesting complex II (LHC-II) of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Experiments were performed at two different excitation wavelengths, 670 and 650 nm, corresponding to Chl-a and Chl-b excitation, respectively. The 3PEPS data are analyzed using a new theory that incorporates the effect of energy transfer on third-order response functions. The theoretical model separates energy transfer dynamics from the solvation dynamics arising from coupling of the electronic transitions to the protein environment. The protein fluctuations can be described by an ultrafast solvation on a sub-100 fs time scale and a long time correlation (static disorder). Decay of the 670 nm peak shift reveals spectral equilibration time scales for Chl-a molecules that range from 300 fs to 6 ps and agree well with other experiments. 3PEPS data at 650 nm (Chl-b excitation) reveal rapid Chl-b to Chl-b energy transfer (<1 ps), which suggests excitation hopping between a pair of Chls-b, and slow energy transfer from these Chls-b to Chls-a. Also, a 60 cm{sup {minus}1} oscillatory mode is observed for Chl-b which is attributed to the first observation of coherent nuclear dynamics in LHC-II. Calculating the energy transfer dynamics based on recently proposed assignments of chromophores by solving the master equation reveals Chl-b intra- and interband energy transfer dynamics that are in qualitative agreement with the simulation model of the peak shift data.

  7. Revealing the surface and bulk regimes of isothermal graphene growth on Ni with in situ kinetic measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Merkulov, Igor A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    In situ optical diagnostics are used to reveal the isothermal nucleation and growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni across a wide temperature range (560 C < T < 840 C) by chemical vapor deposition from single, sub-second pulses of acetylene. An abrupt, two-orders of magnitude change in growth times (~ 100s to 1s) is revealed at T = 680 C. Below and above this temperature, similar sigmoidal kinetics are measured and attributed to autocatalytic growth reactions but by two different mechanisms, surface assembly and dissolution/precipitation, respectively. These data are used to develop a simple and general kinetic model for graphene growth that includes the nucleation phase and includes the effects of carbon solubility in metals, describes delayed nucleation, and allows the interpretation of the competition between surface and bulk growth modes. The sharp transition in growth kinetics at T = 680 C is explained by a change in defect site density required for nucleation due to a transition in the carbon-induced mobility of the Ni surface. The easily-implemented optical reflectivity diagnostics and the simple kinetic model described here allow a pathway to optimize the growth of graphene on metals with arbitrary carbon solubility.

  8. Revealing the hidden faults in the SE flank of Mt. Etna using radon in-soil gas measurement.

    PubMed

    Johnová, K; Thinová, L; Giammanco, S

    2014-07-01

    Although there are many methods for investigating tectonic structures, many faults remain hidden, and they can endanger the life and property of people living along them. The slopes of volcanoes are covered with such hidden faults, near which strong earthquakes and gas releases can appear. Revealing hidden faults can therefore contribute significantly to the protection of people living in volcanic areas. In the study, seven different techniques were used for making measurements of in-soil radon concentrations in order to search for hidden faults on the SE flank of the Mt. Etna volcano. These reported methods had previously been proved to be useful tools for investigating fault structures. The main aim of the experiment presented here was to evaluate the usability of these methods in the geological conditions of the Mt. Etna region, and to find the best place for continual radon monitoring using a permanent station in the near future. PMID:24729558

  9. In-Plane Electronic Anisotropy of Underdoped ___122___ Fe-Arsenide Superconductors Revealed by Measurements of Detwinned Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ian Randal

    2012-05-08

    The parent phases of the Fe-arsenide superconductors harbor an antiferromagnetic ground state. Significantly, the Neel transition is either preceded or accompanied by a structural transition that breaks the four fold symmetry of the high-temperature lattice. Borrowing language from the field of soft condensed matter physics, this broken discrete rotational symmetry is widely referred to as an Ising nematic phase transition. Understanding the origin of this effect is a key component of a complete theoretical description of the occurrence of superconductivity in this family of compounds, motivating both theoretical and experimental investigation of the nematic transition and the associated in-plane anisotropy. Here we review recent experimental progress in determining the intrinsic in-plane electronic anisotropy as revealed by resistivity, reflectivity and ARPES measurements of detwinned single crystals of underdoped Fe arsenide superconductors in the '122' family of compounds.

  10. Revealing the hidden faults in the SE flank of Mt. Etna using radon in-soil gas measurement.

    PubMed

    Johnová, K; Thinová, L; Giammanco, S

    2014-07-01

    Although there are many methods for investigating tectonic structures, many faults remain hidden, and they can endanger the life and property of people living along them. The slopes of volcanoes are covered with such hidden faults, near which strong earthquakes and gas releases can appear. Revealing hidden faults can therefore contribute significantly to the protection of people living in volcanic areas. In the study, seven different techniques were used for making measurements of in-soil radon concentrations in order to search for hidden faults on the SE flank of the Mt. Etna volcano. These reported methods had previously been proved to be useful tools for investigating fault structures. The main aim of the experiment presented here was to evaluate the usability of these methods in the geological conditions of the Mt. Etna region, and to find the best place for continual radon monitoring using a permanent station in the near future.

  11. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circulating miRNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Measuring Puberty Onset in Chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yijun; Li, Guohui; Qu, Liang; Zhang, Huiyong; Wang, Kehua; Zou, Jianmin; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    There are still no highly sensitive and unique biomarkers for measurement of puberty onset. Circulating miRNAs have been shown to be promising biomarkers for diagnosis of various diseases. To identify circulating miRNAs that could be served as biomarkers for measuring chicken (Gallus gallus) puberty onset, the Solexa deep sequencing was performed to analyze the miRNA expression profiles in serum and plasma of hens from two different pubertal stages, before puberty onset (BO) and after puberty onset (AO). 197 conserved and 19 novel miRNAs (reads > 10) were identified as serum/plasma-expressed miRNAs in the chicken. The common miRNA amounts and their expression changes from BO to AO between serum and plasma were very similar, indicating the different treatments to generate serum and plasma had quite small influence on the miRNAs. 130 conserved serum-miRNAs were showed to be differentially expressed (reads > 10, P < 0.05) from BO to AO, with 68 up-regulated and 62 down-regulated. 4829 putative genes were predicted as the targets of the 40 most differentially expressed miRNAs (|log2(fold-change)|>1.0, P < 0.01). Functional analysis revealed several pathways that were associated with puberty onset. Further quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) test found that a seven-miRNA panel, including miR-29c, miR-375, miR-215, miR-217, miR-19b, miR-133a and let-7a, had great potentials to serve as novel biomarkers for measuring puberty onset in chicken. Due to highly conserved nature of miRNAs, the findings could provide cues for measurement of puberty onset in other animals as well as humans. PMID:27149515

  12. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  13. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  14. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  15. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  16. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  17. Time Series Measurements of Diffuse Hydrothermal Flow at the ASHES Vent Field Reveal Tidally Modulated Heat and Volume Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Fornari, D. J.; Crone, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Existing time-series measurements of temperature and velocity of diffuse hydrothermal fluids exhibit variability over a range of periods from seconds to days. Frequency analysis of these measurements reveals differences between studies and field locations including nearly white spectra, as well as spectra with peaks at tidal and inertial periods. Based upon these results, previous authors have suggested several processes that may control diffuse flow rates, including tidally induced currents and 'tidal pumping', and have also suggested that there are no systematic controls. To further investigate the processes that control variability in diffuse flow, we use data from a new, deep-sea camera and temperature measurement system, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), deployed during the July, 2014 cruise of the R/V Atlantis. The DEMS was deployed with DSV Alvin above a fracture network at the Phoenix vent within the ASHES vent field (Axial Seamount, 1541 mbsl). The system collected 20 seconds of imagery at 20 Hz and 24 seconds of temperature measurements at 1 Hz each hour over the period between July 22 and August 2nd. Velocities of the upwelling fluids were calculated using Diffuse Fluid Velocimetry (DFV; Mittelstaedt et al., 2010). DFV is a cross correlation technique that tracks moving index of refraction anomalies (i.e., hot parcels of fluid) through time. Over the ~12 day deployment, median flow rates ranged from 0.5 cm/s to 6 cm/s and mean fluid temperature anomalies from 0°C up to ~6.5°C, yielding an average heat flux density of 0.23 MW/m2. Spectral analysis of both the measured temperatures and calculated velocities yield a peak in normalized power at the semi-diurnal lunar period (M2, 12.4hrs), but no other spectral peaks above the 95% confidence level. Here, we present these results and discuss their implications for the tidal current and tidal pressure models of diffuse flow variability at the ASHES vent field.

  18. Upwelling characteristics in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) as revealed by Ferrybox measurements in 2007-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Villu; Lips, Urmas

    2016-07-01

    Ferrybox measurements have been carried out between Tallinn and Helsinki in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) on a regular basis since 1997. The system measures autonomously water temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a fluorescence and turbidity and takes water samples for further analyses at a predefined time interval. We aimed to show how the Ferrybox technology could be used to study the coastal upwelling events in the Gulf of Finland. Based on the introduced upwelling index and related criteria, 33 coastal upwelling events were identified in May-September 2007-2013. The number of events, as well as the frequency of their occurrence and intensity expressed as a sum of daily average temperature deviations in the 20 km wide coastal area, were almost equal near the northern and southern coasts. Nevertheless, the wind impulse, which was needed to generate upwelling events of similar intensity, differed between the northern and southern coastal areas. It is suggested that the general thermohaline structure adapted to the prevailing forcing and the estuarine character of the basin weaken the upwelling created by the westerly to southwesterly (up-estuary) winds and strengthen the upwelling created by the easterly to northeasterly (down-estuary) winds. Two types of upwelling events were identified - one characterized by a strong temperature front and the other revealing gradual decrease in temperature from the open sea to the coastal area, with maximum temperature deviation close to the shore.

  19. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssedre, G.; Vu, T. T. N.; Laurent, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30-60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10-14-10-13 m2 V-1 s-1 for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  20. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Scholbach, T M; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the "low grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the "high grade reflux"-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR.

  1. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  2. Characterization of mineral-associated organic matter: a combined approach of AFM and NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Lydia; Schurig, Christian; Eusterhues, Karin; Mueller, Carsten W.; Höschen, Carmen; Totsche, Kai-Uwe; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneous spatial distribution and amount of organic matter (OM) in soils, especially at the micro- or submicron-scale, has major consequences for the soil microstructure and for the accessibility of OM to decomposing microbial communities. Processes occurring at the microscale control soil properties and processes at larger scales, such as macro-aggregation and carbon turnover. Since OM acts as substrate and most important driver for biogeochemical processes, particular attention should be paid to its spatial interaction with soil minerals. In contrast to bulk analysis, Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) offers the possibility to examine the composition and spatial distribution of OM within the intact organo-mineral matrix. Nevertheless, the yield of secondary electrons is influenced by the individual topography of the analysed particles, which aggravated the quantitative interpretation of the data. A combination of NanoSIMS and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), enabled us to visualize and quantify the topographical features of individual particles and correct the NanoSIMS data for this effect. We performed adsorption experiments with water-soluble soil OM in 6 concentration steps, which was extracted from forest floor layer of a Podzol, and adsorbed to illite. Upon the end of the sorption experiments the liquid phase and the solid phase were separated and the carbon content was analysed with TOC- and C/N-measurement, respectively. For the spatially resolved analyses, the samples were applied as thin layers onto silicon wafers and individual particles were chosen by means of the AFM. Subsequently, the identical particles were analysed with NanoSIMS to investigate the distribution of C, N, O, Si, P and Al. The recorded data were analysed for differences in elemental distribution between the different concentration steps. Additionally, we performed a correlation of the detectable counts with the topography of the particle within one

  3. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    PubMed

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations <150 mM spherical micelles are present and the oscillation period is close to the micelle diameter, slightly decreasing with the rise of concentration. For elongated micelles (at concentration 200 mM), no harmonic oscillations are observed anymore; instead, the period increases with the decrease of film thickness. In the case of Tween 20, the force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants.

  4. High-resolution AFM topographs of Rubrivivax gelatinosus light-harvesting complex LH2

    PubMed Central

    Scheuring, Simon; Reiss-Husson, Francoise; Engel, Andreas; Rigaud, Jean-Louis; Ranck, Jean-Luc

    2001-01-01

    Light-harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) are the accessory antenna proteins in the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus and are built up of αβ-heterodimers containing three bacteriochlorophylls and one carotenoid each. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate reconstituted LH2 from Rubrivivax gelatinosus, which has a C-terminal hydrophobic extension of 21 amino acids on the α-subunit. High-resolution topographs revealed a nonameric organization of the regularly packed cylindrical complexes incorporated into the membrane in both orientations. Native LH2 showed one surface which protruded by ∼6 Å and one that protruded by ∼14 Å from the membrane. Topographs of samples reconstituted with thermolysin-digested LH2 revealed a height reduction of the strongly protruding surface to ∼9 Å, and a change of its surface appearance. These results suggested that the α-subunit of R.gelatinosus comprises a single transmembrane helix and an extrinsic C-terminus, and allowed the periplasmic surface to be assigned. Occasionally, large rings (∼120 Å diameter) surrounded by LH2 rings were observed. Their diameter and appearance suggest the large rings to be LH1 complexes. PMID:11406579

  5. A holistic metrology approach: hybrid metrology utilizing scatterometry, CD-AFM, and CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, Alok; Yan, Bin Bin; Jiang, Yun Tao; Kelling, Mark; Hartig, Carsten; Allgair, John; Ebersbach, Peter; Sendelbach, Matthew; Rana, Narender; Katnani, Ahmad; Mclellan, Erin; Archie, Chas; Bozdog, Cornel; Kim, Helen; Sendler, Michael; Ng, Susan; Sherman, Boris; Brill, Boaz; Turovets, Igor; Urensky, Ronen

    2011-03-01

    Shrinking design rules and reduced process tolerances require tight control of CD linewidth, feature shape, and profile of the printed geometry. The Holistic Metrology approach consists of utilizing all available information from different sources like data from other toolsets, multiple optical channels, multiple targets, etc. to optimize metrology recipe and improve measurement performance. Various in-line critical dimension (CD) metrology toolsets like Scatterometry OCD (Optical CD), CD-SEM (CD Scanning Electron Microscope) and CD-AFM (CD Atomic Force Microscope) are typically utilized individually in fabs. Each of these toolsets has its own set of limitations that are intrinsic to specific measurement technique and algorithm. Here we define "Hybrid Metrology" to be the use of any two or more metrology toolsets in combination to measure the same dataset. We demonstrate the benefits of the Hybrid Metrology on two test structures: 22nm node Gate Develop Inspect (DI) & 32nm node FinFET Gate Final Inspect (FI). We will cover measurement results obtained using typical BKM as well as those obtained by utilizing the Hybrid Metrology approach. Measurement performance will be compared using standard metrology metrics for example accuracy and precision.

  6. Measurement of solution viscosity by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nabil; Nino, Diego F.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2001-06-01

    We report on studies aimed at employing the atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the viscosity of aqueous solutions. At ambient temperature, the AFM cantilever undergoes thermal fluctuations that are highly sensitive to the local environment. Here, we present measurements of the cantilever's resonant frequency in aqueous solutions of glycerol, sucrose, ethanol, sodium chloride, polyethylene glycol, and bovine plasma albumin. The measurements revealed that variations in the resonant frequency of the cantilever in the different solutions are largely dependent on the viscosity of the medium. An application of this technique is to monitor the progression of a chemical reaction where a change in viscosity is expected to occur. An example is demonstrated through monitoring of the hydrolysis of double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid by DNase I.

  7. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssedre, G. Laurent, C.; Vu, T. T. N.

    2015-12-21

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30–60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10{sup −14}–10{sup −13} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  8. Combined quantitative ultrasonic and time-resolved interaction force AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Z.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-01-15

    The authors describe a method where quantitative ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) is achieved during time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) imaging in intermittent contact mode. The method uses a calibration procedure for quantitative UAFM. It improves elasticity measurements of stiff regions of surfaces while retaining the capabilities of the TRIF mode for topography, adhesion, dissipation, and elasticity measurements on soft regions of sample surfaces. This combination is especially advantageous when measuring and imaging samples with broad stiffness range in a nondestructive manner. The experiments utilize an active AFM probe with high bandwidth and the UAFM calibration is performed by measuring the magnitude of the time-resolved UAFM signal at a judiciously chosen frequency for different contact stiffness values during individual taps. Improved sensitivity to stiff surface elasticity is demonstrated on a special sample. The results show that combining UAFM with TRIF provides 2.5 GPa (5%) standard deviation on the silicon surface reduced Young's modulus, representing 5x improvement over using only TRIF mode imaging.

  9. AFM investigation on surface damage caused by mechanical probing with small ruby spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, Felix; Küng, Alain

    2007-02-01

    One challenge for today's coordinate metrology is fast and accurate 3D measurements on small objects. Mechanical probing is considered to be simple and accurate but limitations may arise from elastic and plastic deformations at the contact point. Understanding these limits quantitatively will help to avoid surface damage and measurement errors. Static and dynamic forces for single point probings and for scanning measurements were investigated in the present work using a metrology AFM and a micro-CMM. The obtained results were compared with theoretical predictions made by Hertz's theory. We found that the standard forces used by the METAS micro-CMM can be kept below the macroscopic damage threshold. On the other hand, plastic deformation of microscopic contact points which forms at the interface due to the surface roughness of the probe and sample is always present. Additionally, probe contamination by build-up of ductile metal on the probe surface was observed and probe wear on a hard sample was measured.

  10. Metabolic balance of coastal Antarctic waters revealed by autonomous pCO2 and ΔO2/Ar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortell, Philippe D.; Asher, Elizabeth C.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Goldman, Johanna A. L.; Dacey, John W. H.; Grzymski, Joseph J.; Young, Jodi N.; Kranz, Sven A.; Bernard, Kim S.; Morel, François M. M.

    2014-10-01

    We use autonomous gas measurements to examine the metabolic balance (photosynthesis minus respiration) of coastal Antarctic waters during the spring/summer growth season. Our observations capture the development of a massive phytoplankton bloom and reveal striking variability in pCO2 and biological oxygen saturation (ΔO2/Ar) resulting from large shifts in community metabolism on time scales ranging from hours to weeks. Diel oscillations in surface gases are used to derive a high-resolution time series of net community production (NCP) that is consistent with 14C-based primary productivity estimates and with the observed seasonal evolution of phytoplankton biomass. A combination of physical mixing, grazing, and light availability appears to drive variability in coastal Antarctic NCP, leading to strong shifts between net autotrophy and heterotrophy on various time scales. Our approach provides insight into the metabolic responses of polar ocean ecosystems to environmental forcing and could be employed to autonomously detect climate-dependent changes in marine primary productivity.

  11. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pea, M.; Maiolo, L.; Giovine, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Araneo, R.; Notargiacomo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  12. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    formation allow the highly resolved measurement of a number of physical properties far beyond the determination of surface topography. The development of techniques allowing atomic resolution dynamic mode imaging in liquids pushes the door open for an atomic precision analysis of biological samples under physiological conditions. In each of these fields, the conference demonstrated cutting-edge results and also provided perspectives for the next steps on the roadmap of NC-AFM towards the development of its full extent. The conference in Bad Essen was made possible by the continuous dedication of the local management and we are most grateful to Frauke Riemann, Joachim Fontaine and the members of the supporting team for the smooth organization. We gratefully appreciate the financial support of the exhibitors, namely Anfatec, HALCYONICS, JEOL, LOT-Oriel, NanoMagnetics, NT-MDT, Omicron, Schaefer Technology, SURFACE, UNISOKU and the local sponsors which enabled us to provide free participation at the conference for ten promising young researchers who had submitted excellent contributions. It was a great pleasure for us to continue our most successful collaboration with Nanotechnology as our partner for the proceedings publication and we would like to thank Ian Forbes and the publishing team for the professional handling of the peer review and all production matters.

  13. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  14. Measurements of substrate oxidation using (13)CO 2-breath testing reveals shifts in fuel mix during starvation.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Pollock, Erik D

    2013-12-01

    Most fasting animals are believed to sequentially switch from predominantly utilizing one metabolic substrate to another from carbohydrates, to lipids, then to proteins. The timing of these physiological transitions has been estimated using measures of substrate oxidation including changes in respiratory exchange ratios, blood metabolites, nitrogen excretion, or enzyme activities in tissues. Here, we demonstrate how (13)CO2-breath testing can be used to partition among the oxidation of distinct nutrient pools in the body (i.e., carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins) that have become artificially enriched in (13)C. Seventy-two Swiss Webster mice were raised to adulthood on diets supplemented with (13)C-1-L-leucine, (13)C-1-palmitic acid, (13)C-1-D-glucose, or no tracer. Mice were then fasted for 72 h during which [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], δ(13)C of exhaled CO2, body temperature, body mass, and blood metabolites (i.e., glucose, ketone bodies, and triacylglycerols) were measured. The fasting mice exhibited reductions in body mass (29 %), body temperature (3.3 °C), minimum observed metabolic rates (24 %), and respiratory exchange ratio (0.18), as well as significant changes in blood metabolites; but these responses were not particularly indicative of changes in oxidative fuel mixture. Measurements of endogenous nutrient oxidation by way of (13)CO2-breath testing revealed a decrease in the rate of oxidation of carbohydrates from 61 to 10 % of the total energy expenditure during the first 6 h without food. This response was mirrored by a coincidental increase in rate of endogenous lipid oxidation from 18 to 64 %. A transient peak in carbohydrate oxidation occurred between 8 and 14 h, presumably during increased glycogen mobilization. A well-defined period of protein sparing between 8 and 12 h was observed where endogenous protein oxidation accounted for as little as 8 % of the total energy expenditure. Thereafter, protein oxidation continually

  15. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  16. Imaging and measuring the biophysical properties of Fc gamma receptors on single macrophages using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Nanoscale cellular ultra-structures of macrophages were observed. •The binding affinities of FcγRs were measured directly on macrophages. •The nanoscale distributions of FcγRs were mapped on macrophages. -- Abstract: Fc gamma receptors (FcγR), widely expressed on effector cells (e.g., NK cells, macrophages), play an important role in clinical cancer immunotherapy. The binding of FcγRs to the Fc portions of antibodies that are attached to the target cells can activate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) killing mechanism which leads to the lysis of target cells. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe the cellular ultra-structures and measure the biophysical properties (affinity and distribution) of FcγRs on single macrophages in aqueous environments. AFM imaging was used to obtain the topographies of macrophages, revealing the nanoscale cellular fine structures. For molecular interaction recognition, antibody molecules were attached onto AFM tips via a heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) crosslinker. With AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the binding affinities of FcγRs were quantitatively measured on single macrophages. Adhesion force mapping method was used to localize the FcγRs, revealing the nanoscale distribution of FcγRs on local areas of macrophages. The experimental results can improve our understanding of FcγRs on macrophages; the established approach will facilitate further research on physiological activities involved in antibody-based immunotherapy.

  17. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  18. Complete noise analysis of a simple force spectroscopy AFM setup and its applications to study nanomechanics of mammalian Notch 1 protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ashim; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2012-05-01

    We describe a complete noise analysis and application of a custom made AFM force spectroscopy setup on pulling a recombinant protein with an NRR domain of mouse Notch 1. Our table top AFM setup is affordable, has an open architecture, and is easily transferable to other laboratories. Its calculated noise characteristics are dominated by the Brownian noise with 2% non-Brownian components integrated over the first thermally induced resonance of a typical cantilever. For a typical SiN cantilever with a force constant of ˜15 pN nm-1 and in water the force sensitivity and resolution are less than 10 pN, and the corresponding deflection sensitivities are less than 100 pm Hz-1/2. Also, we obtain a sub-ms time resolution in detecting the protein length change, and only few ms cantilever response times as measured in the force clamp mode on a well-known protein standard. Using this setup we investigate force-induced conformational transitions in the NRR region of a mouse Notch 1. Notch is an important protein related to leukemia and breast cancers in humans. We demonstrate that it is feasible to develop AFM-based studies of the force-induced conformational transitions in Notch. Our results match recent steered molecular dynamics simulations of the NRR unfolding and constitute a first step towards a detailed study of Notch activation with AFM.

  19. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  20. In situ AFM crystal growth and dissolution study of calcite in the presence of aqueous fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavouraki, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Koutsoukos, P. G.

    2009-04-01

    Fluoride is naturally abundant, encountered in rocks, soil and fresh and ocean water. Calcite crystals, during crystal growth may incorporate fluoride ions into their lattice (Okumura et al., 1983). In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the growth and dissolution of calcite {104} surfaces in aqueous solutions in the presence of fluoride, using a fluid cell in which the supersaturated and the understaturated solutions respectively, flow over a freshly cleaved calcite crystal. For growth experiments, supersaturation index (S.I.) with respect to calcite was equal to 0.89 and the initial solution pH 10.2. The crystal growth rates were measured from the closure of the rhombohedral etch pits along the [010] direction induced by an initial dissolution step using pure water. The spreading rate of 2-dimensional nuclei was also measured along the same direction. In the presence of low fluoride concentrations (≤0.33 mM), the crystal growth rate of calcite was unaffected. At higher concentrations (up to 5 mM) growth rate decreased substantially to 50% of the rate in the absence of fluoride. Potential fluoride sorption over the calcite surface may ascribe the decrease of growth rates. Dissolution experiments were conducted at pH= 7.2 and dissolution rates of calcite were measured from the spreading of rhombohedral etch pits along both [010] and [42] directions. The presence of low concentrations of fluoride (≤1.1 mM) in the undersaturated solutions enhanced the dissolution rate along the [42] direction by 50% in comparison with pure water. The morphology of rhombohedral etch pits changed to hexagonal in the presence of fluoride in the undersaturated solutions. The AFM dissolution experiments suggested that the fluoride ions adsorbed onto the calcite surface. Further increase of fluoride concentrations (up to 1.6 mM) resulted in the decrease of the calcite dissolution rate by 60% in both [010] and [42] directions. Reference: Okumura, M, Kitano, Y

  1. Comparison of the cohesion-adhesion balance approach to colloidal probe atomic force microscopy and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography for the prediction of dry powder inhalation performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew D; Buckton, Graham

    2016-07-25

    The abilities of the cohesive-adhesive balance approach to atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to predict the performance of carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations were compared. Five model drugs (beclometasone dipropionate, budesonide, salbutamol sulphate, terbutaline sulphate and triamcinolone acetonide) and three model carriers (erythritol, α-lactose monohydrate and d-mannitol) were chosen, giving fifteen drug-carrier combinations. Comparison of the AFM and IGC interparticulate adhesion data suggested that they did not produce equivalent results. Comparison of the AFM data with the in vitro fine particle delivery of appropriate DPI formulations normalised to account for particle size differences revealed a previously observed pattern for the AFM measurements, with a slightly cohesive AFM CAB ratio being associated with the highest fine particle fraction. However, no consistent relationship between formulation performance and the IGC data was observed. The results as a whole highlight the complexity of the many interacting variables that can affect the behaviour of DPIs and suggest that the prediction of their performance from a single measurement is unlikely to be successful in every case.

  2. Comparison of the cohesion-adhesion balance approach to colloidal probe atomic force microscopy and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography for the prediction of dry powder inhalation performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew D; Buckton, Graham

    2016-07-25

    The abilities of the cohesive-adhesive balance approach to atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to predict the performance of carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations were compared. Five model drugs (beclometasone dipropionate, budesonide, salbutamol sulphate, terbutaline sulphate and triamcinolone acetonide) and three model carriers (erythritol, α-lactose monohydrate and d-mannitol) were chosen, giving fifteen drug-carrier combinations. Comparison of the AFM and IGC interparticulate adhesion data suggested that they did not produce equivalent results. Comparison of the AFM data with the in vitro fine particle delivery of appropriate DPI formulations normalised to account for particle size differences revealed a previously observed pattern for the AFM measurements, with a slightly cohesive AFM CAB ratio being associated with the highest fine particle fraction. However, no consistent relationship between formulation performance and the IGC data was observed. The results as a whole highlight the complexity of the many interacting variables that can affect the behaviour of DPIs and suggest that the prediction of their performance from a single measurement is unlikely to be successful in every case. PMID:27265314

  3. Inhibition of cold rolled steel corrosion by Tween-20 in sulfuric acid: weight loss, electrochemical and AFM approaches.

    PubMed

    Mu, Guannan; Li, Xianghong

    2005-09-01

    The inhibiting action of a nonionic surfactant of Tween-20 on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 0.5-7.0 M sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) was studied by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Atomic force microscope (AFM) provided the surface conditions. The results show that inhibition efficiency increases with the inhibitor concentration, while it decreases with the sulfuric acid concentration. The adsorption of inhibitor on the cold rolled steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. Effect of immersion time was studied and discussed. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of cold rolled steel was also studied at four temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 degrees C, the thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption heat, adsorption free energy, and adsorption entropy were calculated. The results revealed that the adsorption was physisorption mechanism. A kinetic study of cold rolled steel in uninhibited and inhibited acid was also discussed. The kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, rate constant, and reaction constant were calculated for the reactions of corrosion. The inhibition effect is satisfactorily explained by both thermodynamic and kinetic models. Polarization curves show that Tween-20 is a cathodic-type inhibitor in sulfuric acid. The results obtained from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization are in good agreement, and the Tween-20 inhibition action could also be evidenced by surface AFM images.

  4. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  5. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  6. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  7. Characterization of local elastic modulus in confined polymer films via AFM indentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu; Putz, Karl W; Wood, Charles D; Brinson, L Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The properties of polymers near an interface are altered relative to their bulk value due both to chemical interaction and geometric confinement effects. For the past two decades, the dynamics of polymers in confined geometries (thin polymer film or nanocomposites with high-surface area particles) has been studied in detail, allowing progress to be made toward understanding the origin of the dynamic effects near interfaces. Observations of mechanical property enhancements in polymer nanocomposites have been attributed to similar origins. However, the existing measurement methods of these local mechanical properties have resulted in a variety of conflicting results on the change of mechanical properties of confined polymers. Here, an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method is demonstrated that directly measures the mechanical properties of polymers adjacent to a substrate with nanometer resolution. This method allows us to consistently observe the gradient in mechanical properties away from a substrate in various materials systems, and paves the way for a unified understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical response of polymers. This gradient is both longer (up to 170 nm) and of higher magnitude (50% increase) than expected from prior results. Through the use of this technique, we will be better able to understand how to design polymer nanocomposites and polymeric structures at the smallest length scale, which affects the fields of structures, electronics, and healthcare.

  8. Characterization of local elastic modulus in confined polymer films via AFM indentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu; Putz, Karl W; Wood, Charles D; Brinson, L Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The properties of polymers near an interface are altered relative to their bulk value due both to chemical interaction and geometric confinement effects. For the past two decades, the dynamics of polymers in confined geometries (thin polymer film or nanocomposites with high-surface area particles) has been studied in detail, allowing progress to be made toward understanding the origin of the dynamic effects near interfaces. Observations of mechanical property enhancements in polymer nanocomposites have been attributed to similar origins. However, the existing measurement methods of these local mechanical properties have resulted in a variety of conflicting results on the change of mechanical properties of confined polymers. Here, an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method is demonstrated that directly measures the mechanical properties of polymers adjacent to a substrate with nanometer resolution. This method allows us to consistently observe the gradient in mechanical properties away from a substrate in various materials systems, and paves the way for a unified understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical response of polymers. This gradient is both longer (up to 170 nm) and of higher magnitude (50% increase) than expected from prior results. Through the use of this technique, we will be better able to understand how to design polymer nanocomposites and polymeric structures at the smallest length scale, which affects the fields of structures, electronics, and healthcare. PMID:25537230

  9. Growth behaviour and mechanical properties of PLL/HA multilayer films studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Uzüm, Cagri; Hellwig, Johannes; Madaboosi, Narayanan; Volodkin, Dmitry; von Klitzing, Regine

    2012-01-01

    Scanning- and colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy were used to study the mechanical properties of poly(L-lysine)/hyaluronan (PLL/HA)(n) films as a function of indentation velocity and the number of polymer deposition steps n. The film thickness was determined by two independent AFM-based methods: scratch-and-scan and newly developed full-indentation. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods are highlighted, and error minimization techniques in elasticity measurements are addressed. It was found that the film thickness increases linearly with the bilayer number n, ranging between 400 and 7500 nm for n = 12 and 96, respectively. The apparent Young's modulus E ranges between 15 and 40 kPa and does not depend on the indenter size or the film bilayer number n. Stress relaxation measurements show that PLL/HA films have a viscoelastic behaviour, regardless of their thickness. If indentation is performed several times at the same lateral position on the film, a viscous/plastic deformation takes place.

  10. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction. PMID:25758979

  11. BOREAS AFM-1 NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ Aircraft Flux data Over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Timothy L.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Gunter, Laureen; Dumas, Ed; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains measurements from the Airborne Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-1 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (NOAA/ATDD) Long-EZ Aircraft collected during the 1994 Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) at the southern study area (SSA). These measurements were made from various instruments mounted on the aircraft. The data that were collected include aircraft altitude, wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, potential temperature, water mixing ratio, U and V components of wind velocity, static pressure, surface radiative temperature, downwelling and upwelling total radiation, downwelling and upwelling longwave radiation, net radiation, downwelling and upwelling photosynthectically active radiation (PAR), greenness index, CO2 concentration, O3 concentration, and CH4 concentration. There are also various columns that indicate the standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and trend of some of these data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ aircraft flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Musawi, R. S. J.; Brousseau, E. B.; Geng, Y.; Borodich, F. M.

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves.

  13. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  14. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  15. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm(2). For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm(2), yielding good statistic results. PMID:25854547

  16. Comparative studies of thin film growth on aluminium by AFM, TEM and GDOES characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jiantao; Thompson, George E.

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, comparative studies of trivalent chromium conversion coating formation, associated with aluminium dissolution process, have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). High-resolution electron micrographs revealed the evident and uniform coating initiation on the whole surface after conversion treatment for only 30 s, although a network of metal ridges was created by HF etching pre-treatment. In terms of conversion treatment process on electropolished aluminium, constant kinetics of coating growth, ∼0.30 ± 0.2 nm/s, were found after the prolonged conversion treatment for 600 s. The availability of electrolyte anions for coating deposition determined the growth process. Simultaneously, a proceeding process of aluminium dissolution during conversion treatment, of ∼0.11 ± 0.02 nm/s, was found for the first time, indicating constant kinetics of anodic reactions. The distinct process of aluminium consumption was assigned with loss of corrosion protection of the deposited coating material as evidenced in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the present data, a new mechanism of coating growth on aluminium was proposed, and it consisted of an activation period (0-30 s), a linear growth period (0.30 nm/s, up for 600 s) and limited growth period (0.17 nm/s, 600-1200 s). In addition, the air-drying post-treatment and a high-vacuum environment in the microscope revealed a coating shrinkage, especially in the coatings after conversion treatments for longer time.

  17. Advances in CO2 cryogenic aerosol technology for photomask post AFM repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Charles; Varghese, Ivin; Balooch, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Jaime

    2009-10-01

    As the mask technology moves towards production of 36 nm and 22 nm DRAM half pitch nodes, printing features and sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) shrink below 80 nm. These narrow features become more fragile and place new demands on cleaning processes for a physically non damaging solution. These challenges include compatibility with new materials, oxidation, chemical contamination sensitivity, proportionally decreasing printable defect size, and a requirement for a damage-free clean. CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning has, for many years, shown potential to offer a wide process window for meeting some of these new challenges. CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning for post AFM repair debris cleaning has been used for many years on masks greater than 90 nm DRAM half pitch nodes. Until recently, CO2 purity and delivery hardware issues resulted in foreign material adder (FMACO2) contamination and SRAF damage below 150 nm critical feature size. Some key desirable properties of CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning are the non-oxidizing and non-etching properties when compared to current chemical wet clean processes. In this paper, recent advancements of CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning technology are presented, highlighting improvements in the areas of FMACO2 reduction, lowering the critical feature size without damage, and electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation. Key aspects of successful CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning include the spray nozzle design, CO2 liquid purity, and integrated system design. The design of the nozzle directly controls the size, flux, and velocity of the CO2 snow particles. Methodology and measurements of the solid CO2 particle size and velocity distributions will be presented, and their responses to various control parameters will be discussed. FMACO2 mitigation can be achieved only through use of highly purified CO2 and careful materials selection of the delivery hardware. Recent advances in CO2 purity will be discussed and data shown. The mask cleaning

  18. Experimental evidence of ultrathin polymer film stratification by AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Nicolas; Chebil, Mohamed Souheib; Vignaud, Guillaume; Le Houerou, Vincent; Bardeau, Jean-François; Busselez, Rémi; Gibaud, Alain; Grohens, Yves

    2015-06-01

    By performing Atomic Force Microscopy measurements of pull-off force as a function of the temperature, we were able to probe the dynamic of supported thin polystyrene (PS) films. Thermal transitions induce modifications in the surface energy, roughness and surface modulus that are clearly detected by AFM and related to PS chain relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrated the existence of three transition temperatures that can be associated to the relaxation of polymer chains located at different depth regions within the polymer film. Independently of the film thickness, we have confirmed the presence of a region of high mobility for the polymer chains at the free interface. The thickness of this region is estimated to be above 7nm. The detection of a transition only present for film thicker than the gyration radius Rg is linked to the dynamics of polymer chains in a bulk conformation (i.e. not in contact with the free interface). We claim here that our results demonstrate, in agreement with other techniques, the stratification of thin polymer film depth profile in terms of relaxation behavior. PMID:26087914

  19. Direct electrochemical and AFM detection of amyloid-β peptide aggregation on basal plane HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Paula; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ting; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2014-06-01

    Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation.Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details: procedures for Aβ42 aggregation and electrode modification, DPV/AFM measurements and analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02413c

  20. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions.

  1. Zeta potential, contact angles, and AFM imaging of protein conformation adsorbed on hybrid nanocomposite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ana C; Piedade, Ana P

    2013-08-28

    The sputtering deposition of gold (Au) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) was used to prepare a nanocomposite hybrid thin film suitable for protein adsorption while maintaining the native conformation of the biological material. The monolithic PTFE and the nanocomposite PTFE/Au thin films, with Au content up to 1 at %, were co-deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering using argon as a discharge gas and deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrates, the most commonly used steel in biomaterials. The deposited thin films, before and after bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, were thoroughly characterized with special emphasis on the surface properties/characteristics by atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential, and static and dynamic contact angle measurements, in order to assess the relationship between structure and conformational changes. The influence of a pre-adsorbed peptide (RGD) was also evaluated. The nanotopographic and chemical changes induced by the presence of gold in the nanocomposite thin films enable RGD bonding, which is critical for the maintenance of the BSA native conformation after adsorption.

  2. AFM and EDX Study of Self Assembled Pt Nanostructures on PEDOT Thin Films under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senevirathne, Indrajith; Mohney, Austin; Buchheit, Joshua; Goonewardene, Anura

    2011-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructure systems on conductive polymer thin films under ambient conditions are interesting due to their use in BioMEMS and hybrid systems further and considering the physics of the polymer - metal interactions The observed nanostructures have deformed spherical shape. The Pt was magnetron sputter deposited at RT (300K), PEDOT Baytron P 60nm thick, spin coated on glass slides cleaned with acetone and IPA. The system was studied using ambient IC mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for its structure. Elemental composition/distribution of the system was measured with Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy (EDX). Pt nanostructures on the surface observed to be likely Volmer - Weber growth mode At Pt coverage of 120 ML, nanostructures had a mean diameter of 32 nm and mean height of 5 nm. When annealing at 15min at 473K systems changes to smaller nanostructures coexisting with bigger structures of mean diameter of 120 nm and mean height of 36 nm. Elemental/morphological variations when annealed at successively higher temperatures were also investigated. NSF Grant #: 0923047 and PASSHE FPDC (LOU # 2010-LHU-03).

  3. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions. PMID:26586109

  4. Mechanical properties of complex biological systems using AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John Stephen

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was designed and built to study the mechanical properties of small collagen fibrils and the plasma membrane of living cells. Collagen is a major component of bone, skin and connective tissues, and is abundant in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Because of its abundance, an understanding of how disease affects collagen mechanics is crucial in disease prevention efforts. Two levels of type I collagen structure were investigated, subfibrils (on the order of 1 mum in length) and longer fibrils. Comparisons were made between measurements of wild-type (wt) collagen and collagen from the mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Significant differences between OI and wt collagen were observed, primarily that intermolecular bonds in OI collagen fibrils are weaker than in wt, or not ruptured, as in the case of OI subfibrils. As cells interact with collagen in the ECM, the mechanical properties of the plasma membrane are also of great interest. Membrane tethers were extracted from living cells under varied conditions in order to assess the contributions of membrane-associated macromolecules such as the actin cytoskeleton and the glycocalyx, and intracellular signaling. Tether extraction force was found to be sensitive to all of these altered conditions, suggesting that tether extraction may be used to monitor various cellular processes.

  5. Forced Unfolding of the Coiled-Coils of Fibrinogen by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Litvinov, Rustem; Discher, Dennis; Weisel, John

    2007-03-01

    A blood clot needs to have the right degree of stiffness and plasticity for hemostasis, but the origin of these mechanical properties is unknown. Here we report the first measurements using single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the forced unfolding of fibrinogen to begin addressing this problem. To generate longer reproducible curves than are possible using monomer, factor XIIIa cross-linked, single chain fibrinogen oligomers were used. When extended under force, these oligomers showed sawtooth shaped force-extension patterns characteristic of unfolding proteins with a peak-to-peak separation of approximately 26 nm, consistent with the independent unfolding of the coiled-coils. These results were then reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation with parameters in the same range as those previously used for unfolding globular domains. In particular, we found that the refolding time was negligible on experimental time and force scales in contrast to previous work on simpler coiled-coils. We suggest that this difference may be due to fibrinogen's structurally and topologically more complex coiled-coils and that an interaction between the alpha C and central domains may be involved. These results suggest a new functional property of fibrinogen and that the coiled-coil is more than a passive structural element of this molecule.

  6. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  7. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  8. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  9. Surface structure of CdSe Nanorods revealed by combined X-rayabsorption fine structure measurements and ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aruguete, Deborah A.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Li, Liang-shi; Williamson, Andrew; Fakra, Sirine; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-01-27

    We report orientation-specific, surface-sensitive structural characterization of colloidal CdSe nanorods with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and ab-initio density functional theory calculations. Our measurements of crystallographically-aligned CdSe nanorods show that they have reconstructed Cd-rich surfaces. They exhibit orientation-dependent changes in interatomic distances which are qualitatively reproduced by our calculations. These calculations reveal that the measured interatomic distance anisotropy originates from the nanorod surface.

  10. Tip-surface interactions at redox responsive poly(ferrocenylsilane) (PFS) interface by AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hong Jing; Song, Jing; Vancso, G. Julius

    2009-05-01

    Poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) belong to the class of redox responsive organometallic polymers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used earlier to study single chain PFS response and redox energy driven single chain PFS molecular motors. Here we present further AFM investigations of force interactions between tip and a grafted PFS surface under potential control in electrochemical redox cycles. Typical tip-Au interaction is considered as reference in the force measurements. First the electrostatic component in the diffused double layer (DL) in NaClO 4 electrolyte environment was considered for a "grafted to" PFS, which dominated the interplay between the tip and sample surface. The DL forces can also hinder the physisorption of PFS chain onto the tip when the voltage was applied at -0.1 V. On the other hand, if the tip contacted the PFS surface prior to the electrochemical process, physisorption of PFS chains governed the overall interaction regardless of subsequently applied surface potential. In addition, prolonged contact time, tc, may also contribute to the stability of tip-PFS bridging and detection of electrostatic forces between the tip-PFS interface. The results showed that tip-substrate interaction forces without PFS grafts have negligibly small force contributions under similar, electrochemically controlled, conditions used in single PFS chain based molecular motors.

  11. Characterization of microscale wear in a ploysilicon-based MEMS device using AFM and PEEM-NEXAFS spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, D. S.; Konicek, A. R.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Sumant, A. V.; de Boer, M. P.; Corwin, A. D.; Carpick, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of microscale wear in silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are elucidated by studying a polysilicon nanotractor, a device specifically designed to conduct friction and wear tests under controlled conditions. Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) was combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantitatively probe chemical changes and structural modification, respectively, in the wear track of the nanotractor. The ability of PEEM-NEXAFS to spatially map chemical variations in the near-surface region of samples at high lateral spatial resolution is unparalleled and therefore ideally suited for this study. The results show that it is possible to detect microscopic chemical changes using PEEM-NEXAFS, specifically, oxidation at the sliding interface of a MEMS device. We observe that wear induces oxidation of the polysilicon at the immediate contact interface, and the spectra are consistent with those from amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The oxidation is correlated with gouging and debris build-up in the wear track, as measured by AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  12. Frequency distribution of the amide-I vibration sorted by residues in Amyloid fibrils revealed by 2D-IR measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Cyril; Zhuang, Wei; Kim, Yung Sam; Axelsen, Paul H.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    The infrared optical response of Amyloid Fibrils Aβ1–40 is investigated. Simulations of two models corresponding to different protonation states are compared with experiment. The simulations reveal that vibrational frequency distributions inside the fibrils are dominated by sidechain fluctuations. We further confirm earlier suggestions based on 2D-IR measurements that water molecules can be trapped inside the fibrils. PMID:22338639

  13. AFM-based mapping of the elastic properties of cell walls: at tissue, cellular, and subcellular resolutions.

    PubMed

    Peaucelle, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    We describe a recently developed method to measure mechanical properties of the surfaces of plant tissues using atomic force microscopy (AFM) micro/nano-indentations, for a JPK AFM. Specifically, in this protocol we measure the apparent Young's modulus of cell walls at subcellular resolutions across regions of up to 100 µmx100 µm in floral meristems, hypocotyls, and roots. This requires careful preparation of the sample, the correct selection of micro-indenters and indentation depths. To account for cell wall properties only, measurements are performed in highly concentrated solutions of mannitol in order to plasmolyze the cells and thus remove the contribution of cell turgor pressure. In contrast to other extant techniques, by using different indenters and indentation depths, this method allows simultaneous multiscale measurements, i.e. at subcellular resolutions and across hundreds of cells comprising a tissue. This means that it is now possible to spatially-temporally characterize the changes that take place in the mechanical properties of cell walls during development, enabling these changes to be correlated with growth and differentiation. This represents a key step to understand how coordinated microscopic cellular changes bring about macroscopic morphogenetic events. However, several limitations remain: the method can only be used on fairly small samples (around 100 µm in diameter) and only on external tissues; the method is sensitive to tissue topography; it measures only certain aspects of the tissue's complex mechanical properties. The technique is being developed rapidly and it is likely that most of these limitations will be resolved in the near future. PMID:25080133

  14. AFM probes fabricated with masked maskless combined anisotropic etching and p+ surface doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianqiang; Li, Xinxin; Bao, Haifei; Zuo, Guomin; Wang, Yuelin; Feng, Fei; Yu, Zhenyin; Ge, Xiaohong

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents a newly developed high-yield micro-fabrication technology for single-crystalline silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. Both the tips and the cantilevers are simultaneously formed by a masked-maskless combined anisotropic etching process. Compared to a conventional tip-to-cantilever sequential fabrication scheme, this tip-and-cantilever simultaneous formation can effectively increase fabrication yield by avoiding the tips damaged during the following processed photolithographic steps for defining the cantilevers. By heavy boron doping at the surface, the conductive AFM probe provides an electrical path to the electric ground of the AFM that helps to eliminate the electrostatic accumulation of charges and, therefore, eliminate undesirable electrostatic forces between the probes and the samples. A fabrication yield as high as 90% has been obtained for the AFM probes for 4 inch wafers. The tips after oxidation-sharpening treatment generally have a radius of 10-30 nm. The cantilever spring constant can be well controlled in the range of 0.025-40 N m-1. High-quality sample scanning results with the formed AFM probes are obtained with a slightly better resolution than that from commercial probes without surface conductive treatment.

  15. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  16. AFM studied the effect of celastrol on β1 integrin-mediated HUVEC adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Ke, Changhong; Jin, Hua; Cai, Jiye

    2013-01-01

    Integrin-mediated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a fundamental role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Celastrol, a traditional Chinese medicine plant, has possessed anticancer and suppressed angiogenesis activities. Here, the mechanism underling the antiangiogenesis capacity of celastrol was investigated by exploring the effect of celastrol on β1(CD29) integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Flow cytometry results showed that the HUVECs highly expressed CD29 and cell adhesion assay indicated that celastrol specifically inhibited the adhesion of HUVECs to fibronectin (FN) without affecting nonspecific adhesion to poly-L-lysine (PLL). After cell FN adhesion being inhibited, the cell surface nanoscale structure and adhesion force were detected by atomic force microscope (AFM). High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with celastrol. The membrane average roughness (Ra) and the major forces were decreased from 31.34 ± 4.56 nm, 519.60 ± 82.86 pN of 0 μg/ml celastrol to 18.47 ± 6.53 nm, 417.79 ± 53.35 pN of 4.0 μg/ml celastrol, 10.54 ± 2.85 nm, 258.95 ± 38.98 pN of 8.0 μg/ml celastrol, respectively. Accompanying with the decrease of adhesion force, the actin cytoskeleton in the cells was obviously disturbed by the celastrol. All of these changes influenced the migration of HUVECs from the wound-healing migration assay. Taken together, our results suggest that celastrol can be as an inhibitor of HUVEC adhesion to FN. This work provides a novel approach to inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:23239560

  17. The ReactorAFM: non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Roobol, S B; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Bergman, M; van Spronsen, M A; Onderwaater, W G; van der Tuijn, P C; Koehler, R; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  18. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  19. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  20. Quantitative atomic resolution force imaging on epitaxial graphene with reactive and nonreactive AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Boneschanscher, Mark P; van der Lit, Joost; Sun, Zhixiang; Swart, Ingmar; Liljeroth, Peter; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2012-11-27

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of graphene and graphite show contrast with atomic periodicity. However, the contrast patterns vary depending on the atomic termination of the AFM tip apex and the tip-sample distance, hampering the identification of the atomic positions. Here, we report quantitative AFM imaging of epitaxial graphene using inert (carbon-monoxide-terminated) and reactive (iridium-terminated) tips. The atomic image contrast is markedly different with these tip terminations. With a reactive tip, we observe an inversion from attractive to repulsive atomic contrast with decreasing tip-sample distance, while a nonreactive tip only yields repulsive atomic contrast. We are able to identify the atoms with both tips at any tip-sample distance. This is a prerequisite for future structural and chemical analysis of adatoms, defects, and the edges of graphene nanostructures, crucial for understanding nanoscale graphene devices.

  1. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Gumí-Audenis, B; Carlà, F; Vitorino, M V; Panzarella, A; Porcar, L; Boilot, M; Guerber, S; Bernard, P; Rodrigues, M S; Sanz, F; Giannotti, M I; Costa, L

    2015-11-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  2. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  3. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  4. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, David P.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R. J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kerper, P. S.; Warmack, R. J.

    1995-04-01

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 104, we demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS+) or two (pMP32) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in our preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  5. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems. PMID:26783076

  6. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M.; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems.

  7. High resolution Hall measurements across the VO2 metal-insulator transition reveal impact of spatial phase separation.

    PubMed

    Yamin, Tony; Strelniker, Yakov M; Sharoni, Amos

    2016-01-01

    Many strongly correlated transition metal oxides exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT), the manipulation of which is essential for their application as active device elements. However, such manipulation is hindered by lack of microscopic understanding of mechanisms involved in these transitions. A prototypical example is VO2, where previous studies indicated that the MIT resistance change correlate with changes in carrier density and mobility. We studied the MIT using Hall measurements with unprecedented resolution and accuracy, simultaneously with resistance measurements. Contrast to prior reports, we find that the MIT is not correlated with a change in mobility, but rather, is a macroscopic manifestation of the spatial phase separation which accompanies the MIT. Our results demonstrate that, surprisingly, properties of the nano-scale spatially-separated metallic and semiconducting domains actually retain their bulk properties. This study highlights the importance of taking into account local fluctuations and correlations when interpreting transport measurements in highly correlated systems. PMID:26783076

  8. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  9. Resonance Frequency Analysis for Surface-Coupled AFM Cantilever in Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirman, B; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Shifts in the resonance frequencies of surface-coupled atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are used as the basis for the detection mechanisms in a number of scanning probe microscopy techniques including atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), force modulation microscopy, and resonance enhanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Here, we analyze resonance characteristics for AFM cantilever coupled to surface in liquid environment, and derive approximate expressions for resonant frequencies as a function of vertical and lateral spring constant of the tip-surface junction. This analysis provides a simplified framework for the interpretation of AFAM and PFM data in ambient, liquid, and vacuum environments.

  10. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  11. An Evaluation of the Impacts of AF-M315E Propulsion Systems for Varied Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fittje, James; Colozza, Anthony; Packard, Tom; Gyekenyesi, John; McLean, Christopher H.; Spores, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the AF-M315E COMPASS study is to identify near-term (3-5 years) and long term (5 years +) opportunities for infusion, specifically the thruster and associated component technologies being developed as part of the GPIM project. Develop design reference missions which show the advantages of the AF-M315E green propulsion system. Utilize a combination of past COMPASS designs and selected new designs to demonstrate AF-M315E advantages. Use the COMPASS process to show the puts and takes of using AF-M315E at the integrated system level.

  12. Hybrid Metrology and 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.

    2011-11-10

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R and D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials...). Therefore, time for R and D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam.In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R and D and production. The final goal for 'chip makers' is to improve yield and save R and D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2{sup nd} part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  13. 146Sm-142Nd systematics measured in enstatite chondrites reveals a heterogeneous distribution of 142Nd in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Gannoun, Abdelmouhcine; Boyet, Maud; Rizo, Hanika; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2011-05-10

    The short-lived (146)Sm-(142)Nd chronometer (T(1/2) = 103 Ma) is used to constrain the early silicate evolution of planetary bodies. The composition of bulk terrestrial planets is then considered to be similar to that of primitive chondrites that represent the building blocks of rocky planets. However for many elements chondrites preserve small isotope differences. In this case it is not always clear to what extent these variations reflect the isotope heterogeneity of the protosolar nebula rather than being produced by the decay of parent isotopes. Here we present Sm-Nd isotopes data measured in a comprehensive suite of enstatite chondrites (EC). The EC preserve (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios that range from those of ordinary chondrites to values similar to terrestrial samples. The EC having terrestrial (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios are also characterized by small (144)Sm excesses, which is a pure p-process nuclide. The correlation between (144)Sm and (142)Nd for chondrites may indicate a heterogeneous distribution in the solar nebula of p-process matter synthesized in supernovae. However to explain the difference in (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios, 20% of the p-process contribution to (142)Nd is required, at odds with the value of 4% currently proposed in stellar models. This study highlights the necessity of obtaining high-precision (144)Sm measurements to interpret properly measured (142)Nd signatures. Another explanation could be that the chondrites sample material formed in different pulses of the lifetime of asymptotic giant branch stars. Then the isotope signature measured in SiC presolar would not represent the unique s-process signature of the material present in the solar nebula during accretion.

  14. 146Sm-142Nd systematics measured in enstatite chondrites reveals a heterogeneous distribution of 142Nd in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Gannoun, Abdelmouhcine; Boyet, Maud; Rizo, Hanika; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2011-05-10

    The short-lived (146)Sm-(142)Nd chronometer (T(1/2) = 103 Ma) is used to constrain the early silicate evolution of planetary bodies. The composition of bulk terrestrial planets is then considered to be similar to that of primitive chondrites that represent the building blocks of rocky planets. However for many elements chondrites preserve small isotope differences. In this case it is not always clear to what extent these variations reflect the isotope heterogeneity of the protosolar nebula rather than being produced by the decay of parent isotopes. Here we present Sm-Nd isotopes data measured in a comprehensive suite of enstatite chondrites (EC). The EC preserve (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios that range from those of ordinary chondrites to values similar to terrestrial samples. The EC having terrestrial (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios are also characterized by small (144)Sm excesses, which is a pure p-process nuclide. The correlation between (144)Sm and (142)Nd for chondrites may indicate a heterogeneous distribution in the solar nebula of p-process matter synthesized in supernovae. However to explain the difference in (142)Nd/(144)Nd ratios, 20% of the p-process contribution to (142)Nd is required, at odds with the value of 4% currently proposed in stellar models. This study highlights the necessity of obtaining high-precision (144)Sm measurements to interpret properly measured (142)Nd signatures. Another explanation could be that the chondrites sample material formed in different pulses of the lifetime of asymptotic giant branch stars. Then the isotope signature measured in SiC presolar would not represent the unique s-process signature of the material present in the solar nebula during accretion. PMID:21515828

  15. 146Sm–142Nd systematics measured in enstatite chondrites reveals a heterogeneous distribution of 142Nd in the solar nebula

    PubMed Central

    Gannoun, Abdelmouhcine; Boyet, Maud; Rizo, Hanika; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    The short-lived 146Sm–142Nd chronometer (T1/2 = 103 Ma) is used to constrain the early silicate evolution of planetary bodies. The composition of bulk terrestrial planets is then considered to be similar to that of primitive chondrites that represent the building blocks of rocky planets. However for many elements chondrites preserve small isotope differences. In this case it is not always clear to what extent these variations reflect the isotope heterogeneity of the protosolar nebula rather than being produced by the decay of parent isotopes. Here we present Sm–Nd isotopes data measured in a comprehensive suite of enstatite chondrites (EC). The EC preserve 142Nd/144Nd ratios that range from those of ordinary chondrites to values similar to terrestrial samples. The EC having terrestrial 142Nd/144Nd ratios are also characterized by small 144Sm excesses, which is a pure p-process nuclide. The correlation between 144Sm and 142Nd for chondrites may indicate a heterogeneous distribution in the solar nebula of p-process matter synthesized in supernovae. However to explain the difference in 142Nd/144Nd ratios, 20% of the p-process contribution to 142Nd is required, at odds with the value of 4% currently proposed in stellar models. This study highlights the necessity of obtaining high-precision 144Sm measurements to interpret properly measured 142Nd signatures. Another explanation could be that the chondrites sample material formed in different pulses of the lifetime of asymptotic giant branch stars. Then the isotope signature measured in SiC presolar would not represent the unique s-process signature of the material present in the solar nebula during accretion. PMID:21515828

  16. Heat-denatured lysozyme aggregation and gelation as revealed by combined dielectric relaxation spectroscopy and light scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Giugliarelli, A; Sassi, P; Paolantoni, M; Onori, G; Cametti, C

    2012-09-01

    The dielectric behavior of native and heat-denatured lysozyme in ethanol-water solutions was examined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 2 GHz, using frequency-domain dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. Because of the conformational changes on unfolding, dielectric methods provide information on the denaturation process of the protein and, at protein concentration high enough, on the subsequent aggregation and gelation. Moreover, the time evolution of the protein aggregation and gelation was monitored measuring, by means of dynamic light scattering methods, the diffusion coefficient of micro-sized polystyrene particles, deliberately added to the protein solution, which act as a probe of the viscosity of the microenvironment close to the particle surface. All together, our measurements indicate that heat-induced denaturation favors, at high concentrations, a protein aggregation process which evolves up to the full gelation of the system. These findings have a direct support from IR measurements of the absorbance of the amide I band that, because of the unfolding, indicate that proteins entangle each other, producing a network structure which evolves, in long time limit, in the gel.

  17. Geodynamics of the Indian Lithospheric Plate relative to the neighbouring Plates as revealed by Space Geodetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, S.; Mathew, J.; Majumdar, R.; Roy, P.; Vinod Kumar, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Indian Plate is highly dynamic in nature which in turn makes the Indo-Eurassian collision zone the foci of most of the historic large magnitude earthquakes. Processing of positional information from continuously observing reference stations is one of the space based geodetic techniques used globally and nationally to understand the crustal dynamics. The present study evaluates the dynamic nature of the Indian plate relative to its adjoining plates using the permanent GPS data (2011 to 2013) of 12 International GNSS Service (IGS), which are spread across the Indian, Eurassian, Australian, Somaliyan and African plates. The data processing was carried out using GAMIT/GLOBK software. The results indicate that the average velocity for the two IGS stations on the Indian Plate (Hyderabad and Bangalore) is 54.25 mm/year towards NE in the ITRF-2008 reference frame. The relative velocity of various stations with respect to the Indian plate has been estimated using the Bangalore station and has been found that the stations in the Eurasian plate (Lhasa, Urumqi, Bishkek and Kitab) are moving with velocity ranging from 25 to 33 mm/year in the SE direction resulting in compressional interaction with the Indian plate. This study reveals and confirms to the previous studies that the Indian- Eurassian-Australian Plates are moving at different relative velocities leading to compressional regimes at their margins leading to seismicity in these zones.

  18. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  19. Whole-Cell Electrical Activity Under Direct Mechanical Stimulus by AFM Cantilever Using Planar Patch Clamp Chip Approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Kalpesh V; Candiello, Joseph E; Davidson, Lance A; Lin, Hai

    2011-06-01

    Patch clamp is a powerful tool for studying the properties of ion-channels and cellular membrane. In recent years, planar patch clamp chips have been fabricated from various materials including glass, quartz, silicon, silicon nitride, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS), and silicon dioxide. Planar patch clamps have made automation of patch clamp recordings possible. However, most planar patch clamp chips have limitations when used in combination with other techniques. Furthermore, the fabrication methods used are often expensive and require specialized equipments. An improved design as well as fabrication and characterization of a silicon-based planar patch clamp chip are described in this report. Fabrication involves true batch fabrication processes that can be performed in most common microfabrication facilities using well established MEMS techniques. Our planar patch clamp chips can form giga-ohm seals with the cell plasma membrane with success rate comparable to existing patch clamp techniques. The chip permits whole-cell voltage clamp recordings on variety of cell types including Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, for times longer than most available patch clamp chips. When combined with a custom microfluidics chamber, we demonstrate that it is possible to perfuse the extra-cellular as well as intra-cellular buffers. The chamber design allows integration of planar patch clamp with atomic force microscope (AFM). Using our planar patch clamp chip and microfluidics chamber, we have recorded whole-cell mechanosensitive (MS) currents produced by directly stimulating human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells using an AFM cantilever. Our results reveal the spatial distribution of MS ion channels and temporal details of the responses from MS channels. The results show that planar patch clamp chips have great potential for multi-parametric high throughput studies of ion channel proteins. PMID:22174731

  20. Satellite chlorophyll fluorescence measurements reveal large-scale decoupling of photosynthesis and greenness dynamics in boreal evergreen forests.

    PubMed

    Walther, Sophia; Voigt, Maximilian; Thum, Tea; Gonsamo, Alemu; Zhang, Yongguang; Köhler, Philipp; Jung, Martin; Varlagin, Andrej; Guanter, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Mid-to-high latitude forests play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the representation of photosynthesis in boreal forests by current modelling and observational methods is still challenging. In particular, the applicability of existing satellite-based proxies of greenness to indicate photosynthetic activity is hindered by small annual changes in green biomass of the often evergreen tree population and by the confounding effects of background materials such as snow. As an alternative, satellite measurements of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be used as a direct proxy of photosynthetic activity. In this study, the start and end of the photosynthetically active season of the main boreal forests are analysed using spaceborne SIF measurements retrieved from the GOME-2 instrument and compared to that of green biomass, proxied by vegetation indices including the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) derived from MODIS data. We find that photosynthesis and greenness show a similar seasonality in deciduous forests. In high-latitude evergreen needleleaf forests, however, the length of the photosynthetically active period indicated by SIF is up to 6 weeks longer than the green biomass changing period proxied by EVI, with SIF showing a start-of-season of approximately 1 month earlier than EVI. On average, the photosynthetic spring recovery as signalled by SIF occurs as soon as air temperatures exceed the freezing point (2-3 °C) and when the snow on the ground has not yet completely melted. These findings are supported by model data of gross primary production and a number of other studies which evaluated in situ observations of CO2 fluxes, meteorology and the physiological state of the needles. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of space-based SIF measurements to light-use efficiency of boreal forests and their potential for an unbiased detection of photosynthetic activity even under the challenging conditions interposed by evergreen

  1. E/N effects on K0 values revealed by high precision measurements under low field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Brian C; Siems, William F; Harden, Charles S; McHugh, Vincent M; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-07-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and narcotics. While IMS has a low rate of false positives, their occurrence causes the loss of time and money as the alarm is verified. Because numerous variables affect the reduced mobility (K0) of an ion, wide detection windows are required in order to ensure a low false negative response rate. Wide detection windows, however, reduce response selectivity, and interferents with similar K0 values may be mistaken for targeted compounds and trigger a false positive alarm. Detection windows could be narrowed if reference K0 values were accurately known for specific instrumental conditions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of confidence in the literature values due to discrepancies in the reported K0 values and their lack of reported error. This creates the need for the accurate control and measurement of each variable affecting ion mobility, as well as for a central accurate IMS database for reference and calibration. A new ion mobility spectrometer has been built that reduces the error of measurements affecting K0 by an order of magnitude less than ±0.2%. Precise measurements of ±0.002 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) or better have been produced and, as a result, an unexpected relationship between K0 and the electric field to number density ratio (E/N) has been discovered in which the K0 values of ions decreased as a function of E/N along a second degree polynomial trend line towards an apparent asymptote at approximately 4 Td.

  2. E/N effects on K0 values revealed by high precision measurements under low field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Brian C.; Siems, William F.; Harden, Charles S.; McHugh, Vincent M.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-07-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and narcotics. While IMS has a low rate of false positives, their occurrence causes the loss of time and money as the alarm is verified. Because numerous variables affect the reduced mobility (K0) of an ion, wide detection windows are required in order to ensure a low false negative response rate. Wide detection windows, however, reduce response selectivity, and interferents with similar K0 values may be mistaken for targeted compounds and trigger a false positive alarm. Detection windows could be narrowed if reference K0 values were accurately known for specific instrumental conditions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of confidence in the literature values due to discrepancies in the reported K0 values and their lack of reported error. This creates the need for the accurate control and measurement of each variable affecting ion mobility, as well as for a central accurate IMS database for reference and calibration. A new ion mobility spectrometer has been built that reduces the error of measurements affecting K0 by an order of magnitude less than ±0.2%. Precise measurements of ±0.002 cm2 V-1 s-1 or better have been produced and, as a result, an unexpected relationship between K0 and the electric field to number density ratio (E/N) has been discovered in which the K0 values of ions decreased as a function of E/N along a second degree polynomial trend line towards an apparent asymptote at approximately 4 Td.

  3. Satellite chlorophyll fluorescence measurements reveal large-scale decoupling of photosynthesis and greenness dynamics in boreal evergreen forests.

    PubMed

    Walther, Sophia; Voigt, Maximilian; Thum, Tea; Gonsamo, Alemu; Zhang, Yongguang; Köhler, Philipp; Jung, Martin; Varlagin, Andrej; Guanter, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Mid-to-high latitude forests play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the representation of photosynthesis in boreal forests by current modelling and observational methods is still challenging. In particular, the applicability of existing satellite-based proxies of greenness to indicate photosynthetic activity is hindered by small annual changes in green biomass of the often evergreen tree population and by the confounding effects of background materials such as snow. As an alternative, satellite measurements of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be used as a direct proxy of photosynthetic activity. In this study, the start and end of the photosynthetically active season of the main boreal forests are analysed using spaceborne SIF measurements retrieved from the GOME-2 instrument and compared to that of green biomass, proxied by vegetation indices including the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) derived from MODIS data. We find that photosynthesis and greenness show a similar seasonality in deciduous forests. In high-latitude evergreen needleleaf forests, however, the length of the photosynthetically active period indicated by SIF is up to 6 weeks longer than the green biomass changing period proxied by EVI, with SIF showing a start-of-season of approximately 1 month earlier than EVI. On average, the photosynthetic spring recovery as signalled by SIF occurs as soon as air temperatures exceed the freezing point (2-3 °C) and when the snow on the ground has not yet completely melted. These findings are supported by model data of gross primary production and a number of other studies which evaluated in situ observations of CO2 fluxes, meteorology and the physiological state of the needles. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of space-based SIF measurements to light-use efficiency of boreal forests and their potential for an unbiased detection of photosynthetic activity even under the challenging conditions interposed by evergreen

  4. High frequency measurements using in situ sensors in a coupled watershed-estuary reveal factors driving DOC variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulukutla, G. K.; Carey, R. O.; Wollheim, W. M.; Salisbury, J.

    2012-12-01

    Estuaries are recipients of large inputs of organic matter and nutrients from coastal river systems and together form a vital link between two of the largest pools of carbon, the terrestrial and ocean environment, at the same time actively cycling carbon. The Great Bay situated in New Hampshire/Maine is a nitrogen(N)-impaired estuary with a suburbanizing watershed of the Lamprey River its largest source of DOC. Long term deployment of continuously monitoring sensors are changing the way biogeochemical studies of rivers, streams and estuaries are conducted. We linked simultaneous and continuous in situ measurements of CDOM and associated measures of DOC quality (e.g. absorption coefficient, spectral slope ) in both the Great Bay estuary and its largest source of DOC the Lamprey River between April and December 2011. These sensors allowed us to examine the continuous dynamics of CDOM from inland to the coastal waters not only in short-term hydrologically varying (storm pulses) conditions, but also the longer term seasonal variability. We also collected a suite of other relevant parameters in both the watershed and estuary, including NO3, PO4, Turbidity, Chlorophyll, Conductivity/Salinity to help understand the dynamics of DOC in the river and estuary. Preliminary time series analysis indicates that DOC in the Great Bay estuary co-varies with discharge of the Lamprey River, especially in spring and fall. Freshwater discharges and its variations explained the variability in estuarine DOC. UV- absorbance at 254 nm (the precursor to SUVA) co-varies in periods of high flow during spring and fall, consistent with the bulk DOC results This suggests that hydrology is the more important driver of variability of coastal CDOM. In light of climate change, suburbanization and changing land use patterns this emphasizes the need to examine continuous measurements of DOC quantity and quality in coupled watershed-estuarine systems.

  5. E/N effects on K0 values revealed by high precision measurements under low field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Brian C; Siems, William F; Harden, Charles S; McHugh, Vincent M; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-07-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives, and narcotics. While IMS has a low rate of false positives, their occurrence causes the loss of time and money as the alarm is verified. Because numerous variables affect the reduced mobility (K0) of an ion, wide detection windows are required in order to ensure a low false negative response rate. Wide detection windows, however, reduce response selectivity, and interferents with similar K0 values may be mistaken for targeted compounds and trigger a false positive alarm. Detection windows could be narrowed if reference K0 values were accurately known for specific instrumental conditions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of confidence in the literature values due to discrepancies in the reported K0 values and their lack of reported error. This creates the need for the accurate control and measurement of each variable affecting ion mobility, as well as for a central accurate IMS database for reference and calibration. A new ion mobility spectrometer has been built that reduces the error of measurements affecting K0 by an order of magnitude less than ±0.2%. Precise measurements of ±0.002 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) or better have been produced and, as a result, an unexpected relationship between K0 and the electric field to number density ratio (E/N) has been discovered in which the K0 values of ions decreased as a function of E/N along a second degree polynomial trend line towards an apparent asymptote at approximately 4 Td. PMID:27475592

  6. Advances in post AFM repair cleaning of photomask with CO2 cryogenic aerosol technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Charles; Varghese, Ivin; Balooch, Mehdi; Brandt, Werner

    2009-04-01

    As the mask technology matures, critical printing features and sub-resolution assist features (SRAF) shrink below 100 nm, forcing critical cleaning processes to face significant challenges. These challenges include use of new materials, oxidation, chemical contamination sensitivity, proportionally decreasing printable defect size, and a requirement for a damage-free clean. CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning has the potential to offer a wide process window for meeting these new challenges, if residue adder issues and damage can be eliminated. Some key differentiations of CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning are the non-oxidizing and non-etching properties compared to conventional chemical wet clean processes with or without megasonics. In prior work, the feasibility of CO2 cryogenic aerosol in post AFM repair photomask cleaning was demonstrated. In this paper, recent advancements of CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning technology are presented, focusing on the traditional problem areas of particle adders, electrostatic discharge (ESD), and mask damage mitigation. Key aspects of successful CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning include the spray nozzle design, CO2 liquid purity, and system design. The design of the nozzle directly controls the size, density, and velocity of the CO2 snow particles. Methodology and measurements of the solid CO2 particle size and velocity distributions will be presented, and their responses to various control parameters will be discussed. Adder control can be achieved only through use of highly purified CO2 and careful materials selection. Recent advances in CO2 purity will be discussed and data shown. The mask cleaning efficiency by CO2 cryogenic aerosol and damage control is essentially an optimization of the momentum of the solid CO2 particles and elimination of adders. The previous damage threshold of 150 nm SRAF structures has been reduced to 70nm and data will be shown indicating 60 nm is possible in the near future. Data on CO2 tribocharge mitigation

  7. DNA Release Dynamics from Reducible Polyplexes by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lei; Manickam, Devika S.; Oupický, David; Mao, Guangzhao

    2010-01-01

    Controlled intracellular disassembly of polyelectrolyte complexes of polycations and DNA (polyplexes) is a crucial step for the success of non-viral gene delivery. Motivated by our previous observation of different gene delivery performance among multiblock reducible copolypeptide vectors [Bioconjugate Chem. 2006, 17, 1395], atomic force microscopy is used to visualize plasmid DNA in various decondensed states from reducible polypeptide polyplexes under simulated physiological reducing conditions. DNA decondensation is triggered by reductive degradation of disulfide-containing cationic polypeptides. Striking differences in DNA release dynamics between polyplexes based on polypeptides of histidine-rich peptide HRP (CKHHHKHHHKC) and nuclear localization signal NLS (CGAGPKKKRKVC) peptide are presented. The HRP and NLS polyplexes are similar to each other in their initial morphology with a majority of them containing only one DNA plasmid. Upon reductive degradation by dithiothreitol, DNA is released from NLS abruptly regardless of the initial polyplex morphology, while DNA release from HRP polyplexes displays a gradual decondensation that is dependent on the size of polyplexes. The release rate is higher for larger HRP polyplexes. The smaller HRP polyplexes become unstable when they are in contact with expanding chains nearby. The results reveal potentially rich DNA release dynamics that can be controlled by subtle variation in multivalent counterion binding to DNA as well as the cellular matrix. PMID:18839970

  8. Influence of the Film Thickness on the Crystallization of Poly(e-Caprolactone) Ultrathin Films, a Real Time AFM Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareau, Vincent H.; Prud'Homme, Robert E.

    2004-03-01

    Whereas spherulitic crystallization in thick polymer films has been extensively studied (kinetics and morphology), the understanding of the influence of the film thickness on the crystallization process in ultrathin films is still incomplete. In a previous study (Mareau, V.H.; Prud'homme, R.E. Macromolecules 2002, 36, 675), radial growth rates measured during isothermal crystallization of poly(e-caprolactone)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/PVC) blends thin films (between 1000 and 100 nm) were found to decrease with the film thickness. However, no variation was observed in this range of thicknesses for pure PCL. In this work, ultrathin (less than 100 nm) spin-coated PCL films were isothermally crystallized and observed by AFM. Crystallizations were performed at low supercooling and isolated flat-on lamellae with a truncated lozenge shape were observed. Growth rates decrease for film thicknesses below 30 nm, along with distinct morphological modifications, and non-linear growth are observed in 5 nm thick films.

  9. Protein Thermal Conductivity Measured in the Solid State Reveals Anharmonic Interactions of Vibrations in a Fractal Structure.

    PubMed

    Foley, Brian M; Gorham, Caroline S; Duda, John C; Cheaito, Ramez; Szwejkowski, Chester J; Constantin, Costel; Kaehr, Bryan; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2014-04-01

    Energy processes and vibrations in biological macromolecules such as proteins ultimately dictate biological, chemical, and physical functions in living materials. These energetic vibrations in the ribbon-like motifs of proteins interact on self-similar structures and fractal-like objects over a range of length scales of the protein (a few angstroms to the size of the protein itself, a few nanometers). In fact, the fractal geometries of protein molecules create a complex network of vibrations; therefore, proteins represent an ideal material system to study the underlying mechanisms driving vibrational thermal transport in a dense, fractal network. However, experimental studies of thermal energy transport in proteins have been limited to dispersive protein suspensions, which limits the knowledge that can be extracted about how vibrational energy is transferred in a pure protein solid. We overcome this by synthesizing solid, water-insoluble protein films for thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance. We measure the thermal conductivity of bovine serum albumin and myoglobin solid films over a range of temperatures from 77 to 296 K. These temperature trends indicate that anharmonic coupling of vibrations in the protein is contributing to thermal conductivity. This first-ever observation of anharmonic-like trends in the thermal conductivity of a fully dense protein forms the basis of validation of seminal theories of vibrational energy-transfer processes in fractal objects.

  10. Rapid in vivo measurement of β-amyloid reveals biphasic clearance kinetics in an Alzheimer’s mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo; Restivo, Jessica L.; Davis, Todd A.; Hettinger, Jane C.; Wallace, Clare E.; Young, Katherine L.; Hayne, Margaret R.; Bu, Guojun; Li, Chen-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Findings from genetic, animal model, and human studies support the observation that accumulation of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain plays a central role in the pathogenic cascade of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Human studies suggest that one key factor leading to accumulation is a defect in brain Aβ clearance. We have developed a novel microimmunoelectrode (MIE) to study the kinetics of Aβ clearance using an electrochemical approach. This is the first study using MIEs in vivo to measure rapid changes in Aβ levels in the brains of living mice. Extracellular, interstitial fluid (ISF) Aβ levels were measured in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Baseline levels of Aβ40 in the ISF are relatively stable and begin to decline within minutes of blocking Aβ production with a γ-secretase inhibitor. Pretreatment with a P-glycoprotein inhibitor, which blocks blood–brain barrier transport of Aβ, resulted in significant prolongation of Aβ40 half-life, but only in the latter phase of Aβ clearance from the ISF. PMID:27069115

  11. Phase-Imaging with a Sharpened Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube AFM Tip: Investigation of Low-k Dielectric Polymer Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, M.; Volksen, Willi; Miller, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Phase shift tapping mode scanning force microscopy (TMSFM) has evolved into a very powerful technique for the nanoscale surface characterization of compositional variations in heterogeneous samples. Phase shift signal measures the difference between the phase angle of the excitation signal and the phase angle of the cantilever response. The signal correlates to the tip-sample inelastic interactions, identifying the different chemical and/or physical property of surfaces. In general, the resolution and quality of scanning probe microscopic images are highly dependent on the size of the scanning probe tip. In improving AFM tip technology, we recently developed a technique for sharpening the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip, reducing the radius of curvature of the CNT tip to less than 5 nm while still maintaining the inherent stability of multi-walled CNT tips. Herein we report the use of sharpened (CNT) AFM tips for phase-imaging of polymer hybrids, a precursor for generating nanoporous low-k dielectrics for on-chip interconnect applications. Using sharpened CNT tips, we obtained phase-contrast images having domains less than 10 nm. In contrast, conventional Si tips and unsharpened CNT tips (radius greater than 15 nm) were not able to resolve the nanoscale domains in the polymer hybrid films. C1early, the size of the CNT tip contributes significantly to the resolution of phase-contrast imaging. In addition, a study on the nonlinear tapping dynamics of the multi-walled CNT tip indicates that the multi-walled CNT tip is immune to conventional imaging instabilities related to the coexistence of attractive and repulsive tapping regimes. This factor may also contribute to the phase-contrast image quality of multi-walled CNT AFM tips. This presentation will also offer data in support of the stability of the CNT tip for phase shift TMSFM.

  12. Simple discrimination method between False Acoustic Emission and Acoustic Emission revealed by piezoelectric sensors, in Gran Sasso mountain measurements (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodati, Paolo; Piazza, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    Recently it was shown, studying data acquired with in-situ measurements on the Gran Sasso mountain (Italy), for about ten years, by means of a high sensitivity transducer coupled to the free-end section of a stainless steel rod fixed by cement in a rock-drill hole 10 m high, about 2500 m above sea level, that Acoustic Emission (AE) can be affected by more than 90% False Acoustic Emission (FAE) of an electromagnetic origin. A very simple method to solve the problem of the discrimination between AE events due to elastic waves, from FAE signals, due to electromagnetic noise, both coming from the same ``reception-point,'' is presented. The reliability of the obtained separation is confirmed also by the reported amplitude and time distribution of AE events, typical of fracture dynamics and those of FAE events, similar to those of noise.

  13. Fully band-resolved scattering rate in MgB2 revealed by the nonlinear hall effect and magnetoresistance measurements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Liu, Yi; Zhuang, Chenggang; Shi, Junren; Yao, Yugui; Massidda, Sandro; Monni, Marco; Jia, Ying; Xi, Xiaoxing; Li, Qi; Liu, Zi-Kui; Feng, Qingrong; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2008-08-01

    We have measured the normal state temperature dependence of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance in epitaxial MgB2 thin films with variable disorders characterized by the residual resistance ratio RRR ranging from 4.0 to 33.3. A strong nonlinearity of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance have been found in clean samples, and they decrease gradually with the increase of disorders or temperature. By fitting the data to the theoretical model based on the Boltzmann equation and ab initio calculations for a four-band system, for the first time, we derived the scattering rates of these four bands at different temperatures and magnitude of disorders. Our method provides a unique way to derive these important parameters in multiband systems.

  14. Satellite-based measurements of surface deformation reveal fluid flow associated with the geological storage of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Rucci, A.; Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.; Bissell, R.; Ringrose, P.; Mathieson, A.; Wright, I.

    2009-10-15

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), gathered over the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project in Algeria, provides an early indication that satellite-based geodetic methods can be effective in monitoring the geological storage of carbon dioxide. An injected volume of 3 million tons of carbon dioxide, from one of the first large-scale carbon sequestration efforts, produces a measurable surface displacement of approximately 5 mm/year. Using geophysical inverse techniques we are able to infer flow within the reservoir layer and within a seismically detected fracture/ fault zone intersecting the reservoir. We find that, if we use the best available elastic Earth model, the fluid flow need only occur in the vicinity of the reservoir layer. However, flow associated with the injection of the carbon dioxide does appear to extend several kilometers laterally within the reservoir, following the fracture/fault zone.

  15. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-22

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  16. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  17. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  18. The structure of high-methoxyl sugar acid gels of citrus pectin as determined by AFM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images of native high methoxyl sugar acid gels (HMSAG) were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the Tapping ModeTM. Electronic thinning of the pectin strands to one pixel wide allowed the pectin network to be viewed in the absence of variable strand widths related to preferentially solvate...

  19. Difference in cellular mechanics of cancer and normal cervical cells as seen with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Subba-Rao, Venkatesh; Woodworth, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Oncogenically transformed cells differ from their normal counter parts in many aspects, including organization and the amount of cytoskeleton. Consequently it is natural to expect to see the difference in cellular mechanics. Here we will present the study of such differences by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in-vitro. So far the present research is the first study of mechanics of cervical cells, and the third comparative study of differences between mechanics of cancer and normal cells down with the help of AFM. Using a micron size silica ball as the AFM probe, we presumably do not overstress the cell surface as it can be in the case of the sharp AFM tip, and consequently, we may use the classical Hertz model. In contrast to the reported previously studies (bladder and fibroblast cells), we found that oncogenically transformed cervical cells are more rigid than the normal cells. The reason for such difference will be discussed. To demonstrate the complexity of the problem, we study cell mechanics in detail. The Young's modulus of rigidity clearly shows two separate regions of rigidity depending on the depth of the probe penetration. There may be two alternative explanations of the difference in rigidity of this top layer: it is either the cell membrane layer or detected long-range (presumably steric) forces due to the molecular ``brush'' of glycocalyx molecules. Experiments and modal calculations will be presented to choose between these two possibilities.

  20. High spatial resolution surface imaging and analysis of fungal cells using SEM and AFM.

    PubMed

    Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2008-06-01

    We review the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) for probing the ultrastructure, chemistry, physical characteristics and motion of fungal cells. When first developed, SEM was used to image fixed/dehydrated/gold coated specimens, but here we describe more recent SEM developments as they apply to fungal cells. CryoSEM offers high resolution for frozen fungal samples, whereas environmental SEM allows the analysis of robust samples (e.g. spores) under ambient conditions. Dual beam SEM, the most recently developed, adds manipulation capabilities along with element detection. AFM has similar lateral and better depth resolution compared to SEM, and can image live cells including growing fungal hyphae. FS can analyze cell wall chemistry, elasticity and dynamic cell characteristics. The integration of AFM with optical microscopy will allow examination of individual molecules or cellular structures in the context of fungal cell architecture. SEM and AFM are complementary techniques that are clarifying our understanding of fungal biology. PMID:18068995

  1. Afm Measrurements of Martian Soil Particles Using Mems Technology - Results from the PHOENIX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautsch, S.; Parrat, D.; de Rooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Morookian, J. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Vijendran, S.; Sykulska, H.; Pike, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Light scattering experiments conducted on Mars indicated that soil particles have dimensions around 1 μm. Particles in that range play an important role in the gas exchange between sub-surface water ice and the atmosphere. Their shape can help tracing the geological history and may indicate past presence of liquid water. NASA's Phoenix mission therefore decided to analyze soil and dust particles in the sub-micrometer to a few micrometer range using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the first time on another planet. The co-axially mounted AFM was capable of resolving particles with 10nm lateral resolution. A MEMS approach combined with mechatronic concepts for the scanner was selected for implementing the AFM. For redundancy, the sensor chip featured eight silicon cantilevers each with a 7 to 8 μm high tip. The cantilevers could be cleaved off if contaminated. During NASA's Phoenix Mission, which operated on the red planet from May to October 2008, we could demonstrate successful AFM operations. The instrument has executed 85 experiments of which 26 were needed for calibration. Of the remaining experiments about half (28) returned images where signatures of particles could be discerned.

  2. Measuring citalopram in blood and central nervous system: revealing a distribution pattern that differs from other antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Paulzen, Michael; Lammertz, Sarah E; Gründer, Gerhard; Veselinovic, Tanja; Hiemke, Christoph; Tauber, Simone C

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to measure blood and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of citalopram and its weakly active N-demethylated metabolite desmethylcitalopram to account for the distribution between the two compartments. The findings are discussed in the context with own preceding studies on the distribution pattern of different antidepressants. Concentrations of citalopram were measured in blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 18 patients treated with daily doses of 10-40 mg. Daily doses were correlated with serum and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations, and serum concentrations were correlated with concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum concentrations of citalopram and desmethylcitalopram showed no significant correlation to the daily dose, r=0.164, P=0.515, and r=0.174, P=0.505, respectively, whereas citalopram concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were highly correlated (r=0.763, P<0.001). The cerebrospinal fluid/serum ratio for citalopram (total=bound+unbound concentration) varied between 0.14 and 0.86 (mean 0.35, SD 0.16). By correcting the mean cerebrospinal fluid/serum ratio for 80% plasma protein binding, cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of citalopram were on average 77% higher than the calculated unbound serum concentration with a ratio of 1.77 (SD 0.81, range 0.68-4.29). Findings indicate a very good ability of citalopram to cross the blood-brain and cerebrospinal fluid barrier. High concentrations of citalopram in the cerebrospinal fluid are indicative of active transport of citalopram into or missing active transport out of the cerebrospinal fluid. The results suggest a high ability of citalopram to enter the brain with sufficiently high drug concentrations at the target sites within the brain, contributing toward clinical efficacy. PMID:26650488

  3. Frequency specific interactions of MEG resting state activity within and across brain networks as revealed by the multivariate interaction measure.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Della Penna, S; Snyder, A Z; Pizzella, V; Nolte, G; de Pasquale, F; Romani, G L; Corbetta, M

    2013-10-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are sets of brain regions exhibiting temporally coherent activity fluctuations in the absence of imposed task structure. RSNs have been extensively studied with fMRI in the infra-slow frequency range (nominally <10(-1)Hz). The topography of fMRI RSNs reflects stationary temporal correlation over minutes. However, neuronal communication occurs on a much faster time scale, at frequencies nominally in the range of 10(0)-10(2)Hz. We examined phase-shifted interactions in the delta (2-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequency bands of resting-state source space MEG signals. These analyses were conducted between nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), one of the most robust RSNs, and between the DAN and other networks. Phase shifted interactions were mapped by the multivariate interaction measure (MIM), a measure of true interaction constructed from the maximization of imaginary coherency in the virtual channels comprised of voxel signals in source space. Non-zero-phase interactions occurred between homologous left and right hemisphere regions of the DAN in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Even stronger non-zero-phase interactions were detected between networks. Visual regions bilaterally showed phase-shifted interactions in the alpha band with regions of the DAN. Bilateral somatomotor regions interacted with DAN nodes in the beta band. These results demonstrate the existence of consistent, frequency specific phase-shifted interactions on a millisecond time scale between cortical regions within RSN as well as across RSNs. PMID:23631996

  4. AFM Studies of Lunar Soils and Application to the Mars 2001 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Anderson, M. S.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The upcoming Mars 01 mission will carry an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) as part of the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument. By operating in a tapping mode, the AFM is capable of sub-nanometer resolution in three dimensions and can distinguish between substances of different compositions by employing phase contrast imaging. To prepare for the Mars 01 mission, we are testing the AFM on a lunar soil to determine its ability to define particle shapes and sizes and grain-surface textures. The test materials are from the Apollo 17 soil 79221, which is a mixture of agglutinates, impact and volcanic beads, and mare and highland rock and mineral fragments. The majority of the lunar soil particles are less than 100 microns in size, comparable to the sizes estimated for martian dust. We have used the AFM to examine several different soil particles at various resolutions. The instrument has demonstrated the ability to identify parallel ridges characteristic of twinning on a 150 micron plagioclase feldspar particle. Extremely small (10-100 nanometer) adhering particles are visible on the surface of the feldspar grain, and they appear elongate with smooth surfaces. Phase contrast imaging of the nanometer particles shows several compositions to be present. When the AFM was applied to a 100 micron glass spherule, it was possible to define an extremely smooth surface; this is in clear contrast to results from a basalt fragment which exhibited a rough surface texture. Also visible on the surface of the glass spherule were chains of 100 nanometer and smaller impact melt droplets. For the '01 Mars mission, the AFM is intended to define the size and shape distributions of soil particles, in combination with the NMCA optical microscope system and images from the Robot Arm Camera (RAC). These three data sets will provide a means of assessing potentially hazardous soil and dust properties. The study that we have conducted on the lunar soils now suggests that the

  5. Spectroscopic ellipsometry meets AFM nanolithography: about hydration of bio-inert oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated self assembled monolayers on gold.

    PubMed

    Solano, Ilaria; Parisse, Pietro; Gramazio, Federico; Cavalleri, Ornella; Bracco, Gianangelo; Castronovo, Matteo; Casalis, Loredana; Canepa, Maurizio

    2015-11-21

    For the first time, to our knowledge, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been combined with state-of-the-art AFM differential height measurements conducted after shaving nano-lithography of ultrathin, soft-matter films for thickness determination. We investigated self-assembled monolayers of SH-(CH2)11-EGn-OH molecules on gold, where EG is ethylene glycol units and n = 3 and 6, a prototypical non-fouling system. We performed SE measurements (245-1200 nm) focusing on the changes induced by the formation of the film (difference spectra). SE measurements, analysed by simple models, confirm the formation of the S-Au interface, transparency of the SAMs and provide a sharp picture of the ability of the EG functionality to protect the surface from unspecific adsorption of proteins. A quantitative assessment of the film thickness by SE was carried out ex situ, thanks to the optical contrast between the film and the ambient, and by AFM in liquid. The cross-check between SE and AFM height measurements combined with the comparison between in-liquid and ex situ SE measurements allowed obtaining non-perturbative information about the vertical density profile of the SAM. The in-liquid SE measurements indicate a refractive index matching between the aqueous medium and the outer part of the SAM, consistent with a disordered configuration of OEG and/or the penetration of water amid the OEG strands. A critical discussion provides a detailed insight into the subtle issues and pitfalls related to the thickness determination of soft-matter films to the monolayer limit. PMID:26445913

  6. Drivers of nitrogen dynamics in ecologically based agriculture revealed by long-term, high-frequency field measurements.

    PubMed

    Finney, Denise M; Eckert, Sara E; Kaye, Jason P

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss from agriculture impacts ecosystems worldwide. One strategy to mitigate these losses, ecologically based nutrient management (ENM), seeks to recouple carbon (C) and N cycles to reduce environmental losses and supply N to cash crops. However, our capacity to apply ENM is limited by a lack of field-based high-resolution data on N dynamics in actual production contexts. We used data from a five-year study of organic cropping systems to investigate soil inorganic N (SIN) variability and nitrate (NO3-) leaching in ENM. Four production systems initiated in 2007 and 2008 in central Pennsylvania varied in crop rotation, timing and intensity of tillage, inclusion of fallow periods, and N inputs. Extractable SIN was measured fortnightly from March through November throughout the experiment, and NO3- N concentration below the rooting zone was sampled with lysimeters during the first year of the 2008 start. We used recursive partitioning models to assess the importance of management and environmental factors to SIN variability and NO3- leaching and identify interactions between influential variables. Air temperature and tillage were the most important drivers of SIN across systems. The highest SIN concentrations occurred when the average air temperature three weeks prior to measurement was above 21 degrees C. Above this temperature and within 109 days of moldboard plowing, average SIN concentrations were 22.1 mg N/kg soil; 109 days or more past plowing average SIN dropped to 7.7 mg N/kg soil. Other drivers of SIN dynamics were N available from manure and cover crops. Highest average leachate NO3- N concentrations (15.2 ppm) occurred in fall and winter when SIN was above 4.9 mg/kg six weeks prior to leachate collection. Late season tillage operations leading to elevated SIN and leachate NO3- N concentrations were a strategy to reduce weeds while meeting consumer demand for organic products. Thus, while tillage that incorporates organic N inputs preceding cash

  7. Drivers of nitrogen dynamics in ecologically based agriculture revealed by long-term, high-frequency field measurements.

    PubMed

    Finney, Denise M; Eckert, Sara E; Kaye, Jason P

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) loss from agriculture impacts ecosystems worldwide. One strategy to mitigate these losses, ecologically based nutrient management (ENM), seeks to recouple carbon (C) and N cycles to reduce environmental losses and supply N to cash crops. However, our capacity to apply ENM is limited by a lack of field-based high-resolution data on N dynamics in actual production contexts. We used data from a five-year study of organic cropping systems to investigate soil inorganic N (SIN) variability and nitrate (NO3-) leaching in ENM. Four production systems initiated in 2007 and 2008 in central Pennsylvania varied in crop rotation, timing and intensity of tillage, inclusion of fallow periods, and N inputs. Extractable SIN was measured fortnightly from March through November throughout the experiment, and NO3- N concentration below the rooting zone was sampled with lysimeters during the first year of the 2008 start. We used recursive partitioning models to assess the importance of management and environmental factors to SIN variability and NO3- leaching and identify interactions between influential variables. Air temperature and tillage were the most important drivers of SIN across systems. The highest SIN concentrations occurred when the average air temperature three weeks prior to measurement was above 21 degrees C. Above this temperature and within 109 days of moldboard plowing, average SIN concentrations were 22.1 mg N/kg soil; 109 days or more past plowing average SIN dropped to 7.7 mg N/kg soil. Other drivers of SIN dynamics were N available from manure and cover crops. Highest average leachate NO3- N concentrations (15.2 ppm) occurred in fall and winter when SIN was above 4.9 mg/kg six weeks prior to leachate collection. Late season tillage operations leading to elevated SIN and leachate NO3- N concentrations were a strategy to reduce weeds while meeting consumer demand for organic products. Thus, while tillage that incorporates organic N inputs preceding cash

  8. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  9. Quantitative Measurement of Histone Tail Acetylation Reveals Stage-Specific Regulation and Response to Environmental Changes during Drosophila Development.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ryan A; Singh, Tanu; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Biester, Alison; O'Keefe, Abigail; Lee, Sandy; Andrews, Andrew J; O'Reilly, Alana M

    2016-03-22

    Histone modification plays a major role in regulating gene transcription and ensuring the healthy development of an organism. Numerous studies have suggested that histones are dynamically modified during developmental events to control gene expression levels in a temporal and spatial manner. However, the study of histone acetylation dynamics using currently available techniques is hindered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring acetylation of the numerous potential sites of modification present in histones. Here, we present a methodology that allows us to combine mass spectrometry-based histone analysis with Drosophila developmental genetics. Using this system, we characterized histone acetylation patterns during multiple developmental stages of the fly. Additionally, we utilized this analysis to characterize how treatments with pharmacological agents or environmental changes such as γ-irradiation altered histone acetylation patterns. Strikingly, γ-irradiation dramatically increased the level of acetylation at H3K18, a site linked to DNA repair via nonhomologous end joining. In mutant fly strains deficient in DNA repair proteins, however, this increase in the level of H3K18 acetylation was lost. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our combined mass spectrometry system with a Drosophila model system and provide interesting insight into the changes in histone acetylation during development, as well as the effects of both pharmacological and environmental agents on global histone acetylation.

  10. Real-time monitoring of hypertrophy in HL-1 cardiomyocytes by impedance measurements reveals different modes of growth.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Laura; Ndongson-Dongmo, Bernadin; Kusch, Angelika; Dragun, Duska; Heller, Regine; Huber, Otmar

    2016-10-01

    Hypertrophic growth is a response of the heart to increased mechanical load or physiological stress. Thereby, cardiomyocytes grow in length and/or width to maintain cardiac pump function. Major signaling pathways involved in cardiomyocyte growth and remodeling have been identified during recent years including calcineurin-NFAT and PI3K-Akt signaling. Modulation of these pathways is of certain interest for therapeutic treatment of cardiac hypertrophy. However, quantification and characterization of hypertrophy in response to different stimuli or modulators is difficult. This study aims to test different read-out systems for detection and quantification of differences in hypertrophic growth in response to prohypertrophic stimuli. Real-time impedance measurements allowed the detection of distinct differences in hypertrophic growth in response to endothelin, norepinephrine, phenylephrine or BIO, which were not observable by other methods such as flow cytometry. Endothelin treatment induced a rapid and strong peak in the impedance signal concomitant with a massive reorientation of the actin cytoskeleton. Changes in expression of hypertrophy-associated genes were detected and stabilization of β-catenin was identified as a common response to all hypertrophic stimuli used in this study. Hypertrophic growth was blocked by the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PI-103.

  11. Quantitative Measurement of Histone Tail Acetylation Reveals Stage-Specific Regulation and Response to Environmental Changes during Drosophila Development.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ryan A; Singh, Tanu; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Biester, Alison; O'Keefe, Abigail; Lee, Sandy; Andrews, Andrew J; O'Reilly, Alana M

    2016-03-22

    Histone modification plays a major role in regulating gene transcription and ensuring the healthy development of an organism. Numerous studies have suggested that histones are dynamically modified during developmental events to control gene expression levels in a temporal and spatial manner. However, the study of histone acetylation dynamics using currently available techniques is hindered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring acetylation of the numerous potential sites of modification present in histones. Here, we present a methodology that allows us to combine mass spectrometry-based histone analysis with Drosophila developmental genetics. Using this system, we characterized histone acetylation patterns during multiple developmental stages of the fly. Additionally, we utilized this analysis to characterize how treatments with pharmacological agents or environmental changes such as γ-irradiation altered histone acetylation patterns. Strikingly, γ-irradiation dramatically increased the level of acetylation at H3K18, a site linked to DNA repair via nonhomologous end joining. In mutant fly strains deficient in DNA repair proteins, however, this increase in the level of H3K18 acetylation was lost. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our combined mass spectrometry system with a Drosophila model system and provide interesting insight into the changes in histone acetylation during development, as well as the effects of both pharmacological and environmental agents on global histone acetylation. PMID:26836402

  12. Simple measurements reveal the feeding history, the onset of reproduction, and energy conversion efficiencies in captive bluefin tuna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusup, Marko; Klanjšček, Tin; Matsuda, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical approach that, in conjunction with a fully set up Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model, aims at consistently approximating the feeding history of cultivated fish from the commonly measured aquaculture data (body length, body mass, or the condition factor). We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by performing validation of a DEB-based model for Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) on an independent dataset and exploring the implied bioenergetics of this species in captivity. In the context of validation, the results indicate that the model successfully accounts for more than 75% of the variance in actual fish feed. At the 5% significance level, predictions do not underestimate nor overestimate observations and there is no bias. The overall model accuracy of 87.6% is satisfactory. In the context of tuna bioenergetics, we offer an explanation as to why the first reproduction in the examined case occurred only after the fish reached seven years of age, whereas it takes five years in the wild and sometimes as little as three years in captivity. Finally, we calculate energy conversion efficiencies and the supply stress throughout the entire lifetime to theoretically underpin the relatively low contribution of growth to aerobic metabolism implied by respirometry and high feed conversion ratio observed in bluefin tuna aquaculture.

  13. Tidal and flood signatures of settling particles in the Gaoping submarine canyon (SW Taiwan) revealed from radionuclide and flow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huh, C.-A.; Liu, J.T.; Lin, H.-L.; Xu, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment transport and sedimentation processes in the Gaoping submarine canyon were studied using sediment trap and current meter moorings deployed at a location during the winter (January-March) and the summer (July-September) months in 2008. At the end of each deployment, sediment cores were also collected from the canyon floor at the mooring site. Samples from sediment traps and sediment cores were analyzed for 210Pb and 234Th by gamma spectrometry. In conjunction with particle size and flow measurements, the datasets suggest that sediment transport in the canyon is tidally-modulated in the drier winter season and flood (river)-dominated in the wetter summer season. From the magnitude and temporal variation of sediment flux in the canyon with respect to the burial flux and sediment budget on the open shelf and slope region, we reaffirm that, on annual or longer timescales, the Gaoping submarine canyon is an effective conduit transporting sediments from the Gaoping River's drainage basin (the source) to the deep South China Sea (the ultimate sink). ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Prominent conjugate processes in the PCI recapture of photoelectrons revealed by high resolution Auger electron measurements of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Yoshiro; Kosugi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Shigemasa, Eiji; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2016-05-01

    The Xe (N5O2 , 3O2 , 3) Auger electron spectrum originating from 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization was measured with the photon energy tuned very close above the ionization threshold. As the photon energy approached the 4d5/ 2 - 1 photoionization threshold, Rydberg series structures including several angular momentum components were formed within the Auger profile by the recapture of the photoelectrons into high-lying final ion orbitals. Our spectrum with resolution much narrower than the lifetime width of the corresponding core excited state allowed us to resolve detailed structures due to the orbital angular momenta very clearly. Unexpectedly, conjugate peaks originating from the exchange of angular momentum between the photoelectron and the Auger electron through Post-Collision-Interaction were found to dominate the spectrum. The new assignments were in accord with the quantum defect values obtained for the high Rydberg series for singly charged ionic Xe + 5 p(1S0) ml. This work was supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 23600009.

  15. Structural impact of cations on lipid bilayer models: nanomechanical properties by AFM-force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Giannotti, Marina I; Sanz, Fausto

    2014-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has become an invaluable tool for studying the micro- and nanoworlds. As a stand-alone, high-resolution imaging technique and force transducer, it defies most other surface instrumentation in ease of use, sensitivity and versatility. The main strength of AFM relies on the possibility to operate in an aqueous environment on a wide variety of biological samples, from single molecules - DNA or proteins - to macromolecular assemblies like biological membranes. Understanding the effect of mechanical stress on membranes is of primary importance in biophysics, since cells are known to perform their function under a complex combination of forces. In the later years, AFM-based Force-Spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has provided a new vista on membrane mechanics in a confined area within the nanometer realm, where most of the specific molecular interactions take place. Lipid membranes are electrostatically charged entities that physiologically coexist with electrolyte solutions. Thus, specific interactions with ions are a matter of considerable interest. The distribution of ions in the solution and their interaction with the membranes are factors that substantially modify the structure and dynamics of the cell membranes. Furthermore, signaling processes are modified by the membrane capability of retaining ions. Supported Lipid Bilayers (SLBs) are a versatile tool to investigate phospholipid membranes mimicking biological surfaces. In the present contribution, we review selected experiments on the mechanical stability of SLBs as models of lipid membranes by means of AFM-FS, with special focus on the effect of cations and ionic strength in the overall nanomechanical stability. PMID:24341385

  16. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Naik, Vikrant V; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E; Spencer, Nicholas D; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-21

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.

  17. Continuous gravity measurements reveal a low-density lava lake at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    On 5 March 2011, the lava lake within the summit eruptive vent at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, began to drain as magma withdrew to feed a dike intrusion and fissure eruption on the volcanoʼs east rift zone. The draining was monitored by a variety of continuous geological and geophysical measurements, including deformation, thermal and visual imagery, and gravity. Over the first ∼14 hours of the draining, the ground near the eruptive vent subsided by about 0.15 m, gravity dropped by more than 100 μGal, and the lava lake retreated by over 120 m. We used GPS data to correct the gravity signal for the effects of subsurface mass loss and vertical deformation in order to isolate the change in gravity due to draining of the lava lake alone. Using a model of the eruptive vent geometry based on visual observations and the lava level over time determined from thermal camera data, we calculated the best-fit lava density to the observed gravity decrease — to our knowledge, the first geophysical determination of the density of a lava lake anywhere in the world. Our result, 950 +/- 300 kg m-3, suggests a lava density less than that of water and indicates that Kīlaueaʼs lava lake is gas-rich, which can explain why rockfalls that impact the lake trigger small explosions. Knowledge of such a fundamental material property as density is also critical to investigations of lava-lake convection and degassing and can inform calculations of pressure change in the subsurface magma plumbing system.

  18. Micrometeorological measurements over 3 years reveal differences in N2 O emissions between annual and perennial crops.

    PubMed

    Abalos, Diego; Brown, Shannon E; Vanderzaag, Andrew C; Gordon, Robert J; Dunfield, Kari E; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Perennial crops can deliver a wide range of ecosystem services compared to annual crops. Some of these benefits are achieved by lengthening the growing season, which increases the period of crop water and nutrient uptake, pointing to a potential role for perennial systems to mitigate soil nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions. Employing a micrometeorological method, we tested this hypothesis in a 3-year field experiment with a perennial grass-legume mixture and an annual corn monoculture. Given that N2 O emissions are strongly dependent on the method of fertilizer application, two manure application options commonly used by farmers for each crop were studied: injection vs. broadcast application for the perennial; fall vs. spring application for the annual. Across the 3 years, lower N2 O emissions (P < 0.001) were measured for the perennial compared to the annual crop, even though annual N2 O emissions increased tenfold for the perennial after ploughing. The percentage of N2 O lost per unit of fertilizer applied was 3.7, 3.1 and 1.3 times higher for the annual for each consecutive year. Differences in soil organic matter due to the contrasting root systems of these crops are probably a major factor behind the N2 O reduction. We found that a specific manure management practice can lead to increases or reductions in annual N2 O emissions depending on environmental variables. The number of freeze-thaw cycles during winter and the amount of rainfall after fertilization in spring were key factors. Therefore, general manure management recommendations should be avoided because interannual weather variability has the potential to determine if a specific practice is beneficial or detrimental. The lower N2 O emissions of perennial crops deserve further research attention and must be considered in future land-use decisions. Increasing the proportion of perennial crops in agricultural landscapes may provide an overlooked opportunity to regulate N2 O emissions. PMID:26491961

  19. Direct force measurements reveal that protein Tau confers short-range attractions and isoform-dependent steric stabilization to microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Peter J.; Choi, Myung Chul; Miller, Herbert P.; Feinstein, H. Eric; Raviv, Uri; Li, Youli; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are hollow cytoskeletal filaments assembled from αβ-tubulin heterodimers. Tau, an unstructured protein found in neuronal axons, binds to MTs and regulates their dynamics. Aberrant Tau behavior is associated with neurodegenerative dementias, including Alzheimer’s. Here, we report on a direct force measurement between paclitaxel-stabilized MTs coated with distinct Tau isoforms by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of MT-Tau mixtures under osmotic pressure (P). In going from bare MTs to MTs with Tau coverage near the physiological submonolayer regime (Tau/tubulin-dimer molar ratio; ΦTau = 1/10), isoforms with longer N-terminal tails (NTTs) sterically stabilized MTs, preventing bundling up to PB ∼ 10,000–20,000 Pa, an order of magnitude larger than bare MTs. Tau with short NTTs showed little additional effect in suppressing the bundling pressure (PB ∼ 1,000–2,000 Pa) over the same range. Remarkably, the abrupt increase in PB observed for longer isoforms suggests a mushroom to brush transition occurring at 1/13 < ΦTau < 1/10, which corresponds to MT-bound Tau with NTTs that are considerably more extended than SAXS data for Tau in solution indicate. Modeling of Tau-mediated MT–MT interactions supports the hypothesis that longer NTTs transition to a polyelectrolyte brush at higher coverages. Higher pressures resulted in isoform-independent irreversible bundling because the polyampholytic nature of Tau leads to short-range attractions. These findings suggest an isoform-dependent biological role for regulation by Tau, with longer isoforms conferring MT steric stabilization against aggregation either with other biomacromolecules or into tight bundles, preventing loss of function in the crowded axon environment. PMID:26542680

  20. Controlled Measurement and Comparative Analysis of Cellular Components in E. coli Reveals Broad Regulatory Changes in Response to Glucose Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Houser, John R.; Barnhart, Craig; Boutz, Daniel R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Dasgupta, Aurko; Michener, Joshua K.; Needham, Brittany D.; Papoulas, Ophelia; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Sydykova, Dariya K.; Marx, Christopher J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2015-01-01

    How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not on the genetic adaptation of E. coli to utilize alternative nutrients. In our analysis, we have taken advantage of the temporal correlations within and among RNA and protein abundances to identify systematic trends in gene regulation. Specifically, we have developed a general computational strategy for classifying expression-profile time courses into distinct categories in an unbiased manner. We have also developed, from dynamic models of gene expression, a framework to characterize protein degradation patterns based on the observed temporal relationships between mRNA and protein abundances. By comparing and contrasting our transcriptomic and proteomic data, we have identified several broad physiological trends in the E. coli starvation response. Strikingly, mRNAs are widely down-regulated in response to glucose starvation, presumably as a strategy for reducing new protein synthesis. By contrast, protein abundances display more varied responses. The abundances of many proteins involved in energy-intensive processes mirror the corresponding mRNA profiles while proteins involved in nutrient metabolism remain abundant even though their corresponding mRNAs are down-regulated. PMID:26275208

  1. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes. PMID:21446752

  2. Characterization of single 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle attachments on AFM tips for single sub-4-nm object pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hui-Wen; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Tang, Song-Nien; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the attachment of a 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle (Au-NP) to the tip of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe through the application of a current-limited bias voltage. The resulting probe is capable of picking up individual objects at the sub-4-nm scale. We also discuss the mechanisms involved in the attachment of the Au-NP to the very apex of an AFM probe tip. The Au-NP-modified AFM tips were used to pick up individual 4-nm quantum dots (QDs) using a chemically functionalized method. Single QD blinking was reduced considerably on the Au-NP-modified AFM tip. The resulting AFM tips present an excellent platform for the manipulation of single protein molecules in the study of single protein-protein interactions.

  3. AFM-measured surface roughness of SU-8 structures produced by deep x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, K. D.; Lochel, B.; Harvey, E. C.; Hayes, J. P.; Peele, A. G.

    2006-10-01

    Deep x-ray lithography is a well-known technique used to pattern ultra high aspect ratio microstructures. It relies on the fact that higher energy synchrotron x-rays have the ability to penetrate millimeters of resist layers. However, the spectral shape of the beam will vary as a function of penetration depth, sometimes by design, so as to distribute the dose differently for different thickness structures and always as a result of filtering of lower energies. Some studies have shown that in PMMA sidewall roughness can be affected by spectral issues. SU-8 is now the resist of choice for certain high aspect ratio structures due to its high sensitivity and contrast. As sidewall roughness is a key parameter in several potential applications of high aspect ratio structures, we therefore investigated the surface roughness of 500 µm thick SU-8 structures exposed using beam spectra with peak energies between 3 keV and 12 keV. Results indicate that as the x-ray energy increases so too does the surface roughness. The surface roughness also increases as a function of feature depth. We attribute this to the random secondary physical processes of photo and Auger electron scattering both of which are strongly energy dependent.

  4. Double Layer of a Gold Electrode Probed by AFM Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Barten, D; Kleijn, J M; Duval, J; Leeuwen, H P V; Lyklema, J; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2003-02-18

    Colloidal probe atomic force microscopy was used to determine the electric double layer interactions between a gold electrode and a spherical silica probe. The double layer properties of the gold/solution interface were varied through the pH and salt concentration of the electrolyte, as well as by externally applying an electric potential. The double layer potentials ψ(d) of the gold surface were obtained by fitting the force-distance curves according to the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) theory, using earlier obtained values for the double layer potential of the silica probe as input parameter. It was found that the gold electrode combines the features of reversible and polarizable interfaces; i.e., its charge and potential are determined by both the solution pH and the external potential. The pH dependence is attributed to proton adsorption and desorption from oxidic groups on the gold surface. In the potential range studied, ψ(d) varies linearly with the applied potential; the variation in ψ(d) is roughly 10% of that in the applied potential. The potential of zero force (the external potential at which ψ(d) = 0) varies with pH. The various features of the gold/electrolyte interface are described well by an amphifunctional double layer model. The results of this study form the basis of the interpretation of adsorption studies on gold as a function of pH and externally applied potential.

  5. AFM force spectroscopy reveals how subtle structural differences affect the interaction strength between Candida albicans and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Figdor, Carl G; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, such as the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intracellular cell adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. DC-SIGN recognizes specific Candida-associated molecular patterns, that is, mannan structures present in the cell wall of Candida. The molecular recognition mechanism is however poorly understood. We postulated that small differences in mannan-branching may result in considerable differences in the binding affinity. Here, we exploit atomic force microscope-based dynamic force spectroscopy with single Candida cells to gain better insight in the carbohydrate recognition capacity of DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that slight differences in the N-mannan structure of Candida, that is, the absence or presence of a phosphomannan side chain, results in differences in the recognition by DC-SIGN as follows: (i) it contributes to the compliance of the outer cell wall of Candida, and (ii) its presence results in a higher binding energy of 1.6 kB T. The single-bond affinity of tetrameric DC-SIGN for wild-type C. albicans is ~10.7 kB T and a dissociation constant kD of 23 μM, which is relatively strong compared with other carbohydrate-protein interactions described in the literature. In conclusion, this study shows that DC-SIGN specifically recognizes mannan patterns on C. albicans with high affinity. Knowledge on the binding pocket of DC-SIGN and its pathogenic ligands will lead to a better understanding of how fungal-associated carbohydrate structures are recognized by receptors of the immune system and can ultimately contribute to the development of new anti-fungal drugs.

  6. Cytochrome c self-assembly on alkanethiol monolayer electrodes as characterized by AFM, IR, QCM, and direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Yoshitake, Tadateru; Yamashita, Yasunori; Bowden, Edmond F

    2007-05-22

    With the advantage of carbodiimide coupling chemistry, horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c) has been covalently immobilized onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) from 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) developed on single-crystal or polycrystalline gold substrate surfaces. The cyt c immobilized substrates thus prepared have been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM); we have succeeded in obtaining surface topographical images down to single-protein resolution. AFM imaging has also shown densely packed, uniform protein monolayer formation that is highly suggestive of self-assembly of cyt c molecules on MUDA SAMs. Covalent attachment of cyt c has been further evidenced by reflection-absorption FT-IR as well as microgravimetric analysis using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). In the latter, the specific MUDA and cyt c surface concentrations were determined to be 0.86 +/- 0.11 nmol cm-2 (n = 5) and 28 +/- 12 pmol cm-2 (n = 5), both of which agree fairly well with their theoretical counterparts. The obtained QCM chips having the cyt c/MUDA/Au interfacial structure were found to be capable of the direct electrochemistry of the surface-attached cyt c molecules. Cyclic voltammetric measurements on the chips gave particular redox waves showing characteristics of surface process. The electroactive protein surface concentration was determined to be 7.2 +/- 4.8 pmol cm-2 (n = 6); it was almost consistent with values found in literature, while it was limited to 26% in magnitude for the QCM data. This was deemed to have arisen from the orientation variation of the surface-confined cyt c molecules and is discussed briefly.

  7. Optical Measurements Reveal Interplay Between Surface and Bottom Processes Involving Phytoplankton, Organic Carbon, Iron, Light, and Oxygen in Two Stratified Mesotrophic Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, B. R.; Vaidya, A.; Wiles, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Water column distribution of phytoplankton, organic carbon, particulate and dissolved iron are described through detailed vertical optical measurements that include downwelling cosine irradiance, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence by CDOM, Chl-a, phycobilin pigments, and diffuse attenuation for several UV wavebands, plus pH, temperature, and specific conductance. These measurements were completed with a group of profiling instruments during summer in two mid-latitude small lakes. Special calibration allowed for correcting the impact of CDOM and turbidity on the pigment fluorescence signals. These in situ data were combined with laboratory analysis of discrete water column samples for methanol-extracted chlorophyll-a, spectral absorbance of particles, concentration of particulates (dry mass and ash-free mass), total particulate and "dissolved" iron, DOC and CDOM (the "dissolved fraction" passes through a GF/F filter). Surface processes revealed by these measurement include solar heating and photobleaching of CDOM (partly distributed by wind-driven mixing), and nonphotochemical quenching of phytoplankton chlorophyll-a fluorescence. Bottom processes revealed by these measurements include oxygen consumption by net heterotrophic metabolism, release of DOC, CDOM, and iron from anoxic bottom sediments, and the development of a biological community structured by the light and temperature gradients and absence or scarcity of dissolved oxygen near the bottom. The iron associated with CDOM and particles in the deep samples substantially increased the latter's DOC-specific absorption once there was an opportunity for oxidation. A model for mass-specific spectral absorption of particulates accounts for the contribution of organic matter and iron associated with the particles. A detailed hydrologic budget for one of the lakes will allow the water column processes to be explored further by accounting for inputs and outputs of water and organic carbon (via precipitation

  8. AFM combines functional and morphological analysis of peripheral myelinated and demyelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Alejandro; Bui, Chin Chu; Suter, Ueli; Young, Peter; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2007-10-01

    Demyelination of the myelinated peripheral or central axon is a common pathophysiological step in the clinical manifestation of several human diseases of the peripheral and the central nervous system such as the majority of Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndromes and multiple sclerosis, respectively. The structural degradation of the axon insulating myelin sheath has profound consequences for ionic conduction and nerve function in general, but also affects the micromechanical properties of the nerve fiber. We have for the first time investigated mechanical properties of rehydrated, isolated peripheral nerve fibers from mouse using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have generated quantitative maps of elastic modulus along myelinated and demyelinated axons, together with quantitative maps of axon topography. This study shows that AFM can combine functional and morphological analysis of neurological tissue at the level of single nerve fibers.

  9. SEM and AFM images of pyrite surfaces after bioleaching by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-L; Chen, B-Y; Lan, Y-W; Cheng, Y-C

    2003-09-01

    The bioleaching mechanism of pyrite by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans was examined with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the pyrite surface. The presence of pyrite eliminated the lag phase during growth of this microorganism. This was due to the stimulatory effect on cell growth of the slight amount of Cu2+ that had leached from the pyrite. Zn2+ was found to be much more readily solubilized than Cu2+. The efficiency of bioleaching was four times higher than that of chemical leaching. SEM images provided evidence of direct cell attachment onto the pyrite surface, thereby enhancing the bioleaching rate. Furthermore, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were found on the pyrite surface after 4 days of oxidation. AFM images showed that the pyrite surface area positively correlated with the oxidation rate. A combination of direct and indirect mechanism is probably responsible for the oxidation of pyrite by T. thiooxidans.

  10. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  11. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  12. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  13. Determination of work of adhesion of biological cell under AFM bead indentation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinyao; Siamantouras, E; Liu, K K; Liu, X

    2016-03-01

    Hertz contact theory has been widely used for the determination of cell elasticity based on AFM indentation experiments. In light of the adhesive contact between AFM tip and cell, this study applied Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model to fit the indentation force-displacement (F-D) curves reported previously. A MIN6 cell has been modeled as first a sphere and then a flattened cell with different thicknesses. The results have shown that both basic JKR model and "generalized" JKR model can best describe the unloading force-displacement behaviors of the indentation curves. The Young׳s modulus of the cell and the work of adhesion of the cell-indenter interface are obtained. In comparison to the Hertzian contact model, the JKR model provides obviously better fitting to the experimental results, indicating that the adhesion is significant in the cell interaction. PMID:26688423

  14. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)