Science.gov

Sample records for afm observations revealed

  1. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results.

  2. MDI: integrity index of cytoskeletal fibers observed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghi, Massimo; Bruni, Luca; Croci, Simonetta

    2016-06-01

    The Modified Directional Index (MDI) is a form factor of the angular spectrum computed from the 2D Fourier transform of an image marking the prevalence of rectilinear features throughout the picture. We study some properties of the index and we apply it to AFM images of cell cytoskeleton regions featuring patterns of rectilinear nearly parallel actin filaments as in the case of microfilaments grouped in bundles. The analysis of AFM images through MDI calculation quantifies the fiber directionality changes which could be related to fiber damages. This parameter is applied to the images of Hs 578Bst cell line, non-tumoral and not immortalized human epithelial cell line, irradiated with X-rays at doses equivalent to typical radiotherapy treatment fractions. In the reported samples, we could conclude that the damages are mainly born to the membrane and not to the cytoskeleton. It could be interesting to test the parameter also using other kinds of chemical or physical agents.

  3. AFM Observation of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films on GaAs (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hirotaka; Motomatsu, Makoto; Mizutani, Wataru; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    1995-02-01

    We have confirmed that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film of octadecanethiol (ODT), CH3(CH2)17SH, can be formed on a cleaved GaAs (110) surface, by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Circular depressions were observed on the surface after film formation. The area of the circular depressions increased with immersion time, indicating that the solution oxidized the interface between ODT molecules and the GaAs surface, resulting in removal of ODT molecules. The oxidation was considerably faster in pure ethanol solution than that in ODT solution, demonstrating that the SAM film protects the GaAs surface from oxidation. High-resolution lateral force microscope (LFM) images revealed a periodic structure that had two types of lines: periodic lines 0.57 nm apart and lines rotated 55° with respect to them. A structural model of the SAM successfully explained both the features in high-resolution LFM images and the depression depth observed in AFM images.

  4. Nanostructure of Porosity (and Entrapped Solvent Effects) in Laboratory-Grown Crystals of RDX as Revealed by an AFM*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Coffey, C. S.; Armstrong, R. W.; Elban, W. L.

    1999-06-01

    Internal porosity within laboratory-grown crystals of RDX has been investigated by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in extension of previous work [1]. The crystals were cleaved along 001 planes so as to provide cross-sections of numerous complex morphologies. The nano-caverns ranged in size from 50 nm to a few micrometers. Rather shallow pond-like structures, only 10-200 nm deep, with strange and complicated shapes and tentacle-like arms were observed. It is speculated that the complex shapes arise from thermal influences and associated redistribution of solvent and solute. Commercial cleaved crystals of sucrose were also examined and failed to show such defects consistent with greater solubility characteristics. The sucrose crystals showed a terraced structure with numerous steps of unit cell height, reminiscent of those observed in calcite, mica, and TATB. *Supported by the Office of Naval Research. 1. J. Sharma, C.S. Coffey, R.W. Armstrong, and W.L. Elban, "Nanostructure of Hot Spots as Revealed by an AFM," in 11th International Detonation Symposium, in print.

  5. Spontaneous aggregation of humic acid observed with AFM at different pH.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Claudio; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Angelico, Ruggero; Cho, Hyen Goo; Francioso, Ornella; Ertani, Andrea; Nardi, Serenella

    2015-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy in contact (AFM-C) mode was used to investigate the molecular dynamics of leonardite humic acid (HA) aggregate formed at different pH values. HA nanoparticles dispersed at pH values ranging from 2 to 12 were observed on a mica surface under dry conditions. The most clearly resolved and well-resulted AFM images of single particle were obtained at pH 5, where HA appeared as supramolecular particles with a conic shape and a hole in the centre. Those observations suggested that HA formed under these conditions exhibited a pseudo-amphiphilic nature, with secluded hydrophobic domains and polar subunits in direct contact with hydrophilic mica surface. Based on molecular simulation methods, a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) model was proposed to explain the HA ring-like morphology. The LCC model optimized the parameters of β-O-4 linkages between 14 units of 1-4 phenyl propanoid, and resulted in an optimized structure comprising 45-50 linear helical molecules looped spirally around a central cavity. Those results added new insights on the adsorption mechanism of HA on polar surfaces as a function of pH, which was relevant from the point of view of natural aggregation in soil environment. PMID:26295541

  6. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  7. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  8. Multiparametric AFM reveals turgor-responsive net-like peptidoglycan architecture in live streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar Dover, Ron; Bitler, Arkady; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-05-01

    Cell-wall peptidoglycan (PG) of Gram-positive bacteria is a strong and elastic multi-layer designed to resist turgor pressure and determine the cell shape and growth. Despite its crucial role, its architecture remains largely unknown. Here using high-resolution multiparametric atomic force microscopy (AFM), we studied how the structure and elasticity of PG change when subjected to increasing turgor pressure in live Group B Streptococcus. We show a new net-like arrangement of PG, which stretches and stiffens following osmotic challenge. The same structure also exists in isogenic mutants lacking surface appendages. Cell aging does not alter the elasticity of the cell wall, yet destroys the net architecture and exposes single segmented strands with the same circumferential orientation as predicted for intact glycans. Together, we show a new functional PG architecture in live Gram-positive bacteria.

  9. Multiparametric AFM reveals turgor-responsive net-like peptidoglycan architecture in live streptococci.

    PubMed

    Dover, Ron Saar; Bitler, Arkady; Shimoni, Eyal; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Shai, Yechiel

    2015-01-01

    Cell-wall peptidoglycan (PG) of Gram-positive bacteria is a strong and elastic multi-layer designed to resist turgor pressure and determine the cell shape and growth. Despite its crucial role, its architecture remains largely unknown. Here using high-resolution multiparametric atomic force microscopy (AFM), we studied how the structure and elasticity of PG change when subjected to increasing turgor pressure in live Group B Streptococcus. We show a new net-like arrangement of PG, which stretches and stiffens following osmotic challenge. The same structure also exists in isogenic mutants lacking surface appendages. Cell aging does not alter the elasticity of the cell wall, yet destroys the net architecture and exposes single segmented strands with the same circumferential orientation as predicted for intact glycans. Together, we show a new functional PG architecture in live Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Direct observation of hydration of TiO 2 on Ti using electrochemical AFM: freely corroding versus potentiostatically held

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Orme, Christine A.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2001-10-01

    Hydration of titanium/titanium oxide surfaces under freely corroding and potentiostatically held conditions has been characterized using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC AFM). In contrast to conventional high vacuum techniques, AFM enables measurement of morphological surface structure in the in situ hydrated state. Electrochemical probes in the imaging environment further enable acquisition of electrical characteristics during AFM imaging. Experiments were performed on etched, electropolished commercially pure titanium. As noted by direct observation and corroborated by power spectral density (Fourier analysis) measurements, oxide domes cover the titanium surface and grow laterally during hydration. Applied potential altered the growth rate. Under open circuit potential conditions, growth proceeded approximately six times faster than under a -1 V applied voltage ( 1098±52 nm2/ min ± versus 184.84±19 nm2/min). Film growth increased electrical resistance and lowered interfacial capacitance based on step polarization impedance spectroscopy tests.

  11. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  12. New insights into morphology of high performance BHJ photovoltaics revealed by high resolution AFM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Feng; Yagihashi, Noritoshi; Nakaya, Masafumi; Ferdous, Sunzida; Liang, Xiaobin; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Nakajima, Ken; Russell, Thomas P

    2014-10-01

    Direct imaging of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin film morphology in polymer-based solar cells is essential to understand device function and optimize efficiency. The morphology of the BHJ active layer consists of bicontinuous domains of the donor and acceptor materials, having characteristic length scales of several tens of nanometers, that reduces charge recombination, enhances charge separation, and enables electron and hole transport to their respective electrodes. Direct imaging of the morphology from the molecular to macroscopic level, though, is lacking. Though transmission electron tomography provides a 3D, real-space image of the morphology, quantifying the structure is not possible. Here we used high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping and nanomechanical modes to investigate the BHJ active layer morphology that, when combined with Ar(+) etching, provided unique insights with unparalleled spatial resolution. PCBM was seen to form a network that interpenetrated into the fibrillar network of the hole-conducting polymer, both being imbedded in a mixture of the two components. The free surface was found to be enriched with polymer crystals having a "face-on" orientation and the morphology at the anode interface was markedly different.

  13. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves.

    PubMed

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-05-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  14. Single Cell Wall Nonlinear Mechanics Revealed by a Multiscale Analysis of AFM Force-Indentation Curves

    PubMed Central

    Digiuni, Simona; Berne-Dedieu, Annik; Martinez-Torres, Cristina; Szecsi, Judit; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Arneodo, Alain; Argoul, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Individual plant cells are rather complex mechanical objects. Despite the fact that their wall mechanical strength may be weakened by comparison with their original tissue template, they nevertheless retain some generic properties of the mother tissue, namely the viscoelasticity and the shape of their walls, which are driven by their internal hydrostatic turgor pressure. This viscoelastic behavior, which affects the power-law response of these cells when indented by an atomic force cantilever with a pyramidal tip, is also very sensitive to the culture media. To our knowledge, we develop here an original analyzing method, based on a multiscale decomposition of force-indentation curves, that reveals and quantifies for the first time the nonlinearity of the mechanical response of living single plant cells upon mechanical deformation. Further comparing the nonlinear strain responses of these isolated cells in three different media, we reveal an alteration of their linear bending elastic regime in both hyper- and hypotonic conditions. PMID:25954881

  15. AFM mapping of the elastic properties of brain tissue reveals kPa μm(-1) gradients of rigidity.

    PubMed

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Meyer, Mikaël; Gaude, Christophe; Gay, Emmanuel; Ratel, David; Nicolas, Alice

    2016-07-20

    It is now well established that the mechanical environment of the cells in tissues deeply impacts cellular fate, including life cycle, differentiation and tumor progression. Designs of biomaterials already include the control of mechanical parameters, and in general, their main focus is to control the rheological properties of the biomaterials at a macroscopic scale. However, recent studies have demonstrated that cells can stress their environment below the micron scale, and therefore could possibly respond to the rheological properties of their environment at this micron scale. In this context, probing the mechanical properties of physiological cellular environments at subcellular scales is becoming critical. To this aim, we performed in vitro indentation measurements using AFM on sliced human pituitary gland tissues. A robust methodology was implemented using elasto-adhesive models, which shows that accounting for the adhesion of the probe on the tissue is critical for the reliability of the measurement. In addition to quantifying for the first time the rigidity of normal pituitary gland tissue, with a geometric mean of 9.5 kPa, our measurements demonstrated that the mechanical properties of this tissue are far from uniform at subcellular scales. Gradients of rigidity as large as 12 kPa μm(-1) were observed. This observation suggests that physiological rigidity can be highly non-uniform at the micron-scale. PMID:27377831

  16. Tendon glycosaminoglycan proteoglycan sidechains promote collagen fibril sliding-AFM observations at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Rigozzi, S; Müller, R; Stemmer, A; Snedeker, J G

    2013-02-22

    The extracellular matrix of tendon is mainly composed of discontinuous Type-I collagen fibrils and small leucine rich proteoglycans (PG). Macroscopic tendon behaviors like stiffness and strength are determined by the ultrastructural arrangement of these components. When a tendon is submitted to load, the collagen fibrils both elongate and slide relative to their neighboring fibrils. The role of PG glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sidechains in mediating inter-fibril load sharing remains controversial, with competing structure-function theories suggesting that PGs may mechanically couple neighboring collagen fibrils (cross-linking them to facilitate fibril stretch) or alternatively isolating them (promoting fibril gliding). In this study, we sought to clarify the functional role of GAGs in tensile tendon mechanics by directly investigating the mechanical response of individual collagen fibrils within their collagen network in both native and GAG depleted tendons. A control group of Achilles tendons from adult mice was compared with tendons in which GAGs were enzymatically depleted using chondroitinase ABC. Tendons were loaded to specific target strains, chemically fixed under constant load, and later sectioned for morphological analysis by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Increases in periodic banding of the collagen fibrils (D-period) or decreases in fibril diameter was considered to be representative of collagen fibril elongation and the mechanical contribution of GAGs at the ultrascale was quantified on this basis. At high levels of applied tendon strain (10%), GAG depleted tendons showed increased collagen stretch (less fibril sliding). We conclude that the hydrophilic GAGs seem thus not to act as mechanical crosslinks but rather act to promote collagen fibril sliding under tension.

  17. Dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode: overview and challenges in revealing the appropriate mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Makasheva, K; Villeneuve-Faure, C; Laurent, C; Despax, B; Boudou, L; Teyssedre, G

    2015-07-24

    The study of charge distribution on the surface and in the bulk of dielectrics is of great scientific interest because of the information gained on the storage and transport properties of the medium. Nevertheless, the processes at the nanoscale level remain out of the scope of the commonly used diagnostic methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is currently applied for both injection and imaging of charges on dielectric thin films at the nanoscale level to answer the increasing demand for characterization of miniaturized components used in microelectronics, telecommunications, electrophotography, electrets, etc. However, the mechanisms for dielectric charging by AFM are not well documented, and an analysis of the literature shows that inappropriate mechanisms are sometimes presented. It is shown here that corona discharge, frequently pointed out as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode, cannot develop in such small distances. Furthermore, a review of different mechanisms surmised to be at the origin of dielectric charging at the nanoscale level is offered. Field electron emission enhanced by thermionic emission is identified as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging at the nanoscale level. Experimental validation of this mechanism is obtained for typical electric field strengths in AFM. PMID:26133237

  18. Dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode: overview and challenges in revealing the appropriate mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makasheva, K.; Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Laurent, C.; Despax, B.; Boudou, L.; Teyssedre, G.

    2015-07-01

    The study of charge distribution on the surface and in the bulk of dielectrics is of great scientific interest because of the information gained on the storage and transport properties of the medium. Nevertheless, the processes at the nanoscale level remain out of the scope of the commonly used diagnostic methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is currently applied for both injection and imaging of charges on dielectric thin films at the nanoscale level to answer the increasing demand for characterization of miniaturized components used in microelectronics, telecommunications, electrophotography, electrets, etc. However, the mechanisms for dielectric charging by AFM are not well documented, and an analysis of the literature shows that inappropriate mechanisms are sometimes presented. It is shown here that corona discharge, frequently pointed out as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging by AFM in tip-to-sample space mode, cannot develop in such small distances. Furthermore, a review of different mechanisms surmised to be at the origin of dielectric charging at the nanoscale level is offered. Field electron emission enhanced by thermionic emission is identified as a likely mechanism for dielectric charging at the nanoscale level. Experimental validation of this mechanism is obtained for typical electric field strengths in AFM.

  19. Construction of Compact Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Inspired by Marine Mussel: Effects of Salt Concentration and pH As Observed by QCM-D and AFM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weina; Xu, Yisheng; Backes, Sebastian; Li, Ang; Micciulla, Samantha; Kayitmazer, A Basak; Li, Li; Guo, Xuhong; von Klitzing, Regine

    2016-04-12

    Biomimetic multilayers based on layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly were prepared as functional films with compact structure by incorporating the mussel-inspired catechol cross-linking. Dopamine-modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAADopa) was synthesized as a polyanion to offer electrostatic interaction with the prelayer polyethylenimine (PEI) and consecutively cross-linked by zinc to generate compact multilayers with tunable physicochemical properties. In situ layer-by-layer growth and cross-linking were monitored by a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) to reveal the kinetics of the process and the influence of Dopa chemistry. Addition of Dopa enhanced the mass adsorption and led to the formation of a more compact structure. An increase of ionic strength induced an increase in mass adsorption in the Dopa-cross-linked multilayers. This is a universal approach for coating of various surfaces such as Au, SiO2, Ti, and Al2O3. Roughness observed by AFM in both wet and dry conditions was compared to confirm the compact morphology of Dopa-cross-linked multilayers. Because of the pH sensitivity of Dopa moiety, metal-chelated Dopa groups can be turned into softer structure at higher pH as revealed by reduction of Young's modulus determined by MFP-3D AFM. A deeper insight into the growth and mechanical properties of Dopa-cross-linked polyelectrolyte multilayers was addressed in the present study. This allows a better control of these systems for bioapplications. PMID:27007179

  20. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  1. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGES

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  2. In situ AFM observations of Ca-Mg carbonate crystallization catalyzed by dissolved sulfide: Implications for sedimentary dolomite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangfu; Yan, Chao; Teng, H. Henry; Roden, Eric E.; Xu, Huifang

    2013-03-01

    It has been observed that the metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria can overcome the energy barrier to Mg2+ incorporation into growing Ca-Mg carbonates and enhance dolomite precipitation, although the role of SRB in dolomite formation is still under debate. In this study, we presented in situ AFM observations of Ca-Mg carbonate {1 0 4} surface growing from supersaturated solutions. Our data showed that not only can Mg2+ modify the morphology of the polygonal growth hillocks and impede step growth, but it can also inhibit 1-D step nucleation, resulting in the inability for spirals to continue their vertical growth. However, in the presence of dissolved sulfide, both the 1-D step nucleation and step growth which had been retarded by Mg2+ ions were significantly enhanced. For example, in the presence as low as 0.13 mM dissolved sulfide, the step velocity can be increased by more than 9 times compared to that in contact with solutions containing Mg2+ ions but no dissolved sulfide. The Ca-Mg carbonate growth hillock in contact with dissolved sulfide-bearing growth solutions eventually developed a micromosaic-like structure. Based on our observations, we propose that the overall catalytic effect of dissolved sulfide may be twofold, one to stabilize the critical nuclei during 1-D step nucleation by the adsorption of dissolved sulfide on Ca-Mg carbonate surfaces and two to facilitate the dehydration of surface Mg2+-water complexes during growth. We hypothesize that dissolved sulfide may adsorb on crystal faces through hydrogen bonding between the H in HS-/H2S and the O in calcite CO32- to weaken the rigid Mg2+ hydration shell, resulting in an elevated activation entropy for particle attachment and hence a larger kinetic coefficient for step growth. Together with previous studies on disorder dolomite precipitation induced by dissolved sulfide, we demonstrate the catalysis role of dissolved sulfide in sedimentary dolomite formation associate with SRB, which may shed new

  3. Germ direct observation by AFM under crystallization of self-organized assemblies of mono-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udal'tsov, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    Assemblies consisting of mono-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers and water have been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy in solution and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in thin layers. These assemblies self-organized into domains produce microcrystals in thin layer. Morphology of the microcrystals and characteristic features of crystallization germ on the top found by contact AFM indicate that surface tension of an aqueous layer on the domain generates the crystallization process. Estimations of the pressure producing the germ and bulk modulus (Bm) of microcrystals give 26.3±2.6 MPa and 3.72 GPa and Bm=12.7 GPa obtained for dried thin films. The former modulus is comparable with bulk modulus of water (2.174 GPa) that implies liquid crystals formation. Absorptions of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with ћωLO=0.3761 and 0.3577 eV, which are arisen because of hole polaron moving through water, are found in the electronic spectra of the assemblies. The crystallization is suggested to occur due to Zundel cation (H5O2+) operation like the water-porphyrin matrix self-organization found earlier.

  4. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  5. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  6. Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to reveal the coexistence of coupled antiferromagnetic (AFM)/ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) orders in multiferroic TbMnO3 films, which can guide researchers in creating new kinds of multiferroic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jingbo; Zhu, Jianxin; Trugman, Stuart A.; Taylor, Antoinette; Jia, Quanxi; Prasankumar, Rohit

    2012-07-06

    , experimental techniques capable of dynamically unraveling the interplay between these degrees of freedom on an ultrafast timescale are needed. Here, we use ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy to reveal coexisting coupled magnetic orders in epitaxial TMO thin films grown on (001)-STO, which were not observed in previous work. Our temperature (T)-dependent transient differential reflectivity ({Delta}R/R) measurements show clear signatures of sinusoidal AFM, spiral AFM (FE) and FM phases developing as the film thickness changes. We carry out first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations to explain the coupling between AFM/FE and FM orders. These results reveal that the coupling between different magnetic orders observed in our multiferroic TMO thin films may offer greater control of functionality as compared to bulk single crystal multiferroics.

  7. Dimming Titan Revealed by the Cassini Observations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the temporal variation of Titan's emitted energy with the Cassini/CIRS observations. In the northern hemisphere, the hemispheric-average emitted power decreased from 2007 to 2009 and increased from 2009 to 2012–13, which make the net change insignificant (0.1 ± 0.2%) during the period 2007–2013. The decrease from 2007 to 2009 is mainly due to the cooling around the stratospause, and the increase from 2009 to 2012–13 is probably related to temporal variation of atmospheric temperature around the tropopuase in the northern hemisphere. In the southern hemisphere, the emitted power continuously decreased by 5.0 ± 0.6% from 2.40 ± 0.01 W/m2 in 2007 to 2.28 ± 0.01 in 2012–13, which is mainly related to Titan's seasonal variation. The asymmetry in the temporal variation between the two hemispheres results in the global-average emitted power decreasing by 2.5 ± 0.6% from 2.41 ± 0.01 W/m2 in 2007 to 2.35 ± 0.01 W/m2 in 2012–13. The solar constant at Titan decreased by ~13.0% in the same period 2007–2013, which is much stronger than the temporal variation of emitted power. The measurements of Titan's absorbed solar power are needed to determine the temporal variation of the global energy budget. PMID:25649341

  8. Dimming titan revealed by the Cassini observations.

    PubMed

    Li, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the temporal variation of Titan's emitted energy with the Cassini/CIRS observations. In the northern hemisphere, the hemispheric-average emitted power decreased from 2007 to 2009 and increased from 2009 to 2012-13, which make the net change insignificant (0.1 ± 0.2%) during the period 2007-2013. The decrease from 2007 to 2009 is mainly due to the cooling around the stratospause, and the increase from 2009 to 2012-13 is probably related to temporal variation of atmospheric temperature around the tropopuase in the northern hemisphere. In the southern hemisphere, the emitted power continuously decreased by 5.0 ± 0.6% from 2.40 ± 0.01 W/m(2) in 2007 to 2.28 ± 0.01 in 2012-13, which is mainly related to Titan's seasonal variation. The asymmetry in the temporal variation between the two hemispheres results in the global-average emitted power decreasing by 2.5 ± 0.6% from 2.41 ± 0.01 W/m(2) in 2007 to 2.35 ± 0.01 W/m(2) in 2012-13. The solar constant at Titan decreased by ~13.0% in the same period 2007-2013, which is much stronger than the temporal variation of emitted power. The measurements of Titan's absorbed solar power are needed to determine the temporal variation of the global energy budget. PMID:25649341

  9. Detailed Observation of Multiphoton Emission Enhancement from a Single Colloidal Quantum Dot Using a Silver-Coated AFM Tip.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroki; Naiki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Li; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji; Tamai, Naoto; Masuo, Sadahiro

    2016-09-14

    The enhancement of multiphoton emission from a single colloidal nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) interacting with a plasmonic nanostructure was investigated using a silver-coated atomic force microscopy tip (AgTip) as the plasmonic nanostructure. Using the AgTip, which exhibited a well-defined localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance band, we controlled the spectral overlap and the distance between the single NQD and the AgTip. The emission behavior of the single NQD when approaching the AgTip at the nanometer scale was measured using off-resonance (405 nm) and resonance (465 nm) excitation of the LSP. We directly observed the conversion of the single-photon emission from a single NQD to multiphoton emission with reduction of the emission lifetime at both excitation wavelengths as the NQD-AgTip distance decreased, whereas a decrease and increase in the emission intensity were observed at 405 and 465 nm excitation, respectively. By combining theoretical analysis and the numerical simulation of the AgTip, we deduced that the enhancement of the multiphoton emission was caused by the quenching of the single-exciton state due to the energy transfer from the NQD to the AgTip and that the emission intensity was increased by enhancement of the excitation rate due to the electric field of the LSP on the AgTip. These results provide evidence that the photon statistics and the photon flux from the single NQD can be manipulated by the plasmonic nanostructure through control of the spectral overlap and the distance.

  10. Detailed Observation of Multiphoton Emission Enhancement from a Single Colloidal Quantum Dot Using a Silver-Coated AFM Tip.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroki; Naiki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Li; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji; Tamai, Naoto; Masuo, Sadahiro

    2016-09-14

    The enhancement of multiphoton emission from a single colloidal nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) interacting with a plasmonic nanostructure was investigated using a silver-coated atomic force microscopy tip (AgTip) as the plasmonic nanostructure. Using the AgTip, which exhibited a well-defined localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance band, we controlled the spectral overlap and the distance between the single NQD and the AgTip. The emission behavior of the single NQD when approaching the AgTip at the nanometer scale was measured using off-resonance (405 nm) and resonance (465 nm) excitation of the LSP. We directly observed the conversion of the single-photon emission from a single NQD to multiphoton emission with reduction of the emission lifetime at both excitation wavelengths as the NQD-AgTip distance decreased, whereas a decrease and increase in the emission intensity were observed at 405 and 465 nm excitation, respectively. By combining theoretical analysis and the numerical simulation of the AgTip, we deduced that the enhancement of the multiphoton emission was caused by the quenching of the single-exciton state due to the energy transfer from the NQD to the AgTip and that the emission intensity was increased by enhancement of the excitation rate due to the electric field of the LSP on the AgTip. These results provide evidence that the photon statistics and the photon flux from the single NQD can be manipulated by the plasmonic nanostructure through control of the spectral overlap and the distance. PMID:27501388

  11. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  12. High-speed AFM for Studying Dynamic Biomolecular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Biological molecules show their vital activities only in aqueous solutions. It had been one of dreams in biological sciences to directly observe biological macromolecules (protein, DNA) at work under a physiological condition because such observation is straightforward to understanding their dynamic behaviors and functional mechanisms. Optical microscopy has no sufficient spatial resolution and electron microscopy is not applicable to in-liquid samples. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize molecules in liquids at high resolution but its imaging rate was too low to capture dynamic biological processes. This slow imaging rate is because AFM employs mechanical probes (cantilevers) and mechanical scanners to detect the sample height at each pixel. It is quite difficult to quickly move a mechanical device of macroscopic size with sub-nanometer accuracy without producing unwanted vibrations. It is also difficult to maintain the delicate contact between a probe tip and fragile samples. Two key techniques are required to realize high-speed AFM for biological research; fast feedback control to maintain a weak tip-sample interaction force and a technique to suppress mechanical vibrations of the scanner. Various efforts have been carried out in the past decade to materialize high-speed AFM. The current high-speed AFM can capture images on video at 30-60 frames/s for a scan range of 250nm and 100 scan lines, without significantly disturbing week biomolecular interaction. Our recent studies demonstrated that this new microscope can reveal biomolecular processes such as myosin V walking along actin tracks and association/dissociation dynamics of chaperonin GroEL-GroES that occurs in a negatively cooperative manner. The capacity of nanometer-scale visualization of dynamic processes in liquids will innovate on biological research. In addition, it will open a new way to study dynamic chemical/physical processes of various phenomena that occur at the liquid-solid interfaces.

  13. High-Bandwidth AFM-Based Rheology Reveals that Cartilage is Most Sensitive to High Loading Rates at Early Stages of Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Bozchalooi, Iman S.; Li, Yang; Han, Lin; Hung, Han-Hwa; Frank, Eliot; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a newly developed atomic-force-microscopy-based wide-frequency rheology system, we measured the dynamic nanomechanical behavior of normal and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-depleted cartilage, the latter representing matrix degradation that occurs at the earliest stages of osteoarthritis. We observed unique variations in the frequency-dependent stiffness and hydraulic permeability of cartilage in the 1 Hz-to-10 kHz range, a frequency range that is relevant to joint motions from normal ambulation to high-frequency impact loading. Measurement in this frequency range is well beyond the capabilities of typical commercial atomic force microscopes. We showed that the dynamic modulus of cartilage undergoes a dramatic alteration after GAG loss, even with the collagen network still intact: whereas the magnitude of the dynamic modulus decreased two- to threefold at higher frequencies, the peak frequency of the phase angle of the modulus (representing fluid-solid frictional dissipation) increased 15-fold from 55 Hz in normal cartilage to 800 Hz after GAG depletion. These results, based on a fibril-reinforced poroelastic finite-element model, demonstrated that GAG loss caused a dramatic increase in cartilage hydraulic permeability (up to 25-fold), suggesting that early osteoarthritic cartilage is more vulnerable to higher loading rates than to the conventionally studied “loading magnitude”. Thus, over the wide frequency range of joint motion during daily activities, hydraulic permeability appears the most sensitive marker of early tissue degradation. PMID:23561529

  14. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    PubMed

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  15. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  16. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell.

  17. On CD-AFM bias related to probe bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, V. A.; Orji, N. G.; Vorburger, T. V.; Dixson, R. G.; Fu, J.; Silver, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Critical Dimension AFM (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, very small and flexible probes, often 15 nm to 20 nm in diameter, are now frequently used. Several recent publications have reported on uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements [1,2]. Results obtained in this work suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and thus potentially can explain much of the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe bias variation. We have developed and experimentally tested one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) models to describe the bending of cylindrical probes. An earlier 1D bending model reported by Watanabe et al. [3] was refined. Contributions from several new phenomena were considered, including: probe misalignment, diameter variation near the carbon nanotube tip (CNT) apex, probe bending before snapping, distributed van der Waals-London force, etc. The methodology for extraction of the Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe bending data was developed. To overcome limitations of the 1D model, a new 2D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Comparison of the new model with the 1D single point force (SPF) model revealed about 27 % difference in probe bending bias between the two. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1D SPF and 2D DF models was found. This finding simplifies use of the advanced 2D DF model of probe bending in various CD-AFM applications. New 2D and three-dimensional (3D) CDAFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  18. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  19. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS REVEAL ANOMALOUS MOLECULAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnentrucker, P.; Neufeld, D. A.; Indriolo, N.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Lis, D. C.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2013-01-20

    We report the Herschel detections of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and para-water (p-H{sub 2}O) in gas intercepting the sight lines to two well-studied molecular clouds in the vicinity of the Sgr A complex: G-0.02-0.07 (the {sup +}50 km s{sup -1} cloud{sup )} and G-0.13-0.08 (the {sup +}20 km s{sup -1} cloud{sup )}. Toward both sight lines, HF and water absorption components are detected over a wide range of velocities covering {approx}250 km s{sup -1}. For all velocity components with V{sub LSR} > -85 km s{sup -1}, we find that the HF and water abundances are consistent with those measured toward other sight lines probing the Galactic disk gas. The velocity components with V{sub LSR} {<=} -85 km s{sup -1}, which are known to trace gas residing within {approx}200 pc of the Galactic center, however, exhibit water vapor abundances with respect to HF at least a factor three higher than those found in the Galactic disk gas. Comparison with CH data indicates that our observations are consistent with a picture where HF and a fraction of the H{sub 2}O absorption arise in diffuse molecular clouds showing Galactic disk-like abundances while the bulk of the water absorption arises in warmer (T {>=} 400 K) diffuse molecular gas for V{sub LSR} {<=} -85 km s{sup -1}. This diffuse Interstellar Medium (ISM) phase has also been recently revealed through observations of CO, HF, H{sup +}{sub 3}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} absorption toward other sight lines probing the Galactic center inner region.

  20. AFM nanoindentations of diatom biosilica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Losic, Dusan; Short, Ken; Mitchell, James G; Lal, Ratnesh; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2007-04-24

    Diatoms have intricately and uniquely nanopatterned silica exoskeletons (frustules) and are a common target of biomimetic investigations. A better understanding of the diatom frustule structure and function at the nanoscale could provide new insights for the biomimetic fabrication of nanostructured ceramic materials and lightweight, yet strong, scaffold architectures. Here, we have mapped the nanoscale mechanical properties of Coscinodiscus sp. diatoms using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation. Mechanical properties were correlated with the frustule structures obtained from high-resolution AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Significant differences in the micromechanical properties for the different frustule layers were observed. A comparative study of other related inorganic material including porous silicon films and free-standing membranes as well as porous alumina was also undertaken.

  1. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  2. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  3. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  4. The NH2D hyperfine structure revealed by astrophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, F.; Coudert, L. H.; Punanova, A.; Harju, J.; Faure, A.; Roueff, E.; Sipilä, O.; Caselli, P.; Güsten, R.; Pon, A.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The 111-101 lines of ortho- and para-NH2D (o/p-NH2D) at 86 and 110 GHz, respectively, are commonly observed to provide constraints on the deuterium fractionation in the interstellar medium. In cold regions, the hyperfine structure that is due to the nitrogen (14N) nucleus is resolved. To date, this splitting is the only one that is taken into account in the NH2D column density estimates. Aims: We investigate how including the hyperfine splitting caused by the deuterium (D) nucleus affects the analysis of the rotational lines of NH2D. Methods: We present 30 m IRAM observations of the above mentioned lines and APEX o/p-NH2D observations of the 101-000 lines at 333 GHz. The hyperfine patterns of the observed lines were calculated taking into account the splitting induced by the D nucleus. The analysis then relies on line lists that either neglect or include the splitting induced by the D nucleus. Results: The hyperfine spectra are first analyzed with a line list that only includes the hyperfine splitting that is due to the 14N nucleus. We find inconsistencies between the line widths of the 101-000 and 111-101 lines, the latter being larger by a factor of ~1.6 ± 0.3. Such a large difference is unexpected because the two sets of lines probably originate from the same region. We next employed a newly computed line list for the o/p-NH2D transitions where the hyperfine structure induced by both nitrogen and deuterium nuclei was included. With this new line list, the analysis of the previous spectra leads to compatible line widths. Conclusions: Neglecting the hyperfine structure caused by D leads to overestimating the line widths of the o/p-NH2D lines at 3 mm. The error for a cold molecular core is about 50%. This error propagates directly to the column density estimate. We therefore recommend to take the hyperfine splittings caused by both the 14N and D nuclei into account in any analysis that relies on these lines. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM

  5. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W

    2003-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C{sub 6}A{sub 2}S-bar{sub 2}H{sub 34} or {l_brace}Ca{sub 6}[Al(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O{r_brace}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2}. If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125.

  6. Structured Observations Reveal Slow HIV-1 CTL Escape

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Hannah E.; Hurst, Jacob; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Flanagan, Peter; Vass, Laura; Fidler, Sarah; Weber, Jonathan; Babiker, Abdel; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    The existence of viral variants that escape from the selection pressures imposed by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in HIV-1 infection is well documented, but it is unclear when they arise, with reported measures of the time to escape in individuals ranging from days to years. A study of participants enrolled in the SPARTAC (Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at HIV Seroconversion) clinical trial allowed direct observation of the evolution of CTL escape variants in 125 adults with primary HIV-1 infection observed for up to three years. Patient HLA-type, longitudinal CD8+ T-cell responses measured by IFN-γ ELISpot and longitudinal HIV-1 gag, pol, and nef sequence data were used to study the timing and prevalence of CTL escape in the participants whilst untreated. Results showed that sequence variation within CTL epitopes at the first time point (within six months of the estimated date of seroconversion) was consistent with most mutations being transmitted in the infecting viral strain rather than with escape arising within the first few weeks of infection. Escape arose throughout the first three years of infection, but slowly and steadily. Approximately one third of patients did not drive any new escape in an HLA-restricted epitope in just under two years. Patients driving several escape mutations during these two years were rare and the median and modal numbers of new escape events in each patient were one and zero respectively. Survival analysis of time to escape found that possession of a protective HLA type significantly reduced time to first escape in a patient (p = 0.01), and epitopes escaped faster in the face of a measurable CD8+ ELISpot response (p = 0.001). However, even in an HLA matched host who mounted a measurable, specific, CD8+ response the average time before the targeted epitope evolved an escape mutation was longer than two years. PMID:25642847

  7. Structured observations reveal slow HIV-1 CTL escape.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Hannah E; Hurst, Jacob; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Flanagan, Peter; Vass, Laura; Fidler, Sarah; Weber, Jonathan; Babiker, Abdel; Phillips, Rodney E; McLean, Angela R; Frater, John

    2015-02-01

    The existence of viral variants that escape from the selection pressures imposed by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in HIV-1 infection is well documented, but it is unclear when they arise, with reported measures of the time to escape in individuals ranging from days to years. A study of participants enrolled in the SPARTAC (Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at HIV Seroconversion) clinical trial allowed direct observation of the evolution of CTL escape variants in 125 adults with primary HIV-1 infection observed for up to three years. Patient HLA-type, longitudinal CD8+ T-cell responses measured by IFN-γ ELISpot and longitudinal HIV-1 gag, pol, and nef sequence data were used to study the timing and prevalence of CTL escape in the participants whilst untreated. Results showed that sequence variation within CTL epitopes at the first time point (within six months of the estimated date of seroconversion) was consistent with most mutations being transmitted in the infecting viral strain rather than with escape arising within the first few weeks of infection. Escape arose throughout the first three years of infection, but slowly and steadily. Approximately one third of patients did not drive any new escape in an HLA-restricted epitope in just under two years. Patients driving several escape mutations during these two years were rare and the median and modal numbers of new escape events in each patient were one and zero respectively. Survival analysis of time to escape found that possession of a protective HLA type significantly reduced time to first escape in a patient (p = 0.01), and epitopes escaped faster in the face of a measurable CD8+ ELISpot response (p = 0.001). However, even in an HLA matched host who mounted a measurable, specific, CD8+ response the average time before the targeted epitope evolved an escape mutation was longer than two years.

  8. Eye movements reveal epistemic curiosity in human observers.

    PubMed

    Baranes, Adrien; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Gottlieb, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    Saccadic (rapid) eye movements are primary means by which humans and non-human primates sample visual information. However, while saccadic decisions are intensively investigated in instrumental contexts where saccades guide subsequent actions, it is largely unknown how they may be influenced by curiosity - the intrinsic desire to learn. While saccades are sensitive to visual novelty and visual surprise, no study has examined their relation to epistemic curiosity - interest in symbolic, semantic information. To investigate this question, we tracked the eye movements of human observers while they read trivia questions and, after a brief delay, were visually given the answer. We show that higher curiosity was associated with earlier anticipatory orienting of gaze toward the answer location without changes in other metrics of saccades or fixations, and that these influences were distinct from those produced by variations in confidence and surprise. Across subjects, the enhancement of anticipatory gaze was correlated with measures of trait curiosity from personality questionnaires. Finally, a machine learning algorithm could predict curiosity in a cross-subject manner, relying primarily on statistical features of the gaze position before the answer onset and independently of covariations in confidence or surprise, suggesting potential practical applications for educational technologies, recommender systems and research in cognitive sciences. With this article, we provide full access to the annotated database allowing readers to reproduce the results. Epistemic curiosity produces specific effects on oculomotor anticipation that can be used to read out curiosity states. PMID:26518743

  9. Eye movements reveal epistemic curiosity in human observers.

    PubMed

    Baranes, Adrien; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Gottlieb, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    Saccadic (rapid) eye movements are primary means by which humans and non-human primates sample visual information. However, while saccadic decisions are intensively investigated in instrumental contexts where saccades guide subsequent actions, it is largely unknown how they may be influenced by curiosity - the intrinsic desire to learn. While saccades are sensitive to visual novelty and visual surprise, no study has examined their relation to epistemic curiosity - interest in symbolic, semantic information. To investigate this question, we tracked the eye movements of human observers while they read trivia questions and, after a brief delay, were visually given the answer. We show that higher curiosity was associated with earlier anticipatory orienting of gaze toward the answer location without changes in other metrics of saccades or fixations, and that these influences were distinct from those produced by variations in confidence and surprise. Across subjects, the enhancement of anticipatory gaze was correlated with measures of trait curiosity from personality questionnaires. Finally, a machine learning algorithm could predict curiosity in a cross-subject manner, relying primarily on statistical features of the gaze position before the answer onset and independently of covariations in confidence or surprise, suggesting potential practical applications for educational technologies, recommender systems and research in cognitive sciences. With this article, we provide full access to the annotated database allowing readers to reproduce the results. Epistemic curiosity produces specific effects on oculomotor anticipation that can be used to read out curiosity states.

  10. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  12. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  13. Tapping mode AFM evidence for an amorphous reticular phase in a condensation-cured hybrid elastomer: alpha,omega-dihydroxypoly(dimethylsiloxane)/poly(diethoxysiloxane)/fumed silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Bertolucci, Massimo; Galli, Giancarlo; Chiellini, Emo; Chujo, Yoshiki; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2004-10-01

    A new surface phenomenon is reported for hybrid nanocomposites comprising (1) a low Tg poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) phase cross-linked by (2) a siliceous phase (SP) generated by in situ hydrolysis/condensation of poly(diethoxysiloxane) (PDES), and (3) fumed silica nanoparticles (FSN). After ambient temperature cure, tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) easily reveals near-surface FSN. For nanocomposites with higher PDES content, FSN surprisingly "disappear" after a further cure at 100 degrees C. The observation is explained by further condensation of extant siliceous fragments creating an amorphous reticular phase, which acts as a mechanical barrier between the FSN and the AFM tip. PMID:15453759

  14. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM.

    PubMed

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  15. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  16. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  17. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  20. The NTA-His6 bond is strong enough for AFM single-molecular recognition studies.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Claire; Gruber, Hermann J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2007-01-01

    There is a need in current atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecular recognition studies for generic methods for the stable, functional attachment of proteins on tips and solid supports. In the last few years, the site-directed nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-polyhistidine (Hisn) system has been increasingly used towards this goal. Yet, a crucial question in this context is whether the NTA-Hisn bond is sufficiently strong for ensuring stable protein immobilization during force spectroscopy measurements. Here, we measured the forces between AFM tips modified with NTA-terminated alkanethiols and solid supports functionalized with His6-Gly-Cys peptides in the presence of Ni2+. The force histogram obtained at a loading rate of 6600 pN s(-1) showed three maxima at rupture forces of 153 +/- 57 pN, 316 +/- 50 pN and 468 +/- 44 pN, that we attribute primarily to monovalent and multivalent interactions between a single His6 moiety and one, two and three NTA groups, respectively. The measured forces are well above the 50-100 pN unbinding forces typically observed by AFM for receptor-ligand pairs. The plot of adhesion force versus log (loading rate) revealed a linear regime, from which we deduced a kinetic off-rate constant of dissociation, k(off) approximately 0.07 s(-1). This value is in the range of that estimated for the multivalent interaction involving two NTA, using fluorescence measurements, and may account for an increased binding stability of the NTA-His6 bond. We conclude that the NTA-His6 system is a powerful, well-suited platform for the stable, oriented immobilization of proteins in AFM single-molecule studies. PMID:17712775

  1. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  2. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  3. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  4. Microhardness, chemical etching, SEM, AFM and SHG studies of novel nonlinear optical crystal -L-threonine formate

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumantha Rao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness studies of novel LTF crystal reported first time in the literature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface studies are done by AFM, chemical etching and SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From SHG studies, it is known that LTF is potential NLO crystal. -- Abstract: The crystal L-threonine formate, an organic NLO crystal was synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystal surface has been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis reveals pyramidal shaped minute crystallites on the growth surface. The etching study indicates the occurrence of etch pit patterns like striations and step like pattern. The mechanical properties of LTF crystals were evaluated by mechanical testing which reveals certain mechanical characteristics like elastic stiffness constant (C{sub 11}) and young's modulus (E). The Vickers and Knoop microhardness studies have been carried out on LTF crystals over a range of 10-50 g. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal. AFM image shows major hillock on growth surface. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency has been tested by the Kurtz powder technique using Nd:YAG laser and found to be about 1.21 times in comparison with standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals.

  5. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  6. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  7. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  8. SMA submillimeter observations of HL Tau: revealing a compact molecular outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Lumbreras, Alba M.; Zapata, Luis A.

    2014-04-01

    We present archival high angular resolution (∼2'') {sup 12}CO(3-2) line and continuum submillimeter observations of the young stellar object HL Tau made with the Submillimeter Array. The {sup 12}CO(3-2) line observations reveal the presence of a compact and wide opening angle bipolar outflow with a northeast to southwest orientation (P.A. = 50°) that is associated with the optical and infrared jet emanating from HL Tau with a similar orientation. On the other hand, the 850 μm continuum emission observations exhibit a strong and compact source in the position of HL Tau that has a spatial size of ∼200 × 70 AU with a P.A. = 145° and a dust mass of around 0.1 M {sub ☉}. These physical parameters are in agreement with values obtained recently from millimeter observations. This submillimeter source is therefore related to the disk surrounding HL Tau.

  9. Altitude dependence of nightside Martian suprathermal electron depletions as revealed by MAVEN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckiewicz, M.; Mazelle, C.; Garnier, P.; André, N.; Penou, E.; Beth, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Toublanc, D.; Mitchell, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Luhmann, J. G.; Lillis, R. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Andersson, L.; Halekas, J. S.; Larson, D. E.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN) spacecraft is providing new detailed observations of the Martian ionosphere thanks to its unique orbital coverage and instrument suite. During most periapsis passages on the nightside ionosphere suprathermal electron depletions were detected. A simple criterion was implemented to identify the 1742 depletions observed from 16 November 2014 to 28 February 2015. A statistical analysis reveals that the main ion and electron populations within the depletions are surprisingly constant in time and altitude. Absorption by CO2 is the main loss process for suprathermal electrons, and electrons that strongly peaked around 6 eV are resulting from this interaction. The observation of depletions appears however highly dependent on altitude. Depletions are mainly located above strong crustal magnetic sources above 170 km, whereas the depletions observed for the first time below 170 km are globally scattered onto the Martian surface with no particular dependence on crustal fields.

  10. Observations of Supersonic Downflows near the Umbra-Penumbra Boundary of Sunspots as Revealed by Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, R. E.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Mathew, S. K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2012-05-01

    High resolution spectropolarimetric observations by Hinode have revealed the existence of supersonic downflows at the umbra-penumbra boundary of 3 sunspots (Louis et al. 2011). These downflows are observed to be co-spatial with bright penumbral filaments and occupy an area greater than 1.6 arcsec2. They are located at the center-side penumbra and have the same polarity as the sunspot which suggests that they are not associated with the Evershed flow. In this paper we describe the supersonic velocities observed in NOAA AR 10923 and discuss the photospheric as well as chromospheric brightenings that lie close to the downflowing areas. Our observations suggest that this phenomenon is driven by dynamic and energetic physical processes in the inner penumbra which affect the chromosphere, providing new constraints to numerical models of sunspots.

  11. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  12. Probing Ternary Solvent Effect in High V(oc) Polymer Solar Cells Using Advanced AFM Techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ding, Yi; Soliman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton V; Gesquiere, Andre J; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high V(oc) low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with V(oc) more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor-acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Finally, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing. PMID:26807919

  13. Confocal Raman-AFM, A New Tool for Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ute

    2005-03-01

    Characterization of heterogeneous systems, e.g. polymers, on the nanometer scale continues to grow in importance and to impact key applications in the field of materials science, nanotechnology and catalysis. The development of advanced polymeric materials for such applications requires detailed information about the physical and chemical properties of these materials on the nanometer scale. However, some details about the phase-separation process in polymers are difficult to study with conventional characterization techniques due to the inability of these methods to chemically differentiate materials with good spatial resolution, without damage, staining or preferential solvent washing. The CR-AFM is a breakthrough in microscopy. It combines three measuring techniques in one instrument: a high resolution confocal optical microscope, an extremely sensitive Raman spectroscopy system, and an Atomic Force Microscope. Using this instrument, the high spatial and topographical resolution obtained with an AFM can be directly linked to the chemical information gained by Confocal Raman spectroscopy. To demonstrate the capabilities of this unique combination of measuring techniques, polymer blend films, spin coated on glass substrates, have been characterized. AFM measurements reveal the structural and mechanical properties of the films, whereas Raman spectral images show the chemical composition of the blends.

  14. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  16. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  17. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  18. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  19. Identifying individual chemical bonds in single-molecule chemical reaction products using nc-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; de Oteyza, Dimas G.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Riss, Alexander; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Gorman, Patrick; Etkin, Grisha; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Perez, Alejandro; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F.; Fischer, Felix R.

    2014-03-01

    Determining reaction pathways and products is an integral part of chemical synthesis. Ensemble measurements are commonly used, but identifying products of complex reactions at surfaces presents a significant challenge. Here we present a non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) study to directly address this issue. We followed the change of the chemical structures, from reactants to products of enediyne cyclization reactions on metal surfaces. Thermal annealing of enediynes induced a series of cyclization cascades leading to radical species and the formation of dimers. Atomically resolved nc-AFM images reveal the precise chemical structure and the formation of chemical bonds between single molecular units. With the support of DFT calculations, we identified the underlying chemical pathways and barriers, demonstrating the potential of this atomically resolved AFM technique to study unknown reaction products in surface chemistry at the single-molecule level.

  20. Expanded Very Large Array Observations of the Barnard 5 Star-forming Core: Embedded Filaments Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Arce, Héctor G.; Caselli, Paola; Longmore, Steven; Corder, Stuartt

    2011-09-01

    We present ~6farcm5 × 8' Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) mosaic observations of the NH3 (1,1) emission in the Barnard 5 region in Perseus, with an angular resolution of 6''. This map covers the coherent region, where the dense gas presents subsonic non-thermal motions (as seen from single dish observations with the Green Bank Telescope, GBT). The combined EVLA and GBT observations reveal, for the first time, a striking filamentary structure (20'' wide or 5000 AU at the distance of Perseus) in this low-mass star-forming region. The integrated intensity profile of this structure is consistent with models of an isothermal filament in hydrostatic equilibrium. The observed separation between the B5-IRS1 young stellar object (YSO), in the central region of the core, and the northern starless condensation matches the Jeans length of the dense gas. This suggests that the dense gas in the coherent region is fragmenting. The observed region displays a narrow velocity dispersion, where most of the gas shows evidence for subsonic turbulence and where little spatial variations are present. It is only close to the YSO where an increase in the velocity dispersion is found, but still displaying subsonic non-thermal motions.

  1. Global dynamic topography observations reveal limited influence of large-scale mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggard, M. J.; White, N.; Al-Attar, D.

    2016-06-01

    Convective circulation of the Earth's mantle maintains some fraction of surface topography that varies with space and time. Most predictive models show that this dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-2 km, dominated by wavelengths of 104 km. Here, we test these models against our comprehensive observational database of 2,120 spot measurements of dynamic topography that were determined by analysing oceanic seismic surveys. These accurate measurements have typical peak amplitudes of +/-1 km and wavelengths of approximately 103 km, and are combined with limited continental constraints to generate a global spherical harmonic model, the robustness of which has been carefully tested and benchmarked. Our power spectral analysis reveals significant discrepancies between observed and predicted dynamic topography. At longer wavelengths (such as 104 km), observed dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-500 m. At shorter wavelengths (such as 103 km), significant dynamic topography is still observed. We show that these discrepancies can be explained if short-wavelength dynamic topography is generated by temperature-driven density anomalies within a sub-plate asthenospheric channel. Stratigraphic observations from adjacent continental margins show that these dynamic topographic signals evolve quickly with time. More rapid temporal and spatial changes in vertical displacement of the Earth's surface have direct consequences for fields as diverse as mantle flow, oceanic circulation and long-term climate change.

  2. Nanoscale fabrication of a peptide layer using an AFM probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Chie; Obataya, Ikuo; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Miyake, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been applied in many studies to manipulate atoms or molecules. In particular, force spectroscopy using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool to elucidate intermolecular or intramolecular interactions and provide mechanical information. If enzymes could retain their activity when immobilized on probes, not only could enzyme-substrate interactions be investigated but also the probes could be used for precise biomolecular manipulation at the nano-scale. In our study, a method based on "Enzymatic Nanolithography" was successfully performed in a buffered solution using Staphylococcal serine V8 protease and AFM. To estimate the fabricating activity of the protease immobilized on the AFM tip to peptides immobilized on a substrate, we designed and synthesized peptides that showed enzymatic action specific to the protease. When the protease digested the reporter peptide a quencher residue was released from the main flame of the peptide and resulted in fluorescence. In the designed 9 mer peptides, TAMRA functioned as a good quencher for FAM. After contact of the protease-immobilized tip to the reporter peptide layer, a fluorescent area was observed by microscopic imaging.

  3. Nanomechanics of new materials — AFM and computer modelling studies of trichoptera silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Janusz; Strzelecka, Joanna; Mikulska, Karolina; Tszydel, Mariusz; Balter, Aleksander; Nowak, Wiesław

    2011-04-01

    Caddisfly (Trichopera) can glue diverse material underwater with a silk fiber. This makes it a particularly interesting subject for biomimetcs. Better understanding of silk composition and structure could lead to an adhesive capable to close bleeding wounds or to new biomaterials. However, while spiderweb or silkworm secretion is well researched, caddisfly silk is still poorly understood. Here we report a first nanomechanical analysis of H. Angustipennis caddisfly silk fiber. An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) imaging shows dense 150 nm bumps on silk surface, which can be identified as one of features responsible for its outstanding adhesive properties. AFM force spectroscopy at the fiber surface showed, among others, characteristic saw like pattern. This pattern is attributed to sacrificial bond stretching and enhances energy dissipation in mechanical deformation. Similarities of some force curves observed on Tegenaria domestica spiderweb and caddisfly silk are also discussed. Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed that the strength of short components of Fib-H HA species molecules, abundant in Trichoptera silk is critically dependent on calcium presence.

  4. Probing correlated current and force effects of nanoparticle charge states by hybrid STM-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Y.; Trudeau, P.-E.; Dhirani, A.-A.

    2002-12-01

    By using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever as a substrate for a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we can simultaneously probe currents I and forces F in a tunnel junction as a function of bias voltage V. Measurements performed using gold-nanoparticle (NP) coated cantilevers under ambient conditions reveal correlated kinks in both I-V and F-V curves. Changes in background charge distributions, which have been problematic in controlling single charges in such systems, can be readily detected by the hybrid STM-AFM. To test whether we can statistically attribute observed kinks to Coulomb staircase phenomena, we have performed measurements using NP’s of different sizes. NP’s 4.8 and 2.5 nm in diameter exhibit kinks spaced on average 0.22 and 0.52 V apart, respectively. These values are in good agreement with a metallic sphere flat surface model for the STM tip NP capacitance and the orthodox model for single-electron tunneling.

  5. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  6. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  7. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  8. Eddy-Kuroshio interaction processes revealed by mooring observations off Taiwan and Luzon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Ju; Andres, Magdalena; Jan, Sen; Mensah, Vigan; Sanford, Thomas B.; Lien, Ren-Chieh; Lee, Craig M.

    2015-10-01

    The influence and fate of westward propagating eddies that impinge on the Kuroshio were observed with pressure sensor-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIESs) deployed east of Taiwan and northeast of Luzon. Zero lag correlations between PIES-measured acoustic travel times and satellite-measured sea surface height anomalies (SSHa), which are normally negative, have lower magnitude toward the west, suggesting the eddy-influence is weakened across the Kuroshio. The observational data reveal that impinging eddies lead to seesaw-like SSHa and pycnocline depth changes across the Kuroshio east of Taiwan, whereas analogous responses are not found in the Kuroshio northeast of Luzon. Anticyclones intensify sea surface and pycnocline slopes across the Kuroshio, while cyclones weaken these slopes, particularly east of Taiwan. During the 6 month period of overlap between the two PIES arrays, only one anticyclone affected the pycnocline depth first at the array northeast of Luzon and 21 days later in the downstream Kuroshio east of Taiwan.

  9. 2-D Convection and Electrodynamic Features of Substorms Revealed by Multiple Radar Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.

    2010-12-01

    Substorms are one of the fundamental elements of geomagnetic activity, which involve complex magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this work, we aim to better understand the evolution of high latitude ionospheric convection and the relevant current systems associated with substorms, with emphasis on these features near the nightside Harang reversal region. Three different types of radars, including the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) coherent-scatter radars, the new advanced modular incoherent-scatter radar at Poker Flat (PFISR), and the Sondrestrom ISR, have been utilized. Observations from these radars, together with those from complementary instruments, including satellites and other ground-based instruments, have enabled fundamental new understanding of the ionospheric electrodynamic properties associated with substorms. In this presentation, I focus on electrodynamics near the nightside Harang reversal region. Observations from the SuperDARN and the PFISR radars revealed that auroral activity at substorm onset is located near the center of the Harang reversal, which represents a key feature of magnetospheric and ionospheric convection and is part of the Region 2 system. The observations also show nightside convection flows exhibit repeatable, distinct variations at different locations relative to the substorm-related auroral activity. Taking advantage of the simultaneous flow and ionization measurements from PFISR, a current closure relation has been found between the Region 2 and the substorm field-aligned current systems. By synthesizing these observations, a 2-D comprehensive view of the nightside ionospheric electrodynamical features, including electrical equipotentials, flows and FACs, and their evolution associated with substorms has been constructed, which has revealed a strong coupling between the substorm and the Region 2 current systems. This study sheds new light on substorm-related magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and

  10. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  11. Altitude Dependence of Nightside Martian Suprathermal Electron Depletions as Revealed by MAVEN Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckiewicz, M.; Mazelle, C. X.; Garnier, P.; Andre, N.; Penou, E.; Beth, A.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Toublanc, D.; Mitchell, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Luhmann, J. G.; Lillis, R. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Andersson, L.; Halekas, J. S.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution) spacecraft is providing new detailed observations of the Martian ionosphere thanks to its unique orbital coverage and its sophisticated instrument suite. From November 16 2014 to February 28 2015 its periapsis sampled the nightside Northern latitudes of Mars from 30° to 75° down to 125 km altitude above regions with and without significant crustal magnetic sources. On almost each periapsis in the nightside ionosphere suprathermal electron depletions were detected. A simple but robust criterion based on data recorded by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) was implemented in order to detect all these electron depletions. This resulted in a dataset of 1742 depletions identified on 457 orbits among the 494 orbits where data were available during the time period under study. A statistical analysis reveals that the main ion and electron populations within the depletions are surprisingly constant in time and altitude. Absorption by CO2 is the main loss process for suprathermal electrons and electrons strongly peaked around 6 eV are resulting from this interaction. The observation of depletions appears however highly dependent on altitude. Depletions are mainly located above strong crustal magnetic sources above 170 km whereas the depletions observed for the first time below 170 km are globally scattered onto the Martian surface with no particular dependence on crustal fields. These results will be supplemented with new MAVEN data obtained above the southern hemisphere and will be contrasted with similar observations obtained from previous missions.

  12. Undersea interplate coupling off the western Japan revealed by GPS-A observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Watanabe, S. I.; Tashiro, T.

    2015-12-01

    The recurring devastating earthquakes in the Nankai and Sagami Troughs subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the continental plates (Eurasian and North American plates) have a potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in not-so-distant future. Many studies assumed the interplate coupling ratios using the onshore geodetic data only. However, the offshore region that has a potential to derive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved enough due to the observation network that is biased to land area. The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan (JHOD) have constructed the seafloor geodetic observation network on the seafloor surface using a GPS-acoustic combination technique (GPS-A) [e.g., Sato et al., 2011, Science] and observed seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai and Sagami Troughs subduction zones. We have set 17 sites off the western Japan to lead an undersea interplate coupling distribution. The observations around the Sagami Trough are consistent with the block motions presented by Nishimura [2011, Tectonophysics]. On the other hand, our seafloor geodetic observation network along the Nankai Trough revealed heterogeneity and complexity interplate coupling off the western Japan. The fast displacement rates observed in the eastern area indicate a strong interplate coupling around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. Our observations in the westernmost area also suggest that the area off the Cape Ashizuri has a high-coupling ratio. The slow displacement rate observed in the shallower area than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off the Cape Muroto-zaki reflects a weakening interplate coupling probably due to a subducting seamount. The observation in the westernmost area differs depending on the depth. The north deep area below Bungo-channel has a high-coupling ratio. The south shallow area has a low-coupling ratio. In these deep and shallow areas, VLFEs

  13. Fabrication of carbon nanotube AFM probes using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kang, Won-Seok; Choi, Bung-Sam; Choi, Sung-Wook; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have shown a significant potential for obtaining high-resolution imaging of nanostructure and biological materials. In this paper, we report a simple method to fabricate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanoprobes for AFM using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. Thiophenyl-modified SWNTs (SWNT-SHs) through amidation of SWNTs in chloroform allowed to be spread and form a stable Langmuir monolayer at the water/air interface. A simple two-step transfer process was used: (1) dipping conventional AFM probes into the Langmuir monolayer and (2) lifting the probes from the water surface. This results in the attachment of SWNTs onto the tips of AFM nanoprobes. We found that the SWNTs assembled on the nanoprobes were well-oriented and robust enough to maintain their shape and direction even after successive scans. AFM measurements of a nano-porous alumina substrate and deoxyribonucleic acid using SWNT-modified nanoprobes revealed that the curvature diameter of the nanoprobes was less than 3 nm and a fine resolution was obtained than that from conventional AFM probes. We also demonstrate that the LB method is a scalable process capable of simultaneously fabricating a large number of SWNT-modified nanoprobes.

  14. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  15. ULF wave power features in the topside ionosphere revealed by Swarm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Pilipenko, Viacheslav

    2015-09-01

    Recently developed automated methods for deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves are applied to the Swarm data sets in order to retrieve new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Here we present the first ULF wave observations by Swarm, analyzing 1 year data from the mission. We find evidence for the decay of the amplitude of the Pc3 (20-100 mHz) signal with altitude in the topside ionosphere as predicted by theoretical models of wave propagation. We show that the major characteristics of the Swarm ULF power maps generally agree with respect to the wave activity seen by the upper satellite and the lower pair of satellites when the power spectrum of the upper satellite is shifted by 1 h in magnetic local time. Moreover, a puzzling enhancement, not predicted by current ULF wave theories, of compressional Pc3 wave energy was revealed by Swarm in the region of South Atlantic Anomaly.

  16. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  17. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Insulator Contaminations Revealed by Daily Observations of Equivalent Salt Deposit Density

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Ling; Han, Ge; Zhu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Miao; Gong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The accurate estimation of deposits adhering on insulators is of great significance to prevent pollution flashovers which cause huge costs worldwide. Researchers have developed sensors using different technologies to monitor insulator contamination on a fine time scale. However, there is lack of analysis of these data to reveal spatial and temporal characteristics of insulator contamination, and as a result the scheduling of periodical maintenance of power facilities is highly dependent on personal experience. Owing to the deployment of novel sensors, daily Equivalent Salt Deposit Density (ESDD) observations of over two years were collected and analyzed for the first time. Results from 16 sites distributed in four regions of Hubei demonstrated that spatial heterogeneity can be seen at both the fine and coarse geographical scales, suggesting that current polluted area maps are necessary but are not sufficient conditions to guide the maintenance of power facilities. Both the local emission and the regional air pollution condition exert evident influences on deposit accumulation. A relationship between ESDD and PM10 was revealed by using regression analysis, proving that air pollution exerts influence on pollution accumulations on insulators. Moreover, the seasonality of ESDD was discovered for the first time by means of time series analysis, which could help engineers select appropriate times to clean the contamination. Besides, the trend component shows that the ESDD increases in a negative exponential fashion with the accumulation date (ESDD = a − b × exp(−time)) at a long time scale in real environments. PMID:25643058

  18. Planetary-scale wave structures of the earth's atmosphere revealed from the COSMIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisetty, S. K. A. V. Prasad Rao; Brahmanandam, P. S.; Uma, G.; Babu, A. Narendra; Huang, Ching-Yuang; Kumar, G. Anil; Ram, S. Tulasi; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2014-02-01

    GPS radio occultation (GPS RO) method, an active satellite-to-satellite remote sensing technique, is capable of producing accurate, all-weather, round the clock, global refractive index, density, pressure, and temperature profiles of the troposphere and stratosphere. This study presents planetary-scale equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in temperature profiles retrieved using COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) satellites during 2006-2009 and their interactions with background atmospheric conditions. It is found that the Kelvin waves are not only associated with wave periods of higher than 10 days (slow Kelvin waves) with higher zonal wave numbers (either 1 or 2), but also possessing downward phase progression, giving evidence that the source regions of them are located at lower altitudes. A thorough verification of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) reveals that deep convection activity has developed regularly over the Indonesian region, suggesting that the Kelvin waves are driven by the convective activity. The derived Kelvin waves show enhanced (diminished) tendencies during westward (eastward) phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in zonal winds, implying a mutual relation between both of them. The El Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) below 18 km and the QBO features between 18 and 27 km in temperature profiles are observed during May 2006-May 2010 with the help of an adaptive data analysis technique known as Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT). Further, temperature anomalies computed using COSMIC retrieved temperatures are critically evaluated during different phases of ENSO, which has revealed interesting results and are discussed in light of available literature.

  19. ULF wave power features in the topside ionosphere revealed by Swarm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Giannakis, Omiros

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed automated methods for detecting and deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves are applied to the Swarm data sets in order to retrieve new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Here, we present the first ULF wave observations by Swarm, by performing a statistical study on the occurence and properties of Pc3 waves (20-100 mHz) for a time period spanning two years. We derive distributions for various properties of the detected wave events (amplitude, peak frequency, duration, bandwidth) and examine evidence for the decay of the amplitude of the Pc3 signal with altitude, as predicted by theoretical models of wave propagation. We show that the major characteristics of the Swarm ULF power maps generally agree between observations made by the upper satellite and the lower pair of satellites, when the power spectrum of the upper satellite is shifted in local time, to account for the angular separation between their orbital planes. Moreover, a puzzling enhancement, not predicted by current ULF wave theories, of compressional Pc3 wave energy was revealed by Swarm in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly.

  20. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  1. AFM cantilever vibration detection with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, Taylor; Wagner, Ryan; Keller, Robert; Killgore, Jason

    Cantilever oscillations for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are conventionally measured with an optical lever system. The speed of AFM cantilevers can be increased by decreasing the size of the cantilever; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the current optical lever approach. Here we demonstrate an electron detection scheme in an SEM for detecting AFM cantilever oscillations. An oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to the propagation direction of a stationary ~ 1 nm diameter electron probe, and the oscillatory change in electron scattering resulting from the changing thickness of the electron irradiated area of the AFM tip is detected with a transmitted electron detector positioned below the AFM tip. We perform frequency sweep and ring-down experiments to determine the first resonant frequency and Q factor of an AFM cantilever.

  2. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  3. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  4. Postseismic deformation of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake revealed by repeated GPS/Acoustic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, F.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Hino, R.; Osada, Y.; Iinuma, T.

    2015-12-01

    Afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation are the major mechanisms of postseismic deformations caused by large earthquakes and hence provide us information on the mechanical and rheological properties of subduction zones. A number of studies have investigated the postseismic deformations of past huge earthquakes. For the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, Sun et al. [2014, Nature] indicated that viscoelastic relaxation is dominant based on their numerical model that explains both off-shore and on-shore geodetic data. However, the spatial extent of their off-shore geodetic data was limited in the area around the main rupture of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, and was not sufficient to reveal the whole postseismic deformation. To fill the gap in the site distribution, we have constructed 20 GPS/acoustic seafloor observation sites along the Japan Trench in Sep. 2012 and have repeatedly conducted surveys for 2.5 years since then. Estimated positions for individual surveys are weighted by their error and linearly fitted to get a displacement rate of the site. Our results clearly show spatial variation: trench-ward low rates (-5 cm/yr) in the north region of the main rupture zone, land-ward high rates (~10 cm/yr) in the main rupture zone, and trench-ward high rates (5-15 cm/yr) in the south region of the main rupture zone. Our results in the north region and the main rupture zone are roughly explained by the viscoelastic responses expected from the model of Sun et al. [2014]. However, slight systematic difference between them are also seen, which indicates the necessity of minor improvement of the viscoelastic model itself. Meanwhile, the displacements in the south region significantly differ from the viscoelastic response indicating significant contribution of afterslip near the trench. Thus, our observational facts provide new insight to the postseismic deformation process of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and will be utilized for improving the existing models.

  5. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Marcus T.; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation—dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input—both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals. PMID:26787854

  6. Brain responses in humans reveal ideal observer-like sensitivity to complex acoustic patterns.

    PubMed

    Barascud, Nicolas; Pearce, Marcus T; Griffiths, Timothy D; Friston, Karl J; Chait, Maria

    2016-02-01

    We use behavioral methods, magnetoencephalography, and functional MRI to investigate how human listeners discover temporal patterns and statistical regularities in complex sound sequences. Sensitivity to patterns is fundamental to sensory processing, in particular in the auditory system, because most auditory signals only have meaning as successions over time. Previous evidence suggests that the brain is tuned to the statistics of sensory stimulation. However, the process through which this arises has been elusive. We demonstrate that listeners are remarkably sensitive to the emergence of complex patterns within rapidly evolving sound sequences, performing on par with an ideal observer model. Brain responses reveal online processes of evidence accumulation--dynamic changes in tonic activity precisely correlate with the expected precision or predictability of ongoing auditory input--both in terms of deterministic (first-order) structure and the entropy of random sequences. Source analysis demonstrates an interaction between primary auditory cortex, hippocampus, and inferior frontal gyrus in the process of discovering the regularity within the ongoing sound sequence. The results are consistent with precision based predictive coding accounts of perceptual inference and provide compelling neurophysiological evidence of the brain's capacity to encode high-order temporal structure in sensory signals.

  7. Interaction between Coronal Mass Ejections: Limited Spatial Extent Revealed by SOHO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Reiner, Mike J.; Makela, Pertti; Yashiro, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    A spectacular CME interaction event was observed on 2013 May 22 by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission as confirmed by the radio signature detected by the Radio and Plasma Wave experiment (WAVES) on board the Wind spacecraft. The interaction event was also associated with an intense solar energetic particle event, typical of such events in solar cycles 23 and 24. Detailed height-time plots of the interacting CMEs at various position angles revealed a surprising result: only a limited spatial extent of the primary CME was affected by the interaction. The speed of the primary CME showed a sharp decline in the position angle range where it interacted with the preceding CME. At these position angles, the speed of the preceding CME increased. At position angles away from the interaction region, the speed of the primary CME remained roughly the same except for the usual drag deceleration. This result has important implications to theories on CME collision: treating the interacting CMEs to be rigid bodies and using the whole mass of the CMEs may not be correct.

  8. AFM and electroanalytical studies of synthetic oligonucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chiorcea Paquim, A-M; Diculescu, V C; Oretskaya, T S; Oliveira Brett, A M

    2004-11-15

    The first and most important step in the development and manufacture of a sensitive DNA-biosensor for hybridization detection is the immobilization procedure of the nucleic acid probe on the transducer surface, maintaining its mobility and conformational flexibility. MAC Mode AFM images were used to demonstrate that oligonucleotide (ODN) molecules adsorb spontaneously at the electrode surface. After adsorption, the ODN layers were formed by molecules with restricted mobility, as well as by superposed molecules, which can lead to reduced hybridization efficiency. The images also showed the existence of pores in the adsorbed ODN film that revealed large parts of the electrode surface, and enabled non-specific adsorption of other ODNs on the uncovered areas. Electrostatic immobilization onto a clean glassy carbon electrode surface was followed by hybridization with complementary sequences and by control experiments with non-complementary sequences, studied using differential pulse voltammetry. The data obtained showed that non-specific adsorption strongly influenced the results, which depended on the sequence of the ODNs. In order to reduce the contribution of non-specific adsorbed ODNs during hybridization experiments, the carbon electrode surface was modified. After modification, the AFM images showed an electrode completely covered by the ODN probe film, which prevented the undesirable binding of target ODN molecules to the electrode surface. The changes of interfacial capacitance that took place after hybridization or control experiments showed the formation of a mixed multilayer that strongly depended on the local environment of the immobilized ODN.

  9. Upper mantle structure of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates revealed by seafloor seismic array observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isse, Takehi; Shiobara, Hajime; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Sugioka, Hiroko; Ito, Aki

    2016-04-01

    Seismic tomography studies have revealed the structure and dynamics of Earth's interior since the 1980s. However, the spatial resolution of the oceanic region is not good enough caused by sparse distribution of the seismic stations. The observations with broadband ocean-bottom seismographs (BBOBSs) since the 2000s enabled us to obtain seismic tomography models with higher spatial resolution. Our Japanese BBOBS group deployed more than 100 BBOBSs in the Pacific Ocean and obtained a high-resolution (300-500 km) three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the upper mantle beneath northwestern and south Pacific Ocean by using surface wave tomography technique. In the northwestern Pacific Ocean, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate, we found that the shear wave structure in the Philippine sea plate is well correlated with the seafloor age in the upper 120 km, three separate slow anomalies in the mantle wedge at depth shallower than 100 km beneath the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, which have a close relationship with the three groups of frontal and rear arc volcanoes having distinct Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios, and that the Philippine Sea plate, which is a single plate, shows very large lateral variations in azimuthal and radial anisotropies compared with the Pacific plate. In the South Pacific Ocean, where midplate hotspots are concentrated, we found that the localized slow anomalies are found near hotspots in the upper mantle, estimated thickness of the lithosphere is about 90 km in average and is thinned by ~20 km in the vicinity of hotspots, which may represent thermal erosion due to mantle plumes.

  10. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  11. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  12. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  13. Review and perspectives of AFM application on the study of deformable drop/bubble interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Kai; Ma, Mengyu; Jin, Hang; Angeli, Panagiota; Gong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The applications of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on the study of dynamic interactions and film drainage between deformable bodies dispersed in aqueous solutions are reviewed in this article. Novel experimental designs and recent advances in experimental methodologies are presented, which show the advantage of using AFM as a tool for probing colloidal interactions. The effects of both DLVO and non-DLVO forces on the colloid stabilization mechanism are discussed. Good agreement is found between the force - drop/bubble deformation behaviour revealed by AFM measurements and the theoretical modeling of film drainage process, giving a convincing explanation of the occurrence of certain phenomenon. However, the behaviour and shape of deformable drops as they approach or retract is still not well resolved. In addition, when surfactants are present further research is needed on the absorption of surfactant molecules into the interfaces, their mobility and the effects on interfacial film properties.

  14. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  15. Cells mechanics with AFM: problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia

    2012-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to study mechanics of cells. Cell is far from being a homogeneous medium. This creates a number of problems which will be discussed as well as the ways to solve them. We will focus on the following problems: 1. Cellular surface brush (microvilli, glycocalyx..) surrounds cells. A simple model to separate the brush and cell deformation will be overviewed. 2. Problem of nonlinearity of stress-strain relation. Although unsolved, this may indirectly tested: the rigidity modulus should be reasonably independent of penetration. We will show that it can be achieved when using relatively dull AFM probes (the radii of microns) only. 3. Heterogeneity of cell surface. Cells are not homogeneous over the surface. We will discuss the question how many points is enough to characterize the cell. We will exemplify the above with human cervical epithelial cells. We will demonstrate that without proper consideration of the above problems, the error in defining the modulus of rigidity can easily reach an order of magnitude.

  16. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  17. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  18. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets.

  19. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. PMID:26972765

  20. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  1. Quantitative atomic resolution force imaging on epitaxial graphene with reactive and nonreactive AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Boneschanscher, Mark P; van der Lit, Joost; Sun, Zhixiang; Swart, Ingmar; Liljeroth, Peter; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2012-11-27

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of graphene and graphite show contrast with atomic periodicity. However, the contrast patterns vary depending on the atomic termination of the AFM tip apex and the tip-sample distance, hampering the identification of the atomic positions. Here, we report quantitative AFM imaging of epitaxial graphene using inert (carbon-monoxide-terminated) and reactive (iridium-terminated) tips. The atomic image contrast is markedly different with these tip terminations. With a reactive tip, we observe an inversion from attractive to repulsive atomic contrast with decreasing tip-sample distance, while a nonreactive tip only yields repulsive atomic contrast. We are able to identify the atoms with both tips at any tip-sample distance. This is a prerequisite for future structural and chemical analysis of adatoms, defects, and the edges of graphene nanostructures, crucial for understanding nanoscale graphene devices.

  2. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Gumí-Audenis, B; Carlà, F; Vitorino, M V; Panzarella, A; Porcar, L; Boilot, M; Guerber, S; Bernard, P; Rodrigues, M S; Sanz, F; Giannotti, M I; Costa, L

    2015-11-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  3. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  4. AFM studies of semicrystalline polymer/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this work are to elucidate the effects of interaction strength on the crystallization of a polymer near an inorganic surface; connect filler induced polymer crystallinity with resulting property changes, especially for strongly interacting (i.e. hydrogen bonding) systems; and to devise atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods for probing the crystallinity and properties of polymer/layered silicate systems at the nanometer level. Three inorganically filled systems were studied: (1) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), (2) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), and (3) polypropylene (PP). Since it has the strongest, interactions, the PVA system is investigated first. AFM is used in conjunction with x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to show that strong polymer/filler interactions can promote a different crystalline structure and a different morphology than those seen in the bulk. The study then proceeds to the weakly interacting PEO/inorganic system where it is found that the inorganic layers disrupt crystalline morphology, but do not change the crystal structure. Furthermore, crystallization always occurs in volumes away from the inorganic filler. The third system (neutral interactions), PP/inorganic is then discussed. The three systems are compared with each other, and is found that the crystalline morphology and structure is highly dependent upon the strength of interaction between the polymer and filler. Due to its far-reaching morphology changes, the strongly interacting system was chosen for property studies. The composite structure study revealed a coexistence of exfoliated and intercalated MMT layers, especially for low and moderate silicate loadings. The inorganic layers promote a new crystalline phase different than the one of the respective neat PVA, characterized by higher melting temperature and a different crystal structure. This new crystal phase reflects on the composite materials properties, which have mechanical, thermal, and water

  5. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    , AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

  6. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  8. High-resolution AFM topographs of Rubrivivax gelatinosus light-harvesting complex LH2

    PubMed Central

    Scheuring, Simon; Reiss-Husson, Francoise; Engel, Andreas; Rigaud, Jean-Louis; Ranck, Jean-Luc

    2001-01-01

    Light-harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) are the accessory antenna proteins in the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus and are built up of αβ-heterodimers containing three bacteriochlorophylls and one carotenoid each. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate reconstituted LH2 from Rubrivivax gelatinosus, which has a C-terminal hydrophobic extension of 21 amino acids on the α-subunit. High-resolution topographs revealed a nonameric organization of the regularly packed cylindrical complexes incorporated into the membrane in both orientations. Native LH2 showed one surface which protruded by ∼6 Å and one that protruded by ∼14 Å from the membrane. Topographs of samples reconstituted with thermolysin-digested LH2 revealed a height reduction of the strongly protruding surface to ∼9 Å, and a change of its surface appearance. These results suggested that the α-subunit of R.gelatinosus comprises a single transmembrane helix and an extrinsic C-terminus, and allowed the periplasmic surface to be assigned. Occasionally, large rings (∼120 Å diameter) surrounded by LH2 rings were observed. Their diameter and appearance suggest the large rings to be LH1 complexes. PMID:11406579

  9. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tyler D; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2014-06-24

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88-5 μm at a resolution of 12-18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. PMID:24876272

  10. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tyler D; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2014-06-24

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan's atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88-5 μm at a resolution of 12-18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. Titan solar occultation observations reveal transit spectra of a hazy world

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude clouds and hazes are integral to understanding exoplanet observations, and are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra. However, it is difficult to make inferences from these data because of the need to disentangle effects of gas absorption from haze extinction. Here, we turn to the quintessential hazy world, Titan, to clarify how high-altitude hazes influence transit spectra. We use solar occultation observations of Titan’s atmosphere from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer aboard National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Data span 0.88–5 μm at a resolution of 12–18 nm, with uncertainties typically smaller than 1%. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan’s haze affects its transit spectrum. Our spectra show strong methane-absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases. Most importantly, the data demonstrate that high-altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding observations to pressures smaller than 0.1–10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous-absorption features. These findings have important consequences for interpreting future exoplanet observations, including those from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. PMID:24876272

  12. Observed bromodomain flexibility reveals histone peptide- and small molecule ligand-compatible forms of ATAD2.

    PubMed

    Poncet-Montange, Guillaume; Zhan, Yanai; Bardenhagen, Jennifer P; Petrocchi, Alessia; Leo, Elisabetta; Shi, Xi; Lee, Gilbert R; Leonard, Paul G; Geck Do, Mary K; Cardozo, Mario G; Andersen, Jannik N; Palmer, Wylie S; Jones, Philip; Ladbury, John E

    2015-03-01

    Preventing histone recognition by bromodomains emerges as an attractive therapeutic approach in cancer. Overexpression of ATAD2 (ATPase family AAA domain-containing 2 isoform A) in cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis making the bromodomain of ATAD2 a promising epigenetic therapeutic target. In the development of an in vitro assay and identification of small molecule ligands, we conducted structure-guided studies which revealed a conformationally flexible ATAD2 bromodomain. Structural studies on apo-, peptide-and small molecule-ATAD2 complexes (by co-crystallization) revealed that the bromodomain adopts a 'closed', histone-compatible conformation and a more 'open' ligand-compatible conformation of the binding site respectively. An unexpected conformational change of the conserved asparagine residue plays an important role in driving the peptide-binding conformation remodelling. We also identified dimethylisoxazole-containing ligands as ATAD2 binders which aided in the validation of the in vitro screen and in the analysis of these conformational studies.

  13. Spitzer Observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 Reveal a New Path toward Breaking Strong Microlens Degeneracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, V.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Udalski, A.; Calchi Novati, S.; Bond, I. A.; Han, C.; Hundertmark, M.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; and; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; Zhu, W.; Spitzer Team; Abe, F.; Asakura, Y.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Donachie, M.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Hirao, Y.; Inayama, K.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Li, M. C. A.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Nagakane, M.; Nishioka, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Oyokawa, H.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sharan, A.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNet Group; Dominik, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Andersen, M. I.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Rasmussen, R. T.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEp; Maoz, D.; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Wise Group

    2016-03-01

    Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively break a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. We argue that several types of discrete degeneracies can be broken via such space-based parallax observations.

  14. Supermassive black holes in the EAGLE Universe. Revealing the observables of their growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Guevara, Yetli; Bower, Richard G.; Schaye, Joop; McAlpine, Stuart; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Frenk, Carlos S.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of supermassive black holes in the `Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments' (EAGLE) cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The largest of the EAGLE volumes covers a (100 cMpc)3 and includes state-of-the-art physical models for star formation and black hole growth that depend only on local gas properties. We focus on the black hole mass function, Eddington ratio distribution and the implied duty cycle of nuclear activity. The simulation is broadly consistent with observational constraints on these quantities. In order to make a more direct comparison with observational data, we calculate the soft and hard X-ray luminosity functions of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). Between redshifts 0 and 1, the simulation is in agreement with data. At higher redshifts, the simulation tends to underpredict the luminosities of the brightest observed AGN. This may be due to the limited volume of the simulation, or a fundamental deficiency of the underlying model. It seems unlikely that additional unresolved variability can account for this difference. The simulation shows a similar `downsizing' of the AGN population as seen in observational surveys.

  15. HII 2407: AN ECLIPSING BINARY REVEALED BY K2 OBSERVATIONS OF THE PLEIADES

    SciTech Connect

    David, Trevor J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Zhang, Celia; Riddle, Reed L.; Stauffer, John; Rebull, L. M.; Cody, Ann Marie; Conroy, Kyle; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pope, Benjamin; Aigrain, Suzanne; Gillen, Ed; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Barrado, David; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph

    2015-11-20

    The star HII 2407 is a member of the relatively young Pleiades star cluster and was previously discovered to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary. It is newly identified here within Kepler/K2 photometric time series data as an eclipsing binary system. Mutual fitting of the radial velocity and photometric data leads to an orbital solution and constraints on fundamental stellar parameters. While the primary has arrived on the main sequence, the secondary is still pre-main sequence and we compare our results for the M/M{sub ⊙} and R/R{sub ⊙} values with stellar evolutionary models. We also demonstrate that the system is likely to be tidally synchronized. Follow-up infrared spectroscopy is likely to reveal the lines of the secondary, allowing for dynamically measured masses and elevating the system to benchmark eclipsing binary status.

  16. Mars surface diversity as revealed by the OMEGA/Mars Express observations.

    PubMed

    Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Gendrin, Aline; Gondet, Brigitte; Poulet, François; Berthé, Michel; Soufflot, Alain; Arvidson, Ray; Mangold, Nicolas; Mustard, John; Drossart, P

    2005-03-11

    The Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activité (OMEGA) investigation, on board the European Space Agency Mars Express mission, is mapping the surface composition of Mars at a 0.3- to 5-kilometer resolution by means of visible-near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imagery. The data acquired during the first 9 months of the mission already reveal a diverse and complex surface mineralogy, offering key insights into the evolution of Mars. OMEGA has identified and mapped mafic iron-bearing silicates of both the northern and southern crust, localized concentrations of hydrated phyllosilicates and sulfates but no carbonates, and ices and frosts with a water-ice composition of the north polar perennial cap, as for the south cap, covered by a thin carbon dioxide-ice veneer.

  17. Bimodal distribution of free tropospheric ozone over the tropical western Pacific revealed by airborne observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L. L.; Honomichl, S. B.; Randel, W. J.; Apel, E. C.; Atlas, E. L.; Beaton, S. P.; Bresch, J. F.; Hornbrook, R.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    A recent airborne field campaign over the remote western Pacific obtained the first intensive in situ ozone sampling over the warm pool region from oceanic surface to 15 km altitude (near 360 K potential temperature level). The new data set quantifies ozone in the tropical tropopause layer under significant influence of convective outflow. The analysis further reveals a bimodal distribution of free tropospheric ozone mixing ratio. A primary mode, narrowly distributed around 20 ppbv, dominates the troposphere from the surface to 15 km. A secondary mode, broadly distributed with a 60 ppbv modal value, is prominent between 3 and 8 km (320 K to 340 K potential temperature levels). The latter mode occurs as persistent layers of ozone-rich drier air and is characterized by relative humidity under 45%. Possible controlling mechanisms are discussed. These findings provide new insight into the physical interpretation of the "S"-shaped mean ozone profiles in the tropics.

  18. Structural and Mechanical Mechanisms of Ocular Tissues Probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Rico, Felix; Moy, Vincent T.

    In recent years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become an important tool in ophthalmic research. It has gained popularity largely because AFM is not restricted by the diffraction limits of light microscopy and can be applied to resolve images with molecular resolution. AFM is a minimally invasive technique and can be used to visualize molecular structures under near-physiological conditions. In addition, the AFM can be employed as a force apparatus to characterize the viscoelastic properties of biomaterials on the micron level and at the level of individual proteins. In this article, we summarize recent AFM studies of ocular tissues, while highlighting the great potential of AFM technology in ophthalmic research. Previous research demonstrates the versatility of the AFM as high resolution imaging technique and as a sensitive force apparatus for probing the mechanical properties of ocular tissues. The structural and mechanical properties of ocular tissues are of major importance to the understanding of the optomechanical functions of the human eye. In addition, AFM has played an important role in the development and characterization of ocular biomaterials, such as contact lenses and intraocular lenses. Studying ocular tissues using Atomic Force Microscopy has enabled several advances in ophthalmic research.

  19. Early-time observations of Type Ia supernovae to reveal progenitor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. Andrew; Parrent, Jerod; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Nugent, Peter; Dilday, Benjamin; Graham, Melissa

    2013-02-01

    SNe Ia remain nature's best standardized candles, and yet their progenitors have long been a mystery. However, it is now clear that there is a multiplicity of SN Ia progenitors. Recent findings that SNe Ia correct to different absolute magnitudes in different mass galaxies may be related to differing progenitors, and/or explosion physics. With this proposal we will obtrain early GMOS spectroscopy of SNe a few days after explosion with three main goals: (1) trigger our high resolution spectroscopy time on Keck HIRES and VLT X-Shooter to search for circumstellar material indicative of a single degenerate origin, (2) build the first well-controlled sample studying unburned progenitor carbon in SNe Ia, testing whether this traces white dwarf mergers or explosion physics (3) type SNe as early as possible to enable follow-up observations and studies, including cosmology. Our results depend on early-time observations for which the queue-scheduled Gemini is uniquely suited.

  20. Early-time observations of Type Ia supernovae to reveal progenitors and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Parrent, Jerod; Nugent, Peter; Ellis, Richard; Dilday, Benjamin; Graham, Melissa; Hook, Isobel

    2012-08-01

    SNe Ia remain nature's best standardized candles, and yet their progenitors have long been a mystery. However, it is now clear that there is a multiplicity of SN Ia progenitors. Recent findings that SNe Ia correct to different absolute magnitudes in different mass galaxies may be related to differing progenitors, and/or progenitor metallicity. With this proposal we will obtrain early GMOS spectroscopy of SNe a few days after explosion with three main goals: (1) to trigger our proposed HST Cycle 20 STIS observations probing early UV spectra and thus metallicity, (2) trigger our high resolution spectroscopy time on Keck HIRES and VLT X-shooter to search for circumstellar material indicative of a single degenerate origin, (3) build the first well-controlled sample studying unburned progenitor carbon in SNe Ia, testing whether this traces white dwarf mergers or explosion physics. Our results depend on early-time observations for which the queue-scheduled Gemini is uniquely suited.

  1. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process-a search state and a recognition state-facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state.

  2. Hemispherical Nature of EUV Shocks Revealed by SOHO, STEREO, and SDO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Nitta, N.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    EUV wave transients associated with type II radio bursts are manifestation of CME-driven shocks in the solar corona. We use recent EUV wave observations from SOHO, STEREO, and SDO for a set of CMEs to show that the EUV transients have a spherical shape in the inner corona. We demonstrate this by showing that the radius of the EUV transient on the disk observed by one instrument is approximately equal to the height of the wave above the solar surface in an orthogonal view provided by another instrument. The study also shows that the CME-driven shocks often form very low in the corona at a heliocentric distance of 1.2 Rs, even smaller than the previous estimates from STEREO/CORl data (Gopalswamy et aI., 2009, Solar Phys. 259, 227). These results have important implications for the acceleration of solar energetic particles by CMEs

  3. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R; Stock, Michael G; Edens, Harald E; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J; Stanley, Mark A; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. The breakdown is found to have a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in nature and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown. PMID:26876654

  4. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms

    DOE PAGES

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Stock, Michael G.; Edens, Harald E.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J.; Stanley, Mark A.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-15

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. We find that the breakdown has a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in naturemore » and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown.« less

  5. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process—a search state and a recognition state—facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state. PMID:26027871

  6. Direct observation of TALE protein dynamics reveals a two-state search mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2015-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins are a class of programmable DNA-binding proteins for which the fundamental mechanisms governing the search process are not fully understood. Here we use single-molecule techniques to directly observe TALE search dynamics along DNA templates. We find that TALE proteins are capable of rapid diffusion along DNA using a combination of sliding and hopping behaviour, which suggests that the TALE search process is governed in part by facilitated diffusion. We also observe that TALE proteins exhibit two distinct modes of action during the search process--a search state and a recognition state--facilitated by different subdomains in monomeric TALE proteins. Using TALE truncation mutants, we further demonstrate that the N-terminal region of TALEs is required for the initial non-specific binding and subsequent rapid search along DNA, whereas the central repeat domain is required for transitioning into the site-specific recognition state.

  7. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R; Stock, Michael G; Edens, Harald E; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J; Stanley, Mark A; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-15

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. The breakdown is found to have a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in nature and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown.

  8. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms

    PubMed Central

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Stock, Michael G.; Edens, Harald E.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J.; Stanley, Mark A.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. The breakdown is found to have a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in nature and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown. PMID:26876654

  9. Observations of Supersonic Downflows in a Sunspot Light Bridge as Revealed by Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, R. E.; Rubio, L. R. B.; Mathew, S. K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2012-08-01

    Recent high resolution spectropolarimetric observations from Hinode detected the presence of supersonic downflows in a sunspot light bridge (Louis et al. 2009). These downflows occurred in localized patches, close to regions where the field azimuth changed by a large value. This apparent discontinuity in the field azimuth was seen along a thin ridge running along the western edge of the light bridge. Some, but not all, of these downflowing patches were co-spatial with chromospheric brightness enhancements seen in Ca II H filtergrams. The presence of magnetic inhomogeneities at scales of 0.″3 could facilitate the reconnection of field lines in the lower chromosphere whose signatures might be the supersonic downflows and the brightness enhancements that have been observed.

  10. Morphological observations of Diplodia maydis on synthetic and natural substrates as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J A; Campbell, L L; Pappelis, A J

    1974-01-01

    Mycelial and spore morphology of Diplodia maydis were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy after growth on various media and natural substrates (oat and corn kernels, and corn husks). Of several specimen preparation methods studied, Parducz fixation followed by critical-point or freeze-drying gave adequate preservation for pycnidia, mycelia, and spores. Morphological characteristics were similar in rotary and reciprocal shaker cultures and differed from that found in stationary cultures in the amount of slime-like material produced and precipitated matter on the mycelial surfaces. In general, mycelial surfaces were smooth. Large areas of coalesced material were present in all samples examined. Slime-like material produced in liquid media appeared as a finely laced net, randomly appearing throughout the mycelia with bead-like structures present along the net. A fine netting also was observed interspersed among the spores inside the pycnidia obtained from oats. Slime-like material was observed to cover the pycnidia produced on oat and corn kernels. In the latter case, the spores were less protected by the outer slime-like covering. Thickened node-like structures were observed in mycelial mats produced in modified Fries 2 medium, on potato dextrose agar plates, and on infected oats. Round and ovate thickened node-like structures were observed in mycelium produced on corn kernels. In general, node-like structures were less abundant in mycelia from naturally infected substrates. Conidia were commonly rounded to tapered and two celled, with a distinctive ridged septum at the middle. Dried spores were collapsed in a characteristic flask-like fashion. PMID:4203784

  11. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions. PMID:23721486

  12. Radio Observations Reveal a Smooth Circumstellar Environment Around the Extraordinary Type Ib Supernova 2012au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chomiuk, Laura; Margutti, Raffaella; Medvedev, Mikhail; Milisavljevic, Dan; Chakraborti, Sayan; Chevalier, Roger; Chugai, Nikolai; Dittmann, Jason; Drout, Maria; Fransson, Claes; Nakar, Ehud; Sanders, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2012au, an energetic, radio-luminous supernova of Type Ib that exhibits multi-wavelength properties bridging subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae, hypernovae, and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from a shock-heated circumburst medium that has a wind density profile (ρvpropr -2). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave v ≈ 0.2 c and a radius of r ≈ 1.4 × 1016cm at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a wind velocity of 1000 km s-1, we determine the mass-loss rate of the progenitor to be \\dot{M} = 3.6 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio-emitting material to be E ≈ 1047 erg, which is intermediate to SN 1998bw and SN 2002ap. The evolution of the radio light curve of SN 2012au is in agreement with its interaction with a smoothly distributed circumburst medium and the absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to r ≈ 1017 cm from the supernova site. We conclude that the bright radio emission from SN 2012au was not dissimilar from other core-collapse supernovae despite its extraordinary optical properties, and that the evolution of the SN 2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet, marked with a steady mass loss, during the final years preceding explosion.

  13. Radio observations reveal a smooth circumstellar environment around the extraordinary type Ib supernova 2012au

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Chakraborti, Sayan; Dittmann, Jason; Drout, Maria; Sanders, Nathan; Chomiuk, Laura; Medvedev, Mikhail; Chevalier, Roger; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-12-10

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2012au, an energetic, radio-luminous supernova of Type Ib that exhibits multi-wavelength properties bridging subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae, hypernovae, and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from a shock-heated circumburst medium that has a wind density profile (ρ∝r {sup –2}). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave v ≈ 0.2 c and a radius of r ≈ 1.4 × 10{sup 16}cm at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a wind velocity of 1000 km s{sup –1}, we determine the mass-loss rate of the progenitor to be M-dot =3.6×10{sup −6} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio-emitting material to be E ≈ 10{sup 47} erg, which is intermediate to SN 1998bw and SN 2002ap. The evolution of the radio light curve of SN 2012au is in agreement with its interaction with a smoothly distributed circumburst medium and the absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to r ≈ 10{sup 17} cm from the supernova site. We conclude that the bright radio emission from SN 2012au was not dissimilar from other core-collapse supernovae despite its extraordinary optical properties, and that the evolution of the SN 2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet, marked with a steady mass loss, during the final years preceding explosion.

  14. Study of Thin Oxide Films with NC-AFM: Atomically Resolved Imaging and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, M.; Simon, G. H.; König, T.

    Results presented in the following show structural analysis of metaloxide surfaces and the extraction of physical quantities from the force field above such a surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). The measurements have been performed with our dual mode NC-AFM/STM in ultrahigh vacuum at 5 K. The introduction will be followed by a description of the experimental setup, including the ultrahigh vacuum cryogenic environment and our tuning fork tunneling current and force sensor. The sensor parameters affecting the measurements are given together with an amplitude characterization method. In the next section, a structure determination of ultrathin Alumina/NiAl(110) is shown. Atomic resolution could be achieved throughout both reflection domain unit cells. NC-AFM reveals details of morphological features, interconnections to substrate-film interactions, and comparability to theory also with respect to topographic height. In the last section, we present measurements beyond imaging, namely spectroscopy data taken on thin MgO films grown on Ag(001). Force-distance measurements based on atomically resolved NC-AFM images of these films have been taken. Inequivalent sites could be resolved and their effect on nucleation and adsorption processes is debated. Furthermore, work function shift measurements on different MgO film thicknesses grown on Ag(001) are studied and the impact of this shift on the catalytic properties of adsorbed metal species is discussed.

  15. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  16. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  17. Lunar crater ejecta: Physical properties revealed by radar and thermal infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Tai Udovicic, C. J.; Campbell, B. A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the physical properties, and changes through time, of lunar impact ejecta using radar and thermal infrared data. We use data from two instruments on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) - the Diviner thermal radiometer and the Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) radar instrument - together with Earth-based radar observations. We use this multiwavelength intercomparison to constrain block sizes and to distinguish surface from buried rocks in proximal ejecta deposits. We find that radar-detectable rocks buried within the upper meter of regolith can remain undisturbed by surface processes such as micrometeorite bombardment for >3 Gyr. We also investigate the thermophysical properties of radar-dark haloes, comprised of fine-grained, rock-poor ejecta distal to the blocky proximal ejecta. Using Diviner data, we confirm that the halo material is depleted in surface rocks, but show that it is otherwise thermophysically indistinct from background regolith. We also find that radar-dark haloes, like the blocky ejecta, remain visible in radar observations for craters with ages >3 Ga, indicating that regolith overturn processes cannot replenish their block populations on that timescale.

  18. WEAK TURBULENCE IN THE HD 163296 PROTOPLANETARY DISK REVEALED BY ALMA CO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, Kevin M.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.; Chiang, Eugene; Kerzner, Skylar; Simon, Jacob B.

    2015-11-10

    Turbulence can transport angular momentum in protoplanetary disks and influence the growth and evolution of planets. With spatially and spectrally resolved molecular emission line measurements provided by (sub)millimeter interferometric observations, it is possible to directly measure non-thermal motions in the disk gas that can be attributed to this turbulence. We report a new constraint on the turbulence in the disk around HD 163296, a nearby young A star, determined from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Science Verification observations of four CO emission lines (the CO(3-2), CO(2-1), {sup 13}CO(2-1), and C{sup 18}O(2-1) transitions). The different optical depths for these lines permit probes of non-thermal line-widths at a range of physical conditions (temperature and density) and depths into the disk interior. We derive stringent limits on the non-thermal motions in the upper layers of the outer disk such that any contribution to the line-widths from turbulence is <3% of the local sound speed. These limits are approximately an order of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions for full-blown magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability, potentially suggesting that this mechanism is less efficient in the outer (R ≳ 30 AU) disk than has been previously considered.

  19. Weak Turbulence in the HD 163296 Protoplanetary Disk Revealed by ALMA CO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Kevin M.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene; Simon, Jacob B.; Kerzner, Skylar; Wilner, David J.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence can transport angular momentum in protoplanetary disks and influence the growth and evolution of planets. With spatially and spectrally resolved molecular emission line measurements provided by (sub)millimeter interferometric observations, it is possible to directly measure non-thermal motions in the disk gas that can be attributed to this turbulence. We report a new constraint on the turbulence in the disk around HD 163296, a nearby young A star, determined from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Science Verification observations of four CO emission lines (the CO(3-2), CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and C18O(2-1) transitions). The different optical depths for these lines permit probes of non-thermal line-widths at a range of physical conditions (temperature and density) and depths into the disk interior. We derive stringent limits on the non-thermal motions in the upper layers of the outer disk such that any contribution to the line-widths from turbulence is <3% of the local sound speed. These limits are approximately an order of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions for full-blown magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability, potentially suggesting that this mechanism is less efficient in the outer (R ≳ 30 AU) disk than has been previously considered.

  20. Upper ocean response to Hurricane Gonzalo (2014): Salinity effects revealed by targeted and sustained underwater glider observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, Ricardo; Goni, Gustavo; Bringas, Francis; Lee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Halliwell, George; Dong, Jili; Morell, Julio; Pomales, Luis

    2015-09-01

    During October 2014, Hurricane Gonzalo traveled within 85 km from the location of an underwater glider situated north of Puerto Rico. Observations collected before, during, and after the passage of this hurricane were analyzed to improve our understanding of the upper ocean response to hurricane winds. The main finding in this study is that salinity potentially played an important role on changes observed in the upper ocean; a near-surface barrier layer likely suppressed the hurricane-induced upper ocean cooling, leading to smaller than expected temperature changes. Poststorm observations also revealed a partial recovery of the ocean to prestorm conditions 11 days after the hurricane. Comparison with a coupled ocean-atmosphere hurricane model indicates that model-observations discrepancies are largely linked to salinity effects described. Results presented in this study emphasize the value of underwater glider observations for improving our knowledge of how the ocean responds to tropical cyclone winds and for tropical cyclone intensification studies and forecasts.

  1. Source properties of microearthquakes revealed by near-source observation at SAFOD (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, K.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Near-source observation of earthquakes in deep boreholes and mines provides significant opportunities to enhance our understanding of the source properties of earthquakes. Short hypocentral distances and a high-Q environment make it possible to observe earthquake processes that cannot be seen in shallow boreholes or at the surface. The SAFOD Main Hole is a 3.2 km-deep inclined borehole that crosses the active traces of the San Andreas Fault. A 3-component 15 Hz GS-20DM geophone was deployed within the fault zone at depths between 2350 and 2750 m. Because of the close proximity to earthquake sources, we routinely observed earthquakes with Mw < 0 with high signal-to-noise ratio. Events were recorded at three different sampling rates (1000, 2000, and 4000 sps) depending on observation period (2005 - 2010). This study focuses on earthquakes with S-P time differences shorter than 0.5s, corresponding to hypocentral distance less than 3 km. Among more than 400 earthquakes, we selected 117 events classified into 35 clusters on the basis of waveform similarity at low frequencies. Selected events range in size from approximately Mw -3 to Mw 2. The dataset includes many events in three clusters that formed the SAFOD drilling target; San Francisco, Los Angeles and Hawaii named as their relative positions with respect to those cities. We determined source parameters by the Multi-Window Spectral Ratio (MWSR) method (Imanishi and Ellsworth, 2006). The key step in the method is to stack the ratios calculated from moving windows taken along the record starting with the direct waves. We confirmed that stacking better suppresses the random noise due to differences in path than single-window methods, producing a better estimate of the source spectral ratio. For Mw>-1, the calculated stress drops range between 0.1 and 100 MPa. These observations indicate that there is no breakdown in stress drop scaling for Mw>-1. The stacked spectral ratios show that corner frequencies of events for

  2. ULF wave power features in the topside ionosphere revealed by Swarm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.

    2015-04-01

    Recently developed automated methods for deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves are applied to the Swarm datasets in order to retrieve, on an operational basis, new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Processing Swarm measurements with these methods helps to elucidate the processes influencing the generation and propagation of ULF waves, which in turn play a crucial role in magnetospheric dynamics. Here we present the first ULF wave observations by Swarm, obtained by applying our analysis tools to the latest months of the mission (i.e., after the constellation attained its final configuration) using scalar magnetic field data. We find that different local times (LTs) correspond to the maximum wave activity seen by the upper satellite and the lower pair of satellites. If these initial results were to be confirmed, it could imply significant spatial variability of ULF wave turbulence in the upper ionosphere.

  3. Unambiguous observation of blocked states reveals altered, blocker-induced, cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N. Lowri; Williams, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of ions through membrane channels is precisely regulated by gates. The architecture and function of these elements have been studied extensively, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying gating. Recent investigations have focused on ion occupancy of the channel’s selectivity filter and its ability to alter gating, with most studies involving prokaryotic K+ channels. Some studies used large quaternary ammonium blocker molecules to examine the effects of altered ionic flux on gating. However, the absence of blocking events that are visibly distinct from closing events in K+ channels makes unambiguous interpretation of data from single channel recordings difficult. In this study, the large K+ conductance of the RyR2 channel permits direct observation of blocking events as distinct subconductance states and for the first time demonstrates the differential effects of blocker molecules on channel gating. This experimental platform provides valuable insights into mechanisms of blocker-induced modulation of ion channel gating. PMID:27703263

  4. Crustal Deformation and Seismicity in Southern Bavaria revealed by GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völksen, C.; Hackl, M.

    2012-04-01

    A geodetic network consisting of approximately 30 GNSS stations in Southern Bavaria, bordered by the Alps and the river Danube within Bavaria, has been analysed over the past 5 years. The network itself consists of several GNSS stations that have been installed for crustal deformation studies in the Bavarian Alps, some sites of the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) and mainly stations of the GNSS network of the Bavarian Office for Surveying and Geographic Information. The later stations mainly serve for real-time positioning at the 1 cm level for engineering surveys, land register, aerial imagery and other surveying applications. For these sites it is crucial that the data are permanently available, reliable, integrity monitored and well maintained. Since the focus of these sites is not crustal deformation monitoring they are continuously modernized and the equipment is regularly exchanged to fulfil the most recent real-time standards, which in turn provokes frequent coordinate jumps due to the systematic biases caused by the different GNSS antennas or receivers. It is therefore necessary to analyse the time series of the coordinate changes very carefully in order to estimate a reliable mean velocity along with the uncertainty for each site with frequent position shifts within the entire observation period. The derived geodetic velocity models can be used to identify rotations of the continental crust or even active geological features. In addition 2-D strain rate tensors have been derived based on the geodetic velocity model. The analysis of the tensors provide strain characteristics like dilatation and shear strain rates, which in turn support the seismic hazard assessment. Based on the analysed data, two areas of high strain rates have been identified that agree very well with the observed seismicity in Bavaria.

  5. Ocean impact on decadal Atlantic climate variability revealed by sea-level observations.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Gerard D; Haigh, Ivan D; Hirschi, Joël J-M; Grist, Jeremy P; Smeed, David A

    2015-05-28

    Decadal variability is a notable feature of the Atlantic Ocean and the climate of the regions it influences. Prominently, this is manifested in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) in sea surface temperatures. Positive (negative) phases of the AMO coincide with warmer (colder) North Atlantic sea surface temperatures. The AMO is linked with decadal climate fluctuations, such as Indian and Sahel rainfall, European summer precipitation, Atlantic hurricanes and variations in global temperatures. It is widely believed that ocean circulation drives the phase changes of the AMO by controlling ocean heat content. However, there are no direct observations of ocean circulation of sufficient length to support this, leading to questions about whether the AMO is controlled from another source. Here we provide observational evidence of the widely hypothesized link between ocean circulation and the AMO. We take a new approach, using sea level along the east coast of the United States to estimate ocean circulation on decadal timescales. We show that ocean circulation responds to the first mode of Atlantic atmospheric forcing, the North Atlantic Oscillation, through circulation changes between the subtropical and subpolar gyres--the intergyre region. These circulation changes affect the decadal evolution of North Atlantic heat content and, consequently, the phases of the AMO. The Atlantic overturning circulation is declining and the AMO is moving to a negative phase. This may offer a brief respite from the persistent rise of global temperatures, but in the coupled system we describe, there are compensating effects. In this case, the negative AMO is associated with a continued acceleration of sea-level rise along the northeast coast of the United States.

  6. Evidence of Viscoelastic Deformation following the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake Revealed from Seafloor Geodetic Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S. I.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yokota, Y.; Ujihara, N.; Asada, A.

    2014-12-01

    The great Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) occurred on 11th March, 2011 along the Japan Trench, off the Pacific coast of eastern Japan. The source region spreads over an area with a length of 500 km and a width of 200 km, almost all part of which is beneath the seafloor. We, the group of Japan Coast Guard (JCG), have continued repeated GPS-acoustic seafloor positioning after the Tohoku-oki earthquake at six seafloor sites in the offshore source region, the results of which are expected to provide information leading to better understandings of postseismic processes. In contrast to the coastal GNSS sites where trenchward-upward movements were reported, the offshore sites above the main rupture zone in the northern part of the source region exhibit landward displacements of tens of centimeters with significant subsidence from more than three years of repeated observations. At the sites above around the edge of the main rupture zone, smaller amount of trench-normal movements were found. Although the terrestrial movements were reasonably interpreted by afterslip beneath the coastal area, these offshore results are rather consistent with effects predicted from viscoelastic relaxation in the upper mantle, providing definitive evidence of its occurrence. On the other hand, a site in the southern part of the source region with relatively small coseismic slips shows not only trenchward movements with logarithmical decay with time but also significant subsidence, which imply superposition of effects from viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip. In this presentation, we report our latest observation results and discuss postseismic movements on the seafloor just above the source region for more than three years after the earthquake.

  7. Ocean impact on decadal Atlantic climate variability revealed by sea-level observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Gerard D.; Haigh, Ivan D.; Hirschi, Joël J.-M.; Grist, Jeremy P.; Smeed, David A.

    2015-05-01

    Decadal variability is a notable feature of the Atlantic Ocean and the climate of the regions it influences. Prominently, this is manifested in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) in sea surface temperatures. Positive (negative) phases of the AMO coincide with warmer (colder) North Atlantic sea surface temperatures. The AMO is linked with decadal climate fluctuations, such as Indian and Sahel rainfall, European summer precipitation, Atlantic hurricanes and variations in global temperatures. It is widely believed that ocean circulation drives the phase changes of the AMO by controlling ocean heat content. However, there are no direct observations of ocean circulation of sufficient length to support this, leading to questions about whether the AMO is controlled from another source. Here we provide observational evidence of the widely hypothesized link between ocean circulation and the AMO. We take a new approach, using sea level along the east coast of the United States to estimate ocean circulation on decadal timescales. We show that ocean circulation responds to the first mode of Atlantic atmospheric forcing, the North Atlantic Oscillation, through circulation changes between the subtropical and subpolar gyres--the intergyre region. These circulation changes affect the decadal evolution of North Atlantic heat content and, consequently, the phases of the AMO. The Atlantic overturning circulation is declining and the AMO is moving to a negative phase. This may offer a brief respite from the persistent rise of global temperatures, but in the coupled system we describe, there are compensating effects. In this case, the negative AMO is associated with a continued acceleration of sea-level rise along the northeast coast of the United States.

  8. Ten years of satellite observations reveal highly variable sulphur dioxide emissions at Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Brendan; Popp, Christoph; Andrews, Benjamin; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Satellite remote sensing enables continuous multiyear observations of volcanic activity in remote settings. Anatahan (Mariana Islands) is a remote volcano in the western North Pacific. Available ground-based measurements of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions at Anatahan place it among thelargest volcanic SO2 sources worldwide. These ground-based measurements, however, are restricted to eruptive intervals. Anatahan's activity since 2003 has been dominated temporally by prolonged periods of quiescence. Using 10 years of satellite observations from OMI, AIRS, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2, we report highly variable SO2 emissions within and between eruptive and quiescent intervals at Anatahan. We find close correspondence between levels of activity reported at the volcano and levels of SO2 emissions detected from space. Eruptive SO2 emission rates have a mean value of ˜6400 t d-1, but frequently are in excess of 20,000 t d-1. Conversely, SO2 emissions during quiescent intervals are below the detection limit of space-based sensors and therefore are not likely to exceed ˜300 t d-1. We show that while Anatahan occupies a quiescent state for 85% of the past 10 years, only ˜15% of total SO2 emissions over this interval occur during quiescence, with the remaining ˜85% released in short duration but intense syn-eruptive degassing. We propose that the integration of multiyear satellite data sets and activity histories are a powerful complement to targeted ground-based campaign measurements in better describing the long-term degassing behavior of remote volcanoes.

  9. Video Observations by Telepresence Reveal Two Types of Hydrothermal Venting on Kawio Barat Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Shank, T. M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Sherrin, J.; Herrera, S.; Baker, E. T.; Lovalvo, D.; Makarim, S.; Malik, M. A.; Wirasantosa, S.; Hammond, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The INDEX-SATAL 2010 expedition began an international exploration of the seafloor in Indonesian waters using the methodology of telepresence, conducting EM302 multibeam mapping, water column CTD, and ROV high-definition video operations and sending data back to Exploration Command Centers in Indonesia and Seattle. Science observers in other locations in the US and Canada were engaged in real-time observations and interpretation of results. One mission goal was to locate hydrothermal or volcanic activity. Intense light scattering and redox potential measurements in the water column over Kawio Barat (KB)indicated a high level of hydrothermal activity, and direct video observations confirmed venting near the summit. None of the other volcanic features west of the Sangihe arc that were investigated during the mission had confirmed hydrothermal activity. ROV capabilities did not include physical sampling or temperature measurement, so our interpretation is based on visual comparison to other known sites. The steep western flank of KB from 2000 m depth to the summit (1850 m) has many areas of white and orange staining on exposed rocks, with some elemental sulfur, and broad areas covered with dark volcaniclastic sand, but no active venting was seen. KB has a summit ridge running WNW-ESE, with a major cross-cutting ridge on the western portion of the summit. Hydrothermal activity is concentrated near the eastern side of this intersection, on both the northern and southern sides of the summit ridge. Venting on the northern side of the summit ridge is characterized by intense white particle-rich fluids emanating directly from the rocky substrate with frozen flows of elemental sulfur down slope. This type of venting is visually very similar to the venting seen on NW Rota-1, an actively erupting volcano in the Mariana arc, and suggests that KB is actively releasing magmatic gases rich in sulfur dioxide to produce the elemental sulfur flows, inferred fine particulate sulfur

  10. Degassing system from the magma reservoir of Miyakejima volcano revealed by GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, J.; Nakao, S.; Matsushima, T.

    2013-12-01

    Miyake-jima is a volcanic island located approximately 180 km south of Tokyo. The island is an active basaltic volcano that was dormant for a 17-year period between an eruption in 1983 and June 26, 2000, when it again became active. The volcanic activity that occurred in 2000 is divided into the following four stages: the magma intrusion stage, summit subsidence stage, summit eruptive stage, and degassing stage (Nakada et al., 2001). Earthquake swarm activity began on June 26, 2000, accompanied by large-scale crustal deformation. This led to a summit eruption on July 8, 2000. Based on the pattern of hypocenter migration and the nature of crustal deformation, it was estimated that magma migrated from beneath the summit of Miyake-jima to the northwest during the magma intrusion stage. The rapid collapse of the summit took place between July 8 and the beginning of August 2000 (summit subsidence stage). Large-scale eruptions took place on August 10, 18, and 29, 2000 (explosion stage). The eruptions largely ceased after August 29, followed by the release of large amounts of gas from the summit crater (degassing stage). In this study, we examined the location of the magma reservoir during the degassing stage based on crustal deformation observed by GPS. By comparing the amounts of degassing and volume change of the magma reservoir, as determined from crustal deformation, we determined the mechanism of degassing and the nature of the magma reservoir-vent system. According to observations by the Japan Meteorological Agency, a large amount of volcanic gas began to be released from Miyake-jima in September 2000 (Kazahaya et al., 2003). Approximately 42,000 tons/day of SO2 was released during the period between September 2000 and January 2001. Analysis of GPS data during the period [Figure 1] indicates a source of crustal deformation on the south side of the summit crater wall at a depth of 5.2 km. The rate of volume change was -3.8 x 106 m3/month [Figure 2]. As the volume is

  11. Deep Imaging Observations of the Lupus 3 Cloud: Dark Cloud Revealed as Infrared Reflection Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yasushi; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagashima, Chie; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Kawai, Toshihide; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji

    2003-03-01

    We carried out deep imaging observations of the Lupus 3 dark cloud in near-infrared J, H, and Ks bands. An area of ~8'×8' was observed, which corresponds to a projected area of ~0.4×0.4 pc at the distance of the cloud, ~150 pc. Lupus 3 showed itself as a near-infrared nebula that has a surface brightness higher than the adjacent sky at all the three wavelengths. In a JHKs color composite image (blue, green, and red are assigned to J, H, and Ks, respectively), three dark red cores are surrounded by a blue halo. The surface brightness was measured with 5 σ limiting magnitudes of J=21.6, H=21.3, and Ks=20.6 mag arcsec-2. The appearance of the nebula depends on the wavelength. In the J band, dark cores are surrounded by a brighter halo, while in the Ks band, the dark cores of the J band are bright except for the central part of two of the cores. The appearance in the H band is intermediate between those of the J and Ks bands, having dark cores surrounded by local maxima of the surface brightness and decreased surface brightness farther out. The surface brightness is J=20.6, H=19.8, and Ks=19.4 mag arcsec-2 at the maximum in each band. Photometry of the point sources was done with 10 σ limiting magnitudes of J=20.1, H=18.8, and Ks=17.7. We constructed an extinction map of the background stars, using the H-K color of 1974 sources and the standard reddening law of Rieke & Lebofsky. The maximum value for the extinction is AV=47 mag. There are three local maxima of the extinction with AV>~30 mag, which we consider to be dense cores. Their positions agree with the cores identified with the surface brightness appearance. The surface brightness and its relationship with the extinction are understood in terms of scattering of starlight by dust. The values of the maximum surface brightness can be explained by scattering of starlight by dust in the cloud if we adopt a model of grain size distribution by Weingartner & Draine.

  12. Dominance of Viscoelastic Relaxation after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed By Seafloor GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Wang, K.; Hino, R.; Iinuma, T.; He, J.; Fujimoto, H.; Kido, M.; Osada, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Megathrust rupture is mostly offshore. Using land-based GPS data only, it is difficult to tell whether viscoelastic relaxation, when compared to afterslip, is important in driving post-seismic deformation immediately after the earthquake. GPS/acoustic observations, which measure the displacements of seafloor precision transponder arrays using sea surface platforms equipped with GPS antennas and acoustic transducers, were made by Japan Coast Guard and Tohoku University during and after the 2011 M 9 Tohoku earthquake. Five seafloor sites near the main rupture were reoccupied 4-10 times over the first two years after the earthquake and provide a unique opportunity to study the importance of viscoelastic relaxation. After the large coseismic seaward motion (up to ~ 31 m), the near-trench sites immediately reversed their direction to move landward, opposing the continuing seaward motion of all land sites. This landward motion (~ 30-50 cm over the first year) is faster than the plate convergence rate (8.3 cm/year) and therefore cannot be explained by the relocking of the subduction fault. Using numerical models with transient mantle rheology, we demonstrate that the fast landward motion is caused by viscoelastic relaxation of stresses induced by the asymmetric rupture of the thrust earthquake. For shallow megathrust events, the hanging wall has a lower stiffness and hence always exhibits larger coseismic seaward motion than the landward motion of the footwall. Greater tension is thus induced landward of the rupture area. As the mantle wedge undergoes viscoelastic relaxation, this tension in the upper plate drives the observed landward motion of the trench area. Tests on the effects of mantle rheology, coseismic slip distribution, and plate thickness suggest the wide presence of viscoelastic landward trench motion following large subduction earthquakes. This work indicates that afterslip models assuming a purely elastic Earth substantially overestimated or underestimated

  13. XMM-Newton Observations of HESSJ1813-178 Reveal a Composite Supernova Remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J.A.; Moriguchi, Y.; Aharonian, F.A.; Fukui, Y.; Hofmann, W.; Horns, D.; Puehlhofer, G.; Reimer, O.; Rowell, G.; Terrier, R.; Vink, J.; Wagner, S.

    2006-11-27

    Aims--We present X-ray and {sup 12}CO(J=1-0) observations of the very-high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray source HESS J1813-178 with the aim of understanding the origin of the {gamma}-ray emission. Methods--High-angular resolution X-ray studies of the VHE {gamma}-ray emission region are performed using 18.6 ks of XMM-Newton data, taken on HESS J1813-178 in October 2005. Using this dataset we are able to undertake spectral and morphological studies of the X-ray emission object with greater precision than previous studies. NANTEN {sup 12}CO(J=1-0) data are used to search for correlations of the {gamma}-ray emission with molecular clouds which could act as target material for {gamma}-ray production in a hadronic scenario. Results--The NANTEN {sup 12}CO(J=1-0) observations show a giant molecular cloud of mass 2.5 x 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} at a distance of 4 kpc in the vicinity of HESS J1813-178. Even though there is no direct positional coincidence, this giant cloud might have influenced the evolution of the {gamma}-ray source and its surroundings. The X-ray data show a highly absorbed (n{sub H} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) non-thermal X-ray emitting object coincident with the previously known ASCA source AXJ1813-178 showing a compact core and an extended tail towards the north-east, located in the center of the radio shell-type Supernova remnant (SNR) G12.82-0.2. This central object shows morphological and spectral resemblance to a Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) and we therefore consider that this object is very likely to be a composite SNR. Nevertheless, we cannot distinguish between the scenarios in which the {gamma}-rays originate in the shell of the SNR and the one in which they originate in the central object. We discuss both scenarios in terms of a one-zone leptonic model and demonstrate, that in order to connect the core X-ray emission to the VHE {gamma}-ray emission electrons have to be accelerated to energies of at least 1 PeV. We conclude that if indeed the

  14. RADIO OBSERVATIONS REVEAL UNUSUAL CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENTS FOR SOME TYPE Ibc SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Wellons, Sarah; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2012-06-10

    We present extensive radio observations of the nearby Type Ibc supernovae (SNe Ibc) 2004cc, 2004dk, and 2004gq spanning {Delta}t Almost-Equal-To 8-1900 days after explosion. Using a dynamical model developed for synchrotron emission from a slightly decelerated shock wave, we estimate the velocity and energy of the fastest ejecta and the density profile of the circumstellar medium. The shock waves of all three supernovae are characterized by non-relativistic velocities of v-bar approx. (0.1-25)c and associated energies of E Almost-Equal-To (2-10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} erg, in line with the expectations for a typical homologous explosion. Smooth circumstellar density profiles are indicated by the early radio data and we estimate the progenitor mass-loss rates to be M-dot approx. (0.6-13) x 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (wind velocity, v{sub w} = 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}). These estimates approach the saturation limit ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) for line-driven winds from Wolf-Rayet stars, the favored progenitors of SNe Ibc including those associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts. Intriguingly, at later epochs all three supernovae show evidence for abrupt radio variability that we attribute to large density modulations (factor of {approx}3-6) at circumstellar radii of r Almost-Equal-To (1-50) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm. If due to variable mass loss, these modulations are associated with progenitor activity on a timescale of {approx}10-100 years before explosion. We consider these results in the context of variable mass-loss mechanisms including wind clumping, metallicity-independent continuum-driven ejections, and binary-induced modulations. It may also be possible that the SN shock waves are dynamically interacting with wind termination shocks; however, this requires the environment to be highly pressurized and/or the progenitor to be rapidly rotating prior to explosion. The proximity of the density modulations to the

  15. Early-time observations of Type Ia supernovae to reveal progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Parrent, Jerod; Nugent, Peter; Hook, Isobel; Dilday, Ben; Maguire, Kate; Graham, Melissa

    2012-02-01

    SNe Ia remain nature's best standardized candles, and yet their progenitors have long been a mystery. However, in a series of three studies this year, our group has placed the first serious constraints on the progenitors of two SNe Ia, finding (1) the first hard evidence that the primary is a CO white dwarf star; (2) in one case the white dwarf is accreting from a mass-losing evolved secondary and has become a recurrent nova like RS Oph; (3) in another case a system like RS Oph is ruled out and the companion is probably a main sequence star. Taken together with our earlier work implicating white dwarfs mergers in the super-Chandra systems, we are led to the remarkable conclusion that there are a multiplicity of progenitors for SNe Ia. This may explain our finding that supernovae in different environments correct to different absolute magnitudes, and could have serious implications for cosmology. Our results depend on early-time observations for which the queue-scheduled Gemini is uniquely suited. We will use these data to rapidly trigger high-resolution searches for circumstellar material at Keck and VLT, and the Gemini data will directly probe the unburned progenitor material in the supernovae themselves.

  16. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  17. Offshore seismicity in the western Marmara Sea, Turkey, revealed by ocean bottom observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yojiro; Takahashi, Narumi; Citak, Seckin; Kalafat, Doğan; Pinar, Ali; Gurbuz, Cemil; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-09-01

    The faults' geometry and their seismic activity beneath the Marmara Sea have been under debate for a couple of decades. We used data recorded by three ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) over a period of 3 months in 2014 to investigate the relationship of fault geometry to microseismicity under the western Marmara Sea in Turkey. We detected a seismic swarm at 13 to 20 km depth beneath the main Marmara fault (MMF), and the maximum depth of seismogenic zone was 25 km within the OBS observation area. These results provided evidence that the dip of the MMF is almost vertical and that the seismogenic zone in this region extends into the lower crust. Our analysis of past seismicity indicated that the seismic swarm we recorded is the most recent of an episodic series of seismic activity with an average recurrence interval of 2-3 years. The repetitive seismicity indicates that the MMF beneath the western Marmara Sea is coupled and that some of the accumulated strain is released every 2 to 3 years. Our study shows that OBS data can provide useful information about seismicity along the MMF, but more extensive studies using more OBSs deployed over a wider area are needed to fully understand the fault geometry and stick-slip behavior of faults under the Marmara Sea.

  18. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke; Korhonen, Johanna; Yasuyuki Aono,

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  19. Multi-Observable Probabilistic Tomography Reveals the Thermochemical Structure of Central-Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Afonso, J. C.; Rawlinson, N.; Schutt, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Central-Western US region has undergone extensive tectono-magmatic activity since the Laramide orogeny (80-45 Ma), including episodes of flat subduction, crustal shortening, lithospheric delamination/alteration, crustal extension, voluminous volcanism, and epeirogenesis. Despite being one of the better studied regions in the world, a number of questions regarding its nature and tectonic evolution remain contentious. Foremost among these are the subsurface thermochemical structure, the causes and timing of the uplift of the Colorado Plateau (CP), and the relative contributions of the various deep (e.g. large scale dynamic topography) and shallow (e.g. small-scale convection or lithospheric heating) processes proposed to explain it. Here we present a thermochemical model of the Central-Western US based on a new 3D multi-observable inversion method based on a probabilistic (Bayesian) formalism (Afonso et al., 2013a,b) using high-quality geophysical, geochemical and geological datasets. Working within this internally and thermodynamically consistent framework allows us to move beyond traditional methods and jointly invert P-wave and S-wave teleseismic arrival times, Rayleigh wave phase dispersion data, Bouguer anomalies, long-wavelength gravity gradients, geoid height, absolute elevation (local and dynamic), and surface heat flow data. In this presentation, we will discuss a number of robust features from our models that carry important implications for supporting or disapproving current evolutionary models for this region.

  20. Multi-Observable Probabilistic Tomography Reveals the Thermochemical Structure of Central-Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, Juan; Rawlinson, Nicholas; Yang, Yingjie; Schutt, Derek; Jones, Alan G.; Fullea, Javier

    2015-04-01

    The Central-Western US region has undergone extensive tectono-magmatic activity since the Laramide orogeny (80-45 Ma), including episodes of flat subduction, crustal shortening, lithospheric delamination/alteration, crustal extension, voluminous volcanism, and epeirogenesis. Despite being one of the better studied regions in the world, a number of questions regarding its nature and tectonic evolution remain contentious. Foremost among these are the subsurface thermochemical structure, the causes and timing of the uplift of the Colorado Plateau (CP), and the relative contributions of the various deep (e.g. large scale dynamic topography) and shallow (e.g. small-scale convection or lithospheric heating) processes proposed to explain it. Here we present a thermochemical model of the Central-Western US based on a new 3D multi-observable inversion method based on a probabilistic (Bayesian) formalism (Afonso et al., 2013a,b) using high-quality geophysical, geochemical and geological datasets. Working within this internally and thermodynamically consistent framework allows us to move beyond traditional methods and jointly invert P-wave and S-wave teleseismic arrival times, Rayleigh wave phase dispersion data, Bouguer anomalies, long-wavelength gravity gradients, geoid height, absolute elevation (local and dynamic), and surface heat flow data. In this presentation, we will discuss a number of robust features from our models that carry important implications for supporting or disapproving current evolutionary models for this region.

  1. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  2. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke A; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  3. BEHAVIOR OF SOLAR CYCLES 23 AND 24 REVEALED BY MICROWAVE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Maekelae, P.; Michalek, G.; Shibasaki, K.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2012-05-10

    Using magnetic and microwave butterfly diagrams, we compare the behavior of solar polar regions to show that (1) the polar magnetic field and the microwave brightness temperature during solar minimum substantially diminished during the cycle 23/24 minimum compared to the 22/23 minimum. (2) The polar microwave brightness temperature (Tb) seems to be a good proxy for the underlying magnetic field strength (B). The analysis indicates a relationship, B = 0.0067Tb - 70, where B is in G and Tb in K. (3) Both the brightness temperature and the magnetic field strength show north-south asymmetry most of the time except for a short period during the maximum phase. (4) The rush-to-the-pole phenomenon observed in the prominence eruption (PE) activity seems to be complete in the northern hemisphere as of 2012 March. (5) The decline of the microwave brightness temperature in the north polar region to the quiet-Sun levels and the sustained PE activity poleward of 60{sup o}N suggest that solar maximum conditions have arrived at the northern hemisphere. The southern hemisphere continues to exhibit conditions corresponding to the rise phase of solar cycle 24.

  4. Behavior of Solar Cycles 23 and 24 Revealed by Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Maekelae, P.; Michalek, G.; Shibasaki, K.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2012-01-01

    Using magnetic and microwave butterfly diagrams, we compare the behavior of solar polar regions to show that (1) the polar magnetic field and the microwave brightness temperature during solar minimum substantially diminished during the cycle 23/24 minimum compared to the 22/23 minimum. (2) The polar microwave brightness temperature (Tb) seems to be a good proxy for the underlying magnetic field strength (B). The analysis indicates a relationship, B = 0.0067Tb - 70, where B is in G and Tb in K. (3) Both the brightness temperature and the magnetic field strength show north-south asymmetry most of the time except for a short period during the maximum phase. (4) The rush-to-the-pole phenomenon observed in the prominence eruption (PE) activity seems to be complete in the northern hemisphere as of 2012 March. (5) The decline of the microwave brightness temperature in the north polar region to the quiet-Sun levels and the sustained PE activity poleward of 60degN suggest that solar maximum conditions have arrived at the northern hemisphere. The southern hemisphere continues to exhibit conditions corresponding to the rise phase of solar cycle 24. Key words: Sun: chromosphere Sun: coronal mass ejections (CMEs) Sun: filaments, prominences Sun: photosphere Sun: radio radiation Sun: surface magnetism

  5. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J; Batt, Ryan D; Winslow, Luke A; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality. PMID:27113125

  6. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  7. GOODS-Herschel: ultra-deep XMM-Newton observations reveal AGN/star-formation connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovilos, E.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ranalli, P.; Vignali, C.; Lusso, E.; Cappelluti, N.; Zamorani, G.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Hwang, H. S.; Charmandaris, V.; Ivison, R. J.; Merloni, A.; Daddi, E.; Carrera, F. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Mullaney, J. R.; Scott, D.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.; Morrison, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Dannerbauer, H.; Kartaltepe, J.; Leiton, R.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Valtchanov, I.

    2012-10-01

    Models of galaxy evolution assume some connection between the AGN and star formation activity in galaxies. We use the multi-wavelength information of the CDFS to assess this issue. We select the AGNs from the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey and measure the star-formation rates of their hosts using data that probe rest-frame wavelengths longward of 20 μm, predominantly from deep 100 μm and 160 μm Herschel observations, but also from Spitzer-MIPS-70 μm. Star-formation rates are obtained from spectral energy distribution fits, identifying and subtracting an AGN component. Our sample consists of sources in the z ≈ 0.5-4 redshift range, with star-formation rates SFR ≈ 101-103 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses M⋆ ≈ 1010-1011.5 M⊙. We divide the star-formation rates by the stellar masses of the hosts to derive specific star-formation rates (sSFR) and find evidence for a positive correlation between the AGN activity (proxied by the X-ray luminosity) and the sSFR for themost active systems with X-ray luminosities exceeding Lx ≃ 1043 erg s-1 and redshifts z ≳ 1. We do not find evidence for such a correlation for lower luminosity systems or those at lower redshifts, consistent with previous studies. We do not find any correlation between the SFR (or the sSFR) and the X-ray absorption derived from high-quality XMM-Newton spectra either, showing that the absorption is likely to be linked to the nuclear region rather than the host, while the star-formation is not nuclear. Comparing the sSFR of the hosts to the characteristic sSFR of star-forming galaxies at the same redshift (the so-called "main sequence") we find that the AGNs reside mostly in main-sequence and starburst hosts, reflecting the AGN-sSFR connection; however the infrared selection might bias this result. Limiting our analysis to the highest X-ray luminosity AGNs (X-ray QSOs with Lx > 1044 erg s-1), we find that the highest-redshift QSOs (with z ≳ 2) reside predominantly in starburst hosts, with an average s

  8. Ambient seismic noise interferometry in Hawai'i reveals long-range observability of volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Silke; Wolfe, Cecily J.; Okubo, Paul G.; Haney, Matthew M.; Thurber, Clifford H.

    2013-07-01

    The use of seismic noise interferometry to retrieve Green's functions and the analysis of volcanic tremor are both useful in studying volcano dynamics. Whereas seismic noise interferometry allows long-range extraction of interpretable signals from a relatively weak noise wavefield, the characterization of volcanic tremor often requires a dense seismic array close to the source. We here show that standard processing of seismic noise interferometry yields volcanic tremor signals observable over large distances exceeding 50 km. Our study comprises 2.5 yr of data from the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory short period seismic network. Examining more than 700 station pairs, we find anomalous and temporally coherent signals that obscure the Green's functions. The time windows and frequency bands of these anomalous signals correspond well with the characteristics of previously studied volcanic tremor sources at Pu'u 'Ō'ō and Halema'uma'u craters. We use the derived noise cross-correlation functions to perform a grid-search for source location, confirming that these signals are surface waves originating from the known tremor sources. A grid-search with only distant stations verifies that useful tremor signals can indeed be recovered far from the source. Our results suggest that the specific data processing in seismic noise interferometry-typically used for Green's function retrieval-can aid in the study of both the wavefield and source location of volcanic tremor over large distances. In view of using the derived Green's functions to image heterogeneity and study temporal velocity changes at volcanic regions, however, our results illustrate how care should be taken when contamination by tremor may be present.

  9. CHARACTERIZING THE YOUNGEST HERSCHEL-DETECTED PROTOSTARS. I. ENVELOPE STRUCTURE REVEALED BY CARMA DUST CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Henning, Thomas; Ragan, Sarah E.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Fischer, William J.; Ali, Babar; Stanke, Thomas; Manoj, P.; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee

    2015-01-10

    We present Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy 2.9 mm dust continuum emission observations of a sample of 14 Herschel-detected Class 0 protostars in the Orion A and B molecular clouds, drawn from the PACS Bright Red Sources (PBRS) sample. These objects are characterized by very red 24-70 μm colors and prominent submillimeter emission, suggesting that they are very young Class 0 protostars embedded in dense envelopes. We detect all of the PBRS in 2.9 mm continuum emission and emission from four protostars and one starless core in the fields toward the PBRS; we also report one new PBRS source. The ratio of 2.9 mm luminosity to bolometric luminosity is higher by a factor of ∼5 on average, compared to other well-studied protostars in the Perseus and Ophiuchus clouds. The 2.9 mm visibility amplitudes for 6 of the 14 PBRS are very flat as a function of uv distance, with more than 50% of the source emission arising from radii <1500 AU. These flat visibility amplitudes are most consistent with spherically symmetric envelope density profiles with ρ ∝ R {sup –2.5}. Alternatively, there could be a massive unresolved structure like a disk or a high-density inner envelope departing from a smooth power law. The large amount of mass on scales <1500 AU (implying high average central densities) leads us to suggest that that the PBRS with flat visibility amplitude profiles are the youngest PBRS and may be undergoing a brief phase of high mass infall/accretion and are possibly among the youngest Class 0 protostars. The PBRS with more rapidly declining visibility amplitudes still have large envelope masses, but could be slightly more evolved.

  10. Jupiter’s Deep Cloud Structure Revealed Using Keck Observations of Spectrally Resolved Line Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoraker, G. L.; Wong, M. H.; de Pater, I.; Ádámkovics, M.

    2015-09-01

    Technique: We present a method to determine the pressure at which significant cloud opacity is present between 2 and 6 bars on Jupiter. We use (a) the strength of a Fraunhofer absorption line in a zone to determine the ratio of reflected sunlight to thermal emission, and (b) pressure-broadened line profiles of deuterated methane (CH3D) at 4.66 μm to determine the location of clouds. We use radiative transfer models to constrain the altitude region of both the solar and thermal components of Jupiter’s 5 μm spectrum. Results: For nearly all latitudes on Jupiter the thermal component is large enough to constrain the deep cloud structure even when upper clouds are present. We find that hot spots, belts, and high latitudes have broader line profiles than do zones. Radiative transfer models show that hot spots in the North Equatorial Belt and South Equatorial Belt (SEB) typically do not have opaque clouds at pressures greater than 2 bars. The South Tropical Zone (STZ) at 32{}^\\circ S has an opaque cloud top between 4 and 5 bars. From thermochemical models this must be a water cloud. We measured the variation of the equivalent width of CH3D with latitude for comparison with Jupiter’s belt-zone structure. We also constrained the vertical profile of H2O in an SEB hot spot and in the STZ. The hot spot is very dry for P < 4.5 bars and then follows the H2O profile observed by the Galileo Probe. The STZ has a saturated H2O profile above its cloud top between 4 and 5 bars.

  11. Hydration effects on gypsum dissolution revealed by in situ nanoscale atomic force microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, A.; Putnis, C. V.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that the rates of mineral dissolution in aqueous solutions are dependent on the kinetics of dehydration of the ions building the crystal. Dehydration kinetics will be ultimately determined by the competition between ion-water and water-water interactions, which can be significantly modified by the presence of background ions in solution. At low ionic strength, the effect of electrolytes on ion-water (electrostatic) interactions will dominate (Kowacz et al., 2007). By performing macroscopic and in situ, microscopic (atomic force microscopy) dissolution experiments, the effect of background electrolytes on the dissolution kinetics of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) {0 1 0} cleavage surfaces is tested at constant, low ionic strength (IS = 0.05) and undersaturation (saturation index, SI = -0.045). Dissolution rates are systematically lower in the presence of 1:1 background electrolytes than in an electrolyte-free solution, regardless of the nature of the electrolyte tested. We hypothesize that stabilization of the hydration shell of calcium by the presence of background ions can explain this result, based on the observed correlations in dissolution rates with the ionic surface tension increment of the background ion in solution. Stabilization of the cation hydration shell should favor dissolution. However, in the case of strongly hydrated ions such as Ca2+, this has a direct entropic effect that reduces the overall ΔG of the system, so that dissolution is energetically less favorable. Overall, these results provide new evidence that supports cation dehydration being the rate-controlling step for gypsum dissolution, as proposed for other minerals such as barite, dolomite and calcite.

  12. Ozone variations over the northern subtropical region revealed by ozonesonde observations in Hanoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, S.-Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Shiotani, M.; Hasebe, F.; Matsumoto, J.; Hoang, Thuy Ha T.; Nguyen, Tan Thanh T.

    2013-04-01

    Seasonal and subseasonal variations in the ozone mixing ratio (OMR) are investigated by using continuous 7 year ozonesonde data from Hanoi (21°N, 106°E), Vietnam. The mean seasonal variations for the 7 years show large amplitude at the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region (10-18 km) and at the lower troposphere (around 3 km) with standard deviations normalized by the annual mean value of about 30% for both regions. In the UTLS region, the seasonal variation in the OMR shows a minimum in winter and a maximum in spring to summer. The variation seems to be caused by the seasonal change in horizontal transport. Low OMR air masses are transported from the equatorial troposphere in winter by the anticyclonic flow associated with the equatorial convections, and high OMR air masses are transported from the midlatitude stratosphere in summer possibly due to Rossby wave breakings in the UT region and anticyclonic circulation associated with the Tibetan High in the LS region. In the lower troposphere, a spring maximum is found at 3 km height. Biomass burning and tropopause foldings are suggested as possible causes of this maximum. Subseasonal variations in the OMR show large amplitude in the UTLS region (at around 15 km) and in the boundary layer (below 1 km) with the standard deviations normalized by the annual mean larger than 40%. The OMR variations in the winter UTLS region have a negative correlation with the meridional wind. This relation indicates that the low OMRs observed at Hanoi has been transported from the equatorial region.

  13. Radio Observations Reveal the Mass Loss History of Type Ibc Supernova Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Sarah; Soderberg, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present extensive radio observations of the nearby Type Ibc supernovae 2004cc, 2004gq, and 2004dk spanning Δ t≈ 8-1800 days after explosion. Using a dynamical model developed for synchrotron emission from a slightly decelerated blastwave, we estimate the velocity and energy of the fastest ejecta and the density profile of the circumstellar medium. The blastwaves for all three supernovae are characterized by non-relativistic velocities of v≈ (0.1-25)c and associated energies of E≈ (2-10)× 1047 erg, in line with the expectations for a typical homologous explosion. Smooth, stellar wind density profiles are indicated by the early radio data and we estimate the progenitor mass loss rates to be ∘ M≈ (8-40)× 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 (wind velocity, vw=103 km s-1). These properties are consistent with those of Wolf-Rayet stars, the favored progenitors of SNe Ibc including those associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts. However, at late time, each of these SNe show evidence for abrupt radio variability which we attribute to significant circumstellar density modulations (factor of 5-100) at radii of R≈ (1-50)× 1016 cm. For SN 2004gq, the density modulations are marginally consistent with the expectations for a variable and/or clumpy Wolf-Rayet line-driven wind. However, in the case of SNe 2004cc and 2004dk, the density modulations are more intense, ∘ M>/ 10-4M⊙ yr-1, and possibly attributed to continuum-driven winds or hydrodynamic eruptions. We compare the circumstellar environments for these three SNe with those of other Type Ibc supernovae and nearby gamma-ray bursts and find that they are characterized by a more violent progenitor mass loss history in the decades leading up to explosion. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  14. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  15. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  16. Insights into magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling revealed in GPS total electron content observations from ground and space (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B.; Miladinovich, D.; Butala, M. D.; Komjathy, A.

    2013-12-01

    The continuous global availability of GPS total electron content (TEC) observations is enabling new insights into how solar wind energy modifies the upper atmosphere during magnetic storm intervals. Detailed studies over a range of storm intensities are revealing a comprehensive and complex picture of the global TEC response. During the main phase of intense geomagnetic storms, large rapid (1-2 hour) increases in TEC are the signature of prompt penetration electric fields causing the daytime superfountain. However, such a response is not always observed. Recent research suggests the TEC response may be affected by high latitude electrodynamics, as driven by the interplanetary magnetic field orientation. We also present the global TEC response to moderate intensity storms driven by coronal mass ejections. Another type of geomagnetic storm is caused by solar wind high speed streams (HSSs) and associated co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs). Focused study on HSS/CIR storms reveals daytime TEC increases and nighttime decreases, but understanding the TEC response during these extended but less intense storms is currently in its infancy. TEC observations are also available from orbiting platforms such as the COSMIC satellite constellation that measure TEC in a limb-sounding geometry. Electron density differences in the E and F region ionosphere are clearly distinguished by these data. At high latitudes, these data provide information on the presence of energetic electron precipitation that is complementary to current high latitude networks of radar and optical observatories. Recently analyzed high latitude observations from COSMIC are presented.

  17. AFM imaging of functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, C; Danzberger, J; Lukanov, P; Tîlmaciu, C-M; Galibert, A-M; Soula, B; Flahaut, E; Gruber, H J; Hinterdorfer, P; Ebner, A; Kienberger, F

    2009-07-01

    We present a comparative study of several non-covalent approaches to disperse, debundle and non-covalently functionalize double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs). We investigated the ability of bovine serum albumin (BSA), phospholipids grafted onto amine-terminated polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG(2000)-NH(2)), as well as a combination thereof, to coat purified DWNTs. Topographical imaging with the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to assess the coating of individual DWNTs and the degree of debundling and dispersion. Topographical images showed that functionalized DWNTs are better separated and less aggregated than pristine DWNTs and that the different coating methods differ in their abilities to successfully debundle and disperse DWNTs. Height profiles indicated an increase in the diameter of DWNTs depending on the functionalization method and revealed adsorption of single molecules onto the nanotubes. Biofunctionalization of the DWNT surface was achieved by coating DWNTs with biotinylated BSA, providing for biospecific binding of streptavidin in a simple incubation step. Finally, biotin-BSA-functionalized DWNTs were immobilized on an avidin layer via the specific avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19375857

  18. Conductive probe AFM measurements of conjugated molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Mizutani, Wataru; Liang, Tien-Tzu; Azehara, Hiroaki; Miyake, Koji; Sasaki, Shinya; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    The electrical conduction of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made from conjugated molecules was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), with a focus on the molecular structural effect on conduction. First, the electrical conduction of SAMs made from phenylene oligomer SAMs was measured. The resistances through the monolayers increased exponentially with an increase in molecular length and the decay constants of transconductance beta were about 0.45 to 0.61 A(-1) measured at lower bias region. We further investigated the influence of applied load on the resistances. The resistances through terphenyl SAMs increased with an increase in the applied load up to 14 nN. Second, using an insertion technique into insulating alkanethiol SAMs, the electrical conduction of single conjugated terphenyl methanethiol and oligo(para-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) molecules embedded into insulating alkanethiol SAMs were measured. Electrical currents through these single molecules of OPVs were estimated to be larger than those through single terphenyl molecules, suggesting that the OPV structure can increase the electrical conduction of single molecules. Third, apparent negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed at higher bias measurements of SAMs. The appearance of NDR might be related to roughness of SAM surface, because apparent NDR was often observed on rough surfaces. In any case, the tip-molecule contact condition strongly affected carrier transport through metal tip/SAM/metal junction.

  19. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  20. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  1. Surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres: An AFM-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; D'Haese, Cécile; Nysten, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) electrical modes were used to study the surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres. The surface electrical conductivity was studied by current sensing AFM and I-V spectroscopy. Kelvin probe force microscopy was used to measure the surface contact potential. The oxide film, known as passivation layer, covering the fibre surface gives rise to the observation of an apparently semiconducting behaviour. The passivation layer generally exhibits a p-type semiconducting behaviour, which is attributed to the predominant formation of chromium oxide on the surface of the stainless steel fibres. At the nanoscale, different behaviours are observed from points to points, which may be attributed to local variations of the chemical composition and/or thickness of the passivation layer. I-V curves are well fitted with an electron tunnelling model, indicating that electron tunnelling may be the predominant mechanism for electron transport.

  2. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Mechanism of immonoglobulin G adsorption on mica-AFM and electrokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Dąbkowska, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    Adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) from aqueous NaCl solutions of the concentration 10(-3)-0.15M on mica was studied. Initially, the kinetics was evaluated at pH 3.5 by direct AFM imaging. A monotonic increase in the maximum coverage of IgG with NaCl concentration was observed. These results were interpreted in terms of the theoretical model postulating an irreversible adsorption of the protein governed by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Additionally, IgG adsorption and desorption was studied under in situ conditions, with streaming potential measurements. These measurements revealed that the maximum coverage of irreversibly adsorbed IgG varies from 0.37mgm(-2) for 10(-3)M, NaCl to 1.2mgm(-2) for 0.15M, NaCl. The significant role of ionic strength was attributed to the lateral electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed IgG molecules, positively charged at this pH value. These experimental results confirmed that monolayers of irreversibly bound IgG can be produced by adjusting ionic strength of the protein solution. In further experiments the stability and acid base properties of such monolayers were studied using the streaming potential method. It revealed that the monolayers were stable against pH cycling for the range from 3.5 to 9.5. The isoelectric point of mica supported IgG monolayers was 5.9, similar to derived from the micro-electrophoretic measurements in the bulk (5.8). Beside significance for basic sciences, the results indicate that thorough characteristics of IgG can be acquired via streaming potential measurements using microgram quantities of the protein.

  4. Complex mean circulation over the inner shelf south of Martha's Vineyard revealed by observations and a high-resolution model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, Neil K.; Lentz, Steven J.; Kirincich, Anthony R.; Farrar, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Inner-shelf circulation is governed by the interaction between tides, baroclinic forcing, winds, waves, and frictional losses; the mean circulation ultimately governs exchange between the coast and ocean. In some cases, oscillatory tidal currents interact with bathymetric features to generate a tidally rectified flow. Recent observational and modeling efforts in an overlapping domain centered on the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) provided an opportunity to investigate the spatial and temporal complexity of circulation on the inner shelf. ADCP and surface radar observations revealed a mean circulation pattern that was highly variable in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Nested modeling incrementally improved representation of the mean circulation as grid resolution increased and indicated tidal rectification as the generation mechanism of a counter-clockwise gyre near the MVCO. The loss of model skill with decreasing resolution is attributed to insufficient representation of the bathymetric gradients (Δh/h), which is important for representing nonlinear interactions between currents and bathymetry. The modeled momentum balance was characterized by large spatial variability of the pressure gradient and horizontal advection terms over short distances, suggesting that observed inner-shelf momentum balances may be confounded. Given the available observational and modeling data, this work defines the spatially variable mean circulation and its formation mechanism—tidal rectification—and illustrates the importance of model resolution for resolving circulation and constituent exchange near the coast. The results of this study have implications for future observational and modeling studies near the MVCO and other inner-shelf locations with alongshore bathymetric variability.

  5. Meteoroid Fragmentation as Revealed in Head- and Trail-Echoes Observed with the Arecibo UHF and VHF Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.; Malhorta, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent 46.8/430 MHz (VHF/UHF) radar meteor observations at Arecibo Observatory (AO) that reveal many previously unreported features in the radar meteor return - including flare-trails at both UHF and VHF - that are consistent with meteoroid fragmentation. Signature features of fragmentation include strong intra-pulse and pulse-to-pulse fading as the result of interference between or among multiple meteor head-echo returns and between head-echo and impulsive flare or "point" trail-echoes. That strong interference fading occurs implies that these scatterers exhibit well defined phase centers and are thus small compared with the wavelength. These results are consistent with and offer advances beyond a long history of optical and radar meteoroid fragmentation studies. Further, at AO, fragmenting and flare events are found to be a large fraction of the total events even though these meteoroids are likely the smallest observed by the major radars. Fragmentation is found to be a major though not dominate component of the meteors observed at other HPLA radars that are sensitive to larger meteoroids.

  6. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  7. Direct and quantitative AFM measurements of the concentration and temperature dependence of the hydrophobic force law at nanoscopic contacts.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-05-15

    By virtue of its importance for self-organization of biological matter the hydrophobic force law and the range of hydrophobic interactions (HI) have been debated extensively over the last 40 years. Here, we directly measure and quantify the hydrophobic force-distance law over large temperature and concentration ranges. In particular, we study the HI between molecularly smooth hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers, and similarly modified gold-coated AFM tips (radii∼8-50 nm). We present quantitative and direct evidence that the hydrophobic force is both long-ranged and exponential down to distances of about 1-2 nm. Therefore, we introduce a self-consistent radius-normalization for atomic force microscopy data. This approach allows quantitative data fitting of AFM-based experimental data to the recently proposed Hydra-model. With a statistical significance of r(2)⩾0.96 our fitting and data directly reveal an exponential HI decay length of 7.2±1.2 Å that is independent of the salt concentration up to 750 mM. As such, electrostatic screening does not have a significant influence on the HI in electrolyte concentrations ranging from 1 mM to 750 mM. In 1 M solutions the observed instability during approach shifts to longer distances, indicating ion correlation/adsorption effects at high salt concentrations. With increasing temperature the magnitude of HI decreases monotonically, while the range increases slightly. We compare our results to the large body of available literature, and shed new light into range and magnitude of hydrophobic interactions at very close distances and over wide temperature and concentration regimes. PMID:25678158

  8. Characterization of the polycaprolactone melt crystallization: complementary optical microscopy, DSC, and AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Speranza, V; Sorrentino, A; De Santis, F; Pantani, R

    2014-01-01

    The first stages of the crystallization of polycaprolactone (PCL) were studied using several techniques. The crystallization exotherms measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were analyzed and compared with results obtained by polarized optical microscopy (POM), rheology, and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results suggest a strong influence of the observation scale. In particular, the AFM, even if limited on time scale, appears to be the most sensitive technique to detect the first stages of crystallization. On the contrary, at least in the case analysed in this work, rheology appears to be the least sensitive technique. DSC and POM provide closer results. This suggests that the definition of induction time in the polymer crystallization is a vague concept that, in any case, requires the definition of the technique used for its characterization.

  9. Characterization and Optimization of Quartz Tuning Fork-Based Force Sensors for Combined STM/AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Agraït, Nicolás; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino

    This chapter will be divided in two main parts. In the first one, we will show a detailed analysis of the dynamics of quartz tuning fork resonators which are being increasingly used in scanning probe microscopy as force sensors. We will also show that a coupled harmonic oscillators model, which includes a finite coupling between the prongs, is in remarkable agreement with the observed motion of the tuning forks. Relevant parameters for the tuning fork performance such as the effective spring constant can be obtained from our analysis. In the second one, we will present an implementation of a quartz tuning fork supplemented with optimized tips based on carbon fibers. The remarkable electrical and mechanical properties of carbon fiber make these tips more suitable for combined and/or simultaneous STM and AFM than conventional metallic tips. The fabrication and the characterization of these carbon fiber tips as well as their performance in STM/AFM will be detailed.

  10. Geometry and Characteristics of the Heliosheath Revealed in the First Five Years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Funsten, H. O.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate and interpret the geometry and characteristics of the inner heliosheath (IHS) plasma and their impact on the heliotail structure as observed in energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps acquired during the first 5 yr of Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations. In particular, IBEX observations of the heliotail reveal distinct, localized emission features (lobes) that provide a rich set of information about the properties and evolution of the heliosheath plasma downstream of the termination shock (TS). We analyze the geometry of the heliotail lobes and find that the plane intersecting the port and starboard heliotail lobe centers is ˜6° from the solar equatorial plane, and the plane intersecting the north and south heliotail lobe centers is ˜90° from the solar equatorial plane, both indicating strong correlation with the fast-slow solar wind asymmetry, and thus reflecting the structure of the IHS flow around the Sun. We also analyze the key parameters and processes that form and shape the port and starboard lobes, which are distinctly different from the north and south lobes. By comparing IBEX ENA observations with results from a simplistic flow model of the heliosphere and a multicomponent description for pickup ions (PUIs) in the IHS, we find that the port and starboard lobe formation is driven by a thin IHS, large nose-tail asymmetry of the distance to the TS (and consequently, a large nose-tail asymmetry of the relative abundance of PUIs at the TS) and the energy-dependent removal of PUIs by charge exchange in the IHS.

  11. Examination of dentin surface using AFM (our experience).

    PubMed

    Zapletalová, Zdenka; Kubínek, Roman; Vůjtek, Milan; Novotný, Radko

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as one the technique of Scanning Probe Microscopy is useful for imaging of surface structure. This method can yield three-dimensional high-resolution topographic images of sample surfaces by using a scanning technique for conductors and insulators on atomic scale. It is based upon mapping of atomic-forces on a surface of an investigated sample. The method is useful not only in physics and chemistry; it can be also applied in biological fields. Special construction of AFM scanner enables to follow biological samples in liquid environments. Artifacts caused by dehydration of samples are removed this way. Dentin of human teeth is a vital hydrated tissue. It is strongly sensitive to dehydration and drying that are commonly used in preparation of samples in examinations by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We describe our experience in examination of dentin surfaces of extracted human third molars using contact method of AFM under moist conditions.

  12. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  13. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  14. CD-AFM reference metrology at NIST and SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Fu, Joseph; Orji, Ndubuisi; Guthrie, William; Allen, Richard; Cresswell, Michael

    2005-05-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and SEMATECH have been working together to improve the traceability of critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) dimensional metrology in semiconductor manufacturing. A major component of this collaboration has been the implementation of a Reference Measurement System (RMS) at SEMATECH using a current generation CD-AFM. An earlier tool, originally used at SEMATECH, has now been installed at NIST. Uncertainty budgets were developed for pitch, height, and CD measurements using both tools. At present, the standard uncertainties are approximately 0.2 % for pitch measurements and 0.4% for step height measurements. Prior to the current work, CD AFM linewidth measurements were limited to a standard uncertainty of about 5 nm. However, this limit can now be significantly reduced. This reduction results from the completion of the NIST/SEMATECH collaboration on the development of single crystal critical dimension reference materials (SCDDRM). A new generation of these reference materials was released to SEMATECH Member Companies during late 2004. The SEMATECH RMS was used to measure the linewidths of selected features on the distributed specimens. To reduce the uncertainty in tip width calibration, a separate transfer experiment was performed in which samples were measured by CD-AFM and then sent for high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In this manner, CD-AFM could be used to transfer the HRTEM width information to the distributed samples. Consequently, we are now able to reduce the limit on the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of CD-AFM width measurements to 1 nm.

  15. BT2 reveals new 'distributed source' water lines in comet 9P, not observed in 73P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, R.; Miller, S.; Stallard, T.; Tennyson, J.

    The recently puplished Barber-Tennyson (BT2) synthetic H2 O water line list is the most complete and accurate line list in existence. It is finding application in a wide range of astrophysical environments. BT2 has been used to identify non-resonant fluorescent transitions in comets and determine rotational and spin temperatures of cometary comas from the intensities of these lines. UKIRT spectra of comet 9P/Tempel 1 reveal H2 O lines not previosly recorded in any other cometary spectra. BT2 has identified these lines as originating from rovibrational states that are not able to be populated by the normal pumping mechanism, and are assumed to be due a first stage of radiative de-excitation by molecules that have sublimed from icy grains produced by the Deep Impact event. These lines were not observed in our follow-up observations on 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3, C fragment. References: Barber R.J., Tennyson J., Harris G., Tolchenov R., 2006, MNRAS, 368, 1087 Dello Russo N., DiSanti M.A., Magee-Sauer K. et al., 2004, Icarus, 168, 186 Dello Russo N., Bonev B.P., DiSanti M.A, et al., 2005, ApJ 621, 537 Barber R.J., Miller S., Stallard T., Tennyson J., et al., Icarus (submitted)

  16. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  17. Thermo-magnetic behaviour of AFM-MFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Arinero, R.; Bergez, W.; Tordjeman, Ph

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the behaviour of AFM cantilevers under an external magnetic field B and temperature field produced by a coil with an iron core. Four cantilever types were studied. Forces were measured for different B values and at various coil-to-cantilever separation distances. The results were analysed on the basis of a phenomenological model. This model contains the contribution of two terms, one monopole-monopole interaction at short distance, and one apparent paramagnetic interaction in \

  18. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  19. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. Population genetic structure and direct observations reveal sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in a cooperative bird

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Xavier A; York, Jennifer E; Young, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is pervasive and has diverse evolutionary implications, but the fundamental drivers of dispersal sex biases remain unresolved. This is due in part to limited diversity within taxonomic groups in the direction of dispersal sex biases, which leaves hypothesis testing critically dependent upon identifying rare reversals of taxonomic norms. Here, we use a combination of observational and genetic data to demonstrate a rare reversal of the avian sex bias in dispersal in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Direct observations revealed that (i) natal philopatry was rare, with both sexes typically dispersing locally to breed, and (ii), unusually for birds, males bred at significantly greater distances from their natal group than females. Population genetic analyses confirmed these patterns, as (i) corrected Assignment index (AIc), FST tests and isolation-by-distance metrics were all indicative of longer dispersal distances among males than females, and (ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated stronger within-group genetic structure among females than males. Examining the spatial scale of extra-group mating highlighted that the resulting ‘sperm dispersal’ could have acted in concert with individual dispersal to generate these genetic patterns, but gamete dispersal alone cannot account entirely for the sex differences in genetic structure observed. That leading hypotheses for the evolution of dispersal sex biases cannot readily account for these sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in white-browed sparrow weavers highlights the continued need for attention to alternative explanations for this enigmatic phenomenon. We highlight the potential importance of sex differences in the distances over which dispersal opportunities can be detected. PMID:25346189

  1. In situ monitoring of the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold using electrochemical AFM.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-03-11

    The lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold (NPG) is observed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging coupled with potentiostatic measurement. Dense Li2O2 nanoparticles form a film at 2.5 V, which is decomposed at 3.8-4.0 V in an ether-based electrolyte.

  2. In situ monitoring of the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold using electrochemical AFM.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2014-03-11

    The lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction on nanoporous gold (NPG) is observed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging coupled with potentiostatic measurement. Dense Li2O2 nanoparticles form a film at 2.5 V, which is decomposed at 3.8-4.0 V in an ether-based electrolyte. PMID:24469227

  3. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  4. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  5. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  6. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Curmi, Patrick A; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages.

  7. Cell secretion machinery: studies using the AFM.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    A new field in biology, 'nano-cell biology', has emerged from the successful use of force microscopy in understanding the structure and dynamics of cells and biomolecules, at nm resolution and in real time. Atomic force microscopy, in combination with conventional tools and approaches (electron microscopy, electrophysiology, X-ray diffraction, photon correlation spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, biochemistry, and molecular biology), has revealed for the first time, the universal molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion in cells. Secretion occurs in all living cells and involves the delivery of intracellular products to the cell exterior. Secretory products are packaged and stored in membranous sacs or vesicles within the cell. When the cell needs to secrete these products, the secretory vesicles containing them, dock and fuse at plasma membrane-associated supramolecular structures called Porosome, to release their contents. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion, or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. During secretion, swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of intravesicular pressure, allowing expulsion of vesicular contents. The extent of vesicle swelling dictates the amount of vesicular contents expelled. The discovery of the porosome as the universal secretory machinery, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle swelling, and the fusion of opposing bilayers, i.e., the fusion of secretory vesicle membrane at the base of the porosome membrane, has also been resolved.

  8. AFM Investigation of mechanical properties of dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Sidney R; Apter, Nathan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Barlam, David; Peretz, Adi Idit; Ziskind, Daniel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of peritubular dentin were investigated using scanning probe microscopy techniques, namely Nanoindentation and Band Excitation. Particular attention was directed to the possible existence of a gradient in these properties moving outward from the tubular lumen to the junction with the intertubular dentin. Finite element analysis showed that the influence of the boundaries is small relative to the effects observed. Thus, these results strongly support the concept of a lowering of modulus and hardness from the tubular exterior to its periphery, which appear to correlate with graded changes in the mineral content.

  9. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  10. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  11. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. HIGH-RESOLUTION CO OBSERVATION OF THE CARBON STAR CIT 6 REVEALING THE SPIRAL STRUCTURE AND A NASCENT BIPOLAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyosun; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Zhao-Geisler, Ronny; Trejo, Alfonso; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Taam, Ronald E.; Kemper, Francisca; Kim, Jongsoo; Byun, Do-Young; Liu, Tie

    2015-11-20

    CIT 6 is a carbon star in the transitional phase from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs). Observational evidences of two point sources in the optical, circumstellar arc segments in an HC{sub 3}N line emission, and a bipolar nebula in near-infrared provide strong support for the presence of a binary companion. Hence, CIT 6 is very attractive for studying the role of companions in the AGB–pPN transition. We have carried out high-resolution {sup 12}CO J = 2–1 and {sup 13}CO J = 2–1 observations of CIT 6 with the Submillimeter Array combined with the Submillimeter Telescope (single-dish) data. The {sup 12}CO channel maps reveal a spiral-shell pattern connecting the HC{sub 3}N segments in a continuous form and an asymmetric outflow corresponding to the near-infrared bipolar nebula. Rotation of the {sup 12}CO channel peak position may be related to the inner spiral winding and/or the bipolar outflow. An eccentric orbit binary is suggested for the presence of an anisotropic mass loss to the west and a double spiral pattern. The lack of interarm emission to the west may indicate a feature corresponding to the periastron passage of a highly eccentric orbit of the binary. Spatially averaged radial and spectral profiles of {sup 12}CO J = 2–1 and {sup 13}CO J = 2–1 are compared with simple spherical radiative transfer models, suggesting a change of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO abundance ratio from ∼30 to ∼50 inward in the CSE of CIT 6. The millimeter continuum emission is decomposed into extended dust thermal emission (spectral index ∼ −2.4) and compact emission from radio photosphere (spectral index ∼ −2.0)

  13. Dissolution of uranophane: An AFM, XPS, SEM and ICP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Michael; Freund, Michael; Hawthorne, Frank C.; Burns, Peter C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2009-05-01

    Dissolution experiments on single crystals of uranophane and uranophane-β, Ca(H 2O) 5[(UO 2)(SiO 3(OH)] 2, from the Shinkolobwe mine of the Democratic Republic of Congo, were done in an aqueous HCl solution of pH 3.5 for 3 h, in HCl solutions of pH 2 for 5, 10 and 30 min, and in Pb 2+-, Ba-, Sr-, Ca- and Mg-HCl solutions of pH 2 for 30 min. The basal surfaces of the treated uranophane crystals were examined using atomic-force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solutions after dissolution experiments on single crystals and synthetic powders were analysed with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The morphology of the observed etch pits (measured by AFM) were compared to the morphology, predicted on the basis of the bond-valence deficiency of polyhedron chains along the edges of the basal surface. Etch pits form in HCl solutions of pH 2. Their decrease in depth with the duration of the dissolution experiment is explained with the stepwave dissolution model, which describes the lowering of the surrounding area of an etch pit with continuous waves of steps emanated from the etch pit into the rest of the crystal surface. Hillocks form in an HCl solution of pH 3.5, and the chemical composition of the surface (as indicated by XPS) shows that these hillocks are the result of the precipitation of a uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phase. Well-orientated hillocks form on the surface of uranophane in a SrCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2. They are part of an aged silica coating of composition Si 2O 2(OH) 4(H 2O) n. An amorphous layer forms on the surface of uranophane in a MgCl 2-HCl solution of pH 2, which has a composition and structure similar to silicic acid. Small crystallites of uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate phases form on the surface of uranophane after treatment in Pb(NO 3) 2-HCl and BaCl 2-HCl solutions of pH 2. Dissolution experiments on synthetic uranophane powders

  14. Limb-brightened jet of 3C 84 revealed by the 43 GHz very-long-baseline-array observation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, H.; Hada, K.; Haga, T.; Giovannini, G.; Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.; Giroletti, M.; Doi, A.; Kino, M.; Nakamura, M.; Asada, K.

    2014-04-10

    We present a study of the sub-parsec scale radio structure of the radio galaxy 3C 84/NGC 1275 based on the Very Long Baseline Array data at 43 GHz. We discover a limb brightening in the 'restarted' jet that is associated with the 2005 radio outburst. In the 1990s, the jet structure was ridge brightening rather than limb brightening, despite the observations being done with similar angular resolutions. This indicates that the transverse jet structure has recently changed. This change in the morphology reveals an interesting agreement with the γ-ray flux increase, i.e., the γ-ray flux in the 1990s was at least seven times lower than the current one. One plausible explanation for the limb brightening is that the velocity structure of the jet is in the context of the stratified jet, which is a successful scenario that explains the γ-ray emission in some active galactic nuclei. If this is the case, then the change in apparent transverse structure might be caused by the change in the transverse velocity structure. We argue that the transition from ridge brightening to limb brightening is related to the γ-ray time variability on the timescale of decades. We also discuss the collimation profile of the jet.

  15. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  16. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  17. Suzaku Observations of Luminous Quasars: Revealing the Nature of High-energy Blazar Emission in Low-level Activity States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Antolini, E.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grandi, P.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sambruna, R.; Sander, A.; Sato, R.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Villata, M.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Tavecchio, F.; Sikora, M.; Schady, P.; Roming, P.; Chester, M. M.; Maraschi, L.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results from the Suzaku X-ray observations of five flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), namely PKS 0208-512, Q 0827+243, PKS 1127-145, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3. All these sources were additionally monitored simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously by the Fermi satellite in gamma rays and the Swift UVOT in the UV and optical bands, respectively. We constructed their broadband spectra covering the frequency range from 1014 Hz up to 1025 Hz, and those reveal the nature of high-energy emission of luminous blazars in their low-activity states. The analyzed X-ray spectra are well fitted by a power-law model with photoelectric absorption. In the case of PKS 0208-512, PKS 1127-145, and 3C 454.3, the X-ray continuum showed indication of hardening at low energies. Moreover, when compared with the previous X-ray observations, we see a significantly increasing contribution of low-energy photons to the total X-ray fluxes when the sources are getting fainter. The same behavior can be noted in the Suzaku data alone. A likely explanation involves a variable, flat-spectrum component produced via inverse-Compton emission, plus an additional, possibly steady soft X-ray component prominent when the source gets fainter. This soft X-ray excess is represented either by a steep power-law (photon indices Γ ~ 3-5) or a blackbody-type emission with temperatures kT ~ 0.1-0.2 keV. We model the broadband spectra of the five observed FSRQs using synchrotron self-Compton and/or external-Compton radiation models. Our modeling suggests that the difference between the low- and high-activity states in luminous blazars is due to the different total kinetic power of the jet, most likely related to varying bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow within the blazar emission zone.

  18. A tetravalent bispecific TandAb (CD19/CD3), AFM11, efficiently recruits T cells for the potent lysis of CD19+ tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Uwe; Duell, Johannes; Ellwanger, Kristina; Herbrecht, Carmen; Knackmuss, Stefan HJ; Fucek, Ivica; Eser, Markus; McAleese, Fionnuala; Molkenthin, Vera; Le Gall, Fabrice; Topp, Max; Little, Melvyn; Zhukovsky, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    To harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells for the treatment of CD19+ malignancies, we constructed AFM11, a humanized tetravalent bispecific CD19/CD3 tandem diabody (TandAb) consisting solely of Fv domains. The molecule exhibits good manufacturability and stability properties. AFM11 has 2 binding sites for CD3 and 2 for CD19, an antigen that is expressed from early B cell development through differentiation into plasma cells, and is an attractive alternative to CD20 as a target for the development of therapeutic antibodies to treat B cell malignancies. Comparison of the binding and cytotoxicity of AFM11 with those of a tandem scFv bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) molecule targeting the same antigens revealed that AFM11 elicited more potent in vitro B cell lysis. Though possessing high affinity to CD3, the TandAb mediates serial-killing of CD19+ cells with little dependence of potency or efficacy upon effector:target ratio, unlike the BiTE. The advantage of the TandAb over the BiTE was most pronounced at lower effector:target ratios. AFM11 mediated strictly target-dependent T cell activation evidenced by CD25 and CD69 induction, proliferation, and cytokine release, notwithstanding bivalent CD3 engagement. In a NOD/scid xenograft model, AFM11 induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of Raji tumors in vivo, and radiolabeled TandAb exhibited excellent localization to tumor but not to normal tissue. After intravenous administration in mice, half-life ranged from 18.4 to 22.9 h. In a human ex vivo B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia study, AFM11 exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity in an autologous setting. Thus, AFM11 may represent a promising therapeutic for treatment of CD19+ malignancies with an advantageous safety risk profile and anticipated dosing regimen. PMID:25875246

  19. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes.We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe2O3 nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe2O3 NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the

  20. The Vertical Distribution of Buried Volatiles at the Moon revealed by Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Fluxes from LEND Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.; Livengood, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the quantity and vertical distribution of volatile species on and below the surface of planetary bodies is vital to understand the primordial chemical inventory and subsequent evolution of planets. Volatiles may provide resources to support future human exploration. This is particularly true for the Moon, which is well observed by many methods from ground-based, lunar orbit, and in situ, and is an accessible destination or way station for human exploration. We present Geant4 models of relative fluxes of Fast, Epithermal, and Thermal neutron emission generated in a planetary regolith by galactic cosmic rays to reveal the first 1-2 meters vertical structure of embedded hydrogen or water. Varying ratios of Thermal versus Epithermal, low-energy-Epithermal versus high-energy-Epithermal, and Thermal versus Fast neutron emissions are diagnostics of the depth in which hydrogen/water layers are buried within the top 1-2 meters of the regolith. In addition, we apply model calculations to Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) thermal and epithermal data, acquired on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), in specific regions of the Moon to retrieve the vertical distribution of buried ice from the remote sensing information. GEANT4 is a set of particle physics transport simulation codes that exploits object-oriented software methods to deliver a comprehensive and flexible toolkit that is modular and extensible, based on a free open-source development model. GEANT4 has become a standard tool to simulate applications as diverse as particle telescope and detector response, space radiation shielding and optimization, total ionizing dose in spacecraft components, and biological effects of radiation.

  1. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  2. Bacteria attachment to surfaces--AFM force spectroscopy and physicochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2011-12-01

    Understanding bacterial adhesion to surfaces requires knowledge of the forces that govern bacterial-surface interactions. Biofilm formation on stainless steel 316 (SS316) by three bacterial species was investigated by examining surface force interaction between the cells and metal surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Bacterial-metal adhesion force was quantified at different surface delay time from 0 to 60s using AFM tip coated with three different bacterial species: Gram-negative Massilia timonae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The results revealed that bacterial adhesion forces on SS316 surface by Gram-negative bacteria is higher (8.53±1.40 nN and 7.88±0.94 nN) when compared to Gram-positive bacteria (1.44±0.21 nN). Physicochemical analysis on bacterial surface properties also revealed that M. timonae and P. aeruginosa showed higher hydrophobicity and surface charges than B. subtilis along with the capability of producing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The higher hydrophobicity, surface charges, and greater propensity to form EPS by M. timonae and P. aeruginosa led to high adhesive force on the metal surface. PMID:21889162

  3. Simultaneous AFM nano-patterning and imaging for photomask repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Tamer, Mehmet S.; van Es, Maarten H.; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a new AFM based nano-patterning technique that can be used for fast defect repairing of high resolution photomasks and possibly other high-speed nano-patterning applications. The proposed method works based on hammering the sample with tapping mode AFM followed by wet cleaning of the residuals. On the area where a specific pattern should be written, the tip-sample interaction force is tuned in a controlled manner by changing the excitation frequency of the cantilever without interrupting the imaging process. Using this method several patterns where transferred to different samples with imaging speed. While the pattern was transferred to the sample in each tracing scan line, the patterned sample was imaged in retracing scan line, thus the outcome was immediately visible during the experiment.

  4. Faint submillimeter galaxies revealed by multifield deep ALMA observations: number counts, spatial clustering, and a dark submillimeter line emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Momose, Rieko; Kurono, Yasutaka

    2014-11-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of a submillimeter/millimeter line emitter (SLE) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band-6 and Band-7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR{sub IR} ∼ 30-300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of <0.1 mJy (SFR{sub IR} ≲ 30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We conduct counts-in-cells analysis with multifield ALMA data for the faint SMGs, and obtain a coarse estimate of galaxy bias, b {sub g} < 4. The galaxy bias suggests that the dark halo masses of the faint SMGs are ≲ 7 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}, which is smaller than those of bright (>1 mJy) SMGs, but consistent with abundant high-z star-forming populations, such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detection of SLE-1, which has no continuum counterparts in our 1.2 mm-band or multi-wavelength images, including ultra deep HST/WFC3 and Spitzer data. The SLE has a significant line at 249.9 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7.1. If the SLE is not a spurious source made by the unknown systematic noise of ALMA, the strong upper limits of our multi-wavelength data suggest that the SLE would be a faint galaxy at z ≳ 6.

  5. In situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration of AFM colloidal probes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sangjin; Franck, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to sense lateral forces applied to the AFM probe tip. Recent advances in tissue engineering and functional biomaterials have shown a need for the surface characterization of their material and biochemical properties under the application of lateral forces. LFM equipped with colloidal probes of well-defined tip geometries has been a natural fit to address these needs but has remained limited to provide primarily qualitative results. For quantitative measurements, LFM requires the successful determination of the lateral force or torque conversion factor of the probe. Usually, force calibration results obtained in air are used for force measurements in liquids, but refractive index differences between air and liquids induce changes in the conversion factor. Furthermore, in the case of biochemically functionalized tips, damage can occur during calibration because tip-surface contact is inevitable in most calibration methods. Therefore, a nondestructive in situ lateral force calibration is desirable for LFM applications in liquids. Here we present an in situ hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method for AFM colloidal probes. In this method, the laterally scanned substrate surface generated a creeping Couette flow, which deformed the probe under torsion. The spherical geometry of the tip enabled the calculation of tip drag forces, and the lateral torque conversion factor was calibrated from the lateral voltage change and estimated torque. Comparisons with lateral force calibrations performed in air show that the hydrodynamic lateral force calibration method enables quantitative lateral force measurements in liquid using colloidal probes.

  6. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  7. Conductive area ratio of multiblock copolymer electrolyte membranes evaluated by e-AFM and its impact on fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takimoto, Naohiko; Takamuku, Shogo; Abe, Mitsutaka; Ohira, Akihiro; Lee, Hae-Seung; McGrath, James E.

    The correlation between membrane surface morphology and fuel cell performance was investigated using a series of hydrophilic-hydrophobic multiblock copolymers based on poly(arylene ether sulfone) with different block lengths. The proton conductive regions on the membrane surface were successfully observed by using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (e-AFM). The results revealed a strong dependence of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic microphase-separated structure on the block length. The conductive area ratio (CAR) estimated from the proton conduction image decreased as the block length increased, and it was found to be closely connected with cell resistance that determines fuel cell performance. The well-defined phase-separated structure of multiblock copolymers can improve proton conductivity without any undesirable increments in water uptake or swelling, but in some instances, it affects the interfacial connection with the catalyst layer, resulting in lower fuel cell performance. The results of this study suggest the necessity for further improvement of the membrane morphology by optimizing both the casting conditions and the molecular design of the block sequences.

  8. Revealing amphiphilic nanodomains of anti-biofouling polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Amadei, Carlo A; Yang, Rong; Chiesa, Matteo; Gleason, Karen K; Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be ∼1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry. PMID:24617757

  9. Revealing Amphiphilic Nanodornains of Anti-Biofouling Polymer Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Amadei, CA; Yang, R; Chiesa, M; Gleason, KK; Santos, S

    2014-04-09

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be similar to 1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  10. Revealing amphiphilic nanodomains of anti-biofouling polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Amadei, Carlo A; Yang, Rong; Chiesa, Matteo; Gleason, Karen K; Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Undesired bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on wetted surfaces leads to significant economic and environmental costs in various industries. Amphiphilic coatings with molecular hydrophilic and hydrophobic patches can mitigate such biofouling effectively in an environmentally friendly manner. The coatings are synthesized by copolymerizing (Hydroxyethyl)methacrylate and perfluorodecylacrylate via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). In previous studies, the size of the patches was estimated to be ∼1.4-1.75 nm by fitting protein adsorption data to a theoretical model. However, no direct observations of the molecular heterogeneity exist and therefore the origin of the fouling resistance of amphiphilic coatings remains unclear. Here, the amphiphilic nature is investigated by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). High-resolution images obtained by penetrating and oscillating the AFM tip under the naturally present water layer with sub-nanometer amplitudes reveal, for the first time, the existence of amphiphilic nanodomains (1-2 nm(2)). Compositional heterogeneity at the nanoscale is further corroborated by a statistical analysis on the data obtained with dynamic AM-AFM force spectroscopy. Variations in the long range attractive forces, responsible for water affinity, are also identified. These nanoscopic results on the polymers wettability are also confirmed by contact angle measurements (i.e., static and dynamic). The unprecedented ability to visualize the amphiphilic nanodomains as well as sub-nanometer crystalline structures provides strong evidence for the existence of previously postulated nanostructures, and sheds light on the underlying antifouling mechanism of amphiphilic chemistry.

  11. Bilayer Incorporated Influenza A M2 Single Molecule Time-Dependent AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Travis; Bradley, Strongin; Davis, Robert; Vijayvergiya, Viksita; Busath, David

    2004-03-01

    We report the observation of Influenza A M2 incorporated in a DPPC supported planar bilayer (SPB) on mica, formed by use of a modified vesicle fusion method from proteoliposomes using contact mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Incubation of proteoliposomes in a hypertonic solution and increased DPPC:M2 weight ratios improved SPB formation by M2/DPPC proteoliposomes. M2's extra-bilayer domains were observed as particles estimated to protrude 1-1.5 nm above the bilayer surface and < 4nm in diameter. Movement of M2 independent of the probe tip was observed with a calculated lateral diffusion coefficient of ˜5 × 10-14cm2/s and a mobile fraction of ˜80%. Protein- protein interaction was also observed.

  12. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer.

  13. Structural changes of polysulfone membrane use for hemodialysis in the consecutive regime: nanometric analysis by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batina, Nikola; Acosta García, Ma. Cristina; Avalos Pérez, Angélica; Alberto Ramírez, Mario; Franco, Martha; Pérez Gravas, Héctor; Cadena Méndez, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the hemodialytic treatment of patients with either acute or chronic renal failure has been improved by promoting biocompatibility in the use of new materials and improve membrane surface characteristics. Low and high flux polysulfone membranes (PM) used in dialysis and ultra filtration have been studied in order to understand the geometry and surface chemistry of the pores at inner (nanometric) and outer (micrometric) membrane parts. The surface changes of polysulfone cartridge membrane (PM) during different number of consecutive reuse trials: after 1st, 10th and 23th times of use. The morphology of the hollow fibers surfaces was studied by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and the surface roughness analysis. The roughness of both inner and outer part of PM surface increases with numbers of reuse trails. Thus, small and medium size pores were wiped out when the number of uses changed from zero to 23 on the outer surface. The pore density decreases. The inner part of membrane shows some nanometric size deformation in forms of new openings and raptures. The AFM analysis show differences in the PM morphology at the nanometric level, not previously revealed, which could be important in the evaluation of the PM.

  14. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  15. Molecular-level insights of early-stage prion protein aggregation on mica and gold surface determined by AFM imaging and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhichao; Wang, Bin; Guo, Cunlan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2015-11-01

    By in situ time-lapse AFM, we investigated early-stage aggregates of PrP formed at low concentration (100 ng/mL) on mica and Au(111) surfaces in acetate buffer (pH 4.5). Remarkably different PrP assemblies were observed. Oligomeric structures of PrP aggregates were observed on mica surface, which was in sharp contrast to the multi-layer PrP aggregates yielding parallel linear patterns observed Au(111) surface. Combining molecular dynamics and docking simulations, PrP monomers, dimers and trimers were revealed as the basic units of the observed aggregates. Besides, the mechanisms of the observed PrP aggregations and the corresponding molecular-substrate and intermolecular interactions were suggested. These interactions involved gold-sulfur interaction, electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen binding interaction. In contrast, the PrP aggregates observed in pH 7.2 PBS buffer demonstrated similar large ball-like structures on both mica and Au(111) surfaces. The results indicate that the pH of a solution and the surface of the system can have strong effects on supramolecular assemblies of prion proteins. This study provides in-depth understanding on the structural and mechanistic nature of PrP aggregation, and can be used to study the aggregation mechanisms of other proteins with similar misfolding properties.

  16. Unspecific membrane protein-lipid recognition: combination of AFM imaging, force spectroscopy, DSC and FRET measurements.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Jordi H; Montero, M Teresa; Morros, Antoni; Domènech, Òscar

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we will describe in quantitative terms the unspecific recognition between lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli, a polytopic model membrane protein, and one of the main components of the inner membrane of this bacterium. Supported lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) (3:1, mol/mol) in the presence of Ca(2+) display lateral phase segregation that can be distinguished by atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as force spectroscopy. LacY shows preference for fluid (Lα) phases when it is reconstituted in POPE : POPG (3:1, mol/mol) proteoliposomes at a lipid-to-protein ratio of 40. When the lipid-to-protein ratio is decreased down to 0.5, two domains can be distinguished by AFM. While the upper domain is formed by self-segregated units of LacY, the lower domain is constituted only by phospholipids in gel (Lβ) phase. On the one hand, classical differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements evidenced the segregation of a population of phospholipids and point to the existence of a boundary region at the lipid-protein interface. On the other hand, Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements in solution evidenced that POPE is selectively recognized by LacY. A binary pseudophase diagram of POPE : POPG built from AFM observations enables to calculate the composition of the fluid phase where LacY is inserted. These results are consistent with a model where POPE constitutes the main component of the lipid-LacY interface segregated from the fluid bulk phase where POPG predominates.

  17. The structure of the kinetoplast DNA network of Crithidia fasciculata revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Danielle Pereira; Gonçalves, Daniela Leão; Costa, Lilian Terezinha; de Souza, Wanderley

    2011-08-01

    DNA is the biopolymer most studied by scanning probe methods, and it is now possible to obtain reliable and reproducible images of DNA using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM has been extensively used to elucidate morphological changes to DNA structure, such as the formation of knots, nicks, supercoiling and bends. The mitochondrial or kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) of trypanosomatids is the most unusual DNA found in nature, being unique in organization and replication. The kDNA is composed of thousands of topologically interlocked DNA circles that form a giant network. To understand the biological significance of the kinetoplast DNA, it is necessary to learn more about its structure. In the present work, we used two procedures to prepare kDNA networks of Crithidia fasciculata for observation by AFM. Because AFM allows for the examination of kDNA at high resolution, we were able to identify regions of overlapping kDNA molecules and sites where several molecules cross. This found support the earlier described kDNA structural organization as composed by interlocked circles. We also observed an intricate high-density height pattern around the periphery of the network of C. fasciculata, which appears to be a bundle of DNA fibers that organizes the border of the network. Our present data confirm that AFM is a powerful tool to study the structural organization of biological samples, including complex arrays of DNA such as kDNA, and can be useful in revealing new details of structures previously visualized by other means. PMID:21377370

  18. Fast image scanning method in liquid-AFM without image distortion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee; Kim, Younghun; Kim, Jong Ho; Yang, Young In; Lee, Jeongjin; Lee, Suseung; Hong, Surin; Yi, Jongheop

    2008-11-01

    High speed imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows one to directly observe the dynamic behavior of a sample surface immersed in liquid media; thus, it has been considered to be an indispensable tool for nanobiotechnology and is used in many research fields, including molecular biology and surface science. For real-time observation of a certain behavior, the high speed imaging technique should be accompanied with a high resolution imaging technique to identify target materials. To improve the image quality at a high scanning rate, we developed a variable-controlled fast scanning method, which originated from the modified squeeze-drag superposition model in liquid media. A collection of non-distorted images was accomplished after proper modification of the operating conditions in a viscous fluid, via the simple handling of loading force and cantilever length. Consequently, a speeded-up AFM imaging process was achieved in the liquid environment at up to 200 µm s(-1), without attachment of additional devices. The reliability of the proposed method was verified by the characterization of a grating sample immersed in three types of liquid media. In addition, the results were visualized for elastic biomolecules submerged in a liquid with high kinematic viscosity. PMID:21832743

  19. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. PMID:27474579

  20. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  1. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  2. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  3. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  4. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  5. Lateral Tip Control Effects in CD-AFM Metrology: The Large Tip Limit

    PubMed Central

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Goldband, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    Sidewall sensing in critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) usually involves continuous lateral dithering of the tip or the use of a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. Understanding the influence and dependence of the effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip can improve the measurement accuracy and uncertainty estimation for CD-AFM measurements. Since CD-AFM typically uses tips that range from 15 nm to 850 nm in geometrical width, the behavior of effective tip width throughout this range should be understood. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. For tip widths of 130 nm and lower, which also have lower lateral stiffness, the response of the effective tip width to lateral dither is greater than for larger tips. However, we have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To validate that our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness are valid for large CD-tips, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm

  6. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  7. Insights Into Precipitation Processes As Revealed By Profiling Radar, Disdrometer and Aircraft Observations During The MC3E Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangrande, S. E.; Toto, T.; Mishra, S.; Ryzhkov, A.; Bansemer, A.; Kumjian, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. This campaign was held at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) in north-central Oklahoma, with the programs joining forces to deploy an extensive array of airborne, radiosonde and ground-based instrumentation towards an unprecedented set of deep convective environment and cloud property observations. An overarching motivation was to capitalize on the wealth of aircraft observations and new multi-frequency dual-polarization radars to provide insights for improving the treatments of cloud processes in convective models. This study considers a coupled aircraft, radar and surface disdrometer approach for identifying key cloud processes and linking those to possible radar-based microphysical fingerprints and/or cloud properties. Our emphasis is on the MC3E observations collected during aircraft spirals over the column of the ARM CF. We focus on those spirals associated with radar 'bright band' signatures and Doppler spectral anomalies observed within trailing stratifrom precipitation. Two cases are highlighted, one following a weaker convective event, and one following a stronger squall line. For each event, we investigate the usefulness of radar to inform on processes including aggregation and riming as viewed by the vertically-pointing ARM wind profiler (915 MHz) and cloud radar Doppler spectral observations (35 GHz). Matching dual-polarization radar signatures from nearby cm-wavelength radar are also consulted for complementary insights. For one event, the successive Citation II aircraft spirals through the melting layer and associated ground observations indicate a fortunate capture of the transition from a region of riming to one favoring aggregation

  8. Equatorial spread F initiation and growth from satellite traces as revealed from conjugate point observations in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, M. A.; Kherani, E. A.; Batista, I. S.; Reinisch, B. W.; Sobral, J. H. A.

    2014-01-01

    better understanding of the precursor conditions for the instability growth is very important for identifying the causes of day-to-day variability in the equatorial spread F (ESF)/plasma bubble irregularity development. We investigate here the satellite trace (S-trace) in the ionograms, a precursor to the postsunset ESF occurrence, as observed by Digisondes operated at an equatorial and two magnetic conjugate sites in Brazil during a 66 day observational campaign (Conjugate Point Equatorial Experiment 2002). The satellite traces first occur at the equatorial site, and sequentially, after a variable delay of approximately 20 to 50 min, they are observed nearly simultaneously over the two conjugate sites. The evening prereversal enhancement in the zonal electric field/vertical drift is found to control its development. Using a three-dimensional simulation code based on collisional interchange instability mechanism, it is shown that the observed S-trace occurrence sequence is fully consistent with the instability initiation over the equator with the field-aligned plasma depletion vertical growth marked by latitudinal expansion of its extremities to conjugate locations. The delay in the S-trace occurrence at the conjugate sites (a measure of the nonlinear growth of the instability for plasma depletion) is controlled also by field line parallel (meridional) neutral wind. The relationship between the S-trace and the large-scale wave structure in the F layer, another widely known characterization of the precursor condition for the ESF development, is also clarified.

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of the chalcopyrite surface: an XPS and AFM study in solution at pH 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, Morag L.; Wincott, Paul L.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Vaughan, David J.

    2003-09-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) has been studied at pH 4 using voltammetry, coulometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and both ex situ and in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Between 500 and 650 mV an anodic oxidation peak is observed, prior to the onset of the main decomposition reactions. Chalcopyrite electrodes in contact with electrolyte show some release of Cu into solution even without an applied potential. At 500 and 650 mV, the loss of Cu from the surface increases by a factor of 2 and 6, respectively. Oxidation at 500 mV results in the formation of a mixed oxide or hydroxide of iron, coincident with islands (<0.15 μm wide) of reaction products observed on the surface using AFM. The surface coverage of these islands increases with amount of charge passed. Oxidation at 650 mV shows similar processes have occurred, but with a greater island surface coverage and a more deeply altered surface. XPS depth profiling suggests iron oxide or hydroxide is now a major phase in the top ˜40 Å, with significant sulphate also formed. Observation of islands (alteration products) using in situ AFM under potential control shows that these features are not an artefact of the preparation methods.

  10. In situ AFM study of interlayer spacing during anion intercalation into HOPG in aqueous electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Alliata, D.; Koetz, R.; Haas, O.; Siegenthaler, H.

    1999-11-23

    In the context of ion transfer batteries, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was studied as a model in aqueous electrolytes to elucidate the mechanism of electrochemical intercalation into graphite. The local time-dependent dimensional changes of the host material occurring during the electrochemical intercalation processes were investigated on the nanometer scale. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), combined with cyclic voltammetry, was used as an in situ analytical tool during the intercalation of perchlorate and hydrogen sulfate ions into and their expulsion from the HOPG electrodes. For the first time, a reproducible, quantitative estimate of the interlayer spacing in HOPG with intercalated perchlorate and hydrogen sulfate ions could be obtained by in situ AFM measurements. The experimental values are in agreement with theoretical expectations, only for relatively low stacks of graphene layers. After formation of stage IV, HOPG expansion upon intercalation typically amounts to 32% when tens of layers are involved but to only 14% when thousands of layers are involved. Blister formation and more dramatic changes in morphology were observed, depending on the kind of electrolyte used, at higher levels of anion intercalation.

  11. Adsorption Studies with AFM of Human Plasma Fibrinogen on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gause, Sheena; Kong, Wendy; Rowe

    2007-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FGN) plays an important role in the clotting of blood. Human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) is a protein that readily adsorbs on biomaterial surfaces. The purpose of this experiment was to use the Atomic Force Microscope to study the adsorption of HPF molecules or FGN onto several silicon surfaces with different orientations and resistivities. The size of the FGN molecules found to be somewhat different of Si(111), (100) and (110) were compared to the size of the FGN molecules in solution (45 nm in length, the end dynodes measures to be 6.5 nm in diameter, and the middle dynode measures to be 5 nm in diameter. For this study, the CPR (Thermo-microscope) Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was used to observe the amount of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed by Si (111) with a resistance of .0281-.0261 φ cm, Si (111) with a resistance of 1 φ cm, Si (100), and Si (110) surfaces. In finding any single fibrinogen molecules, the appropriate image scans and measurements were taken. After collection and analysis of the data, it was found from AFM that the fibrinogen molecules found on Si (110) mostly resembled fibrinogen molecules found in solution. The other images showed that the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on Silicon substrates is significantly greater (˜10-20 %) than those in solution.

  12. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G.

    2013-11-01

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  13. Dry powder inhaler: influence of humidity on topology and adhesion studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Bérard, V; Lesniewska, E; Andrès, C; Pertuy, D; Laroche, C; Pourcelot, Y

    2002-01-31

    In the dry powder inhalers (DPIs), the adhesion results of the interactions between the active substance and the excipient. The carrier and the micronized drug particle morphologies are believed to affect the delivery of the drug. In this work, the couple studied was the lactose monohydrate and micronized zanamivir, used for the treatment of influenza. In a first approach, observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have shown that the relative humidity (RH) greatly influenced the zanamivir amount fixed on the lactose monohydrate surface. This paper deals with the direct measurement in controlled atmosphere by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the forces and the interaction ranges between a zanamivir probe and a lactose substrate. Selected zanamivir crystals were attached to the standard AFM probe. Different RH have been used in order to determine influent parameters permitting to identify the nature of adhesion forces between them. This study demonstrated that the increase of RH modified progressively the surface topology of the two components and increased the adhesion force.

  14. Possible enhancements of AFM spin-fluctuations in high-TC cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlborg, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Ab-initio band calculations for high-TC cuprates, together with modelling based of a free electron like band, show a strong interaction between anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) spin waves and periodic lattice distortions as for phonons, even though this type of spin-phonon coupling (SPC) is underestimated in calculations using the local density approximation. The SPC has a direct influence on the properties of the HTC cuprates and it can explain many observations. The strongest effects are seen for modulated waves in the CuO bond direction, and a band gap is formed near the X,Y points, but unusal band dispersion (like ``waterfalls'') might also be induced below the Fermi energy (EF) in the diagonal direction. The band results are used to propose different ways of increasing AFM spin-fluctuations locally, and to have a higher density-of-states (DOS) at EF. Static potential modulations, via periodic distribution of dopants or lattice distortions, can be tuned to increase the DOS. This opens for possibilities to enhance coupling for spin fluctuations (λsf) and superconductivity. The exchange enhancement is in general increased near a surface, which suggests a tendency towards static spin configurations. The sensivity of the band results to corrections of the local density potential are discussed.

  15. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  16. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  17. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  18. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  19. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  20. Combining AFM and Acoustic Probes to Reveal Changes in the Elastic Stiffness Tensor of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Zhao, Xuegen; Carisey, Alex; Ballestrem, Christoph; Derby, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how the elastic stiffness of a cell affects its communication with its environment is of fundamental importance for the understanding of tissue integrity in health and disease. For stiffness measurements, it has been customary to quote a single parameter quantity, e.g., Young’s modulus, rather than the minimum of two terms of the stiffness tensor required by elasticity theory. In this study, we use two independent methods (acoustic microscopy and atomic force microscopy nanoindentation) to characterize the elastic properties of a cell and thus determine two independent elastic constants. This allows us to explore in detail how the mechanical properties of cells change in response to signaling pathways that are known to regulate the cell’s cytoskeleton. In particular, we demonstrate that altering the tensioning of actin filaments in NIH3T3 cells has a strong influence on the cell's shear modulus but leaves its bulk modulus unchanged. In contrast, altering the polymerization state of actin filaments influences bulk and shear modulus in a similar manner. In addition, we can use the data to directly determine the Poisson ratio of a cell and show that in all cases studied, it is less than, but very close to, 0.5 in value. PMID:25296302

  1. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Asproudis, I.; Tsoutsi, D.; Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV ( λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  2. Conductive-probe AFM characterization of graphene sheets bonded to gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauquier, Fanny; Alamarguy, David; Viel, Pascal; Noël, Sophie; Filoramo, Arianna; Huc, Vincent; Houzé, Frédéric; Palacin, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) has been used to perform mechanical and electrical experiments on graphene layers bonded to polyaminophenylene (PAP) films grafted on gold substrates. This technique is a new approach for the characterization of graphene sheets and represents a complementary tool to Raman spectroscopy. The combination of friction and electrical imaging reveals that different stacked graphene sheets have been successfully distinguished from each other and from the underlying PAP films. Lateral force microscopy has shown that the friction is greatly reduced on graphene sheets in comparison with the organic coating. The electrical resistance images show very different local conduction properties which can be linked to the number of underlying graphene sheets. The resistance decreases very slowly when the normal load increases. Current-voltage curves display characteristics of metal-molecule-metal junctions.

  3. The underlying relationships between the observed practices as revealed by an exploratory factor analysis of equip ratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, Jenesta Rae

    The Electronic Quality of Inquiry Protocol (EQUIP) is an instrument to measure the amount and quality of inquiry instruction of science and mathematics classrooms. The EQUIP rubric includes detailed descriptions for the inquiry practices that it measures. This study analyzed a large dataset of Texas science teacher observations using a discriminant factor analysis and exploratory factor analysis. The discriminant factor analysis found the inquiry instruction practices of primary (1st-5th grade) science teachers and secondary (6th-12th grade) science teachers to differ greatly, with primary science teachers using inquiry practices more often than secondary science teachers. Based on this information the primary and secondary datasets were analyzed separately with the exploratory factor analysis. The resulting factors indicate a variety of differences in the observed practices. The results also, suggest that discourse practices play a divergent but influential role for both datasets. Potential implications for professional development and future research are discussed.

  4. VLA Observations Of T CrB Reveal Increase in Radio Flux Density Between 2014 and 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linford, J.; Weston, J.; Chomiuk, L.; Sokoloski, J.; Nelson, T.; Mukai, K.; Finzell, T.; Rupen, M.; Mioduszewski, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report new observations of the symbiotic binary and known recurrent nova T Coronae Borealis (T CrB) with the Karl G. Janksy Very Large Array (VLA). We recently began monitoring T CrB in 2016 May after reports that it was in a super-active state at other wavelengths (Munari, Dallaporta, & Cherini 2016, NewA, 47, 7; ATEL #8675; AAVSO Special Notice 415).

  5. Deep-sea in situ observations of gonatid squid and their prey reveal high occurrence of cannibalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoving, H. J. T.; Robison, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    In situ observations are rarely applied in food web studies of deep-sea organisms. Using deep-sea observations obtained by remotely operated vehicles in the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we examined the prey choices of more than 100 individual squids of the genus Gonatus. Off the California coast, these squids are abundant, semelparous (one reproductive cycle) oceanic predators but their diet has remained virtually unknown. Gonatus onyx and Gonatus berryi were observed to feed on mesopelagic fishes (in particular the myctophid Stenobrachius leucopsarus) as often as on squids but inter-specific differences in feeding were apparent. Gonatids were the most common squid prey and while cannibalism occurred in both species it was particularly high in Gonatus onyx (42% of all prey items). Typically, the size of prey was similar to the size of the predator but the squids were also seen to take much larger prey. Postjuvenile gonatids are opportunistic predators that consume nektonic members of the meso-and bathypelagic communities, including their own species. Such voracious feeding is likely necessary to support the high energetic demands associated with the single reproductive event; and for females the long brooding period during which they must depend on stored resources.

  6. Temperature decomposition of paired site observations reveals new insights in climate models' capability to simulate the impact of LUC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanden Broucke, Sam; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Davin, Edouard; Janssens, Ivan; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    The biogeophysical impact of land use change (LUC) has been shown to be a significant contributor to climate change. In this study, we present a new methodology for evaluating the impact of LUC in climate models. For this, we use observational data from paired eddy covariance flux towers, representing a LUC from forest to open land (deforestation). Two model simulations with a regional climate model (COSMO-CLM2) are performed which differ only in prescribed land use for site pair locations. The model is evaluated by comparing the observed and simulated difference in surface temperature (Ts) between open land and forests, an evaluation which is performed separately for summer/winter and daytime/ nighttime. Next, we identify the biogeophysical mechanisms responsible for Ts differences by applying a Ts decomposition method to both observations and model simulations, allowing us us to determine which LUC related biogeophysical mechanisms were well represented in COSMO-CLM2, and which were not. Results show that the model is able to simulate the increase in albedo and associated daytime surface cooling following deforestation reasonably well. Also well simulated is the overall decrease in sensible heat flux and associated daytime surface warming and nighttime surface cooling. However, it appears the model is missing one crucial impact of deforestation on the surface energy budget: a reduction in nighttime downwelling longwave radiation. As a result, the magnitude of nighttime cooling following deforestation is underestimated by 4 K. These new insights support a wider application of the methodology (to other climate models).

  7. Segmentation of Hypocenters and 3-D Velocity Structure around the Kii Peninsula Revealed by Onshore and Offshore Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuhara, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakahigashi, K.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.; Sakai, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Uehira, K.; Shimizu, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Philippine Sea Plate subducts beneath the Eurasian Plate at a rate of ~4 cm/year along the Nankai Trough, southwest of Japan. Around the Kii Peninsula, the rupture boundary of the historical Tonankai and Nankai large earthquakes is located, and previous researches have revealed along-strike segmentation of hypocenters [Mochizuki et al., 2010], P-wave anisotropy [Ishise et al., 2009], low frequency earthquake (LFE) distribution [e.g., Obara, 2010] and subduction depth of the Philippine Sea (PHS) Plate, or there may exist a split in the PHS Plate [Ide et al., 2010]. To investigate such segmentation, in our previous work we determined 3-D velocity structure and hypocenters using P- and S-wave arrival times of earthquakes recorded by both ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) that were deployed from 2003 to 2007 and on-land stations [Akuhara et al., 2013]. As a result, it was discovered that Vp/Vs ratio is also segmented within the oceanic crust and at the bottom of the overriding plate, which coincides with the LFE distribution: segment A is located along the Kii Channel, segment B around the western Kii Peninsula, and segment C around the eastern Kii Peninsula. In segment B, Vp/Vs ratio is low within the oceanic crust and LFE cluster characterized by an anomalously small amount of cumulative slip, compared to the other LFE clusters around the Kii Peninsula, is located [Obara, 2010]. The difference of Vp/Vs ratio and LFE activity among segments were interpreted as difference of pore fluid pressure. In fact, similar segmentation can be seen in hypocenters: Segment A with concentrated seismicity in the oceanic mantle, segment B with that in the oceanic crust, and segment C with little seismicity. To derive characteristic patterns of the hypocenters, we conducted a cluster analysis of earthquakes based on waveform similarity represented by cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) [e.g., Cattaneo, 1999], in which we took varying structural site effects among the OBS stations

  8. A widespread low-latitude diurnal CO2 frost cycle on Mars revealed by Mars Climate Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Kleinboehl, A.; Hayne, P. O.; Kass, D. M.; McCleese, D. J.; Shirley, J. H.; Schofield, J. T.; Heavens, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Surface observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter document the widespread occurrence of atmospherically-corrected ground temperatures consistent with the presence of extensive CO2 frost deposits at low latitudes at 3AM. While the detection of CO2 ice has previously been reported outside the polar regions, in discrete locations associated with very high elevation terrains (i.e. associated with Elysium, Olympus Mons and the Tharsis Montes), our observations provide the first observational evidence of a global-scale diurnal CO2 cycle involving the atmosphere and the surface. MCS surface temperatures consistent with the presence of ephemeral diurnal CO2 frost deposits are strongly correlated with geologic terrains characterized by high emissivity, high albedo, and low thermal inertia. All of these properties are conducive to low nighttime temperatures. Thermal modeling of these low inertia terrains (i.e. < 75 J m-2K-1s-1/2), which cover a large fraction of the Martian surface, confirms that the regolith frequently reaches CO2 frost point temperatures at all latitudes near 3AM, with seasonal variations noticed. In addition, models used in conjunction with MCS temperature retrievals also predict that right before sunrise, nearly all of the Martian dusty low thermal inertia units are frosted at some point during the Mars Year. Energy/mass balance modeling suggests deposits with depths of up to several hundreds of microns of CO2 (<<0.1% of the Martian atmosphere). This is not sufficient to generate a measurable diurnal pressure cycle. The discovery of this diurnal CO2 cycle may nonetheless represent an important step forward in our understanding of the way the Mars atmosphere interacts with the surface.

  9. Persistent inelastic deformation in central Japan revealed by GPS observation before and after the Tohoku-oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Gutierrez, Angela; Sagiya, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    We analyze strain rate distribution in central-northeastern Japan based on continuous GPS data before and after the occurrence of the Great Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) on March 11th, 2011, focusing on the far-field response in the Niigata Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ), an E-W contraction region along the Japan seacoast of central Japan. Wavelength decomposition of the strain rate on the E-W direction, calculated from GPS data, indicates that the long-wavelength pattern changed from preseismic E-W contraction to postseismic E-W extension, representing elastic response to plate interaction at the Japan Trench. However, the short wavelength patterns reveal a persistent localized contraction zone around northern NKTZ before and after the Tohoku-oki earthquake. The persistent localized deformation pattern can be reproduced by an aseismic slip on a fault cutting the lower crust and a part of the upper crust. These results demonstrate that an inelastic process plays an essential role in the deformation of the Japan island arc.

  10. Nano-scale modification of electrical and magnetic properties on Fe3O4 thin film by AFM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirooka, Motoyuki; Vilquin, Bertrand; Li, Runwei; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2004-03-01

    We report the nano-patterning of the Fe3O4(111) epitaxial ultrathin film with room temperature ferromagnetism using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fe3O4 thin film with atomically flat surface were grown along the 'q111' rdirection using laser-molecular beam epitaxy on MgAl2O4(111) single crystal substrate. The nano-wires were constructed on Fe3O4 thin film by applying electric field between an AFM conductive tip and the surface of the film. The minimum width and height in the resulting nano-wire are 48 nm and 2 nm, respectively. The patterned region shows 105 times higher resistance than the unpatterned region of Fe3O4 film. Furthermore, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements by phase detection also revealed that magnetization of the patterned region are strongly suppressed. Remarkably, phase shift became almost zero in the patterned region, including no magnetic field was detected. We consider that magnetization is decreased in the patterned region by AFM lithography.

  11. Adhesion of B. subtilis spores and vegetative cells onto stainless steel--DLVO theories and AFM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Zhong, Shaoping; Lim, Chwee-Teck; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (either as vegetative cells or as spores) and stainless steel 316 (SS-316) surfaces were quantified using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and extended DLVO (xDLVO) approach in conjunction with live force spectroscopy using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The xDLVO approach accounts for acid-base (polar) interactions that are not considered in the classical DLVO theory. AFM results revealed that spores manifested stronger attraction interactions to stainless steel compared to their vegetative cells counterparts due to lower energy barrier as predicted by both the theoretical approaches as well as the higher hydrophobicity on the spore surfaces. Both DLVO and xDLVO theories predict that vegetative cells manifest weaker attachment on the surfaces compared to spores. Results of AFM force measurement corroborate these findings; spores recorded significantly higher adhesion force (2.92±0.4 nN) compared to vegetative cells (0.65±0.2 nN). The adhesion of spores presents greater challenges in biofilm control owing to its stronger attachment and persistence when the spores are formed under adverse environmental conditions. PMID:23777862

  12. Adhesion of B. subtilis spores and vegetative cells onto stainless steel--DLVO theories and AFM spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Zhong, Shaoping; Lim, Chwee-Teck; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between the bacterium Bacillus subtilis (either as vegetative cells or as spores) and stainless steel 316 (SS-316) surfaces were quantified using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and extended DLVO (xDLVO) approach in conjunction with live force spectroscopy using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The xDLVO approach accounts for acid-base (polar) interactions that are not considered in the classical DLVO theory. AFM results revealed that spores manifested stronger attraction interactions to stainless steel compared to their vegetative cells counterparts due to lower energy barrier as predicted by both the theoretical approaches as well as the higher hydrophobicity on the spore surfaces. Both DLVO and xDLVO theories predict that vegetative cells manifest weaker attachment on the surfaces compared to spores. Results of AFM force measurement corroborate these findings; spores recorded significantly higher adhesion force (2.92±0.4 nN) compared to vegetative cells (0.65±0.2 nN). The adhesion of spores presents greater challenges in biofilm control owing to its stronger attachment and persistence when the spores are formed under adverse environmental conditions.

  13. Direct observation of single stationary-phase bacteria reveals a surprisingly long period of constant protein production activity

    PubMed Central

    Gefen, Orit; Fridman, Ofer; Ronin, Irine; Balaban, Nathalie Q.

    2014-01-01

    Exponentially growing bacteria are rarely found in the wild, as microorganisms tend to spend most of their lifetime at stationary phase. Despite this general prevalence of stationary-phase bacteria, they are as yet poorly characterized. Our goal was to quantitatively study this phase by direct observation of single bacteria as they enter into stationary phase and by monitoring their activity over several days during growth arrest. For this purpose, we devised an experimental procedure for starving single Escherichia coli bacteria in microfluidic devices and measured their activity by monitoring the production rate of fluorescent proteins. When amino acids were the sole carbon source, the production rate decreased by an order of magnitude upon entry into stationary phase. We found that, even while growth-arrested, bacteria continued to produce proteins at a surprisingly constant rate over several days. Our identification of this newly observed period of constant activity in nongrowing cells, designated as constant activity stationary phase, makes possible the conduction of assays that require constant protein expression over time, and are therefore difficult to perform under exponential growth conditions. Moreover, we show that exogenous protein expression bears no fitness cost on the regrowth of the population when starvation ends. Further characterization of constant activity stationary phase—a phase where nongrowing bacteria can be quantitatively studied over several days in a reproducible manner—should contribute to a better understanding of this ubiquitous but overlooked physiological state of bacteria in nature. PMID:24344288

  14. Revealing the broad iron Kα line in Cygnus X-1 through simultaneous XMM-Newton, RXTE, and INTEGRAL observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duro, Refiz; Dauser, Thomas; Grinberg, Victoria; Miškovičová, Ivica; Rodriguez, Jérôme; Tomsick, John; Hanke, Manfred; Pottschmidt, Katja; Nowak, Michael A.; Kreykenbohm, Sonja; Cadolle Bel, Marion; Bodaghee, Arash; Lohfink, Anne; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Kirsch, Marcus G. F.; Staubert, Rüdiger; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-05-01

    We report on the analysis of the broad Fe Kα line feature of Cyg X-1 in the spectra of four simultaneous hard intermediate state observations made with the X-ray Multiple Mirror mission (XMM-Newton), the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL). The high quality of the XMM-Newton data taken in the Modified Timing Mode of the EPIC-pn camera provides a great opportunity to investigate the broadened Fe Kα reflection line at 6.4 keV with a very high signal to noise ratio. The 4-500 keV energy range is used to constrain the underlying continuum and the reflection at higher energies. We first investigate the data by applying a phenomenological model that consists of the sum of an exponentially cutoff power law and relativistically smeared reflection. Additionally, we apply a more physical approach and model the irradiation of the accretion disk directly from the lamp post geometry. All four observations show consistent values for the black hole parameters with a spin of a ~ 0.9, in agreement with recent measurements from reflection and disk continuum fitting. The inclination is found to be i ~ 30°, consistent with the orbital inclination and different from inclination measurements made during the soft state, which show a higher inclination. We speculate that the difference between the inclination measurements is due to changes in the inner region of the accretion disk.

  15. Non-reciprocal directional dichroism in the AFM phase of BiFeO3 at THz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Urmas; Rõõm, T.; Farkas, D.; Szaller, D.; Bordács, S.; Kézsmárki, I.; Engelkamp, H.; Ozaki, Y.; Tomiaki, Y.; Ito, T.; Fishman, Randy S.

    We did THz absorption spectroscopy of BiFeO3 single crystals in the AFM phase, where the spin cycloid is destroyed in magnetic fields between 18 T and 32 T in Voigt geometry at 1.6 K. If B0 ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , we see strong directional dichroism (DD) of absorption of the magnon mode with light propagating along the direction of the ferroelectric polarization k ∥ P ∥ [ 111 ] and eω ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , bω ∥ [ 1 1 2 ] . The sign of DD can be reversed (i) by reversing the direction of B0 or (ii) by flipping the sample, thus reversing the propagation direction of light. The observed effect is caused by the strong magneto-electric coupling in the collinear AFM phase. Research sponsored by the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research (IUT23-3).

  16. Experimental and observational evidence reveals that predators in natural environments do not regulate their prey: They are passengers, not drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. C. R.

    2013-11-01

    Among both ecologists and the wider community there is a tacit assumption that predators regulate populations of their prey. But there is evidence from a wide taxonomic and geographic range of studies that predators that are adapted to co-evolved prey generally do not regulate their prey. This is because predators either cannot reproduce as fast as their prey and/or are inefficient hunters unable to catch enough prey to sustain maximum reproduction. The greater capacity of herbivores to breed successfully is, however, normally restricted by a lack of enough food of sufficient quality to support reproduction. But whenever this shortage is alleviated by a large pulse of food, herbivores increase their numbers to outbreak levels. Their predators are unable to contain this increase, but their numbers, too, surge in response to this increase in food. Eventually both their populations will crash once the food supply runs out, first for the herbivores and then for the predators. Then an “over-run” of predators will further depress the already declining prey population, appearing to be controlling its abundance. This latter phenomenon has led many ecologists to conclude that predators are regulating the numbers of their prey. However, it is the same process that is revealed during outbreaks that limits populations of both predator and prey in “normal” times, although this is usually not readily apparent. Nevertheless, as all the diverse cases discussed here attest, the abundance of predators and their co-evolved prey are both limited by their food: the predators are passengers, not drivers.

  17. RADIO AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE TYPE Ic SN 2007gr REVEAL AN ORDINARY, NON-RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, A. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Nakar, E.; Chevalier, R. A.; Bietenholz, M. F.

    2010-12-10

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of the nearby Type Ic SN 2007gr in NGC 1058 obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory and spanning 5 to 150 days after explosion. Through our detailed modeling of these data, we estimate the properties of the blast wave and the circumstellar environment. We find evidence for a freely expanding and non-relativistic explosion with an average blast wave velocity, v-bar {approx}0.2c, and a total internal energy for the radio emitting material of E {approx} 2 x 10{sup 46} erg assuming equipartition of energy between electrons and magnetic fields ({epsilon}{sub e} = {epsilon}{sub B} = 0.1). The temporal and spectral evolution of the radio emission points to a stellar wind-blown environment shaped by a steady progenitor mass loss rate of M-dot {approx}6x10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (wind velocity, v{sub w} = 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}). These parameters are fully consistent with those inferred for other SNe Ibc and are in line with the expectations for an ordinary, homologous SN explosion. Our results are at odds with those of Paragi et al. who recently reported evidence for a relativistic blast wave in SN 2007gr based on their claim that the radio emission was resolved away in a low signal-to-noise Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observation. Here we show that the exotic physical scenarios required to explain the claimed relativistic velocity-extreme departures from equipartition and/or a highly collimated outflow-are excluded by our detailed VLA radio observations. Moreover, we present an independent analysis of the VLBI data and propose that a modest loss of phase coherence provides a more natural explanation for the apparent flux density loss which is evident on both short and long baselines. We conclude that SN 2007gr is an ordinary Type Ibc supernova.

  18. Using 2D Correlation Analysis to Enhance Spectral Information Available from Highly Spatially Resolved AFM-IR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Boskey, Adele; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The recent combination of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) has led to the ability to obtain IR spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution, nearly two orders-of-magnitude better than conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. This advanced methodology can lead to significantly sharper spectral features than are typically seen in conventional IR spectra of inhomogeneous materials, where a wider range of molecular environments are coaveraged by the larger sample cross section being probed. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis is used to examine position sensitive spectral variations in datasets of closely spaced AFM-IR spectra. This analysis can reveal new key insights, providing a better understanding of the new spectral information that was previously hidden under broader overlapped spectral features. Two examples of the utility of this new approach are presented. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of a set of AFM-IR spectra were collected at 200-nm increments along a line through a nucleation site generated by remelting a small spot on a thin film of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). There are two different crystalline carbonyl band components near 1720 cm(-1) that sequentially disappear before a band at 1740 cm(-1) due to more disordered material appears. In the second example, 2D correlation analysis of a series of AFM-IR spectra spaced every 1 micrometer of a thin cross section of a bone sample measured outward from an osteon center of bone growth. There are many changes in the amide I and phosphate band contours, suggesting changes in the bone structure are occurring as the bone matures.

  19. Shallow vent architecture of Puyehue Cordón-Caulle, as revealed by direct observation of explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, C. I.; Tuffen, H.; Castro, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    On June 4, 2011, an explosive eruption of rhyodacitic magma began at the Puyehue Cordón-Caulle volcanic complex (PCCVC), southern Chile. Initial Plinian phases of the eruption produced tephra plumes reaching > 14 km high, the ash from which quickly circumnavigated the globe to cause widespread disruption to air traffic in the Southern Hemisphere. Within two weeks, the continuing explosive eruption was joined by synchronous effusion of lava. We present observations of complex vent activity made 7 months after the eruption onset, on January 4th and 10th, 2012, when explosive activity from PCCVC continued at a lower level of intensity. Fortuitous climatic conditions permitted direct, ground-based observation and video recording of transient vent dynamics within the asymmetrical tephra cone around the main eruptive vent complex and site of lava effusion, as well as real-time collection of juvenile ash as it rained out directly from the active plume. On Jan. 4, explosive activity was semi-continuous ash jetting punctuated by Vulcanian-like blasts. In the ~50m-diameter sub-circular base of the ~400 m-wide, asymmetrical tephra cone, near-continuous ash jetting was observed from two primary point sources. The northerly source was clearly visible, with time-averaged diameter of ~10 m, and the apparently larger southerly source was mostly obscured from view by the ash plume. Activity was at all times somewhat erratic, but followed a rough cyclicity on 30-45 s timescales, consisting of: (1) restriction of the point source into a focused ash jet up to ~50 m high, producing coarse ash dominated by tube pumice (with minor free pyroxene crystals); followed by (2) Vulcanian-like failure of the region around the point source, producing incandescent ballistic bombs thrown up to 100-200 m from the vent. Jetting from the two main point sources combined in the crater to produce a low gas-thrust region and sustained buoyant plume. Directed ash plumes that climbed and breached the inner

  20. Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS Observations of I Zw 18: A Population of Old Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Revealed.

    PubMed

    Östlin

    2000-06-01

    I present the first results from a Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS imaging study of the most metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy, I Zw 18. The near-infrared color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is dominated by two populations, one 10-20 Myr population of red supergiants and one 0.1-5 Gyr population of asymptotic giant branch stars. Stars older than 1 Gyr are required to explain the observed CMD at the adopted distance of 12.6 Mpc, showing that I Zw 18 is not a young galaxy. The results hold also if the distance to I Zw 18 is significantly larger. This rules out the possibility that I Zw 18 is a truly young galaxy formed recently in the local universe.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS Observations of I Zw 18: A Population of Old Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars Revealed.

    PubMed

    Östlin

    2000-06-01

    I present the first results from a Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS imaging study of the most metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy, I Zw 18. The near-infrared color-magnitude diagram (CMD) is dominated by two populations, one 10-20 Myr population of red supergiants and one 0.1-5 Gyr population of asymptotic giant branch stars. Stars older than 1 Gyr are required to explain the observed CMD at the adopted distance of 12.6 Mpc, showing that I Zw 18 is not a young galaxy. The results hold also if the distance to I Zw 18 is significantly larger. This rules out the possibility that I Zw 18 is a truly young galaxy formed recently in the local universe. PMID:10835308

  2. The Radial Distribution of H2 and CO in TW Hya as Revealed by Resolved ALMA Observations of CO Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Zhang, Ke; Öberg, Karin I.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Qi, Chunhua

    2016-06-01

    CO is widely used as a tracer of molecular gas. However, there is now mounting evidence that gas phase carbon is depleted in the disk around TW Hya. Previous efforts to quantify this depletion have been hampered by uncertainties regarding the radial thermal structure in the disk. Here we present resolved ALMA observations of 13CO 3-2, C18O 3-2, 13CO 6-5, and C18O 6-5 emission in TW Hya, which allow us to derive radial gas temperature and gas surface density profiles, as well as map the CO abundance as a function of radius. These observations provide a measurement of the surface CO snowline at ˜30 AU and show evidence for an outer ring of CO emission centered at 53 AU, a feature previously seen only in less abundant species. Further, the derived CO gas temperature profile constrains the freeze out temperature of CO in the warm molecular layer to \\lt 21 K. Combined with the previous detection of HD 1-0, these data constrain the surface density of the warm H2 gas in the inner ˜30 AU such that {{{Σ }}}{warm{gas}}={4.7}-2.9+3.0 {{g}} {{cm}}-2{(R/10{au})}-1/2. We find that CO is depleted by two orders of magnitude from R=10{--}60 {{AU}}, with the small amount of CO returning to the gas phase inside the surface CO snowline insufficient to explain the overall depletion. Finally, this new data is used in conjunction with previous modeling of the TW Hya disk to constrain the midplane CO snowline to 17–23 AU.

  3. What can the observed rotation of the Earth's inner core reveal about the state of the outer core?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerbach, Rainer

    1998-11-01

    The discovery that the Earth's inner core is rotating relative to the mantle has prompted a number of authors to reinvestigate the dynamics of inner core rotation. These models include a highly idealized analytical one by Aurnou, Brito & Olson (1996), as well as a fully 3-D numerical one by Glatzmaier & Roberts (1996). In this work I present a model intermediate between these two extremes. In particular, I retain the simplicity of the model of Aurnou et al. by kinematically prescribing a thermal wind and poloidal magnetic field. By doing so it is possible to vary the strengths of these quantities at will, and thereby explore the dependence of the inner core's rotation rate on them more thoroughly than in the model of Glatzmaier & Roberts, where these quantities emerge as part of the solution, and one therefore has far less control over their strengths. However, as in the model of Glatzmaier & Roberts, the full back-reaction of the magnetic field on the fluid flow in the outer core is included. It is found that if one includes this effect, the relationship between the inner core's rotation rate and the strength of the thermal wind is more complicated than that found by Aurnou et al., who did not include it. As a result, while the observed rotation of the inner core certainly gives a rigorous lower bound on the maximum difference in angular velocity throughout the outer core, that maximum difference could be as much as an order of magnitude greater. Finally, it is also pointed out that, because of the particular nature of the torque balance that determines the inner core's rotation rate, it is difficult, if not impossible, to use that observed rate to obtain precise bounds on the magnetic field strength deep within the core.

  4. The circumbinary dusty disk of upsilon Sgr revealed by mid-IR interferometric observations with the VLTI/MIDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneau, D.; Netolický, M.; Chesneau, O.; Harmanec, P.; Koubský, P.; Mourard, D.; Stee, P.

    2008-11-01

    The first mid-IR interferometric observations of a hydrogen-deficient binary star, υ Sgr, were carried out using the MIDI/VLTI instrument between April 2007 and May 2008. The dusty circumbinary envelope is resolved in the N band (8-13.5 μ m), and has a typical size of 20 x 14 mas. The calibrated fringe visibilities, the mid-IR spectrum and the SED were fitted using models computed with the radiative transfer code MC3D using several mixtures of carbon and silicate dust, in order to determine the geometry and chemical composition of the envelope. The best model we obtain is a geometrically thin and dense disk with an inner radius of R_{in} ≃ 6.0AU and a scale height h_{100} ≃ 3.5 AU. The inclination of the disk is i ≃ 50° and its position angle is PA ≃ 80°. The chemical composition of the dust is approximatelya ratio of 60% of carbon dust and 40% of silicate dust. We constrained for the first time the geometry and the chemistry of the circumbinary dusty envelope of υ Sgr. It is now clear that the components of υ Sgr are massive stars (> 10 M_⊙) and the results are compatible with evolutionary scenario proposed by Delgado & Thomas (1981) of a binary with massive components experiencing several phases of important mass transfer leading to the hydrogen-deficient primary star. However, complementary spectro-interferometric observations in the near infrared and the visible are mandatory to investigate the complex structure of the inner circumstellar environment and directly resolve the stellar components of the υ Sgr system.

  5. Intrinsically high-Q dynamic AFM imaging in liquid with a significantly extended needle tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-06-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially available tapping-mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operational frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic material properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments.

  6. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  7. Persistent Aseismic Deformation in Central Japan Revealed by GPS Observation Before and After the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses Gutierrez, A. D. V.; Sagiya, T.

    2015-12-01

    On March 11th, 2011 the occurrence of the Tohoku-oki Earthquake (Mw 9.0) considerably changed the observed crustal deformation pattern in Central -Eastern Japan, providing the opportunity to study the mechanical properties in the area, since elastic and inelastic mediums would have different response to the coseismic instantaneous displacement as well as transient postseismic displacement. In the near field of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, it is difficult to extract a pure deformation response since direct effects from the postseismic deformation source are mixed. In order to focus on the response at the far field, we analyzed postseismic crustal deformation in Central Japan. Before the quake, we observe general East-West contraction with localize deformation in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea, known as the Niigata Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ) (Sagiya, 2000), whereas the coseismic response, which corresponds to the instantaneous elastic strain release, do not indicate highly concentrated strain feature, as expected if the deformation could be explain only by an elastic behavior. This implies that the interseismic and coseismic strains are not balanced and there is significant amount of contribution of inelastic processes. In the Earth's crust, inelastic processes are expected to take a form of aseismic faulting, and should be distinguished from elastic behavior by its spatial wavelength. Also, the inelastic behavior can be persistent before and after the quake since the coseismic stress change in the far field is considered to be too small to change the regional stress that drives the inelastic process. Thus we review temporal variation of crustal deformation pattern in Central Japan based on daily coordinates of 837 GPS sites from GEONET, before and after the Tohoku-oki earthquake in order to distinguish elastic and inelastic behavior within the NKTZ. We found that the deformation in the area can be explained as a combination of two processes: an elastic

  8. SN 2010jl: Optical to hard X-ray observations reveal an explosion embedded in a ten solar mass cocoon

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Zoglauer, Andreas; Boggs, Steven E.; Barriére, Nicolas M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Fryer, Chris L.; Even, Wesley; Harrison, Fiona A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Bellm, Eric; Grefenstette, Brian; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Laher, Russ; and others

    2014-01-20

    Some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the interaction of the SN ejecta with a large amount of circumstellar matter (CSM). However, quantitative estimates of the CSM mass around such SNe are missing when the CSM material is optically thick. Specifically, current estimators are sensitive to uncertainties regarding the CSM density profile and the ejecta velocity. Here we outline a method to measure the mass of the optically thick CSM around such SNe. We present new visible-light and X-ray observations of SN 2010jl (PTF 10aaxf), including the first detection of an SN in the hard X-ray band using NuSTAR. The total radiated luminosity of SN 2010jl is extreme—at least 9 × 10{sup 50} erg. By modeling the visible-light data, we robustly show that the mass of the circumstellar material within ∼10{sup 16} cm of the progenitor of SN 2010jl was in excess of 10 M {sub ☉}. This mass was likely ejected tens of years prior to the SN explosion. Our modeling suggests that the shock velocity during shock breakout was ∼6000 km s{sup –1}, decelerating to ∼2600 km s{sup –1} about 2 yr after maximum light. Furthermore, our late-time NuSTAR and XMM spectra of the SN presumably provide the first direct measurement of SN shock velocity 2 yr after the SN maximum light—measured to be in the range of 2000-4500 km s{sup –1} if the ions and electrons are in equilibrium, and ≳ 2000 km s{sup –1} if they are not in equilibrium. This measurement is in agreement with the shock velocity predicted by our modeling of the visible-light data. Our observations also show that the average radial density distribution of the CSM roughly follows an r {sup –2} law. A possible explanation for the ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} of CSM and the wind-like profile is that they are the result of multiple pulsational pair instability events prior to the SN explosion, separated from each other by years.

  9. Structure of the Circumnuclear Region of Seyfert 2 Galaxies Revealed by RXTE Hard X-Ray Observations of NGC 4945

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejski, G.; Zycki, P.; Done, C.; Valinia, A.; Blanco, P.; Rothschild, R.; Turek, B.

    2000-01-01

    NGC 4945 is one of the brightest Se.yfert galaxies on the sky at 100 keV, but is completely absorbed below 10 keV, implying an optical depth of the absorber to electron scattering of a few; its absorption column is probably the largest which still allows a direct view of the nucleus at hard X-ray energies. Our observations of it with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite confirm the large absorption, which for a simple phenomenological fit using an absorber with Solar abundances implies a column of 4.5(sup 0.4, sub -0.4) x 10(exp 24) /sq cm. Using a a more realistic scenario (requiring Monte Carlo modeling of the scattering), we infer the optical depth to Thomson scattering of approximately 2.4. If such a scattering medium were to subtend a large solid angle from the nucleus, it should smear out any intrinsic hard X-ray variability on time scales shorter than the light travel time through it. The rapid (with a time scale of approximately a day) hard X-ray variability of NGC 4945 we observed with the RXTE implies that the bulk of the extreme absorption in this object does not originate in a parsec-size, geometrically thick molecular torus. Limits on the amount of scattered flux require that the optically thick material on parsec scales must be rather geometrically thin, subtending a half-angle < 10 deg. This is only marginally consistent with the recent determinations of the obscuring column in hard X-rays, where only a quarter of Seyfert 2s have columns which are optically thick, and presents a problem in accounting for the Cosmic X-ray Background primarily with AGN possessing the geometry as that inferred by us. The small solid angle of the obscuring material, together with the black hole mass (of approximately 1.4 x 10(exp 6) solar mass) from megamaser measurements. allows a robust determination of the source luminosity, which in turn implies that the source radiates at approximately 10% of the Eddington limit.

  10. Predictive Factors for Anastomotic Leakage After Colorectal Surgery: Study Protocol for a Prospective Observational Study (REVEAL Study)

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Joanna WAM; Kartal, Serdar; Lubbers, Tim; Sosef, Meindert; Slooter, Gerrit D; Stoot, Jan H; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Bouvy, Nicole D; Derikx, Joep PM

    2016-01-01

    Background Anastomotic leakage (AL) remains the most important complication following colorectal surgery, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Previous research has focused on identifying risk factors and potential biomarkers for AL, but the sensitivity of these tests remains poor. Objective This prospective multicenter observational study aims at combining multiple parameters to establish a diagnostic algorithm for colorectal AL. Methods This study aims to include 588 patients undergoing surgery for colorectal carcinoma. Patients will be eligible for inclusion when surgery includes the construction of a colorectal anastomosis. Patient characteristics will be collected upon consented inclusion, and buccal swabs, breath, stool, and blood samples will be obtained prior to surgery. These samples will allow for the collection of information regarding patients’ inflammatory status, genetic predisposition, and intestinal microbiota. Additionally, breath and blood samples will be taken postoperatively and patients will be strictly observed during their in-hospital stay, and the period shortly thereafter. Results This study has been open for inclusion since August 2015. Conclusions An estimated 8-10% of patients will develop AL following surgery, and they will be compared to non-leakage patients. The objectives of this study are twofold. The primary aim is to establish and validate a diagnostic algorithm for the pre-operative prediction of the risk of AL development using a combination of inflammatory, immune-related, and genetic parameters. Previously established risk factors and novel parameters will be incorporated into this algorithm, which will aid in the recognition of patients who are at risk for AL. Based on these results, recommendations can be made regarding the construction of an anastomosis or deviating stoma, and possible preventive strategies. Furthermore, we aim to develop a new algorithm for the post-operative diagnosis of AL at an

  11. Substantial Underestimation of Post-Harvest Burning Emissions in the North China Plain Revealed by Multi-Species Space Observations.

    PubMed

    Stavrakou, T; Müller, J-F; Bauwens, M; De Smedt, I; Lerot, C; Van Roozendael, M; Coheur, P-F; Clerbaux, C; Boersma, K F; van der A, R; Song, Y

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale burning of crop residues in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated world regions, was recently recognized to cause severe air pollution and harmful health effects. A reliable quantification of the magnitude of these fires is needed to assess regional air quality. Here, we use an eight-year record (2005-2012) of formaldehyde measurements from space to constrain the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in this region. Using inverse modelling, we derive that satellite-based post-harvest burning fluxes are, on average, at least a factor of 2 higher than state-of-the-art bottom-up statistical estimates, although with significant interannual variability. Crop burning is calculated to cause important increases in surface ozone (+7%) and fine aerosol concentrations (+18%) in the North China Plain in June. The impact of crop fires is also found in satellite observations of other species, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide and methanol, and we show that those measurements validate the magnitude of the top-down fluxes. Our study indicates that the top-down crop burning fluxes of VOCs in June exceed by almost a factor of 2 the combined emissions from other anthropogenic activities in this region, underscoring the need for targeted actions towards changes in agricultural management practices. PMID:27577535

  12. HIGH VELOCITY PRECESSING JETS FROM THE WATER FOUNTAIN IRAS 18286-0959 REVEALED BY VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Imai, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Shuji; Diamond, Philip J.

    2011-11-10

    We report the results of multi-epoch Very Long Baseline Array observations of the 22.2 GHz H{sub 2}O maser emission associated with the 'water fountain' IRAS 18286-0959. We suggest that this object is the second example of a highly collimated bipolar precessing outflow traced by H{sub 2}O maser emission, the other is W 43A. The detected H{sub 2}O emission peaks are distributed over a velocity range from -50 km s{sup -1} to 150 km s{sup -1}. The spatial distribution of over 70% of the identified maser features is found to be highly collimated along a spiral jet (jet 1) extended southeast to northwest; the remaining features appear to trace another spiral jet (jet 2) with a different orientation. The two jets form a 'double-helix' pattern which lies across {approx}200 mas. The maser distribution is reasonably fit by a model consisting of two bipolar precessing jets. The three-dimensional velocities of jet 1 and jet 2 are derived to be 138 km s{sup -1} and 99 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The precession period of jet 1 is about 56 years. For jet 2, three possible models are tested and they give different values for the kinematic parameters. We propose that the appearance of two jets is the result of a single driving source with significant proper motion.

  13. Substantial Underestimation of Post-Harvest Burning Emissions in the North China Plain Revealed by Multi-Species Space Observations.

    PubMed

    Stavrakou, T; Müller, J-F; Bauwens, M; De Smedt, I; Lerot, C; Van Roozendael, M; Coheur, P-F; Clerbaux, C; Boersma, K F; van der A, R; Song, Y

    2016-08-31

    The large-scale burning of crop residues in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated world regions, was recently recognized to cause severe air pollution and harmful health effects. A reliable quantification of the magnitude of these fires is needed to assess regional air quality. Here, we use an eight-year record (2005-2012) of formaldehyde measurements from space to constrain the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in this region. Using inverse modelling, we derive that satellite-based post-harvest burning fluxes are, on average, at least a factor of 2 higher than state-of-the-art bottom-up statistical estimates, although with significant interannual variability. Crop burning is calculated to cause important increases in surface ozone (+7%) and fine aerosol concentrations (+18%) in the North China Plain in June. The impact of crop fires is also found in satellite observations of other species, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide and methanol, and we show that those measurements validate the magnitude of the top-down fluxes. Our study indicates that the top-down crop burning fluxes of VOCs in June exceed by almost a factor of 2 the combined emissions from other anthropogenic activities in this region, underscoring the need for targeted actions towards changes in agricultural management practices.

  14. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Romanov, Alexey; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positive correlation between the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies and the Tohoku earthquake. This study may lead to a better understanding of the response of the atmosphere/ionosphere to the Great Tohoku earthquake.

  15. First in situ observations of the deep-sea squid Grimalditeuthis bonplandi reveal unique use of tentacles

    PubMed Central

    Hoving, Hendrik J. T.; Zeidberg, Louis D.; Benfield, Mark C.; Bush, Stephanie L.; Robison, Bruce H.; Vecchione, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The deep-sea squid Grimalditeuthis bonplandi has tentacles unique among known squids. The elastic stalk is extremely thin and fragile, whereas the clubs bear no suckers, hooks or photophores. It is unknown whether and how these tentacles are used in prey capture and handling. We present, to our knowledge, the first in situ observations of this species obtained by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in the Atlantic and North Pacific. Unexpectedly, G. bonplandi is unable to rapidly extend and retract the tentacle stalk as do other squids, but instead manoeuvres the tentacles by undulation and flapping of the clubs’ trabecular protective membranes. These tentacle club movements superficially resemble the movements of small marine organisms and suggest the possibility that G. bonplandi uses aggressive mimicry by the tentacle clubs to lure prey, which we find to consist of crustaceans and cephalopods. In the darkness of the meso- and bathypelagic zones the flapping and undulatory movements of the tentacle may: (i) stimulate bioluminescence in the surrounding water, (ii) create low-frequency vibrations and/or (iii) produce a hydrodynamic wake. Potential prey of G. bonplandi may be attracted to one or more of these as signals. This singular use of the tentacle adds to the diverse foraging and feeding strategies known in deep-sea cephalopods. PMID:23986106

  16. The 2011 outburst of recurrent nova T PYX: Radio observations reveal the ejecta mass and hint at complex mass loss

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas; Chomiuk, Laura; Roy, Nirupam; Krauss, Miriam I.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rupen, Michael P.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Weston, Jennifer; Mukai, Koji

    2014-04-10

    Despite being the prototype of its class, T Pyx is arguably the most unusual and poorly understood recurrent nova. Here, we use radio observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to trace the evolution of the ejecta over the course of the 2011 outburst of T Pyx. The radio emission is broadly consistent with thermal emission from the nova ejecta. However, the radio flux began rising surprisingly late in the outburst, indicating that the bulk of the radio-emitting material was either very cold, or expanding very slowly, for the first ∼50 days of the outburst. Considering a plausible range of volume filling factors and geometries for the ejecta, we find that the high peak flux densities of the radio emission require a massive ejection of (1-30) × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉}. This ejecta mass is much higher than the values normally associated with recurrent novae, and is more consistent with a nova on a white dwarf well below the Chandrasekhar limit.

  17. Substantial Underestimation of Post-Harvest Burning Emissions in the North China Plain Revealed by Multi-Species Space Observations

    PubMed Central

    Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Bauwens, M.; De Smedt, I.; Lerot, C.; Van Roozendael, M.; Coheur, P.-F.; Clerbaux, C.; Boersma, K. F.; van der A, R.; Song, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale burning of crop residues in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated world regions, was recently recognized to cause severe air pollution and harmful health effects. A reliable quantification of the magnitude of these fires is needed to assess regional air quality. Here, we use an eight-year record (2005–2012) of formaldehyde measurements from space to constrain the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in this region. Using inverse modelling, we derive that satellite-based post-harvest burning fluxes are, on average, at least a factor of 2 higher than state-of-the-art bottom-up statistical estimates, although with significant interannual variability. Crop burning is calculated to cause important increases in surface ozone (+7%) and fine aerosol concentrations (+18%) in the North China Plain in June. The impact of crop fires is also found in satellite observations of other species, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide and methanol, and we show that those measurements validate the magnitude of the top-down fluxes. Our study indicates that the top-down crop burning fluxes of VOCs in June exceed by almost a factor of 2 the combined emissions from other anthropogenic activities in this region, underscoring the need for targeted actions towards changes in agricultural management practices. PMID:27577535

  18. A scalable algorithm to order and annotate continuous observations reveals the metastable states visited by dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöchliger, Nicolas; Vitalis, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2013-11-01

    Advances in IT infrastructure have enabled the generation and storage of very large data sets describing complex systems continuously in time. These can derive from both simulations and measurements. Analysis of such data requires the availability of scalable algorithms. In this contribution, we propose a scalable algorithm that partitions instantaneous observations (snapshots) of a complex system into kinetically distinct sets (termed basins). To do so, we use a combination of ordering snapshots employing the method's only essential parameter, i.e., a definition of pairwise distance, and annotating the resultant sequence, the so-called progress index, in different ways. Specifically, we propose a combination of cut-based and structural annotations with the former responsible for the kinetic grouping and the latter for diagnostics and interpretation. The method is applied to an illustrative test case, and the scaling of an approximate version is demonstrated to be O(NlogN) with N being the number of snapshots. Two real-world data sets from river hydrology measurements and protein folding simulations are then used to highlight the utility of the method in finding basins for complex systems. Both limitations and benefits of the approach are discussed along with routes for future research.

  19. An extraordinary ULF wave episode during the 2003 Halloween superstorm revealed by wavelet transforms of multipoint observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Georgiou, M.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Mann, I.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate a rare concurrent observation of an ultra low frequency (ULF) wave event in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere and surface employing a time-frequency analysis technique. We have examined the ULF wave activity in the Pc3 (22-100 mHz) and Pc4-5 (1-22 mHz) frequency bands within a short time interval during the Halloween 2003 magnetic storm, when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction near the dayside noon-midnight meridian. A key finding of the wavelet spectral analysis of data collected from the Geotail, Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft, and the CARISMA and GIMA magnetometer networks was a remarkably clear transition of the waves' frequency into a higher regime within the Pc3 range. Our study offers insights into the energy transfer traced all the way from the solar wind through the magnetosphere and ionosphere to the ground. This work has received support from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  20. Substantial Underestimation of Post-Harvest Burning Emissions in the North China Plain Revealed by Multi-Species Space Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrakou, T.; Müller, J.-F.; Bauwens, M.; de Smedt, I.; Lerot, C.; van Roozendael, M.; Coheur, P.-F.; Clerbaux, C.; Boersma, K. F.; van der A, R.; Song, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The large-scale burning of crop residues in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated world regions, was recently recognized to cause severe air pollution and harmful health effects. A reliable quantification of the magnitude of these fires is needed to assess regional air quality. Here, we use an eight-year record (2005–2012) of formaldehyde measurements from space to constrain the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in this region. Using inverse modelling, we derive that satellite-based post-harvest burning fluxes are, on average, at least a factor of 2 higher than state-of-the-art bottom-up statistical estimates, although with significant interannual variability. Crop burning is calculated to cause important increases in surface ozone (+7%) and fine aerosol concentrations (+18%) in the North China Plain in June. The impact of crop fires is also found in satellite observations of other species, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide and methanol, and we show that those measurements validate the magnitude of the top-down fluxes. Our study indicates that the top-down crop burning fluxes of VOCs in June exceed by almost a factor of 2 the combined emissions from other anthropogenic activities in this region, underscoring the need for targeted actions towards changes in agricultural management practices.

  1. Histological and ultrastructural observation reveals significant cellular differences between Agrobacterium transformed embryogenic and non-embryogenic calli of cotton.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hai-Hong; Liu, Chuan-Liang; Zhang, Chao-Jun; Li, Feng-Lian; Hong, Wei-Dong; Li, Fu-Guang

    2009-05-01

    Over the past few decades genetic engineering has been applied to improve cotton breeding. Agrobacterium medicated transformation is nowadays widely used as an efficient approach to introduce exogenous genes into cotton for genetically modified organisms. However, it still needs to be improved for better transformation efficiency and higher embryogenic callus induction ratios. To research further the difference of mechanisms for morphogenesis between embryogenic callus and non-embryogenic callus, we carried out a systematical study on the histological and cellular ultrastructure of Agrobacterium transformed calli. Results showed that the embryogenic callus developed nodule-like structures, which were formed by small, tightly packed, hemispherical cells. The surface of some embryogenic callus was covered with a fibrilar-like structure named extracellular matrix. The cells of embryogenic calli had similar morphological characteristics. Organelles of embryogenic callus cells were located near the nucleus, and chloroplasts degraded to proplastid-like structures with some starch grains. In contrast, the non-embryogenic calli were covered by oval or sphere cells or small clusters of cells. It was observed that cells had vacuolation of cytoplasm and plastids with a well organized endomembrane system. This study aims to understand the mechanisms of embryogenic callus morphogenesis and to improve the efficiency of cotton transformation in future.

  2. Mechanical properties study of SW480 cells based on AFM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Song, Zhengxun; Qu, Yingmin; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Zuobin

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM), it has been widely applied in biomedicine. One of the most important applications is used as an indenter tool to do the indentation experiment in order to get the mechanical properties of cells. In this paper, SW480 cells were used as the test subjects. Through the analysis of the contact and indentation, Young's modulus (E), which is an important parameter of cancer cells, has been estimated. Experimental results show that different mechanical models should be chosen to calculate the E in different indentation depths. Here, the E of SW480 cells was (2.5 ± 0.8) KPa at the indentation depth of 99 nm.

  3. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  4. Modeling AFM Induced Mechanical Deformation of Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M; Balhorn, R; Allen, M J; Belak, J

    2002-11-15

    Finite element modeling has been applied to study deformation of living cells in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and particularly Recognition Force Microscopy (RFM). The abstract mechanical problem of interest is the response to RFM point loads of an incompressible medium enclosed in a fluid membrane. Cells are soft systems, susceptible to large deformations in the course of an RFM measurement. Often the local properties such as receptor anchoring forces, the reason for the measurement, are obscured by the response of the cell as a whole. Modeling can deconvolute these effects. This facilitates experimental efforts to have reproducible measurements of mechanical and chemical properties at specific kinds of receptor sites on the membrane of a living cell. In this article we briefly review the RFM technique for cells and the problems it poses, and then report on recent progress in modeling the deformation of cells by a point load.

  5. Two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Cryptosporidium hominis reveal protein–ligand interactions including a structural basis for observed antifolate resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Amy C.

    2005-03-01

    An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of DHFR-TS from C. hominis reveals a possible structural basis for observed antifolate resistance in C. hominis DHFR. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals residue substitutions that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors. Cryptosporidium hominis is a protozoan parasite that causes acute gastrointestinal illness. There are no effective therapies for cryptosporidiosis, highlighting the need for new drug-lead discovery. An analysis of the protein–ligand interactions in two crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) from C. hominis, determined at 2.8 and 2.87 Å resolution, reveals that the interactions of residues Ile29, Thr58 and Cys113 in the active site of C. hominis DHFR provide a possible structural basis for the observed antifolate resistance. A comparison with the structure of human DHFR reveals active-site differences that may be exploited for the design of species-selective inhibitors.

  6. Real-time observation of polymer network formation by liquid- and solid-state NMR revealing multistage reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kovermann, Michael; Saalwächter, Kay; Chassé, Walter

    2012-06-28

    The reaction rate for the end-cross-linking process of vinyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) by a cross-linker with four Si-H functionalities in the presence of solvent was studied by (1)H liquid-state NMR in dependence of the reaction temperature. The properties of the resulting polymer networks, i.e., the gel-point and the formation of the elastically effective network, were monitored in situ during the reaction by single-evolution-time (1)H double-quantum (SET-DQ) low-field NMR. It was found that the cross-linking kinetics shows no uniform reaction order for the conversions of the functional groups before the topological gelation threshold of the polymer network. The two NMR methods are combined to investigate the formation of the elastically effective network in dependence of the conversion of the functional groups of the precursor polymers and the cross-linker. The high chemical and time resolution of the experiments enabled an in-depth analysis of the reaction kinetics, allowing us to conclude on a multistage model for PDMS network formation by hydrosilylation-based end-linking in the presence of solvent. We found that the nonuniform network formation kinetics originates from a dependence of the apparent reaction rate on the number of the Si-H groups of the cross-linker that have already reacted during the progress of the reaction. The fastest overall reaction rate is observed in a range until each cross-linker has reacted once on average, and a uniform apparent overall reaction order of unity with respect to cross-linker concentration is only found at a later stage, when multiply reacted cross-linker molecules with similar reactivity dominate. PMID:22650309

  7. Source Processes Revealed at Two Guatemalan Volcanoes: Insights from Multidisciplinary Observations of Harmonic Tremor and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, K. A.; Waite, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Tremor signals at volcanoes are typically attributed to fluid movement within the system. Characteristics of harmonic tremor (i.e. duration, frequency content, polarization) can convey detailed information about source processes from which they emanate, but decoding these signals poses great challenges due to the complexity of volcanic environments. We recorded instances of harmonic tremor at both Santiaguito and Fuego volcanoes Guatemala, Central America. The instances of harmonic tremor occur both independent from and contemporaneous with explosions, and last anywhere from 30 seconds to tens of minutes. The signals have fundamental frequencies between 0.3 and 2.5 Hz, with as many as 20 overtones, and exhibit spectral gliding of up to 0.75 Hz over the course of an event, changing as quickly as 0.1 Hz/second. Field observations; video recordings; and time-lapse, ultraviolet, and thermal imagery; collected simultaneously with acoustic and seismic recordings allow us to constrain source locations and processes beyond what would otherwise be possible just acoustic and seismic recordings. We propose that the harmonic tremor signals are generated by nonlinear excitation of fracture walls as gas vents out of the systems. Additionally, we investigate the complex wavefield generated by harmonic tremor and the heterogeneous volcanic media. Particle motions at both volcanoes are typically elliptical, but vary dramatically over time as the fundamental frequency glides up and down (see figure). In addition, the particle motions of harmonics often have different polarities from each other and the fundamental frequency. Through finite difference modeling, we isolate the effects of near-field terms, topography, and source mechanism to explore each of these factors' contribution to the unexpected behavior.

  8. New redox states observed in [FeFe] hydrogenases reveal redox coupling within the H-cluster.

    PubMed

    Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Krawietz, Danuta; Siebel, Judith; Weber, Katharina; Happe, Thomas; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-08-13

    Active [FeFe] hydrogenases can be obtained by expressing the unmaturated enzyme in Escherichia coli followed by incubation with a synthetic precursor of the binuclear [2Fe] subcluster, namely: [NEt4]2[Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2] (adt = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)). The binuclear subsite Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 is attached through a bridging cysteine side chain to a [4Fe-4S] subcluster already present in the unmaturated enzyme thus yielding the intact native "H-cluster". We present FTIR electrochemical studies of the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrHydA1, maturated with the precursor of the native cofactor [Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) as well as a non-natural variant [Fe2(pdt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) in which the bridging amine functionality is replaced by CH2. The obtained active enzyme CrHydA1(adt) shows the same redox states in the respective potential range as observed for the native system (E(ox/red) = -400 mV, E(red/sred) = -470 mV). For the Hox → Hred transition the reducing equivalent is stored on the binuclear part, ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(II)Fe(I) → [4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(I)), while the Hred → Hsred transition is characterized by a reduction of the [4Fe-4S] part of the H-cluster ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(I) → [4Fe-4S](+)Fe(I)Fe(I)). A similar transition is reported here for the CO inhibited state of the H-cluster: ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(II)CO → [4Fe-4S](+)Fe(I)Fe(II)CO). An FTIR electrochemical study of the inactive variant with the pdt ligand, CrHydA1(pdt), identified two redox states H(pdt)-ox and H(pdt)-"red". Both EPR and FTIR spectra of H(pdt)-ox are virtually identical to those of the H(adt)-ox and the native Hox state. The H(pdt)-"red" state is also characterized by a reduced [4Fe-4S] subcluster. In contrast to CrHydA1(adt), the H(pdt)-ox state of CrHydA1(pdt) is stable up to rather high potentials (+200 mV). This study demonstrates the distinct redox coupling between the two parts of the H-cluster and confirms that the [4Fe-4S]H subsite is also redox active and as

  9. BOREAS AFM-6 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35-GHz cloud-sensing radar in the Northern Study Area (NSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 16 Jul 1994 to 08 Aug 1994. This data set contains a time series of GIF images that show the structure of the lower atmosphere. The NOAA/ETL 35-GHz cloud/turbulence radar GIF images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  11. AFM of the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of lipid-raft-disrupted and/or cold-treated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gan, Chaoye; Li, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2014-02-01

    The nonionic detergent extraction at 4 °C and the cholesterol-depletion-induced lipid raft disruption are the two widely used experimental strategies for lipid raft research. However, the effects of raft disruption and/or cold treatment on the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of cells are still unclear. Here, we evaluated the effects of raft disruption and/or cold (4 °C) treatment on these properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At first, the cholesterol-depletion-induced raft disruption was visualized by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent quantum dots. Next, the cold-induced cell contraction and the formation of end-branched filopodia were observed by confocal microscopy and AFM. Then, the cell-surface ultrastructures were imaged by AFM, and the data showed that raft disruption and cold treatment induced opposite effects on cell-surface roughness (a significant decrease and a significant increase, respectively). Moreover, the cell-surface mechanical properties (stiffness and adhesion force) of raft-disrupted- and/or cold-treated HUVECs were measured by the force measurement function of AFM. We found that raft disruption and cold treatment induced parallel effects on cell stiffness (increase) or adhesion force (decrease) and that the combination of the two treatments caused dramatically strengthened effects. Finally, raft disruption was found to significantly impair cell migration as previously reported, whereas temporary cold treatment only caused a slight but nonsignificant decrease in cell migration performed at physiological temperature. Although the mechanisms for causing these results might be complicated and more in-depth studies will be needed, our data may provide important information for better understanding the effects of raft disruption or cold treatment on cells and the two strategies for lipid raft research.

  12. Application of the Discrete Wavelet Transform to SEM and AFM Micrographs for Quantitative Analysis of Complex Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Workman, Michael J; Serov, Alexey; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2015-05-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has found significant utility in process monitoring, filtering, and feature isolation of SEM, AFM, and optical images. Current use of the DWT for surface analysis assumes initial knowledge of the sizes of the features of interest in order to effectively isolate and analyze surface components. Current methods do not adequately address complex, heterogeneous surfaces in which features across multiple size ranges are of interest. Further, in situations where structure-to-property relationships are desired, the identification of features relevant for the function of the material is necessary. In this work, the DWT is examined as a tool for quantitative, length-scale specific surface metrology without prior knowledge of relevant features or length-scales. A new method is explored for determination of the best wavelet basis to minimize variation in roughness and skewness measurements with respect to change in position and orientation of surface features. It is observed that the size of the wavelet does not directly correlate with the size of features on the surface, and a method to measure the true length-scale specific roughness of the surface is presented. This method is applied to SEM and AFM images of non-precious metal catalysts, yielding new length-scale specific structure-to-property relationships for chemical speciation and fuel cell performance. The relationship between SEM and AFM length-scale specific roughness is also explored. Evidence is presented that roughness distributions of SEM images, as measured by the DWT, is representative of the true surface roughness distribution obtained from AFM.

  13. In Situ AFM Imaging of Solid Electrolyte Interfaces on HOPG with Ethylene Carbonate and Fluoroethylene Carbonate-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cai; Wang, Shuwei; Jin, Yan; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-11-18

    Chemical and morphological structure of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays a vital role in lithium-ion battery (LIB), especially for its cyclability and safety. To date, research on SEI is quite limited because of the complexity of SEI and lack of effective in situ characterization techniques. Here, we present real-time views of SEI morphological evolution using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM). Complemented by an ex situ XPS analysis, fundamental differences of SEI formation from ethylene carbonate (EC) and fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolytes during first lithiation/delithiation cycle on HOPG electrode surface were revealed.

  14. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies-one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  15. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies—one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  16. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies-one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  17. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies—one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  18. Mechanical properties of in situ demineralised human enamel measured by AFM nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Manuela; Hughes, Julie A.; Parker, David M.; Jandt, Klaus D.

    2001-10-01

    Diet-induced demineralisation is one of the key factors in surface changes of tooth enamel, with soft drinks being a significant etiological agent. The first step in this dissolution process is characterised by a change in the mechanical properties of the enamel and a roughening of the surface. The objective of this pilot study was to measure early stages of in situ induced hardness changes of polished human enamel surfaces with high accuracy using a nanoindenter attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Human unerupted third molars were cleaned, sterilised with sodium hypochlorite, sectioned and embedded in epoxy resin. The outer enamel surface was polished and the samples partly covered with a tape, allowing a 2-mm-wide zone to be exposed to the oral environment. Samples were fitted in an intra-oral appliance, which was worn from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for one day. During this time the volunteer sipped 250 ml of a drink over 10 min periods at 9.00, 11.00, 13.00 and 15.00 h. Three different drinks, mineral water, orange juice and the prototype of a blackcurrant drink with low demineralisation potential were used in this study. At the end of the experiment the samples were detached from the appliance, the tape removed and the surfaces chemically cleaned. The surface hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the exposed and unexposed areas of each sample were determined. In addition, high resolution topographical AFM images were obtained. This study shows that by determining the hardness and reduced Young's modulus, the difference in demineralisation caused by the drinks can be detected and quantified before statistically significant changes in surface topography could be observed with the AFM. The maximum decrease in surface hardness and Young's modulus occurred in the samples exposed to orange juice, followed by those exposed to the blackcurrant drink, while exposure to water led to the same values as unexposed areas. A one-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant

  19. Variations of GHGs from the lower-troposphere to the UT/LS revealed by two Japanese regular aircraft observation programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yosuke; Machida, Toshinobu; Sawa, Yousuke; Tsuboi, Kazuhiro; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Imasu, Ryoichi

    2014-05-01

    A Japan-centered observation network consisting of two regular aircraft programs have revealed the greenhouse gases variations from the lower-troposphere to the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere (UT/LS) regions. In the Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airliner (CONTRAIL) project, in-situ continuous measurement equipment (CME) onboard commercial passenger aircraft world-widely observes CO2 profiles in vertical over tens of airports and in horizontal in the UT/LS regions. The CONTRAIL-CME has revealed three-dimensional structure of the global CO2 distribution and has exposed significant inter-hemispheric transport of CO2 through the upper-troposphere. In inverse modeling, the CME data have provided strong constraints on CO2 flux estimation especially for the Asian tropics. Automatic flask air sampling equipment (ASE) is also onboard the CONTRAIL aircraft and has been observing CO2 mixing ratios as well as those of methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide and other trace species in the upper-troposphere between Japan and Australia. The observation period of the ASE has reached 20 years. In recent years, the ASE program has extended to the northern subarctic UT/LS region and has given an insight of transport mechanisms in the UT/LS by observing seasonal GHGs variations. In the other aircraft observation program by Japan Meteorological Agency, variations of GHGs have been observed by flask-sampling onboard a C-130H aircraft horizontally in the mid-troposphere over the western North Pacific as well as vertically over Minamitorishima-Island. The C-130H aircraft has persistently observed high mixing ratios of CH4 in the mid-troposphere, which seems to be originated from fossil fuel combustion throughout the year as well as from biogenic sources during summer in the Asian regions. Those above aircraft observation programs have a significant role for constraining GHGs flux estimates by filling the data gap of the existing surface measurement network

  20. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  1. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  2. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  3. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    PubMed

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations <150 mM spherical micelles are present and the oscillation period is close to the micelle diameter, slightly decreasing with the rise of concentration. For elongated micelles (at concentration 200 mM), no harmonic oscillations are observed anymore; instead, the period increases with the decrease of film thickness. In the case of Tween 20, the force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants.

  4. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  5. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  7. Study of the influence of the acrylic acid plasma parameters on silicon and polyurethane substrates using XPS and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilani, C.; Weibel, D. E.; Zamora, R. R. M.; Habert, A. C.; Achete, C. A.

    2007-10-01

    XPS and AFM have been used to investigate surface modifications produced by acrylic acid (AA) vapor plasma treatment of silicon (Si)(1 0 0) substrates and polyurethanes (PUs) membranes. XPS analyses of Si and PUs treated substrates at low plasma power (5-20 W) revealed the formation of a thin film on the surfaces, which chemically resembles the poly(acrylic acid) film conventionally synthesised. No signal of the Si substrate could be seen under these low plasma power applications on silicon. However, when the plasma power is higher than 30 W one can clearly see XPS silicon signatures. AFM measurements of silicon substrates treated with AA plasma at low power (5-20 W) showed the formation of a thin polymer film of about 220-55 nm thickness. Further, applications of high plasma power (30-100 W) displayed a marked difference from low plasma modifications and it was found sputtering of the silicon substrate. Pervaporation results of AA plasma treated PUs membranes revealed that the selectivity for the separation of methanol from methyl- t-butyl ether is higher at 100 W and 1 min treatment time, than the other conditions studied. This last finding is discussed concerning the surface modifications produced on plasma treated silicon substrates and PU membranes.

  8. DNA Release Dynamics from Reducible Polyplexes by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lei; Manickam, Devika S.; Oupický, David; Mao, Guangzhao

    2010-01-01

    Controlled intracellular disassembly of polyelectrolyte complexes of polycations and DNA (polyplexes) is a crucial step for the success of non-viral gene delivery. Motivated by our previous observation of different gene delivery performance among multiblock reducible copolypeptide vectors [Bioconjugate Chem. 2006, 17, 1395], atomic force microscopy is used to visualize plasmid DNA in various decondensed states from reducible polypeptide polyplexes under simulated physiological reducing conditions. DNA decondensation is triggered by reductive degradation of disulfide-containing cationic polypeptides. Striking differences in DNA release dynamics between polyplexes based on polypeptides of histidine-rich peptide HRP (CKHHHKHHHKC) and nuclear localization signal NLS (CGAGPKKKRKVC) peptide are presented. The HRP and NLS polyplexes are similar to each other in their initial morphology with a majority of them containing only one DNA plasmid. Upon reductive degradation by dithiothreitol, DNA is released from NLS abruptly regardless of the initial polyplex morphology, while DNA release from HRP polyplexes displays a gradual decondensation that is dependent on the size of polyplexes. The release rate is higher for larger HRP polyplexes. The smaller HRP polyplexes become unstable when they are in contact with expanding chains nearby. The results reveal potentially rich DNA release dynamics that can be controlled by subtle variation in multivalent counterion binding to DNA as well as the cellular matrix. PMID:18839970

  9. Emergence of fractal behavior and other changes of cell surface during malignant transformation: AFM study of human cervical epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia; Woodworth, Craig; Sokolov, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Fractal behavior, self-similarity when zooming in or out, is frequently found in natural patterns emerged from chaos or any far from equilibrium systems. While expected and observed for tissues, the emergence of fractal behavior associated with malignant transformations was not observed at the level of single cell. Here report on the appearance of fractal behavior when normal human cervical epithelial cells become malignant. This was found by analyzing the adhesion maps imaged with AFM working in HarmoniX mode. Normal and malignant (a mix of cancerous and precancerous) cells were enzymatic only extracted from cervical tissue of healthy individuals and cancer patients, respectively. A surprising 100% discrimination of malignant and normal cells was observed. Although we previously reported differences in surface (brush) layer of cancer cells, the unambiguous quantitative divergence of the fractal behavior of the adhesion maps is a surprise (in particular, when compared to no difference found in the regular AFM images). The nature of the observed difference in the adhesion behavior will be discussed. These results may suggest that the fractal dimensionality can be treated as a new potential ``physicomarker'' for detection of individual cervical cancer cells.

  10. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  11. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  12. Stratigraphic relationships and timing of the 2012 Havre submarine silicic volcanic eruption revealed by high resolution bathymetric mapping and observations by underwater vehicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Soule, S. A.; Houghton, B. F.; White, J. D. L.; Manga, M.; Wysoczanski, R. J.; Tani, K.; McPhie, J.; Fornari, D. J.; Jutzeler, M.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Ikegami, F.; Jones, M.; Murch, A.; Fauria, K.; Mitchell, S. J.; Cahalan, R. C.; Conway, C.; McKenzie, W.

    2015-12-01

    The 2012 deep rhyolitic caldera eruption of Havre volcano in the Kermadec arc is the first historic observed submarine eruption that produced a pumice raft observed at the ocean's surface. Ship-based bathymetric surveys before and after the eruption permit the intricacies of eruption styles, products and timescales to be quantified. In 2015 we mapped this submarine volcano in unprecedented detail with two submergence vehicles in tandem, facilitating a wide and comprehensive geological survey and sampling mission. These efforts and observations show highly complex and often simultaneous eruptive behavior from more than 14 vents along two 3 km-long fissures that represent massive ruptures of the caldera walls. This survey also revealed an important role for pre- and inter-eruptive periods of mass wasting processes derived from the intrusion of magma and destablisation of caldera walls. The detailed characterization of the eruption products, and quantification of timescales provides the scientific community with the first glimpse of the nature of submarine, intermediate magnitude, deep silicic caldera eruptions and permits unanswered yet first order fundamental questions of submarine eruption and transport processes to be addressed in the decades to come.

  13. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  14. Revealing Interactions between Human Resources, Quality of Life and Environmental Changes within Socially-oriented Observations : Results from the IPY PPS Arctic Project in the Russian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    Socially-oriented Observations (SOO) in the Russian North have been carried out within multidisciplinary IPY PPS Arctic project under the leadership of Norway and supported by the Research Council of Norway as well as Russian Academy of Sciences. The main objective of SOO is to increase knowledge and observation of changes in quality of life conditions (state of natural environment including climate and biota, safe drinking water and foods, well-being, employment, social relations, access to health care and high quality education, etc.) and - to reveal trends in human capital and capacities (health, demography, education, creativity, spiritual-cultural characteristics and diversity, participation in decision making, etc.). SOO have been carried out in industrial cities as well as sparsely populated rural and nature protection areas in observation sites situated in different bioms (from coastal tundra to southern taiga zone) of Murmansk, Arkhangelsk Oblast and Republic of Komi. SOO were conducted according to the international protocol included in PPS Arctic Manual. SOO approaches based both on local people's perceptions and statistics help to identify main issues and targets for life quality, human capital and environment improvement and thus to distinguish leading SOO indicators for further monitoring. SOO have revealed close interaction between human resources, quality of life and environmental changes. Negative changes in human capital (depopulation, increasing unemployment, aging, declining physical and mental health, quality of education, loss of traditional knowledge, marginalization etc.), despite peoples' high creativity and optimism are becoming the major driving force effecting both the quality of life and the state of environment and overall sustainability. Human induced disturbances such as uncontrolled forests cuttings and poaching are increasing. Observed rapid changes in climate and biota (ice and permafrost melting, tundra shrubs getting taller and

  15. Influence of the Film Thickness on the Crystallization of Poly(e-Caprolactone) Ultrathin Films, a Real Time AFM Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareau, Vincent H.; Prud'Homme, Robert E.

    2004-03-01

    Whereas spherulitic crystallization in thick polymer films has been extensively studied (kinetics and morphology), the understanding of the influence of the film thickness on the crystallization process in ultrathin films is still incomplete. In a previous study (Mareau, V.H.; Prud'homme, R.E. Macromolecules 2002, 36, 675), radial growth rates measured during isothermal crystallization of poly(e-caprolactone)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/PVC) blends thin films (between 1000 and 100 nm) were found to decrease with the film thickness. However, no variation was observed in this range of thicknesses for pure PCL. In this work, ultrathin (less than 100 nm) spin-coated PCL films were isothermally crystallized and observed by AFM. Crystallizations were performed at low supercooling and isolated flat-on lamellae with a truncated lozenge shape were observed. Growth rates decrease for film thicknesses below 30 nm, along with distinct morphological modifications, and non-linear growth are observed in 5 nm thick films.

  16. Characterization of local elastic modulus in confined polymer films via AFM indentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu; Putz, Karl W; Wood, Charles D; Brinson, L Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The properties of polymers near an interface are altered relative to their bulk value due both to chemical interaction and geometric confinement effects. For the past two decades, the dynamics of polymers in confined geometries (thin polymer film or nanocomposites with high-surface area particles) has been studied in detail, allowing progress to be made toward understanding the origin of the dynamic effects near interfaces. Observations of mechanical property enhancements in polymer nanocomposites have been attributed to similar origins. However, the existing measurement methods of these local mechanical properties have resulted in a variety of conflicting results on the change of mechanical properties of confined polymers. Here, an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method is demonstrated that directly measures the mechanical properties of polymers adjacent to a substrate with nanometer resolution. This method allows us to consistently observe the gradient in mechanical properties away from a substrate in various materials systems, and paves the way for a unified understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical response of polymers. This gradient is both longer (up to 170 nm) and of higher magnitude (50% increase) than expected from prior results. Through the use of this technique, we will be better able to understand how to design polymer nanocomposites and polymeric structures at the smallest length scale, which affects the fields of structures, electronics, and healthcare.

  17. Direct electrochemical and AFM detection of amyloid-β peptide aggregation on basal plane HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Paula; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ting; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2014-06-01

    Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation.Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details: procedures for Aβ42 aggregation and electrode modification, DPV/AFM measurements and analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02413c

  18. Characterization of local elastic modulus in confined polymer films via AFM indentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xu; Putz, Karl W; Wood, Charles D; Brinson, L Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The properties of polymers near an interface are altered relative to their bulk value due both to chemical interaction and geometric confinement effects. For the past two decades, the dynamics of polymers in confined geometries (thin polymer film or nanocomposites with high-surface area particles) has been studied in detail, allowing progress to be made toward understanding the origin of the dynamic effects near interfaces. Observations of mechanical property enhancements in polymer nanocomposites have been attributed to similar origins. However, the existing measurement methods of these local mechanical properties have resulted in a variety of conflicting results on the change of mechanical properties of confined polymers. Here, an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method is demonstrated that directly measures the mechanical properties of polymers adjacent to a substrate with nanometer resolution. This method allows us to consistently observe the gradient in mechanical properties away from a substrate in various materials systems, and paves the way for a unified understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical response of polymers. This gradient is both longer (up to 170 nm) and of higher magnitude (50% increase) than expected from prior results. Through the use of this technique, we will be better able to understand how to design polymer nanocomposites and polymeric structures at the smallest length scale, which affects the fields of structures, electronics, and healthcare. PMID:25537230

  19. AFM and EDX Study of Self Assembled Pt Nanostructures on PEDOT Thin Films under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senevirathne, Indrajith; Mohney, Austin; Buchheit, Joshua; Goonewardene, Anura

    2011-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructure systems on conductive polymer thin films under ambient conditions are interesting due to their use in BioMEMS and hybrid systems further and considering the physics of the polymer - metal interactions The observed nanostructures have deformed spherical shape. The Pt was magnetron sputter deposited at RT (300K), PEDOT Baytron P 60nm thick, spin coated on glass slides cleaned with acetone and IPA. The system was studied using ambient IC mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for its structure. Elemental composition/distribution of the system was measured with Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy (EDX). Pt nanostructures on the surface observed to be likely Volmer - Weber growth mode At Pt coverage of 120 ML, nanostructures had a mean diameter of 32 nm and mean height of 5 nm. When annealing at 15min at 473K systems changes to smaller nanostructures coexisting with bigger structures of mean diameter of 120 nm and mean height of 36 nm. Elemental/morphological variations when annealed at successively higher temperatures were also investigated. NSF Grant #: 0923047 and PASSHE FPDC (LOU # 2010-LHU-03).

  20. AFM characterization of spin coated carboxylated polystyrene nanospheres/xyloglucan layers on mica and silicon.

    PubMed

    Lubambo, Adriana F; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Petzhold, Cesar L; Sierakowski, Maria-R; Schreiner, Wido H; Saul, Cyro K

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled nano-arrays have a potential application as solid-phase diagnostics in many biomedical devices. The easiness of its production is directly connected to manufacture cost reduction. In this work, we present self-assembled structures starting from spin coated thin films of carboxylated polystyrene (PSC) and xyloglucan (XG) mixtures on both mica and silicon substrates. AFM images showed PSC nanospheres on top of a homogeneous layer of XG, for both substrates. The average nanosphere diameter fluctuated for a constant speed and it was likely to be independent of the component proportions on the mixture within a range of 30-50% (v/v) PSC. It was also observed that the largest diameters were found at the center of the sample and the smallest at the border. The detected nanospheres were also more numerous at the border. This behavior presents a similarity to spin coated colloidal dispersions. We observed that the average nanosphere diameter on mica substrates was bigger than the nanosphere diameters obtained on top of silicon substrates, under the same conditions. This result seems to be possibly connected to different mixture-surface interactions. PMID:23465925

  1. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  2. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  3. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  4. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  5. Inhibition of cold rolled steel corrosion by Tween-20 in sulfuric acid: weight loss, electrochemical and AFM approaches.

    PubMed

    Mu, Guannan; Li, Xianghong

    2005-09-01

    The inhibiting action of a nonionic surfactant of Tween-20 on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 0.5-7.0 M sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) was studied by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Atomic force microscope (AFM) provided the surface conditions. The results show that inhibition efficiency increases with the inhibitor concentration, while it decreases with the sulfuric acid concentration. The adsorption of inhibitor on the cold rolled steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. Effect of immersion time was studied and discussed. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of cold rolled steel was also studied at four temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 degrees C, the thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption heat, adsorption free energy, and adsorption entropy were calculated. The results revealed that the adsorption was physisorption mechanism. A kinetic study of cold rolled steel in uninhibited and inhibited acid was also discussed. The kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, rate constant, and reaction constant were calculated for the reactions of corrosion. The inhibition effect is satisfactorily explained by both thermodynamic and kinetic models. Polarization curves show that Tween-20 is a cathodic-type inhibitor in sulfuric acid. The results obtained from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization are in good agreement, and the Tween-20 inhibition action could also be evidenced by surface AFM images.

  6. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  7. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  8. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  9. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  10. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm(2). For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm(2), yielding good statistic results. PMID:25854547

  11. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Musawi, R. S. J.; Brousseau, E. B.; Geng, Y.; Borodich, F. M.

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves.

  12. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  13. Nature of the Unidentified TeV Source HESS J1614-518, Revealed by Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Michito; Yajima, Yukie; Matsumoto, Hironori

    2011-11-01

    We report on new Suzaku and XMM-Newton results concerning HESS J1614-518, which is one of the brightest extended TeV γ-ray sources and has two regions with intense γ-ray emission. We newly observed the south and center regions of HESS J1614-518 with Suzaku, since the north region, including the position of the 1st brightest peak of the TeV γ-ray emission, has already been observed. No X-ray counterpart was found at the position of the 2nd brightest peak of the TeV γ-ray emission; we estimated the upper limit of the X-ray flux to be 1.6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 2-10 keV band. The soft X-ray source Suzaku J1614-5152, which was found at the edge of the field of view in a previous observation, was also detected at the middle of HESS J1614-518. Analyzing the XMM-Newton archival data, we revealed that Suzaku J1614-5152 consists of multiple point sources. The X-ray spectrum of the brightest point source, XMMU J161406.0-515225, can be described by a power-law model with a photon index of Γ = 5.2+0.6-0.5, or a blackbody model with temperature kT = 0.38+0.04-0.04 keV. In the blackbody model, the hydrogen-equivalent column density is almost the same as that of the hard extended X-ray emission, Suzaku J1614-5141, which was found at the 1st peak position. If true, XMMU J161406.0-515225 may be physically related to Suzaku J1614-5141 and HESS J1614-518.

  14. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rise from the seafloor revealed by video observation and acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic reflection depending on physical property differences among solid of methane hydrates and methane gas bubbles from seafloor and sea water.By sending ultrasonic waves from the transducer of an echo sounder or a sonar system through the water and measuring the echo of the back-scatterings from the methane hydrates or bubbles,it is possible that a visualized image of the methane plumes is displayed on the display of an echo sounder or a sonar system.Estimates of the amount of the methane plumes are extremely important for the global environment as part of the carbon cycle.The observations were carried out at Umitaka Spur and Joetsu knoll in the Sea of Japan every year since 2004. There are many methane plumes in the same ocean area. Thus, we investigate minutely about methane plumes in this study.In order to recognize estimates of the methane plumes, we observed the image of methane plumes using a remotely operated submarine vehicle (Hyper Dolphin, of the Japan Agency of Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)), and captured the methane bubble using a funnel.We observe the images of the methane plumes seeping points on the seafloor taken by a high-definition camera loaded in the vehicle, measure the surfacing velocity of the gushed methane plumes, and compute the surfacing velocity of the gas and solid substance using a theoretical formula.The observation was carried out at Umitaka Spur in the Japan Sea. The depth was 1000 m and the seawater temperature was 0.3 C°.From 3 seeping points, we gathered 300ml of methane in 643 seconds in the funnel with an opening of 20 cm in diameter.If it is assumed that the seeping points are equally scattered in the area, the seeping volume per unit area is 5.4×104cm3 per hour, which is 4.7×102m3 per year.The experiment in the ocean revealed the followings.The methane hydrate particles that are seeping out from seafloor are solid substances just above the seafloor.In the studied ocean area, 7.7×104m3 of methane

  15. Comparative studies of thin film growth on aluminium by AFM, TEM and GDOES characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jiantao; Thompson, George E.

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, comparative studies of trivalent chromium conversion coating formation, associated with aluminium dissolution process, have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). High-resolution electron micrographs revealed the evident and uniform coating initiation on the whole surface after conversion treatment for only 30 s, although a network of metal ridges was created by HF etching pre-treatment. In terms of conversion treatment process on electropolished aluminium, constant kinetics of coating growth, ∼0.30 ± 0.2 nm/s, were found after the prolonged conversion treatment for 600 s. The availability of electrolyte anions for coating deposition determined the growth process. Simultaneously, a proceeding process of aluminium dissolution during conversion treatment, of ∼0.11 ± 0.02 nm/s, was found for the first time, indicating constant kinetics of anodic reactions. The distinct process of aluminium consumption was assigned with loss of corrosion protection of the deposited coating material as evidenced in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the present data, a new mechanism of coating growth on aluminium was proposed, and it consisted of an activation period (0-30 s), a linear growth period (0.30 nm/s, up for 600 s) and limited growth period (0.17 nm/s, 600-1200 s). In addition, the air-drying post-treatment and a high-vacuum environment in the microscope revealed a coating shrinkage, especially in the coatings after conversion treatments for longer time.

  16. The Crustal Structure of the Northern South China Sea continental margin revealed by Multi-Channel Seismic Reflection and Ocean Bottom Seismometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chao Huang, I.; Shine Liu, Char; Chang, Emmy T. Y.

    2015-04-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is an ideal place to examine the nature of continental rifting, break-up, and the onset of seafloor spreading. Being mostly inactive today, the SCS basin is measured to get spreading in the early Oligocene and to generate a series of syn-rift structures on the margins, therefore, to know the crustal structures of continental margin can help us to understand the evolution of the SCS. In this study, we use multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data to reveal the upper crustal structures and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data to probe the lower crustal structures. Accompanying the MCS experiments with active sources, 39 OBS stations were deployed along 2 NW-SE trending profiles in the northern SCS. The eastern profile is located southeast of Dongsha atoll, while the western profile extends from the Zhu II depression to the NW sub-basin of SCS. For construction crustal velocity models, we extract shallow velocity structure from the MCS profile data, then we conduct travel-time tomographic inversion on OBS data to derive 2D velocity models. Finally, forward modeling using RAYINVR is subsequently applied to refine the velocity models. Both MCS profiles show that the basement has been offset by normal faults and thick sediments are deposited in the grabens. Many volcanic bodies are observed in the eastern profile, but few appear in the western profile. The OBS velocity model of the eastern profile reveals that the crustal thickness decreases gradually toward the oceanic basin. However the continental crust thins abruptly from continental slope toward the NW sub-basin. A high velocity layer (>7km/s) in the lower crust can be identified in the eastern profile, but not in the western profile. This high velocity layer has been interpreted to be underplating material, however, another possibility is that it might be serpentinized upper mantle, which frequently found in necking zones and COTs zones.

  17. Atomic force microscope observation on ultrastructures in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuliang; Du, Kaihe; Fang, Xiaohong

    2010-10-01

    AFM is being applied in increasingly wide research fields and extracting more biochemical/biophysical information that is beyond the capability of traditional SEM and TEM. Due to its inherent features, AFM is rarely used to observe the subcellular details within cells. Although subcellular features were recently observed on thin sections of plant tissues using AFM, this method might introduce unexpected artifacts during sample processing. Here we try to observe plant cells still embedded in resin block. This modified method minimizes the possibility of artifacts. The comparison among outcomes of AFM, SEM, TEM and LM on the same single cell suggest that this modified method is a good, applicable, efficient and faithful way applying AFM on biological materials.

  18. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  19. Slow Narrow Spectral Width E Region Echoes Observed During the March 17-2015 Storm and What They Reveal About the Disturbed Ionosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Maurice, J. P.; Chau, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    As auroral-type disturbances moved equatorward during the March 17-2015 storm, coherent E region echoes were observed simultaneously with three radar links separated by 40 km each in the east-west direction in northern Germany. One radar operated at 36.2, and the other two at 32.55 MHz. One of the latter operated in a bistatic configuration. On each radar site five separate antennas were used to locate the echoes using interferometry. The unique configuration provided an unsurpassed opportunity to study the origin and evolution of ionospheric structures in a wide field of view during a strong storm. A most noticeable feature was that over a few time intervals, several minutes in duration each, very narrow spectra were observed, with Doppler shifts roughly 1/2 the ion-acoustic speed (often called "type III" echoes in the past). The inferred location indicated that the echoes came from below 100 km altitude. Echoes moving at the nominal ion-acoustic speed came from higher up and/or different flow angles. In one particularly clear instance the "Type III" echo region came from a region 50 to 75 km in extent drifting at roughly 1.5 km/s, while moving at some small (but non-zero) flow angle with respect to the line-of-sight. In view of the observations, a reevaluation of existing theories indicates that the echoes cannot be related to ion cyclotron waves. Instead, their low altitude and flow angle dependence reveal that they are the by-product of the ion Pedersen instability, which has been investigated by a few groups in relation to a non-isothermal treatment of the Farley-Buneman instability. In our present treatment of the problem, nonlinear effects are invoked to compute the final Doppler shift of the resulting structures. We find that the stronger the electric field is, the closer the region of slow echoes has to be to the ExB direction. In our most dramatic example of Type III structures, the size of the echo region pointed to a region of high energy precipitation

  20. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. PMID:25999318

  1. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions.

  2. Gallotannin-Capped Gold Nanoparticles: Green Synthesis and Enhanced Morphology of AFM Images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyung; Yhim, Won Been; Park, Jong-Won; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jang, Hong-Lae; Cho, Miyeon; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by a green method using a plant secondary metabolite, gallotannin. Gallotannin was used as a reducing and capping agent to convert gold ions into AuNPs for the generation of gallotannin-capped AuNPs (GT-AuNPs). This synthetic route is ecofriendly and eliminates the use of toxic chemical reducing agents. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance of the GT-AuNPs was observed at 536 nm in the UV-visible spectra. The face-centered cubic structure of GT-AuNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction analysis. The majority of the GT-AuNPs had a spherical shape with an average diameter of 15.93 ± 8.60 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that the hydroxyl functional groups of gallotannin were involved in the synthesis of GT-AuNPs. The size and shape of nanoparticles can have a crucial impact on their biological, mechanical, and structural properties. Herein, we developed a modified anisotropic diffusion equation to selectively remove nanoscale experimental noise while preserving nanoscale intrinsic geometry information. To demonstrate the performance of the developed method, the ridge and valley lines were plotted by utilizing the principle curvatures. Compared to the original anisotropic diffusion and raw atomic force microscopy (AFM) experimental data, the developed modified anisotropic diffusion shows excellent performance in nanoscale noise removal while preserving the intrinsic aeometry of the nanoparticles. PMID:27427661

  3. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation Dynamics using Correlated AFM and Confocal Ultramicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Yung D.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Zhu, Leyun; Lu, H PETER.

    2003-10-01

    We have studied the laser-excitation-intensity-dependent and Ag-nanocluster interstitial-site-dependent SERS intensity fluctuations under low molecule surface coverage of rhodamine 6G and cytochrome c. a new two-channel photon time-stamping system coupled with atomic force microscopic (AFM), Raman spectroscopic, and imaging microscopy was developed and applied to record Raman intensity fluctuation trajectories at sub-microsecond resolution correlated with in-situ characterization of the nanoparticle clusters. Our experimental results suggest that the nanoconfinement of the local electromagnetic-field enhancement and the interaction of the local field with the molecules, presumably under rotational motions, result in nano-Raman fluctuations. The SERS spectral fluctuation was pertinent to the nanoscale local enhancement and local interaction of the molecules with the surface when the number of molecules to contribute the microscopic Raman signal collected from a diffraction-limited focus spot. The SERS fluctuation dynamics were both photo-induced and spontaneous for rhodamine 6G, but only the photo-induced interstitial sites with heterogeneous geometries. To interpret the observed nano-SERS fluctuation dynamics, we used computer simulation of optical multiple scattering, based on multi-sphere scattering Mie theory, and rotational diffusion of molecules at an interstitial site, based on a random walk in orientation space.

  4. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Block, Stephan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela; Hofacker, Ivo; Müller, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions.

  5. AFM studies in diverse ionic environments of nucleosomes reconstituted on the 601 positioning sequence.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor; Chekliarova, Iana; Rychkov, Georgy; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Tomilin, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study mononucleosomes reconstituted from a DNA duplex of 353 bp containing the strong 601 octamer positioning sequence, together with recombinant human core histone octamers. Three parameters were measured: 1) the length of DNA wrapped around the core histones; 2) the number of superhelical turns, calculated from the total angle through which the DNA is bent, and 3) the volume of the DNA-histone core. This approach allowed us to define in detail the structural diversity of nucleosomes caused by disassembly of the octasome to form subnucleosomal structures containing hexasomes, tetrasomes and disomes. At low ionic strength (TE buffer) and in the presence of physiological concentrations of monovalent cations, the majority of the particles were subnucleosomal, but physiological concentrations of bivalent cations resulted in about half of the nucleosomes being canonical octasomes in which the exiting DNA duplexes cross orthogonally. The dominance of this last species explains why bivalent but not monovalent cations can induce the initial step towards compaction and convergence of neighboring nucleosomes in nucleosomal arrays to form the chromatin fiber in the absence of linker histone. The observed nucleosome structural diversity may reflect the functional plasticity of nucleosomes under physiological conditions. PMID:26586109

  6. Mechanical properties of complex biological systems using AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John Stephen

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was designed and built to study the mechanical properties of small collagen fibrils and the plasma membrane of living cells. Collagen is a major component of bone, skin and connective tissues, and is abundant in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Because of its abundance, an understanding of how disease affects collagen mechanics is crucial in disease prevention efforts. Two levels of type I collagen structure were investigated, subfibrils (on the order of 1 mum in length) and longer fibrils. Comparisons were made between measurements of wild-type (wt) collagen and collagen from the mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Significant differences between OI and wt collagen were observed, primarily that intermolecular bonds in OI collagen fibrils are weaker than in wt, or not ruptured, as in the case of OI subfibrils. As cells interact with collagen in the ECM, the mechanical properties of the plasma membrane are also of great interest. Membrane tethers were extracted from living cells under varied conditions in order to assess the contributions of membrane-associated macromolecules such as the actin cytoskeleton and the glycocalyx, and intracellular signaling. Tether extraction force was found to be sensitive to all of these altered conditions, suggesting that tether extraction may be used to monitor various cellular processes.

  7. AFM and uni-axial testing of pericardium exposed to radiotherapy doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daar, Eman; Kaabar, W.; Lei, C.; Keddie, J. L.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2011-10-01

    The pericardium, a double-layered sac that encloses the heart, is made up of collagen and elastin fibres embedded in an amorphous matrix (forming the extracellular matrix). Collagen fibres are aligned in multidirectional orientation layers. This free arrangement of fibres gives the pericardium its viscoelastic properties and the ability to deform in all directions. This is an important mechanical property for the heart to perform its physiological functions, acknowledging the fact that the heart is attached to different ligaments and muscles in all directions. The present study aims to investigate the effect of penetrating photon ionising radiation on bovine pericardium tissue. This links to an interest in seeking to understand possible mechanisms underlying cardiac complications following treatment of the left breast in radiotherapy regimes. Pericardium samples were subjected to doses in the range 0-80 Gy. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in characterising changes in the infrastructural and mechanical properties of the tissues. Preliminary data for doses of 80 Gy shows there was no significant change in the D-spacing period of the banded structure collagen type I but a significant increase is observed in the FWHM of the fibril widths (by between 25% and 27%) over that of unirradiated pericardium tissue.

  8. AFM investigation on surface damage caused by mechanical probing with small ruby spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, Felix; Küng, Alain

    2007-02-01

    One challenge for today's coordinate metrology is fast and accurate 3D measurements on small objects. Mechanical probing is considered to be simple and accurate but limitations may arise from elastic and plastic deformations at the contact point. Understanding these limits quantitatively will help to avoid surface damage and measurement errors. Static and dynamic forces for single point probings and for scanning measurements were investigated in the present work using a metrology AFM and a micro-CMM. The obtained results were compared with theoretical predictions made by Hertz's theory. We found that the standard forces used by the METAS micro-CMM can be kept below the macroscopic damage threshold. On the other hand, plastic deformation of microscopic contact points which forms at the interface due to the surface roughness of the probe and sample is always present. Additionally, probe contamination by build-up of ductile metal on the probe surface was observed and probe wear on a hard sample was measured.

  9. BOREAS AFM-1 NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ Aircraft Flux data Over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Timothy L.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Gunter, Laureen; Dumas, Ed; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains measurements from the Airborne Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-1 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (NOAA/ATDD) Long-EZ Aircraft collected during the 1994 Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) at the southern study area (SSA). These measurements were made from various instruments mounted on the aircraft. The data that were collected include aircraft altitude, wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, potential temperature, water mixing ratio, U and V components of wind velocity, static pressure, surface radiative temperature, downwelling and upwelling total radiation, downwelling and upwelling longwave radiation, net radiation, downwelling and upwelling photosynthectically active radiation (PAR), greenness index, CO2 concentration, O3 concentration, and CH4 concentration. There are also various columns that indicate the standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and trend of some of these data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ aircraft flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  11. BOREAS AFM-08 ECMWF Hourly Surface and Upper Air Data for the SSA and NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterbo, Pedro; Betts, Alan; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-8 team focused on modeling efforts to improve the understanding of the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer over the boreal forest. This data set contains hourly data from the European Center for for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational model from below the surface to the top of the atmosphere, including the model fluxes at the surface. Spatially, the data cover a pair of the points that enclose the rawinsonde sites at Candle Lake, Saskatchewan, in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Thompson, Manitoba, in the Northern Study Area (NSA). Temporally, the data include the two time periods of 13 May 1994 to 30 Sept 1994 and 01 Mar 1996 to 31 Mar 1997. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The number of records in the upper air data files may exceed 20,000, causing a problem for some software packages. The ECMWF hourly surface and upper air data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Nature of the unidentified TeV source HESS J1614-518 revealed by Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Michito; Yajima, Yukie; Matsumoto, Hironori

    2012-03-01

    We report new results concerning HESS J1614-518, which exhibits two regions with intense γ-ray emission. The south and center regions of HESS J1614-518 were observed with Suzaku in 2008, while the north region with the 1st brightest peak was observed in 2006. No X-ray counterpart is found at the 2nd brightest peak; the upper limit of the X-ray flux is estimated as 1.6×10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 2-10 keV band. A previously-known soft X-ray source, Suzaku J1614-5152, is detected at the center of HESS J1614-518. Analyzing the XMM-Newton archival data, we reveal that Suzaku J1614-5152 consists of multiple point sources. The X-ray spectrum of the brightest point source, XMMU J161406.0-515225, could be described by a power-law model with the photon index Γ = 5.2+0.6-0.5 or a blackbody model with the temperature kT = 0.38+0.04-0.04keV. In the blackbody model, the estimated column density NH = 1.1+0.3-0.2×1022cm-2 is almost the same as that of the hard extended X-ray emission in Suzaku J1614-5141, spatially coincident with the 1st peak position. In this case, XMMU J161406.0-515225 may be physically related to Suzaku J1614-5141 and HESS J1614-518.

  13. Nature of the Unidentified TeV Source HESS J1614-518 Revealed by Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, M.; Yajima, Y.; Matsumoto, H.

    2013-03-01

    We report new results concerning HESS J1614-518, which exhibits two regions with intense γ-ray emission. The south and center regions of HESS J1614-518 were observed with Suzaku in 2008, while the north region with the 1st brightest peak was observed in 2006. No X-ray counterpart is found at the 2nd brightest peak; the upper limit of the X-ray flux is estimated as 1.6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 2-10 keV band. A previously-known soft X-ray source, Suzaku J1614-5152, is detected at the center of HESS J1614-518. Analyzing the XMM-Newton archival data, we reveal that Suzaku J1614-5152 consists of multiple point sources. The X-ray spectrum of the brightest point source, XMMU J161406.0-515225, could be described by a power-law model with the photon index Γ = 5.2+0.6-0.5 or a blackbody model with the temperature kT = 0.38+0.04-0.04 {keV}. In the blackbody model, the estimated column density N H = 1.1+0.3-0.2 × 1022 {cm}-2 is almost the same as that of the hard extended X-ray emission in Suzaku J1614-5141, spatially coincident with the 1st peak position. In this case, XMMU J161406.0-515225 may be physically related to Suzaku J1614-5141 and HESS J1614-518.

  14. fMRI Adaptation between Action Observation and Action Execution Reveals Cortical Areas with Mirror Neuron Properties in Human BA 44/45

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Schillinger, Frieder L.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Schultz, Johannes; Uludag, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Mirror neurons (MNs) are considered to be the supporting neural mechanism for action understanding. MNs have been identified in monkey’s area F5. The identification of MNs in the human homolog of monkeys’ area F5 Broadmann Area 44/45 (BA 44/45) has been proven methodologically difficult. Cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) adaptation studies supporting the existence of MNs restricted their analysis to a priori candidate regions, whereas studies that failed to find evidence used non-object-directed (NDA) actions. We tackled these limitations by using object-directed actions (ODAs) differing only in terms of their object directedness in combination with a cross-modal adaptation paradigm and a whole-brain analysis. Additionally, we tested voxels’ blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response patterns for several properties previously reported as typical MN response properties. Our results revealed 52 voxels in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; particularly BA 44/45), which respond to both motor and visual stimulation and exhibit cross-modal adaptation between the execution and observation of the same action. These results demonstrate that part of human IFG, specifically BA 44/45, has BOLD response characteristics very similar to monkey’s area F5. PMID:26973496

  15. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS) was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  16. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS), was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4 K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  17. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation—relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target—it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  18. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  19. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  20. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  1. Impact of galactosylceramides on the nanomechanical properties of lipid bilayer models: an AFM-force spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Gumí-Audenis, Berta; Sanz, Fausto; Giannotti, Marina I

    2015-07-21

    Galactosylceramides (GalCer) are glycosphingolipids bound to a monosaccharide group, responsible for inducing extensive hydrogen bonds that yield their alignment and accumulation in the outer leaflet of the biological membrane together with cholesterol (Chol) in rafts. In this work, the influence of GalCer on the nanomechanical properties of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) based on DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and DLPC (1,2-didodecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline) as model systems was assessed. Phosphatidylcholine (PC):GalCer SLBs were characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), in both imaging and force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) modes. Comparing both PC systems, we determined that the behaviour of SLB mixtures is governed by the PC phase-like state at the working temperature. While a phase segregated system is observed for DLPC:GalCer SLBs, GalCer are found to be dissolved in DPPC SLBs for GalCer contents up to 20 mol%. In both systems, the incorporation of GalCer intensifies the nanomechanical properties of SLBs. Interestingly, segregated domains of exceptionally high mechanical stability are formed in DLPC:GalCer SLBs. Finally, the role of 20 mol% Chol in GalCer organization and function in the membranes was assessed. Both PC model systems displayed phase segregation and remarkable nanomechanical stability when GalCer and Chol coexist in SLBs. PMID:26058499

  2. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gowthami, T; Kurra, Narendra; Raina, Gargi

    2014-04-18

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84-88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns.

  3. Interaction and dynamics of ambient water adlayers on graphite probed using AFM voltage nanolithography and electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gowthami, T; Kurra, Narendra; Raina, Gargi

    2014-04-18

    In this work, we report the impact of the interaction and dynamics of increasing ambient water adlayers on etch patterns on a hydrophobic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) voltage nanolithography in contact mode by applying a positive bias to the sample. The changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns were investigated as a function of the increasing number of water adlayers present on the HOPG, which is varied by changing the time interval since HOPG cleavage. Changes in the width of the etch patterns and the surrounding water droplets were monitored with time, using intermittent-contact-mode AFM. Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) has been employed to study the charged nature of the etch patterns and the neighboring water film with time. The width of the etch patterns made on freshly cleaved HOPG shows an increase of ∼33% over 48 h, whereas nine-day-old cleaved HOPG shows a 79% increase over the same period. No changes in the dimensions are observed while imaging in a nitrogen atmosphere soon after lithography. In ambient conditions, the EFM phase shift of the patterns shows a large change of ∼84-88% over 30 h. This study demonstrates the effect of the stored electrostatic energy of a polarized ice-like water adlayer, resulting in changes in the dimensions of the etch patterns long after lithography, whereas liquid-like water droplets do not affect the etch patterns. PMID:24651210

  4. AFM Investigations of Phase Separation in Supported Membranes of Binary Mixtures of POPC and an Eicosanyl-based Bisphosphocholine Bolalipid

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Kirk; Brownholland, David; Carnini, Anna; Thompson, David H.; Johnston, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Supported membranes prepared from binary mixtures of DOPC and the bolalipid C20BAS have been examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The supported membranes are phase separated to give a thicker DOPC-rich phase and a thinner bolalipid-rich phase for a range of lipid compositions. These results confirm an earlier prediction from mean field theory that phase separation is the thermodynamically stable state for membranes containing approximately equimolar C20BAS and double chain monopolar lipids with chain lengths exceeding fifteen carbons. Hydrophobic mismatch between the monopolar lipid hydrocarbon chains and the membrane spanning bolalipid chains was suggested to provide the driving force for phase separation. The AFM results also show that the morphology of the mixed POPC:C20BAS supported membranes varies significantly with the conditions used to prepare the vesicles and supported membrane samples. The complex membrane morphologies observed are attributed to the interplay of several factors, including a compositionally heterogeneous vesicle population, exchange of lipid between the vesicle solution and solid substrate during formation of the supported membrane, and slow equilibration of domains due to pinning of the lipids to the solid support. PMID:20099816

  5. Characterization of microscale wear in a ploysilicon-based MEMS device using AFM and PEEM-NEXAFS spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, D. S.; Konicek, A. R.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Sumant, A. V.; de Boer, M. P.; Corwin, A. D.; Carpick, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of microscale wear in silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are elucidated by studying a polysilicon nanotractor, a device specifically designed to conduct friction and wear tests under controlled conditions. Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) was combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantitatively probe chemical changes and structural modification, respectively, in the wear track of the nanotractor. The ability of PEEM-NEXAFS to spatially map chemical variations in the near-surface region of samples at high lateral spatial resolution is unparalleled and therefore ideally suited for this study. The results show that it is possible to detect microscopic chemical changes using PEEM-NEXAFS, specifically, oxidation at the sliding interface of a MEMS device. We observe that wear induces oxidation of the polysilicon at the immediate contact interface, and the spectra are consistent with those from amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The oxidation is correlated with gouging and debris build-up in the wear track, as measured by AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  6. e-MERLIN and VLBI observations of the luminous infrared galaxy IC 883: a nuclear starburst and an AGN candidate revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Cañizales, C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Argo, M. K.; Beswick, R. J.; Kankare, E.; Batejat, F.; Efstathiou, A.; Mattila, S.; Conway, J. E.; Garrington, S. T.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Ryder, S. D.; Väisänen, P.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The high star formation rates of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) make them ideal places for core-collapse supernova (CCSN) searches. Massive star formation can often be found in coexistence with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), contributing jointly to the energy source of LIRGs. At radio frequencies, where light is unaffected by dust extinction, it is possible to detect compact components within the innermost LIRG nuclear regions, such as SNe and SN remnants, as well as AGN buried deep in the LIRG nuclei. Aims: Our study of the LIRG IC 883 aims at: (i) investigating the parsec-scale radio structure of the (circum-)nuclear regions of IC 883; (ii) detecting at radio frequencies the two recently reported circumnuclear SNe 2010cu and 2011hi, which were discovered by near-IR (NIR) adaptive optics observations of IC 883; and (iii) further investigating the nature of SN 2011hi at NIR wavelengths. Methods: We used the electronic European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Network (e-EVN) at 5 GHz, and the electronic Multi-Element Remotely Linked Interferometer Network (e-MERLIN) at 6.9 GHz, to observe contemporaneously the LIRG IC 883 at high angular-resolution (from tens to hundreds of milliarcsec) and with high sensitivity (<70 μJy), complemented by archival VLBI data at 5 GHz and 8.4 GHz. We also used the Gemini North telescope to obtain late-time JHK photometry for SN 2011hi. Results: The circumnuclear regions traced by e-MERLIN at 6.9 GHz have an extension of ~ 1 kpc, at a position angle of 130°, and show a striking double-sided structure, which very likely corresponds to a warped rotating ring, in agreement with previous studies. Our e-EVN observations at 5 GHz and complementary archival VLBI data at 5 GHz and 8.4 GHz, reveal various milliarcsec compact components in the nucleus of IC 883. A single compact source, an AGN candidate, dominates the emission at both nuclear and circumnuclear scales, as imaged with the e-EVN and e-MERLIN, respectively

  7. AFM probes fabricated with masked maskless combined anisotropic etching and p+ surface doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianqiang; Li, Xinxin; Bao, Haifei; Zuo, Guomin; Wang, Yuelin; Feng, Fei; Yu, Zhenyin; Ge, Xiaohong

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents a newly developed high-yield micro-fabrication technology for single-crystalline silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) probes. Both the tips and the cantilevers are simultaneously formed by a masked-maskless combined anisotropic etching process. Compared to a conventional tip-to-cantilever sequential fabrication scheme, this tip-and-cantilever simultaneous formation can effectively increase fabrication yield by avoiding the tips damaged during the following processed photolithographic steps for defining the cantilevers. By heavy boron doping at the surface, the conductive AFM probe provides an electrical path to the electric ground of the AFM that helps to eliminate the electrostatic accumulation of charges and, therefore, eliminate undesirable electrostatic forces between the probes and the samples. A fabrication yield as high as 90% has been obtained for the AFM probes for 4 inch wafers. The tips after oxidation-sharpening treatment generally have a radius of 10-30 nm. The cantilever spring constant can be well controlled in the range of 0.025-40 N m-1. High-quality sample scanning results with the formed AFM probes are obtained with a slightly better resolution than that from commercial probes without surface conductive treatment.

  8. AFM Bio-Mechanical Investigation of the Taxol Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dylan; Patel, Dipika; Monjaraz, Fernando; Park, Soyeun

    2009-10-01

    Cancerous cells are known to be softer and easier to deform than normal cells. Changes in mechanical properties originate from the alteration of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of cancer treatment using Taxol is related to the stabilization of microtubules. It has been shown that Taxol binds to polymerized tublin, stabilizes it against disassembly, and consequently inhibits cell division. An accurate quantitative study still lacks to relate the microtubule stabilizing effect with the cellular mechanical properties. We utilized our AFM to study changes in elastic properties of treated breast cancer cells. The AFM has several advantages for precise force measurements on a localized region with nanometer lateral dimension. In previous AFM studies, measurable contributions from the underlying hard substrate have been an obstacle to accurately determine the properties on thin samples. We modified our AFM tip to obtain the exact deformation profile as well as reducing the high stresses produced. We have probed depth profiles of mechanical properties of the taxol-treated and untreated cells by varying the indentation depth of the AFM-nanoindenting experiments.

  9. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  10. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  11. Interaction Mechanism of Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Asphaltenes Determined Using Droplet Probe AFM.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Zhang, Ling; Xie, Lei; Lu, Xi; Liu, Qingxia; Mantilla, Cesar A; van den Berg, Frans G A; Zeng, Hongbo

    2016-03-15

    Emulsions with interface-active components at the oil/water interface have long been of fundamental and practical interest in many fields. In this work, the interaction forces between two oil droplets in water in the absence/presence of asphaltenes were directly measured using droplet probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed using a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effects of disjoining pressure. It was revealed that the interaction forces measured between two pristine oil droplets (i.e., toluene) could be well described by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, while an additional steric interaction should be included in the presence of asphaltenes in the oil. The surface interaction and the stability of oil droplets in aqueous solution were demonstrated to be significantly influenced by the asphaltenes concentration in oil, salt concentration, pH, and presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) in water. Adsorbed asphaltenes at the oil/water interface led to more negative surface potential of the oil/water interface and also induced steric repulsion between oil droplets, inhibiting the drop coalescence and stabilizing the oil-in-water emulsion. Lower pH of aqueous solution could lead to less negative surface potential and weaken the repulsion between oil droplets. Addition of divalent ions (Ca(2+)) was found to disrupt the protecting effects of adsorbed asphaltenes at oil/water interface and induce coalescence of oil droplets. Our results provide a useful methodology for quantifying the interaction forces and investigating the properties of asphaltenes at the oil/water interfaces and provide insights into the stabilization mechanism of oil-in-water emulsions due to asphaltenes in oil production and water treatment.

  12. AFM studied the effect of celastrol on β1 integrin-mediated HUVEC adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Ke, Changhong; Jin, Hua; Cai, Jiye

    2013-01-01

    Integrin-mediated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a fundamental role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Celastrol, a traditional Chinese medicine plant, has possessed anticancer and suppressed angiogenesis activities. Here, the mechanism underling the antiangiogenesis capacity of celastrol was investigated by exploring the effect of celastrol on β1(CD29) integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Flow cytometry results showed that the HUVECs highly expressed CD29 and cell adhesion assay indicated that celastrol specifically inhibited the adhesion of HUVECs to fibronectin (FN) without affecting nonspecific adhesion to poly-L-lysine (PLL). After cell FN adhesion being inhibited, the cell surface nanoscale structure and adhesion force were detected by atomic force microscope (AFM). High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with celastrol. The membrane average roughness (Ra) and the major forces were decreased from 31.34 ± 4.56 nm, 519.60 ± 82.86 pN of 0 μg/ml celastrol to 18.47 ± 6.53 nm, 417.79 ± 53.35 pN of 4.0 μg/ml celastrol, 10.54 ± 2.85 nm, 258.95 ± 38.98 pN of 8.0 μg/ml celastrol, respectively. Accompanying with the decrease of adhesion force, the actin cytoskeleton in the cells was obviously disturbed by the celastrol. All of these changes influenced the migration of HUVECs from the wound-healing migration assay. Taken together, our results suggest that celastrol can be as an inhibitor of HUVEC adhesion to FN. This work provides a novel approach to inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:23239560

  13. New Observations Reveal How the Martian Residual South Polar Cap Develops Quasi-Circular Pits, Heart-Shaped Pits, Troughs, and Moats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Peter Benjamin; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ehlmann, Bethany; Fassett, Caleb; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    The martian residual south polar cap (RSPC) is a ~1-10 m thick deposit of CO2 ice perched on the much larger H2O ice cap. Because it is the only known CO2 reservoir annually exchanging with the predominantly-CO2 martian atmosphere, understanding its evolution is important to understanding the modern martian climate. The 8 x 105 m2 RSPC is perennial and characterized by mesas dissected by quasi-circular pits, heart-shaped pits, linear troughs and ridges, and moats (a low, CO2-free boundary surrounding a mesa wholly contained within another mesa) that evolve at meter-scales each year [1,2]. However, the underlying processes leading to the development of these landforms have not yet been described. Using repeat-coverage HiRISE (25-50 cm/px) imagery, we observe previously undescribed features on the RSPC, which reveal the processes leading to the emergence of its meter-to-kilometer-scale morphology. We observe dark fans emanating from the sides of RSPC mesas and widespread fracturing and collapse of the upper surface of mesas, which we interpret as evidence for sublimation in the interiors of mesas. On relatively smooth areas of the RSPC, even small relief (~10 cm) collapses generate surface roughness, which concentrates sunlight and enhances sublimation, leading to the development of steep, eroding scarps. Typically, CO2 deposition during the winter then smooths terrain and creates gently sloping scarps (although uneven CO2 deposition can also create steep scarps). A collapse that drops down, such that it is entirely bounded by a steep scarp, develops into a quasi-circular pit. However, when a portion of the collapsing area remains attached to the upper surface, the perimeter is partially bounded by a steep scarp and partially bounded by a gently sloping ramp, which develops into either a heart-shaped pit, linear trough, or moat, depending on the local interplay between deposition and erosion. Finally, we use the spatial distribution of pits in order to determine the

  14. Using AFM Force Curves to Explore Properties of Elastomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Megan A.; Kozlowski, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers. Force curves are used to quantify the stiffness of elastomers prepared with different base-to-curing agent ratios. Trends in observed spring constants of the…

  15. The ReactorAFM: non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions.

    PubMed

    Roobol, S B; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Bergman, M; van Spronsen, M A; Onderwaater, W G; van der Tuijn, P C; Koehler, R; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2015-03-01

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  16. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  17. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  18. Crystallographic order and decomposition of [MnIII6CrIII]3+ single-molecule magnets deposited in submonolayers and monolayers on HOPG studied by means of molecular resolved atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy in UHV.

    PubMed

    Gryzia, Aaron; Volkmann, Timm; Brechling, Armin; Hoeke, Veronika; Schneider, Lilli; Kuepper, Karsten; Glaser, Thorsten; Heinzmann, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Monolayers and submonolayers of [MnIII6CrIII]3+ single-molecule magnets (SMMs) adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using the droplet technique characterized by non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) as well as by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) show island-like structures with heights resembling the height of the molecule. Furthermore, islands were found which revealed ordered 1D as well as 2D structures with periods close to the width of the SMMs. Along this, islands which show half the heights of intact SMMs were observed which are evidences for a decomposing process of the molecules during the preparation. Finally, models for the structure of the ordered SMM adsorbates are proposed to explain the observations.

  19. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  20. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  1. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, David P.; Thundat, Thomas G.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R. J.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kerper, P. S.; Warmack, R. J.

    1995-04-01

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 104, we demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS+) or two (pMP32) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in our preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  2. Probing the PEDOT:PSS/cell interface with conductive colloidal probe AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Zhang, H.; Kranz, C.; Wallace, G. G.; Higgins, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical information e.g., oxygen reduction can be obtained simultaneously. Conductive colloid AFM-SECM probes modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are used for single cell force measurements in mouse fibroblasts and single cell interactions are investigated as a function of the applied potential.Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical

  3. Resonance Frequency Analysis for Surface-Coupled AFM Cantilever in Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirman, B; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Shifts in the resonance frequencies of surface-coupled atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are used as the basis for the detection mechanisms in a number of scanning probe microscopy techniques including atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), force modulation microscopy, and resonance enhanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Here, we analyze resonance characteristics for AFM cantilever coupled to surface in liquid environment, and derive approximate expressions for resonant frequencies as a function of vertical and lateral spring constant of the tip-surface junction. This analysis provides a simplified framework for the interpretation of AFAM and PFM data in ambient, liquid, and vacuum environments.

  4. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  5. Study on the AFM Force Spectroscopy method for elastic modulus measurement of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demichelis, A.; Pavarelli, S.; Mortati, L.; Sassi, G.; Sassi, M.

    2013-09-01

    The cell elasticity gives information about its pathological state and metastatic potential. The aim of this paper is to study the AFM Force Spectroscopy technique with the future goal of realizing a reference method for accurate elastic modulus measurement in the elasticity range of living cells. This biological range has not been yet explored with a metrological approach. Practical hints are given for the realization of a Sylgard elasticity scale. Systematic effects given by the sample curing thickness and nanoindenter geometry have been found with regards of the measured elastic modulus. AFM measurement reproducibility better than 20% is obtained in the entire investigated elastic modulus scale of 101 - 104 kPa.

  6. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid

  7. An Evaluation of the Impacts of AF-M315E Propulsion Systems for Varied Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fittje, James; Colozza, Anthony; Packard, Tom; Gyekenyesi, John; McLean, Christopher H.; Spores, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the AF-M315E COMPASS study is to identify near-term (3-5 years) and long term (5 years +) opportunities for infusion, specifically the thruster and associated component technologies being developed as part of the GPIM project. Develop design reference missions which show the advantages of the AF-M315E green propulsion system. Utilize a combination of past COMPASS designs and selected new designs to demonstrate AF-M315E advantages. Use the COMPASS process to show the puts and takes of using AF-M315E at the integrated system level.

  8. REVEALING THE HEAVILY OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT 3CRR SOURCES WITH CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Haas, Martin; Chini, Rolf; Barthel, Peter; Leipski, Christian; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Antonucci, Robert; Lawrence, Charles; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    2013-08-10

    Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (1 < z < 2), low-frequency-selected (and so unbiased in orientation) 3CRR radio sources are reported. The sample includes 21 quasars (=broad-line radio galaxies) and 17 narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with matched 178 MHz radio luminosity (log L{sub R}(5 GHz) {approx}44-45). The quasars have high radio core fraction, high X-ray luminosities (log L{sub X} {approx}45-46), and soft X-ray hardness ratios (HR {approx}-0.5) indicating low obscuration. The NLRGs have lower core fraction, lower apparent X-ray luminosities (log L{sub X} {approx}43-45), and mostly hard X-ray hardness ratios (HR >0) indicating obscuration (N{sub H} {approx}10{sup 22}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). These properties and the correlation between obscuration and radio core fraction are consistent with orientation-dependent obscuration as in unification models. About half the NLRGs have soft X-ray hardness ratios and/or a high [O III] emission line to X-ray luminosity ratio suggesting obscuration by Compton thick (CT) material so that scattered nuclear or extended X-ray emission dominates (as in NGC 1068). The ratios of unobscured to Compton-thin (10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} < N{sub H}(int) <1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}) to CT (N{sub H}(int) >1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}) is 2.5:1.4:1 in this high-luminosity, radio-selected sample. The obscured fraction is 0.5, higher than is typically reported for active galactic nuclei at comparable luminosities from multi-wavelength surveys (0.1-0.3). Assuming random nuclear orientation, the unobscured half-opening angle of the disk/wind/torus structure is {approx}60 Degree-Sign and the obscuring material covers 30 Degree-Sign , {approx}12 Degree-Sign of which is CT. The multi-wavelength properties reveal that many NLRGs have intrinsic absorption 10-1000 Multiplication-Sign higher than indicated by their X-ray hardness ratios, and their true L{sub X} values are

  9. Whole-Cell Electrical Activity Under Direct Mechanical Stimulus by AFM Cantilever Using Planar Patch Clamp Chip Approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhye, Kalpesh V; Candiello, Joseph E; Davidson, Lance A; Lin, Hai

    2011-06-01

    Patch clamp is a powerful tool for studying the properties of ion-channels and cellular membrane. In recent years, planar patch clamp chips have been fabricated from various materials including glass, quartz, silicon, silicon nitride, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS), and silicon dioxide. Planar patch clamps have made automation of patch clamp recordings possible. However, most planar patch clamp chips have limitations when used in combination with other techniques. Furthermore, the fabrication methods used are often expensive and require specialized equipments. An improved design as well as fabrication and characterization of a silicon-based planar patch clamp chip are described in this report. Fabrication involves true batch fabrication processes that can be performed in most common microfabrication facilities using well established MEMS techniques. Our planar patch clamp chips can form giga-ohm seals with the cell plasma membrane with success rate comparable to existing patch clamp techniques. The chip permits whole-cell voltage clamp recordings on variety of cell types including Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, for times longer than most available patch clamp chips. When combined with a custom microfluidics chamber, we demonstrate that it is possible to perfuse the extra-cellular as well as intra-cellular buffers. The chamber design allows integration of planar patch clamp with atomic force microscope (AFM). Using our planar patch clamp chip and microfluidics chamber, we have recorded whole-cell mechanosensitive (MS) currents produced by directly stimulating human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells using an AFM cantilever. Our results reveal the spatial distribution of MS ion channels and temporal details of the responses from MS channels. The results show that planar patch clamp chips have great potential for multi-parametric high throughput studies of ion channel proteins. PMID:22174731

  10. X-AFm stabilization as a mechanism of bypassing conversion phenomena in calcium aluminate cements

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, Gabriel; Balonis, Magdalena; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-06-15

    Phase conversion phenomena are often observed in calcium aluminate cements (CACs), when the water-rich hydrates (e.g., CAH{sub 10}, C{sub 2}AH{sub 8}) formed at early ages, at temperatures ≤ 30 °C, expel water in time to form more compact, less water-rich structures (C{sub 3}AH{sub 6}). The phase conversions follow a path regulated by the thermodynamic stabilities (solubilities) of phases. Based on this premise, it is proposed that conversion phenomena in CACs can be bypassed by provoking the precipitation of phases more preferred than those typically encountered along the conversion pathway. Therefore, X-AFm formation (where in this case, X = NO{sub 3}{sup −}) triggered by the sequential addition of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} = CN) additives is identified as a new means of bypassing conversion. A multi-method approach comprising X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analytics, and evaluations of the compressive strength is applied to correlate phase balances and properties of CAC systems cured at 25 °C and 45 °C. The results highlight the absence of the C{sub 3}AH{sub 6} phase across all systems and the curing conditions considered, with enhanced strengths being noted, when sufficient quantities of CN are added. The experimental outcomes are supported by insights gained from thermodynamic calculations which highlight thermodynamic selectivity as a means of regulating and controlling the evolutions of solid phase balances using inorganic salts in CACs, and more generally in cementing material systems.

  11. Polymer coatings on conductive polypyrroles surface characterization by XPS, ToFSIMS, inverse gas chromatography and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Chehimi, M.M.; Abel, M.; Delamar, M.; Watts, J.F.; Zhdan, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of PMMA adsorption on some conducting polypyrroles (PPys) using a variety of surface analytical techniques is reported. PMMA adsorption was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). XPS and ToF-SIMS permit to determine the surface composition of PMMA-coated PPy surfaces vs the solvent nature, temperature and the PPy dopant anion. Both techniques show that acid-base interactions may govern PMMA adsorption. IGC was used to determine the coating morphology by monitoring the surface energy of the coated PPy powders. It is suggested that homogeneity of PMMA coatings increases with decreasing solvent power. Preliminary atomic force microscopy (AFM) results on PMMA films cast on flat PPy surfaces confirm the IGC observation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Application of the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model in AFM-based mechanical measurements on cells and gel.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Yu M; Bagrov, D V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V

    2015-10-01

    The force-distance curves (FCs) obtained by the atomic force microscope (AFM) with colloid probes contain information about both the viscoelastic properties and adhesion of a sample. Here, we processed both the approach and retraction parts of FCs obtained on polyacrylamide gels (in water or PBS) and Vero cells (in a culture medium). The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model was applied to the retraction curves to account for the adhesion. The effects of loading rate, holding time and indentation depth on adhesion force and Young's modulus, calculated from approach and retraction curves, were studied. It was shown that both bulk and local interfacial viscoelasticity can affect the observed approach-retraction hysteresis and measured parameters. The addition of 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) decreased adhesion of the probe to the PAA gel surface, so interfacial viscoelasticity effects were diminished. On the contrary, the adhesiveness of Vero cells increased after BSA addition, indicating the complex nature of the cell-probe interaction.

  13. Spectral and AFM characterization of trimethylammoniophenylporphyrin and concanavalin A associate in solution and monolithic SiO 2 gels obtained by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polska, Katarzyna; Radzki, Stanisław

    2008-06-01

    The associate between water-soluble cationic tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl] porphyrin (H2TTMePP) and concanavalin A (Con A) has been studied in the tris-buffer solution by absorption and emission electron spectroscopy. The porphyrin and porphyrin concanavalin associate has been incorporated into the monolithic pure silica gels obtained by polycondensation of tetraethoxysilane. The optically transparent dried gels were studied using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and also by the tapping mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complex formation between porphyrin and concanavalin takes place in both solution and gel. In these media porphyrin and its lectin associate exhibit luminescence emission in the vis-ir range when excited with visible light. Upon binding to concanavalin A the increase in porphyrin fluorescence intensity and the red-shift in the absorption and emission maxima have been observed. AFM visualisation of porphyrin and the porphyrin-concanavalin conjugate shows significant differences between nanostructures of the pure porphyrin and complex doped gels. It has been found that the ''smooth'' surfaces of silica gels prepared by the sol-gel technique are an excellent medium for the AFM visualisation of biomolecules.

  14. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies. PMID:26891762

  15. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies.

  16. WGA-QD probe-based AFM detects WGA-binding sites on cell surface and WGA-induced rigidity alternation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaoping; He Dongmei; Cai Jiye Chen Tongsheng; Zou Feiyan; Li Yalan; Wu Yangzhe; Chen, Zheng W.; Chen Yong

    2009-02-06

    A strategy involving the conjugation of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) acting as fluorescent and topographic probes prior to cell surface staining is developed for fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This strategy provided at least two advantages: (a) an amplified fluorescence of WGA-QD aggregates, strongly resistant to photobleaching, ensures repeated/real-time observations of the probe-labeled cells by fluorescence microscopy; (b) the enlarged size of WGA-QD probe makes it possible for labeled WGA to be distinguished from other membrane proteins by AFM. Here, the random distribution of WGA-binding sites on non-crosslinked cells and the uneven or polarized reorganization due to WGA-induced crosslinking on cell surfaces were studied using AFM-detectable WGA-QD probe. Moreover, we developed a method to rapidly detect the WGA-induced rigidity alternation of the whole cells, which is efficient and has the potentiality of being developed to a useful tool in clinical diagnosis.

  17. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility.

  18. Combined strategies for optimal detection of the contact point in AFM force-indentation curves obtained on thin samples and adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Gavara, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a widely used tool to study cell mechanics. Current AFM setups perform high-throughput probing of living cells, generating large amounts of force-indentations curves that are subsequently analysed using a contact-mechanics model. Here we present several algorithms to detect the contact point in force-indentation curves, a crucial step to achieve fully-automated analysis of AFM-generated data. We quantify and rank the performance of our algorithms by analysing a thousand force-indentation curves obtained on thin soft homogeneous hydrogels, which mimic the stiffness and topographical profile of adherent cells. We take advantage of the fact that all the proposed algorithms are based on sequential search strategies, and show that a combination of them yields the most accurate and unbiased results. Finally, we also observe improved performance when force-indentation curves obtained on adherent cells are analysed using our combined strategy, as compared to the classical algorithm used in the majority of previous cell mechanics studies. PMID:26891762

  19. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. PMID:26517548

  20. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-22

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  1. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  2. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  3. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  4. The structure of high-methoxyl sugar acid gels of citrus pectin as determined by AFM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images of native high methoxyl sugar acid gels (HMSAG) were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the Tapping ModeTM. Electronic thinning of the pectin strands to one pixel wide allowed the pectin network to be viewed in the absence of variable strand widths related to preferentially solvate...

  5. Difference in cellular mechanics of cancer and normal cervical cells as seen with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Subba-Rao, Venkatesh; Woodworth, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Oncogenically transformed cells differ from their normal counter parts in many aspects, including organization and the amount of cytoskeleton. Consequently it is natural to expect to see the difference in cellular mechanics. Here we will present the study of such differences by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in-vitro. So far the present research is the first study of mechanics of cervical cells, and the third comparative study of differences between mechanics of cancer and normal cells down with the help of AFM. Using a micron size silica ball as the AFM probe, we presumably do not overstress the cell surface as it can be in the case of the sharp AFM tip, and consequently, we may use the classical Hertz model. In contrast to the reported previously studies (bladder and fibroblast cells), we found that oncogenically transformed cervical cells are more rigid than the normal cells. The reason for such difference will be discussed. To demonstrate the complexity of the problem, we study cell mechanics in detail. The Young's modulus of rigidity clearly shows two separate regions of rigidity depending on the depth of the probe penetration. There may be two alternative explanations of the difference in rigidity of this top layer: it is either the cell membrane layer or detected long-range (presumably steric) forces due to the molecular ``brush'' of glycocalyx molecules. Experiments and modal calculations will be presented to choose between these two possibilities.

  6. Accurate calibration and uncertainty estimation of the normal spring constant of various AFM cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-03-10

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke's law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  7. High spatial resolution surface imaging and analysis of fungal cells using SEM and AFM.

    PubMed

    Kaminskyj, Susan G W; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2008-06-01

    We review the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) for probing the ultrastructure, chemistry, physical characteristics and motion of fungal cells. When first developed, SEM was used to image fixed/dehydrated/gold coated specimens, but here we describe more recent SEM developments as they apply to fungal cells. CryoSEM offers high resolution for frozen fungal samples, whereas environmental SEM allows the analysis of robust samples (e.g. spores) under ambient conditions. Dual beam SEM, the most recently developed, adds manipulation capabilities along with element detection. AFM has similar lateral and better depth resolution compared to SEM, and can image live cells including growing fungal hyphae. FS can analyze cell wall chemistry, elasticity and dynamic cell characteristics. The integration of AFM with optical microscopy will allow examination of individual molecules or cellular structures in the context of fungal cell architecture. SEM and AFM are complementary techniques that are clarifying our understanding of fungal biology. PMID:18068995

  8. Afm Measrurements of Martian Soil Particles Using Mems Technology - Results from the PHOENIX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautsch, S.; Parrat, D.; de Rooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Morookian, J. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Vijendran, S.; Sykulska, H.; Pike, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Light scattering experiments conducted on Mars indicated that soil particles have dimensions around 1 μm. Particles in that range play an important role in the gas exchange between sub-surface water ice and the atmosphere. Their shape can help tracing the geological history and may indicate past presence of liquid water. NASA's Phoenix mission therefore decided to analyze soil and dust particles in the sub-micrometer to a few micrometer range using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the first time on another planet. The co-axially mounted AFM was capable of resolving particles with 10nm lateral resolution. A MEMS approach combined with mechatronic concepts for the scanner was selected for implementing the AFM. For redundancy, the sensor chip featured eight silicon cantilevers each with a 7 to 8 μm high tip. The cantilevers could be cleaved off if contaminated. During NASA's Phoenix Mission, which operated on the red planet from May to October 2008, we could demonstrate successful AFM operations. The instrument has executed 85 experiments of which 26 were needed for calibration. Of the remaining experiments about half (28) returned images where signatures of particles could be discerned.

  9. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  10. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  11. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  12. AFM Studies of Lunar Soils and Application to the Mars 2001 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Anderson, M. S.; Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The upcoming Mars 01 mission will carry an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) as part of the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument. By operating in a tapping mode, the AFM is capable of sub-nanometer resolution in three dimensions and can distinguish between substances of different compositions by employing phase contrast imaging. To prepare for the Mars 01 mission, we are testing the AFM on a lunar soil to determine its ability to define particle shapes and sizes and grain-surface textures. The test materials are from the Apollo 17 soil 79221, which is a mixture of agglutinates, impact and volcanic beads, and mare and highland rock and mineral fragments. The majority of the lunar soil particles are less than 100 microns in size, comparable to the sizes estimated for martian dust. We have used the AFM to examine several different soil particles at various resolutions. The instrument has demonstrated the ability to identify parallel ridges characteristic of twinning on a 150 micron plagioclase feldspar particle. Extremely small (10-100 nanometer) adhering particles are visible on the surface of the feldspar grain, and they appear elongate with smooth surfaces. Phase contrast imaging of the nanometer particles shows several compositions to be present. When the AFM was applied to a 100 micron glass spherule, it was possible to define an extremely smooth surface; this is in clear contrast to results from a basalt fragment which exhibited a rough surface texture. Also visible on the surface of the glass spherule were chains of 100 nanometer and smaller impact melt droplets. For the '01 Mars mission, the AFM is intended to define the size and shape distributions of soil particles, in combination with the NMCA optical microscope system and images from the Robot Arm Camera (RAC). These three data sets will provide a means of assessing potentially hazardous soil and dust properties. The study that we have conducted on the lunar soils now suggests that the

  13. New Observations Reveal How the Martian Residual South Polar Cap Develops Heart-Shaped and Quasi-Circular Pits, Troughs, and Moats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, P. B.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.

    2016-09-01

    New features seen in time series of HiRISE images reveal internal sublimation within the residual (CO2) South Polar Cap (RSPC), as well as how the diverse morphologies of the RSPC arise through the interplay of erosion and deposition of CO2.

  14. Influence of smectite suspension structure on sheet orientation in dry sediments: XRD and AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Frost, Ray L

    2010-06-15

    The structure-building phenomena within clay aggregates are governed by forces acting between clay particles. Measurements of such forces are important to understand in order to manipulate the aggregate structure for applications such as dewatering of mineral processing tailings. A parallel particle orientation is required when conducting XRD investigation on the oriented samples and conduct force measurements acting between basal planes of clay mineral platelets using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To investigate how smectite clay platelets were oriented on silicon wafer substrate when dried from suspension range of methods like SEM, XRD and AFM were employed. From these investigations, we conclude that high clay concentrations and larger particle diameters (up to 5 microm) in suspension result in random orientation of platelets in the substrate. The best possible laminar orientation in the clay dry film, represented in the XRD 001/020 intensity ratio of 47 was obtained by drying thin layers from 0.02 wt.% clay suspensions of the natural pH. Conducted AFM investigations show that smectite studied in water based electrolytes show very long-range repulsive forces lower in strength than electrostatic forces from double-layer repulsion. It was suggested that these forces may have structural nature. Smectite surface layers rehydrate in water environment forms surface gel with spongy and cellular texture which cushion approaching AFM probe. This structural effect can be measured in distances larger than 1000 nm from substrate surface and when probe penetrate this gel layer, structural linkages are forming between substrate and clay covered probe. These linkages prevent subsequently smooth detachments of AFM probe on way back when retrieval. This effect of tearing new formed structure apart involves larger adhesion-like forces measured in retrieval. It is also suggested that these effect may be enhanced by the nano-clay particles interaction.

  15. Structural impact of cations on lipid bilayer models: nanomechanical properties by AFM-force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Giannotti, Marina I; Sanz, Fausto

    2014-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has become an invaluable tool for studying the micro- and nanoworlds. As a stand-alone, high-resolution imaging technique and force transducer, it defies most other surface instrumentation in ease of use, sensitivity and versatility. The main strength of AFM relies on the possibility to operate in an aqueous environment on a wide variety of biological samples, from single molecules - DNA or proteins - to macromolecular assemblies like biological membranes. Understanding the effect of mechanical stress on membranes is of primary importance in biophysics, since cells are known to perform their function under a complex combination of forces. In the later years, AFM-based Force-Spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has provided a new vista on membrane mechanics in a confined area within the nanometer realm, where most of the specific molecular interactions take place. Lipid membranes are electrostatically charged entities that physiologically coexist with electrolyte solutions. Thus, specific interactions with ions are a matter of considerable interest. The distribution of ions in the solution and their interaction with the membranes are factors that substantially modify the structure and dynamics of the cell membranes. Furthermore, signaling processes are modified by the membrane capability of retaining ions. Supported Lipid Bilayers (SLBs) are a versatile tool to investigate phospholipid membranes mimicking biological surfaces. In the present contribution, we review selected experiments on the mechanical stability of SLBs as models of lipid membranes by means of AFM-FS, with special focus on the effect of cations and ionic strength in the overall nanomechanical stability. PMID:24341385

  16. Investigation of growth rate dispersion in lactose crystallisation by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, T. D.; Ogden, M. I.; Parkinson, G. M.

    2014-09-01

    α-Lactose monohydrate crystals have been reported to exhibit growth rate dispersion (GRD). Variation in surface dislocations has been suggested as the cause of GRD, but this has not been further investigated to date. In this study, growth rate dispersion and the change in morphology were investigated in situ and via bottle roller experiments. The surfaces of the (0 1 0) faces of crystals were examined with Atomic Force Microscopy. Smaller, slow growing crystals tend to have smaller (0 1 0) faces with narrow bases and displayed a single double spiral in the centre of the crystal with 2 nm high steps. Additional double spirals in other crystals resulted in faster growth rates. Large, fast growing crystals were observed to have larger (0 1 0) faces with fast growth in both the a and b directions (giving a broader crystal base) with macro steps parallel to the (c direction). The number and location of spirals or existence of macro steps appears to influence the crystal morphology, growth rates and growth rate dispersion in lactose crystals.

  17. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Naik, Vikrant V; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E; Spencer, Nicholas D; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-21

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.

  18. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes. PMID:21446752

  19. Characterization of single 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle attachments on AFM tips for single sub-4-nm object pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hui-Wen; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Tang, Song-Nien; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the attachment of a 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle (Au-NP) to the tip of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe through the application of a current-limited bias voltage. The resulting probe is capable of picking up individual objects at the sub-4-nm scale. We also discuss the mechanisms involved in the attachment of the Au-NP to the very apex of an AFM probe tip. The Au-NP-modified AFM tips were used to pick up individual 4-nm quantum dots (QDs) using a chemically functionalized method. Single QD blinking was reduced considerably on the Au-NP-modified AFM tip. The resulting AFM tips present an excellent platform for the manipulation of single protein molecules in the study of single protein-protein interactions.

  20. AFM force spectroscopy reveals how subtle structural differences affect the interaction strength between Candida albicans and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Figdor, Carl G; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, such as the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intracellular cell adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. DC-SIGN recognizes specific Candida-associated molecular patterns, that is, mannan structures present in the cell wall of Candida. The molecular recognition mechanism is however poorly understood. We postulated that small differences in mannan-branching may result in considerable differences in the binding affinity. Here, we exploit atomic force microscope-based dynamic force spectroscopy with single Candida cells to gain better insight in the carbohydrate recognition capacity of DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that slight differences in the N-mannan structure of Candida, that is, the absence or presence of a phosphomannan side chain, results in differences in the recognition by DC-SIGN as follows: (i) it contributes to the compliance of the outer cell wall of Candida, and (ii) its presence results in a higher binding energy of 1.6 kB T. The single-bond affinity of tetrameric DC-SIGN for wild-type C. albicans is ~10.7 kB T and a dissociation constant kD of 23 μM, which is relatively strong compared with other carbohydrate-protein interactions described in the literature. In conclusion, this study shows that DC-SIGN specifically recognizes mannan patterns on C. albicans with high affinity. Knowledge on the binding pocket of DC-SIGN and its pathogenic ligands will lead to a better understanding of how fungal-associated carbohydrate structures are recognized by receptors of the immune system and can ultimately contribute to the development of new anti-fungal drugs.

  1. AFM stiffness nanotomography of normal, metaplastic and dysplastic human esophageal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, A.; Staunton, J. R.; Nandakumar, V.; Banyai, N.; Davies, P. C. W.; Ros, R.

    2011-02-01

    The mechanical stiffness of individual cells is important in tissue homeostasis, cell growth, division and motility, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the initiation of cancer. In this work, a normal squamous cell line (EPC2) and metaplastic (CP-A) as well as dysplastic (CP-D) Barrett's Esophagus columnar cell lines are studied as a model of pre-neoplastic progression in the human esophagus. We used the combination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope to study the mechanical properties of single adherent cells. Sixty four force indentation curves were taken over the nucleus of each cell in an 8 × 8 grid pattern. Analyzing the force indentation curves, indentation depth-dependent Young's moduli were found for all cell lines. Stiffness tomograms demonstrate distinct differences between the mechanical properties of the studied cell lines. Comparing the stiffness for indentation forces of 1 nN, most probable Young's moduli were calculated to 4.7 kPa for EPC2 (n = 18 cells), 3.1 kPa for CP-A (n = 10) and 2.6 kPa for CP-D (n = 19). We also tested the influence of nuclei and nucleoli staining organic dyes on the mechanical properties of the cells. For stained EPC2 cells (n = 5), significant stiffening was found (9.9 kPa), while CP-A cells (n = 5) showed no clear trend (2.9 kPa) and a slight softening was observed (2.1 kPa) in the case of CP-D cells (n = 16). Some force-indentation curves show non-monotonic discontinuities with segments of negative slope, resembling a sawtooth pattern. We found the incidence of these 'breakthrough events' to be highest in the dysplastic CP-D cells, intermediate in the metaplastic CP-A cells and lowest in the normal EPC2 cells. This observation suggests that the microscopic explanation for the increased compliance of cancerous and pre-cancerous cells may lie in their susceptibility to 'crumble and yield' rather than their ability to 'bend and flex'.

  2. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for investigating protein crystal growth. Earlier AFM studies were among the first to demonstrate that these crystals grew by dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms [1]. These investigations were restricted to the micron range where only surface features, such as dislocation hillocks and 2D islands are visible. Most AFM instruments can scan at higher resolutions and have the potential to resolve individual protein molecules at nanometer ranges. Such scans are essential for determining the molecular packing arrangements on crystal faces and for probing the growth process at the molecular level. However, at this resolution the AFM tip influences the image produced, with the resulting image being a convolution of the tip shape and the surface morphology [2]. In most studies this problem is resolved by deconvoluting the image to obtain the true surface morphology. Although deconvolution routines work reasonably well for simple one- dimensional shapes, for complex surfaces this approach does not produce accurate results. In this study we devised a new approach which takes advantage of the precise molecular order of crystal surfaces, combined with the knowledge of individual molecular shapes from the crystallographic data of the protein and the AFM tip shape. This information is used to construct expected theoretical AFM images by convoluting the tip shape with the constructed crystal surface shape for a given surface packing arrangement. By comparing the images from actual AFM scans with the constructed ones for different possible surface packing arrangements, the correct packing arrangement can be conclusively determined. This approach was used in this study to determine the correct one from two possible packing arrangements on (I 10) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Another novel AFM technique was also devised to measure the dimension of individual growth units of the crystal faces

  3. Insights into riming and aggregation processes as revealed by aircraft, radar, and disdrometer observations for a 27 April 2011 widespread precipitation event: Insights into Riming and Aggregation

    DOE PAGES

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Bansemer, Aaron; Kumjian, Matthew R.; Mishra, Subhashree; Ryzhkov, Alexander V.

    2016-05-19

    Our study presents aircraft spiral ascent and descent observations intercepting a transition to riming processes during widespread stratiform precipitation. The sequence is documented using collocated scanning and profiling radar, including longer-wavelength dual polarization measurements and shorter-wavelength Doppler spectra. Riming regions are supported using aircraft measurements recording elevated liquid water concentrations, spherical particle shapes, and saturation with respect to water. Profiling cloud radar observations indicate riming regions during the event as having increasing particle fall speeds, rapid time-height changes, and bimodalities in Doppler spectra. These particular riming signatures are coupled to scanning dual polarization radar observations of higher differential reflectivity (ZDR)more » aloft. Moreover, reduced melting layer enhancements and delayed radar bright-band signatures in the column are also observed during riming periods, most notably with the profiling radar observations. The bimodal cloud radar Doppler spectra captured near riming zones indicate two time-height spectral ice peaks, one rimed particle peak, and one peak associated with pristine ice needle generation and/or growth between -4°C and -7°C also sampled by aircraft probes. We observe this pristine needle population near the rimed particle region which gives a partial explanation for the enhanced ZDR. The riming signatures aloft and radar measurements within the melting level are weakly lag correlated (r~0.6) with smaller median drop sizes at the surface, as compared with later times when aggregation of larger particle sizes was believed dominant.« less

  4. Possible magma intrusion revealed by temporal gravity, ground deformation and ground temperature observations at Mount Komagatake (Hokkaido) during the 1996-1998 crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Mori, Hitoshi; Okada, Hiromu

    2000-12-01

    Mount Komagatake (1131m above sea level) is a subduction-related active volcano in Hokkaido (Japan), where two phreatic eruptions occurred in 1996 March and 1998 October, after 54years of dormancy. We analyse four sessions of geodetic, microgravity and ground temperature observations made over a two-year period. From November 1996 to May 1997, neither significant gravity nor significant elevation changes (GPS or levelling) were observed. From May 1997 to November 1997, we observed a slight subsidence (1-2cm) and contraction (within 1cm) of the edifice, a gravity increase (15-30 μgal) at the benchmarks inside the 2km wide summit crater, and a local temperature increase, of 15-20°C, at the summit crater. From November 1997 to May 1998, we observed an edifice-wide gravity increase of about 15µgal, with no significant elevation change for benchmarks outside the summit crater. Besides this edifice-scale variation, we recorded a subsidence of about 5-6cm and apparently no change of gravity inside the summit crater. We inverted our data using models of increasing complexity. Elastic models are able to explain our deformation observations, but they cannot explain either the gravity data or the temperature observations satisfactorily. We introduced both an isothermal and a non-isothermal porous medium filled with fluids to model deformation and gravity variations, and we used a fissure model to invert the temperature anomaly. Our observations are consistent with a model of underground shallow-water evaporation occurring as a result of heat rising from a hot and dense body (density contrast of 200kgm-3) of about 1011 kg at 4-5km depth. This interpretation suggests a possible intrusion of a magmatic body within the edifice.

  5. Immunoactive two-dimensional self-assembly of monoclonal antibodies in aqueous solution revealed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kei; Kominami, Hiroaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    The conformational flexibility of antibodies in solution directly affects their immune function. Namely, the flexible hinge regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are essential in epitope-specific antigen recognition and biological effector function. The antibody structure, which is strongly related to its functions, has been partially revealed by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, but only under non-physiological conditions. Here we observed monoclonal IgG antibodies in aqueous solution by high-resolution frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). We found that monoclonal antibodies self-assemble into hexamers, which form two-dimensional crystals in aqueous solution. Furthermore, by directly observing antibody-antigen interactions using FM-AFM, we revealed that IgG molecules in the crystal retain immunoactivity. As the self-assembled monolayer crystal of antibodies retains immunoactivity at a neutral pH and is functionally stable at a wide range of pH and temperature, the antibody crystal is applicable to new biotechnological platforms for biosensors or bioassays.

  6. Immunoactive two-dimensional self-assembly of monoclonal antibodies in aqueous solution revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ido, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kei; Kominami, Hiroaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    The conformational flexibility of antibodies in solution directly affects their immune function. Namely, the flexible hinge regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are essential in epitope-specific antigen recognition and biological effector function. The antibody structure, which is strongly related to its functions, has been partially revealed by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, but only under non-physiological conditions. Here we observed monoclonal IgG antibodies in aqueous solution by high-resolution frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). We found that monoclonal antibodies self-assemble into hexamers, which form two-dimensional crystals in aqueous solution. Furthermore, by directly observing antibody-antigen interactions using FM-AFM, we revealed that IgG molecules in the crystal retain immunoactivity. As the self-assembled monolayer crystal of antibodies retains immunoactivity at a neutral pH and is functionally stable at a wide range of pH and temperature, the antibody crystal is applicable to new biotechnological platforms for biosensors or bioassays. PMID:24441879

  7. Cryptic speciation within Phytoptus avellanae s.l. (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) revealed by molecular data and observations on molting Tegonotus-like nymphs.

    PubMed

    Cvrković, Tatjana; Chetverikov, Philipp; Vidović, Biljana; Petanović, Radmila

    2016-01-01

    Hazelnut big bud mite, Phytoptus avellanae Nalepa, is one of the most harmful pests of Corylus spp. (Corylaceae) worldwide. Herein, we show that this species represents a complex of two cryptic species: one that lives and reproduces in buds causing their enlargement ('big buds') and drying, whereas the other is a vagrant living on leaves, under bud scales and in catkins, based on phylogenetic analyzes of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA and the nuclear D2 region of 28S rDNA sequences. A molecular assessment based on mtCOI DNA and nuclear D2 28S rDNA revealed consistent differences of 16.8 and 3.5% between the two species, respectively. Molecular analysis also revealed that atypical flattened nymphs (Tegonotus-like nymphs sensu Keifer in Mites Injurious to Economic Plants, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp 327-562, 1975) with differently annulated opisthosoma, which appear in the life cycle of P. avellanae s.l., belong to the 'vagrant' lineage, i.e. vagrant cryptic species. Light microscopy images of Tegonotus-like nymphs molting into males and females are presented for the first time. Our results suggest that the name P. avellanae comprise two species. Big bud mite should keep the name P. avellanae, and the vagrant cryptic species should be re-named after a proper morphological description is made.

  8. Cryptic speciation within Phytoptus avellanae s.l. (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) revealed by molecular data and observations on molting Tegonotus-like nymphs.

    PubMed

    Cvrković, Tatjana; Chetverikov, Philipp; Vidović, Biljana; Petanović, Radmila

    2016-01-01

    Hazelnut big bud mite, Phytoptus avellanae Nalepa, is one of the most harmful pests of Corylus spp. (Corylaceae) worldwide. Herein, we show that this species represents a complex of two cryptic species: one that lives and reproduces in buds causing their enlargement ('big buds') and drying, whereas the other is a vagrant living on leaves, under bud scales and in catkins, based on phylogenetic analyzes of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) DNA and the nuclear D2 region of 28S rDNA sequences. A molecular assessment based on mtCOI DNA and nuclear D2 28S rDNA revealed consistent differences of 16.8 and 3.5% between the two species, respectively. Molecular analysis also revealed that atypical flattened nymphs (Tegonotus-like nymphs sensu Keifer in Mites Injurious to Economic Plants, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp 327-562, 1975) with differently annulated opisthosoma, which appear in the life cycle of P. avellanae s.l., belong to the 'vagrant' lineage, i.e. vagrant cryptic species. Light microscopy images of Tegonotus-like nymphs molting into males and females are presented for the first time. Our results suggest that the name P. avellanae comprise two species. Big bud mite should keep the name P. avellanae, and the vagrant cryptic species should be re-named after a proper morphological description is made. PMID:26530992

  9. A Narrow Amide I Vibrational Band Observed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Highly Ordered Structures of a Biofilm Protein at the Air/Water Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M. Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I band ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface. PMID:26779572

  10. An intensely star-forming galaxy at z ∼ 7 with low dust and metal content revealed by deep ALMA and HST observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Momose, Rieko; Ellis, Richard; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Kurono, Yasutaka; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Iono, Daisuke

    2013-12-01

    We report deep ALMA observations complemented by associated Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging for a luminous (m {sub UV} = 25) galaxy, 'Himiko', at a redshift of z = 6.595. The galaxy is remarkable for its high star formation rate, 100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which has been securely estimated from our deep HST and Spitzer photometry, and the absence of any evidence for strong active galactic nucleus activity or gravitational lensing magnification. Our ALMA observations probe an order of magnitude deeper than previous IRAM observations, yet fail to detect a 1.2 mm dust continuum, indicating a flux of <52 μJy, which is comparable to or weaker than that of local dwarf irregulars with much lower star formation rates. We likewise provide a strong upper limit for the flux of [C II] 158 μm, L{sub [C} {sub II]}<5.4×10{sup 7} L{sub ⊙}, which is a diagnostic of the hot interstellar gas that is often described as a valuable probe for early galaxies. In fact, our observations indicate that Himiko lies off the local L{sub [C} {sub II]}-star formation rate scaling relation by a factor of more than 30. Both aspects of our ALMA observations suggest that Himiko is a unique object with a very low dust content and perhaps nearly primordial interstellar gas. Our HST images provide unique insight into the morphology of this remarkable source, highlighting an extremely blue core of activity and two less extreme associated clumps. Himiko is undergoing a triple major merger event whose extensive ionized nebula of Lyα emitting gas, discovered in our earlier work with Subaru, is powered by star formation and the dense circumgalactic gas. We are likely witnessing an early massive galaxy during a key period of its mass assembly close to the end of the reionization era.

  11. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  12. AFM combines functional and morphological analysis of peripheral myelinated and demyelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Alejandro; Bui, Chin Chu; Suter, Ueli; Young, Peter; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2007-10-01

    Demyelination of the myelinated peripheral or central axon is a common pathophysiological step in the clinical manifestation of several human diseases of the peripheral and the central nervous system such as the majority of Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndromes and multiple sclerosis, respectively. The structural degradation of the axon insulating myelin sheath has profound consequences for ionic conduction and nerve function in general, but also affects the micromechanical properties of the nerve fiber. We have for the first time investigated mechanical properties of rehydrated, isolated peripheral nerve fibers from mouse using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have generated quantitative maps of elastic modulus along myelinated and demyelinated axons, together with quantitative maps of axon topography. This study shows that AFM can combine functional and morphological analysis of neurological tissue at the level of single nerve fibers.

  13. SEM and AFM images of pyrite surfaces after bioleaching by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-L; Chen, B-Y; Lan, Y-W; Cheng, Y-C

    2003-09-01

    The bioleaching mechanism of pyrite by the indigenous Thiobacillus thiooxidans was examined with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the pyrite surface. The presence of pyrite eliminated the lag phase during growth of this microorganism. This was due to the stimulatory effect on cell growth of the slight amount of Cu2+ that had leached from the pyrite. Zn2+ was found to be much more readily solubilized than Cu2+. The efficiency of bioleaching was four times higher than that of chemical leaching. SEM images provided evidence of direct cell attachment onto the pyrite surface, thereby enhancing the bioleaching rate. Furthermore, extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) were found on the pyrite surface after 4 days of oxidation. AFM images showed that the pyrite surface area positively correlated with the oxidation rate. A combination of direct and indirect mechanism is probably responsible for the oxidation of pyrite by T. thiooxidans.

  14. Accurate and precise calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Pratt, Jon R

    2012-09-21

    Accurate cantilever spring constants are important in atomic force microscopy both in control of sensitive imaging and to provide correct nanomechanical property measurements. Conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) spring constant calibration techniques are usually performed in an AFM. They rely on significant handling and often require touching the cantilever probe tip to a surface to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of the configuration. This can damage the tip. The thermal calibration technique developed for laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) can be used to calibrate cantilevers without handling or touching the tip to a surface. Both flexural and torsional spring constants can be measured. Using both Euler-Bernoulli modeling and an SI traceable electrostatic force balance technique as a comparison we demonstrate that the LDV thermal technique is capable of providing rapid calibrations with a combination of ease, accuracy and precision beyond anything previously available.

  15. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  16. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  17. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  18. Determination of work of adhesion of biological cell under AFM bead indentation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinyao; Siamantouras, E; Liu, K K; Liu, X

    2016-03-01

    Hertz contact theory has been widely used for the determination of cell elasticity based on AFM indentation experiments. In light of the adhesive contact between AFM tip and cell, this study applied Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model to fit the indentation force-displacement (F-D) curves reported previously. A MIN6 cell has been modeled as first a sphere and then a flattened cell with different thicknesses. The results have shown that both basic JKR model and "generalized" JKR model can best describe the unloading force-displacement behaviors of the indentation curves. The Young׳s modulus of the cell and the work of adhesion of the cell-indenter interface are obtained. In comparison to the Hertzian contact model, the JKR model provides obviously better fitting to the experimental results, indicating that the adhesion is significant in the cell interaction. PMID:26688423

  19. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  20. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  1. Mode coupling in a hanging-fiber AFM used as a rheological probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, C.; Laurent, J.; Steinberger, A.; Bellon, L.; Ciliberto, S.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the advantages and drawbacks of a method which measures the viscosity of liquids at microscales, using a thin glass fiber fixed on the tip of a cantilever of an ultra-low-noise Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When the fiber is dipped into a liquid, the dissipation of the cantilever-fiber system, which is linked to the liquid viscosity, can be computed from the power spectral density of the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever deflection. The high sensitivity of the AFM allows us to show the existence and to develop a model of the coupling between the dynamics of the fiber and that of the cantilever. This model, which accurately fits the experimental data, gives also more insights into the dynamics of coupled microdevices in a viscous environment.

  2. AFM characterization of nanobubble formation and slip condition in oxygenated and electrokinetically altered fluids.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Pan, Yunlu; Daniels, Stephanie

    2013-02-15

    Nanobubbles are gas-filled features that spontaneously form at the interface of hydrophobic surfaces and aqueous solutions. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to characterize the morphology of nanobubbles formed on hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) films immersed in DI water, saline, saline with oxygen and an electrokinetically altered saline solution produced with Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow under elevated oxygen pressure. AFM force spectroscopy was used to evaluate hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces and boundary slip condition in various fluids. The effect of solution, electric field and surface charge on shape, size and density of nanobubbles as well as slip length was quantified and the results and underlying mechanisms are presented in this paper.

  3. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  4. Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Franz, Clemens M; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A

    2014-07-01

    The ability to perturb individual cells and to obtain information at the single-cell level is of central importance for addressing numerous biological questions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers great potential for this prospering field. Traditionally used as an imaging tool, more recent developments have extended the variety of cell-manipulation protocols. Fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) combines AFM with microfluidics via microchanneled cantilevers with nano-sized apertures. The crucial element of the technology is the connection of the hollow cantilevers to a pressure controller, allowing their operation in liquid as force-controlled nanopipettes under optical control. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrated a broad spectrum of single-cell applications including isolation, deposition, adhesion and injection in a range of biological systems. PMID:24856959

  5. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application.

  6. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ferat; Yablon, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization. PMID:26665072

  7. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-01

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (<100 nm) oscillations are readily measured with AFM. Resonance oscillation frequencies were measured for drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops.

  8. In vitro study of AFB1 and AFM1 effects on human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell model.

    PubMed

    Luongo, D; Russo, R; Balestrieri, A; Marzocco, S; Bergamo, P; Severino, L

    2014-10-01

    Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus spp. that can occur as a natural contaminant in foods and feeds of vegetable origin. Post-ingestion, AFB(1) can be metabolized in the liver of mammals into hydroxylated aflatoxin M(1) (AFM(1)) that is excreted with milk. Although several studies have been carried out to evaluate effects of AFB(1) on the immune system, studies regarding AFM(1) are moreover lacking. The aim of the current study was to investigate effects of AFB(1) and AFM(1) on immune function using a lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cell line as an experimental model. Both AFB(1) and AFM(1) produced significant decreases in Jurkat cell proliferation, whereas only minor effects were noted on interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ cytokines mRNA expression in stimulated cells that had been pre-incubated with AFB(1) and AFM(1). Particularly, AFB(1), but not AFM(1), at the highest concentration (50 µM) induced a marked increase in IL-8 mRNA expression. The results of the current study suggested the existence of a concentration thr