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Sample records for afm ordered state

  1. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  2. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  3. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  4. In situ Stiffness Adjustment of AFM Probes by Two Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, Marcel Lambertus Cornelis; Pérez Garza, Héctor Hugo; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The choice on which type of cantilever to use for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) depends on the type of the experiment being done. Typically, the cantilever has to be exchanged when a different stiffness is required and the entire alignment has to be repeated. In the present work, a method to adjust the stiffness in situ of a commercial AFM cantilever is developed. The adjustment is achieved by changing the effective length of the cantilever by electrostatic pull-in. By applying a voltage between the cantilever and an electrode (with an insulating layer at the point of contact), the cantilever snaps to the electrode, reducing the cantilever’s effective length. An analytical model was developed to find the pull-in voltage of the system. Subsequently, a finite element model was developed to study the pull-in behavior. The working principle of this concept is demonstrated with a proof-of-concept experiment. The electrode was positioned close to the cantilever by using a robotic nanomanipulator. To confirm the change in stiffness, the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever was measured for varying electrode positions. The results match with the theoretical expectations. The stiffness was adjusted in situ in the range of 0.2 N/m to 27 N/m, covering two orders of magnitude in one single cantilever. This proof-of-concept is the first step towards a micro fabricated prototype, that integrates the electrode positioning system and cantilever that can be used for actual AFM experiments. PMID:27077863

  5. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of dAFM in the transient and steady state motions.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir Farokh

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, based on the slow time varying function theory, dynamical equations for the amplitude and phase of the dynamic atomic force microscope are derived. Then, the sensitivity of the amplitude and phase to the dissipative and conservative parts of interaction force is investigated. The most advantage of this dynamical model is the ability to simulate and analysis the dynamics behavior of amplitude and phase of the AFM tip motion not only in the steady state but also in the transient regime. Using numerical analysis the transient and steady state behavior of amplitude and phase is studied and the sensitivity of amplitude and phase to the interaction force is analyzed. PMID:27448201

  6. Effect of the molecular weight on deformation states of the polystyrene film by AFM single scanning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Yan, Yongda; Liang, Yingchun; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen; Sun, Tao; Dong, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Nanobundles patterns can be formed on the surface of most thermoplastic polymers when the atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanomechanical machining method is employed to scratch their surfaces. Such patterns are reviewed as three-dimensional sine-wave structures. In the present study, the single-line scratch test is used firstly to study different removal states of the polystyrene (PS) polymer with different molecular weights (MWs). Effects of the scratching direction and the scratching velocity on deformation of the PS film and the state of the removed materials are also investigated. Single-wear box test is then employed to study the possibility of forming bundle structures on PS films with different MWs. The experimental results show that the state between the tip and the sample plays a key role in the nano machining process. If the contact radius between the AFM tip and the polymer surface is larger than the chain end-to-end distance, it is designated as the "cutting" state that means the area of both side ridges is less than the area of the groove and materials are removed. If the contact radius is less than the chain end-to-end distance, it is designated as the "plowing" state that means the area of both side ridges is larger than the area of the groove and no materials are removed at all. For the perfect bundles formation on the PS film, the plowing state is ideal condition for the larger MW polymers because of the chains' entanglement. PMID:23229843

  7. AFM visualization at a single-molecule level of denaturated states of proteins on graphite.

    PubMed

    Barinov, Nikolay A; Prokhorov, Valery V; Dubrovin, Evgeniy V; Klinov, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Different graphitic materials are either already used or believed to be advantageous in biomedical and biotechnological applications, e.g., as biomaterials or substrates for sensors. Most of these applications or associated important issues, such as biocompatibility, address the problem of adsorption of protein molecules and, in particular the conformational state of the adsorbed protein molecule on graphite. High-resolution AFM demonstrates highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) induced denaturation of four proteins of blood plasma, such as ferritin, fibrinogen, human serum albumin (HSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), at a single molecule level. Protein denaturation is accompanied by the decrease of the heights of protein globules and spreading of the denatured protein fraction on the surface. In contrast, the modification of HOPG with the amphiphilic oligoglycine-hydrocarbon derivative monolayer preserves the native-like conformation and provides even more mild conditions for the protein adsorption than typically used mica. Protein unfolding on HOPG may have universal character for "soft" globular proteins. PMID:27451365

  8. AFM study of excimer laser patterning of block-copolymer: Creation of ordered hierarchical, hybrid, or recessed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švanda, Jan; Siegel, Jakub; Švorčík, Vaclav; Lyutakov, Oleksiy

    2016-05-01

    We report fabrication of the varied range of hierarchical structures by combining bottom-up self-assembly of block copolymer poly(styrene-block-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) with top-down excimer laser patterning method. Different procedures were tested, where laser treatment was applied before phase separation and after phase separation or phase separation and surface reconstruction. Laser treatment was performed using either polarized laser light with the aim to create periodical pattern on polymer surface or non-polarized light for preferential removing of polystyrene (PS) part from PS-b-P4VP. Additionally, dye was introduced into one part of block copolymer (P4VP) with the aim to modify its response to laser light. Resulting structures were analyzed by XPS, UV-vis and AFM techniques. Application of polarized laser light leads to creation of structures with hierarchical, recessed or hybrid geometries. Non-polarized laser beam allows pronouncing the block copolymer phase separated structure. Tuning the order of steps or individual step conditions enables the efficient reorientation of block-copolymer domain at large scale, fabrication of hierarchical, hybrid or recessed structures. The obtained structures can find potential applications in nanotechnology, photonics, plasmonics, information storage, optical devices, sensors and smart surfaces.

  9. Ordering states with coherence measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. L.; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Xu, G. F.; Tong, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    The quantification of quantum coherence has attracted a growing attention, and based on various physical contexts, several coherence measures have been put forward. An interesting question is whether these coherence measures give the same ordering when they are used to quantify the coherence of quantum states. In this paper, we consider the two well-known coherence measures, the l_1 norm of coherence and the relative entropy of coherence, to show that there are the states for which the two measures give a different ordering. Our analysis can be extended to other coherence measures, and as an illustration of the extension we further consider the formation of coherence to show that the l_1 norm of coherence and the formation of coherence, as well as the relative entropy of coherence and the coherence of formation, do not give the same ordering too.

  10. Solid State Microstructure of Poly(L-lactide-co-meso-lactide) Copolymers by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanasopa, M.; Manias, E.; Runt, J.

    2002-03-01

    The focus in the present study is on characterization of the lamellar morphology of poly(L-lactide) and two L-lactide/meso-lactide random copolymers containing 3 and 6 the same (Mn = 65,000, PDI = 2) and crystallization behavior is therefore controlled by comonomer content. Degrees of crystallinity and crystallization rates decrease substantially with increasing meso-lactide content in the copolymers. Tapping mode AFM experiments on the surfaces of films, previously isothermally crystallized at selected temperatures, were conducted. Similar experiments were also performed on cross-sections, microtomed from the crystallized films. Tapping force plays an important role in all experiments, particularly for low crystallinity samples. Mean lamellar thicknesses derived from analysis of height images agree well with those determined previously from small-angle x-ray scattering experiments.

  11. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi; Mroue, Kamal H.; Xu, Jiadi; Pavan, Barbara; Fang, Ming; Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Holl, Mark M.Banaszak; Tecklenburg, Mary M.J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-10-15

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}ν{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ν{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  12. Solid-state SiO2 nano-gears AFM tip manipulation on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianshu; Deng, Jie; Troadec, Cedic; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Joachim, Christian

    2014-11-01

    On a native graphite surface, 15 nm-thick solid-state nanogears are nanofabricated with a 30 nm outer diameter and six teeth. The nanogears are manipulated one at a time by the tip of an atomic force microscope using the sample stage displacements for the manipulation and recording of the corresponding manipulation signals. For step heights below 3.0 nm, nanogears are manipulated up and down native graphite surface step edges. In the absence of a central shaft per nanogear, gearing between nanogears is limited to a few 1/12 turns for six teeth. When the graphite step is higher than 3 nm, a rack-and-pinion mechanism was constructed along the edge with a 90 nm nanogear pinion.

  13. Competing magnetic orderings and tunable topological states in two-dimensional hexagonal organometallic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Li, Chaokai; Feng, Ji; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of topological states is of significant fundamental and practical importance in contemporary condensed matter physics, for which the extension to two-dimensional (2D) organometallic systems is particularly attractive. Using first-principles calculations, we show that a 2D hexagonal triphenyl-lead lattice composed of only main group elements is susceptible to a magnetic instability, characterized by a considerably more stable antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating state rather than the topologically nontrivial quantum spin Hall state proposed recently. Even though this AFM phase is topologically trivial, it possesses an intricate emergent degree of freedom, defined by the product of spin and valley indices, leading to Berry curvature-induced spin and valley currents under electron or hole doping. Furthermore, such a trivial band insulator can be tuned into a topologically nontrivial matter by the application of an out-of-plane electric field, which destroys the AFM order, favoring instead ferrimagnetic spin ordering and a quantum anomalous Hall state with a nonzero topological invariant. These findings further enrich our understanding of 2D hexagonal organometallic lattices for potential applications in spintronics and valleytronics.

  14. Partially ordered state of ice XV.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Noritake, F; Machida, S; Sano-Furukawa, A; Hattori, T; Yamane, R; Kagi, H

    2016-01-01

    Most ice polymorphs have order-disorder "pairs" in terms of hydrogen positions, which contributes to the rich variety of ice polymorphs; in fact, three recently discovered polymorphs- ices XIII, XIV, and XV-are ordered counter forms to already identified disordered phases. Despite the considerable effort to understand order-disorder transition in ice crystals, there is an inconsistency among the various experiments and calculations for ice XV, the ordered counter form of ice VI, i.e., neutron diffraction observations suggest antiferroelectrically ordered structures, which disagree with dielectric measurement and theoretical studies, implying ferroelectrically ordered structures. Here we investigate in-situ neutron diffraction measurements and density functional theory calculations to revisit the structure and stability of ice XV. We find that none of the completely ordered configurations are particular favored; instead, partially ordered states are established as a mixture of ordered domains in disordered ice VI. This scenario in which several kinds of ordered configuration coexist dispels the contradictions in previous studies. It means that the order-disorder pairs in ice polymorphs are not one-to-one correspondent pairs but rather have one-to-n correspondence, where there are n possible configurations at finite temperature. PMID:27375120

  15. Partially ordered state of ice XV

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, K.; Noritake, F.; Machida, S.; Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Yamane, R.; Kagi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Most ice polymorphs have order–disorder “pairs” in terms of hydrogen positions, which contributes to the rich variety of ice polymorphs; in fact, three recently discovered polymorphs— ices XIII, XIV, and XV—are ordered counter forms to already identified disordered phases. Despite the considerable effort to understand order–disorder transition in ice crystals, there is an inconsistency among the various experiments and calculations for ice XV, the ordered counter form of ice VI, i.e., neutron diffraction observations suggest antiferroelectrically ordered structures, which disagree with dielectric measurement and theoretical studies, implying ferroelectrically ordered structures. Here we investigate in-situ neutron diffraction measurements and density functional theory calculations to revisit the structure and stability of ice XV. We find that none of the completely ordered configurations are particular favored; instead, partially ordered states are established as a mixture of ordered domains in disordered ice VI. This scenario in which several kinds of ordered configuration coexist dispels the contradictions in previous studies. It means that the order–disorder pairs in ice polymorphs are not one-to-one correspondent pairs but rather have one-to-n correspondence, where there are n possible configurations at finite temperature. PMID:27375120

  16. Growing quantum states with topological order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letscher, Fabian; Grusdt, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We discuss a protocol for growing states with topological order in interacting many-body systems using a sequence of flux quanta and particle insertion. We first consider a simple toy model, the superlattice Bose-Hubbard model, to explain all required ingredients. Our protocol is then applied to fractional quantum Hall systems in both, continuum and lattice. We investigate in particular how the fidelity, with which a topologically ordered state can be grown, scales with increasing particle number N . For small systems, exact diagonalization methods are used. To treat large systems with many particles, we introduce an effective model based on the composite fermion description of the fractional quantum Hall effect. This model also allows to take into account the effects of dispersive bands and edges in the system, which will be discussed in detail.

  17. Catalytic Scanning Probe Nanolithography (cSPL): Control of the AFM Parameters in Order to Achieve Sub-100-nm Spatially Resolved Epoxidation of Alkenes Grafted onto a Surface.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Vincent; Botton, Julien; Valyaev, Dmitry A; François, Cyril; Patrone, Lionel; Balaban, Teodor Silviu; Abel, Mathieu; Parrain, Jean-Luc; Chuzel, Olivier; Clair, Sylvain

    2016-04-26

    Scanning probe lithography (SPL) appears to be a reliable alternative to the use of masks in traditional lithography techniques as it offers the possibility of directly producing specific chemical functionalities with nanoscale spatial control. We have recently extend the range of applications of catalytic SPL (cSPL) by introducing a homogeneous catalyst immobilized on the apex of a scanning probe. Here we investigate the importance of atomic force microscopy (AFM) physical parameters (applied force, writing speed, and interline distance) on the resultant chemical activity in this cSPL methodology through the direct topographic observation of nanostructured surfaces. Indeed, an alkene-terminated self-assembled monolayer (alkene-SAM) on a silicon wafer was locally epoxidized using a scanning probe tip with a covalently grafted manganese complex bearing the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane macrocycle as the ligand. In a post-transformation process, N-octylpiperazine was covalently grafted to the surface via a selective nucleophilic ring-opening reaction. With this procedure, we could write various patterns on the surface with high spatial control. The catalytic AFM probe thus appears to be very robust because a total area close to 500 μm(2) was patterned without any noticeable loss of catalytic activity. Finally, this methodology allowed us to reach a lower lateral line resolution down to 40 nm, thus being competitive and complementary to the other nanolithographical techniques for the nanostructuration of surfaces. PMID:27027411

  18. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  19. STM and AFM; Which is Better for Surface Structural Analysis? Non- contact AFM Studies on Ge/Si(105) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been utilized to determine surface atomic structure with its highly resolved images. Probing surface electronic states near the Fermi energy (EF), STM images, however, do not necessarily represent the atomic structure of surfaces. It has been believed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides us surface topographic images without being disturbed by the electronic states. In order to prove the surpassing performance, we performed noncontact (nc) AFM on the Ge/Si(105) surface [1], which is a facet plane of the ?hut? clusters formed on Ge-deposited Si(001) surface. It is found that STM images taken on the surface, either filled- or empty-state images, do not show all surface atoms because of the electronic effect; some surface atoms have dangling bond states below EF and other surface atoms have states above EF. [2]. In a nc-AFM image, on the other hand, all surface atoms having a dangling bond are observed [3], directly representing an atomic structure of the surface. Electronic information can also be obtained in AFM by using a Kelvin-probe method. From atomically resolved potential profile we obtained, charge transfer among the dangling bond states is directly demonstrated. These results clearly demonstrate that highly-resolved nc-AFM with a Kelvin-probe method is an ideal tool for analysis of atomic structures and electronic properties of surfaces. This work was done in collaboration with T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama, T. An, and M. Ono, ISSP, Univ. Tokyo and JST, Y. Fujikawa and T. Sakurai, IMR. Tohoku Univ. T. Hashimoto, AIST, Y. Morikawa, ISIR, Osaka Univ. K. Terakura, Hokkaido Univ., and M.G. Lagally, University of Wisconsin-Madison. [1] T. Eguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 266102 (2004). [2] Y. Fujikawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176101 (2002). [3] T. Eguchi and Y. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 256105 (2002)

  20. The regular state in higher order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kadry, Seifedine; Trachilis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    We consider the higher-order gravity theory derived from the quadratic Lagrangian R + 𝜖R2 in vacuum as a first-order (ADM-type) system with constraints, and build time developments of solutions of an initial value formulation of the theory. We show that all such solutions, if analytic, contain the right number of free functions to qualify as general solutions of the theory. We further show that any regular analytic solution which satisfies the constraints and the evolution equations can be given in the form of an asymptotic formal power series expansion.

  1. The liquid-ordered state comes of age.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2010-07-01

    Biomembranes are unique states of soft matter that share some of their materials properties with the mesophases of liquid crystals. Although of genuinely fluid character, membranes can display ordered states under physiological conditions, and it appears that their lateral organization and the related functional properties are intimately coupled to states in-between order and disorder. Hence, the liquid-ordered state of membranes, which owes its existence to the unique ability of cholesterol to mediate between order and disorder, has moved center stage in the characterization of membranes in terms of domains or rafts. PMID:20170626

  2. Weak orbital ordering of Ir t2 g states in the double perovskite Sr2CeIrO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Sudipta; Mogare, Kailash; Yan, Binghai; Reehuis, Manfred; Hoser, Andreas; Felser, Claudia; Jansen, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of distorted monoclinic double perovskite Sr2CeIrO6 were examined based on both experiments and first-principles density functional theory calculations. From the calculations we conclude that low-spin-state Ir4 + (5 d5 ) forms a rare weakly antiferromagnetic (AFM) orbital ordered state derived from alternating occupation of slightly mixed egπ symmetry states in the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). This orbital ordering is caused due to the competition between the comparable strength of Jahn-Teller structural distortion and SOC. We found both electron-electron correlation and SOC are required to drive the experimentally observed AFM-insulating ground state. Electronic structure investigation suggests that this material belongs to the intermediate-SOC regime, by comparing our results with the other existing iridates. This single active site double perovskite provides a rare platform with a prototype geometrically frustrated fcc lattice where among the different degrees of freedom (i.e., spin, orbital, and lattice) SOC, structural distortion, and Coulomb correlation energy scales compete and interact with each other.

  3. Outcomes of Civil Protective Orders: Results from One State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diviney, Charles L.; Parekh, Asha; Olson, Lenora M.

    2009-01-01

    This study compares final sentencing decisions ordered by judges to federal and state sentencing guidelines for protective order violations. The authors reviewed violations that were pled before the largest district court in Utah and found that in the majority of cases, defendants were not sentenced in accordance with federal and state guidelines.…

  4. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  5. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  6. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  7. Optical study of the antiferromagnetic ordered state in electron-overdoped Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Run; Xu, Bing; Dai, Yaomin; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jinyun; Qiu, Ziyang; Qiu, Xianggang

    2016-06-01

    In Ca1 -xRxFeAs2 (R =rare earth), an antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase as well as a structural transition have been reported, even in the electron-overdoped regime. Here, we investigated the temperature-dependent in-plane optical spectroscopy of overdoped Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2 . Upon entering the AFM state, we found an abrupt reduction of low-frequency (500-2000 cm-1) spectral weight in the optical conductivity. In sharp contrast to the parent compounds of the 122 system, where spin-density-wave gaps have been clearly observed in the AFM state, a gap signature is absent in Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2 . This may be a consequence of the poor nesting condition between the hole and electron pockets. However, a spectral weight analysis shows that the reduced spectral weight at low frequency is transferred to the high-frequency range (≳4000 cm-1), pointing to a localization effect. These observations suggest that the AFM order in Ca0.77Nd0.23FeAs2 is most likely to originate from a localized nature rather than Fermi-surface nesting.

  8. Outcomes of civil protective orders: results from one state.

    PubMed

    Diviney, Charles L; Parekh, Asha; Olson, Lenora M

    2009-07-01

    This study compares final sentencing decisions ordered by judges to federal and state sentencing guidelines for protective order violations. The authors reviewed violations that were pled before the largest district court in Utah and found that in the majority of cases, defendants were not sentenced in accordance with federal and state guidelines. Although state guidelines mandate defendants who violate a protective order to attend a batterer intervention program, less than one fourth of defendants were sentenced to attend such programs. Fewer than half of the defendants were arrested and incarcerated, as opposed to the 100% mandated by state sentencing guidelines. Federal guidelines mandate that all defendants be ordered to surrender firearms, but only six defendants were given that order. This study shows that the judicial system could be more aggressive in improving the safety of victims of intimate partner violence by using the full extent of the sentencing guidelines. PMID:18701748

  9. Ordering two-qubit states with concurrence and negativity

    SciTech Connect

    Miranowicz, Adam; Grudka, Andrzej

    2004-09-01

    We study the ordering of two-qubit states with respect to the degree of bipartite entanglement using the Wootters concurrence - a measure of the entanglement of formation - and the negativity - a measure of the entanglement cost under the positive-partial-transpose-preserving operations. For two-qubit pure states, the negativity is the same as the concurrence. However, we demonstrate analytically on simple examples of various mixtures of Bell and separable states that the entanglement measures can impose different orderings on the states. We show which states, in general, give the maximally different predictions (i) when one of the states has the concurrence greater but the negativity smaller than those for the other state and (ii) when the states are entangled to the same degree according to one of the measures, but differently according to the other.

  10. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  11. Design of optimal second-order state estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.

    1991-01-01

    The present consideration of the design of online computation-saving second-order state estimators for second-order vector-matrix differential systems proposes a class of such estimators which is proven to possess guaranteed convergence. A class of optimal second-order estimators is then obtained, and the conditions required for optimality are identified. The estimator proposed offers high performance in conjunction with online computation reductions sufficiently great to allow the estimation of the large number of state variables associated with control of large, flexible space structures represented by high-dimensional second-order systems.

  12. Correlation between Photovoltaic Performance and Interchain Ordering Induced Delocalization of Electronics States in Conjugated Polymer Blends.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Naresh; Gann, Eliot; Jain, Nakul; Kumar, Anshu; Gopinathan, Sreelekha; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Kumar, Anil; McNeill, Christopher R; Kabra, Dinesh

    2016-08-10

    In this paper we correlate the solar cell performance with bimolecular packing of donor:acceptor bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs), where interchain ordering of the donor molecule and its influence on morphology, optical properties, and charge carrier dynamics of BHJ solar cells are studied in detail. Solar cells that are fabricated using more ordered defect free 100% regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (DF-P3HT) as the donor polymer show ca. 10% increase in the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) when compared to that of the solar cell fabricated using 92% regioregularity P3HT, referred to as rr-P3HT. EQE and UV-vis absorption spectrum show a clear increase in the 607 nm vibronic shoulder of the DF-P3HT blend suggesting better interchain ordering which was also reflected in the less Urbach energy (Eu) value for this system. The increase in ordering inside the blend has enhanced the hole-mobility which is calculated from the single carrier device J-V characteristics. Electroluminance (EL) studies on the DF-P3HT system showed a red-shifted peak when compared to rr-P3HT-based devices suggesting low CT energy states in DF-P3HT. The morphologies of the blend films are studied using AFM and grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) suggesting increase in the roughness and phase segregation which could enhance the internal scattering of the light inside the device and improvement in the crystallinity along alkyl and π-stacking direction. Hence, higher PCE, lower Eu, red-shifted EL emission, high hole-mobility, and better crystallinity suggest improved interchain ordering has facilitated a more delocalized HOMO state in DF-P3HT-based BHJ solar cells. PMID:27415029

  13. Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to reveal the coexistence of coupled antiferromagnetic (AFM)/ferroelectric (FE) and ferromagnetic (FM) orders in multiferroic TbMnO3 films, which can guide researchers in creating new kinds of multiferroic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jingbo; Zhu, Jianxin; Trugman, Stuart A.; Taylor, Antoinette; Jia, Quanxi; Prasankumar, Rohit

    2012-07-06

    Multiferroic materials have attracted much interest in the past decade, due not only to their novel device applications, but also their manifestations of coupling and interactions between different order parameters (particularly electric polarization and magnetic order). Recently, much attention has been focused on perovskite manganites, RMnO{sub 3} (R = rare earth ions), due to the discovery of a large magnetoelectric effect in these materials. The first member of this family to be discovered was TbMnO{sub 3} (TMO), which is now well established as a typical magnetoelectric multiferroic. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies have already been done on single crystal TMO (SC-TMO). In brief, SC-TMO, with a distorted orthorhombic perovskite structure, has an antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition at T{sub N} {approx}40 K with sinusoidally ordered Mn moments. Below T{sub FE} {approx} 28 K, ferroelectric (FE) order develops owing to the appearance of cycloidal spiral spin structure. In contrast, there are relatively few reports describing the properties of TMO thin films (typically grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrates). In general, thin films can enable new functionality in materials, as their physical parameters can be changed by modifying their structure via strain imposed by the substrate. Strain in particular has the potential to directly couple FE and FM orders, which is very rare. This could benefit electronic device applications by providing low power consumption, high speed operation, and greater electric/magnetic field controllability. Previous investigations of magnetic properties in TMO films revealed an unexpected ferromagnetic (FM) order, in contrast to SC-TMO. However, several important questions regarding these films are still unanswered for instance: (1) What mechanism induces FM order? (2) Can FM, sinusoidal AFM and spiral AFM (or FE) orders coexist? (3) Can FM order be coupled to FE order? To fully understand these unique materials

  14. Charge Order Induced in an Orbital Density-Wave State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Takimoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent angle resolved photoemission measurements [D. V. Evtushinsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 147201 (2010)] and evidence of the density-wave state for the charge and orbital ordering [J. García et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 107202 (2012)] in La0.5Sr1.5MnO4, the issue of charge and orbital ordering in a two-orbital tight-binding model for layered manganite near half doping is revisited. We find that the charge order with the ordering wavevector 2{Q} = (π ,π ) is induced by the orbital order of d-/d+-type having B1g representation with a different ordering wavevector Q, where the orbital order as the primary order results from the strong Fermi-surface nesting. It is shown that the induced charge order parameter develops according to TCO - T by decreasing the temperature below the orbital ordering temperature TCO, in addition to the usual mean-field behavior of the orbital order parameter. Moreover, the same orbital order is found to stabilize the CE-type spin arrangement observed experimentally below TCE < TCO.

  15. Symmetry-protected topologically ordered states for universal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen Nautrup, Hendrik; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) is a model for quantum information processing utilizing only local measurements on suitably entangled resource states for the implementation of quantum gates. A complete characterization for universal resource states is still missing. It has been shown that symmetry-protected topological order (SPTO) in one dimension can be exploited for the protection of certain quantum gates in MBQC. Here we investigate whether any 2D nontrivial SPTO states can serve as resource for MBQC. In particular, we show that the nontrivial SPTO ground state of the CZX model on the square lattice by Chen et al. [Phys. Rev. B 84, 235141 (2011)] can be reduced to a 2D cluster state by local measurement, hence a universal resource state. Such ground states have been generalized to qudits with symmetry action described by three cocycles of a finite group G of order d and shown to exhibit nontrivial SPTO. We also extend these to arbitary lattices and show that the generalized two-dimensional plaquette states on arbitrary lattices exhibit nontrivial SPTO in terms of symmetry fractionalization and that they are universal resource states for quantum computation. SPTO states therefore can provide a new playground for measurement-based quantum computation. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  16. Identifying non-Abelian topological order through minimal entangled states.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Gong, S S; Haldane, F D M; Sheng, D N

    2014-03-01

    The topological order is encoded in the pattern of long-range quantum entanglements, which cannot be measured by any local observable. Here we perform an exact diagonalization study to establish the non-Abelian topological order for topological band models through entanglement entropy measurement. We focus on the quasiparticle statistics of the non-Abelian Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi states on the lattice models with bosonic particles. We identify multiple independent minimal entangled states (MESs) in the ground state manifold on a torus. The extracted modular S matrix from MESs faithfully demonstrates the Ising anyon or Fibonacci quasiparticle statistics, including the quasiparticle quantum dimensions and the fusion rules for such systems. These findings unambiguously demonstrate the topological nature of the quantum states for these flatband models without using the knowledge of model wave functions. PMID:24655269

  17. Comment on "State of order in α-AgI"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, S.; Fujishita, H.; Sakuma, T.

    1982-02-01

    Beyeler and Strässler stated in their paper

    [Phys. Rev. B 20, 1980 (1979)]
    that the diffuse scattering of α-AgI was dominated by thermal scattering yielding practically no information about the static state of order. However, in our x-ray as well as neutron scattering measurements, the diffuse scattering due to the disordered distribution of cations in α-AgI was clearly observed in addition to the thermal scattering. From the analysis of the disorder scattering the availability of the diffuse scattering in studying a short-range order of cations in the α-AgI-type structure was confirmed.

  18. Diffraction gratings generating orders with selective states of polarization.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeffrey A; Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María M; Badham, Katherine; Albero, Jorge; Cottrell, Don M

    2016-01-25

    We propose specially designed double anisotropic polarization diffraction gratings capable of producing a selective number of diffraction orders and with selective different states of polarization. Different polarization diffraction gratings are demonstrated, including linear polarization with horizontal, vertical and ± 45° orientations, and circular R and L polarization outputs. When illuminated with an arbitrary state of polarization, the system acts as a complete polarimeter where the intensities of the diffraction orders allow measurement of the Stokes parameters with a single shot. Experimental proof-of-concept is presented using a parallel-aligned liquid crystal display operating in a double pass architecture. PMID:26832474

  19. Quantum Entanglement and the Topological Order of Fractional Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezayi, Edward

    2015-03-01

    Fractional quantum Hall states or, more generally, topological phases of matter defy Landau classification based on order parameter and broken symmetry. Instead they have been characterized by their topological order. Quantum information concepts, such as quantum entanglement, appear to provide the most efficient method of detecting topological order solely from the knowledge of the ground state wave function. This talk will focus on real-space bi-partitioning of quantum Hall states and will present both exact diagonalization and quantum Monte Carlo studies of topological entanglement entropy in various geometries. Results on the torus for non-contractible cuts are quite rich and, through the use of minimum entropy states, yield the modular S-matrix and hence uniquely determine the topological order, as shown in recent literature. Concrete examples of minimum entropy states from known quantum Hall wave functions and their corresponding quantum numbers, used in exact diagonalizations, will be given. In collaboration with Clare Abreu and Raul Herrera. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0002140.

  20. Second-order state estimation experiments using acceleration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    The estimation of dynamic states for feedback control of structural systems using second-order differential equations and acceleration measurements is described. The formulation of the observer model, and the design of the observer gains is discussed in detail. It is shown the second-order observer is highly stable because the stability constraints on the observer gains are model independent. The limitation of the proposed observer is the need for 'nearly' collocated actuators and accelerometers. Experimental results using a control-structure interaction testbed are presented that show the second-order observer provided more stability than a Kalman filter estimator without decreasing closed-loop performance.

  1. Ordered ground states of metallic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    The physical attributes of some of the more physically distinct ordered states of metallic hydrogen and metallic deuterium at T = 0 and nearby are discussed. The likelihood of superconductivity in both is considered with respect to the usual coupling via the density fluctuations of the ions.

  2. Responses to the New International Information Order: The United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Thomas L.

    Third World nations' calls for a new international information order are discussed and the responses of Western governments and in particular of the United States government to those calls are analyzed in this paper. The paper notes the Third World countries' preferences for a more restrictive flow of information across borders, their limited…

  3. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  4. Compact Two-State-Variable Second-Order Memristor Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2016-06-01

    A key requirement for using memristors in functional circuits is a predictive physical model to capture the resistive switching behavior, which shall be compact enough to be implemented using a circuit simulator. Although a number of memristor models have been developed, most of these models (i.e., first-order memristor models) have utilized only a one-state-variable. However, such simplification is not adequate for accurate modeling because multiple mechanisms are involved in resistive switching. Here, a two-state-variable based second-order memristor model is presented, which considers the axial drift of the charged vacancies in an applied electric field and the radial vacancy motion caused by the thermophoresis and diffusion. In particular, this model emulates the details of the intrinsic short-term dynamics, such as decay and temporal heat summation, and therefore, it accurately predicts the resistive switching characteristics for both DC and AC input signals. PMID:27152649

  5. Chiral projected entangled-pair state with topological order.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Wahl, Thorsten B; Tu, Hong-Hao; Schuch, Norbert; Cirac, J Ignacio

    2015-03-13

    We show that projected entangled-pair states (PEPS) can describe chiral topologically ordered phases. For that, we construct a simple PEPS for spin-1/2 particles in a two-dimensional lattice. We reveal a symmetry in the local projector of the PEPS that gives rise to the global topological character. We also extract characteristic quantities of the edge conformal field theory using the bulk-boundary correspondence. PMID:25815954

  6. Composite Dirac Liquids: Parent States for Symmetric Surface Topological Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mross, David F.; Essin, Andrew; Alicea, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We introduce exotic gapless states—"composite Dirac liquids"—that can appear at a strongly interacting surface of a three-dimensional electronic topological insulator. Composite Dirac liquids exhibit a gap to all charge excitations but nevertheless feature a single massless Dirac cone built from emergent electrically neutral fermions. These states thus comprise electrical insulators that, interestingly, retain thermal properties similar to those of the noninteracting topological insulator surface. A variety of novel fully gapped phases naturally descend from composite Dirac liquids. Most remarkably, we show that gapping the neutral fermions via Cooper pairing—which crucially does not violate charge conservation—yields symmetric non-Abelian topologically ordered surface phases captured in several recent works. Other (Abelian) topological orders emerge upon alternatively gapping the neutral Dirac cone with magnetism. We establish a hierarchical relationship between these descendant phases and expose an appealing connection to paired states of composite Fermi liquids arising in the half filled Landau level of two-dimensional electron gases. To controllably access these states we exploit a quasi-1D deformation of the original electronic Dirac cone that enables us to analytically address the fate of the strongly interacting surface. The algorithm we develop applies quite broadly and further allows the construction of symmetric surface topological orders for recently introduced bosonic topological insulators.

  7. The Conductance of Nanotubes Deformed by the AFM Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anantram, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The conductance drop under AFM-tip deformation can be explained by stretching of the tube length. NT sensors can be built utilizing uniform stretching. Single sp3 bond cross section cannot block electrons, because another conducting path may exist. AFM tip which forms sp3 bonds with the tube will decrease conductance. In the "table experiment" a conductance drop of 2 orders of magnitude happened only after some bonds were broken.

  8. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  9. Quadratic Reciprocity and the Group Orders of Particle States

    SciTech Connect

    DAI,YANG; BORISOV,ALEXEY B.; LONGWORTH,JAMES W.; BOYER,KEITH; RHODES,CHARLES K.

    2001-06-01

    The construction of inverse states in a finite field F{sub P{sub P{alpha}}} enables the organization of the mass scale by associating particle states with residue class designations. With the assumption of perfect flatness ({Omega}total = 1.0), this approach leads to the derivation of a cosmic seesaw congruence which unifies the concepts of space and mass. The law of quadratic reciprocity profoundly constrains the subgroup structure of the multiplicative group of units F{sub P{sub {alpha}}}* defined by the field. Four specific outcomes of this organization are (1) a reduction in the computational complexity of the mass state distribution by a factor of {approximately}10{sup 30}, (2) the extension of the genetic divisor concept to the classification of subgroup orders, (3) the derivation of a simple numerical test for any prospective mass number based on the order of the integer, and (4) the identification of direct biological analogies to taxonomy and regulatory networks characteristic of cellular metabolism, tumor suppression, immunology, and evolution. It is generally concluded that the organizing principle legislated by the alliance of quadratic reciprocity with the cosmic seesaw creates a universal optimized structure that functions in the regulation of a broad range of complex phenomena.

  10. Growing scheme for topologically ordered states in interacting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letscher, Fabian; Grusdt, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We present a protocol for growing states with topological order in interacting many-body systems. The basic ingredients are explained using the superlattice Bose-Hubbard model as a simple toy model. Firstly, a topologically protected Thouless pump is used to create a local quasi-hole excitation. Secondly, a coherent pump refills the quasi-hole excitation with a single particle by making use of a blockade mechanism due to the repulsive interaction between the particles. In finite systems with dispersive bands, we discuss extensions to the protocol to maintain a high efficiency. The scheme can be used to grow the highly correlated Laughlin state in the fractional quantum Hall effect. We use an effective model based on the composite fermion description to simulate large lattice systems with many particles.

  11. Chiral projected entangled-pair state with topological order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuo; Wahl, Thorsten; Tu, Hong-Hao; Schuch, Norbert; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    We show that projected entangled-pair states (PEPS) can describe chiral topologically ordered phases. For that, we construct a simple PEPS for spin-1/2 particles in a two-dimensional lattice. We reveal a symmetry in the local projector of the PEPS that gives rise to the global topological character. We also extract characteristic quantities of the edge conformal field theory using the bulk-boundary correspondence. EU projects SIQS and QALGO, the Alexander von Humboldt foundation, the Government of Canada through Industry Canada, and the Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Economic Development & Innovation.

  12. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  13. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Jamming in Disordered and Ordered States: From RLP to FCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbert, Leonardo

    2011-03-01

    The concept of jamming was originally introduced in the context of zero-temperature, frictionless sphere packings through which the jamming transition was identified with the more familiar idea of random close packing. More recently, the jamming behaviour for particles with friction has led to a practical definition of the less well-defined random loose packed limit. However, there are a number of subtleties associated with jamming that extend these concepts further. Here we implement a range of protocols to generate jammed packings both with and without friction, and find that the jamming transition actually consists of a finite region in packing fraction depending on the protocol used to create the jammed state. Furthermore, we examine how it is possible to tune the structural properties of jammed packings from the disordered regime through to the ordered face centred cubic lattice, and the subsequent changes in the jamming properties as the structure is manipulated. Supported by NSF CBET-0828359.

  15. Fourth-Order Vibrational Transition State Theory and Chemical Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, John F.; Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.

    2015-06-01

    Second-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT2) is an enormously successful and well-established theory for treating anharmonic effects on the vibrational levels of semi-rigid molecules. Partially as a consequence of the fact that the theory is exact for the Morse potential (which provides an appropriate qualitative model for stretching anharmonicity), VPT2 calculations for such systems with appropriate ab initio potential functions tend to give fundamental and overtone levels that fall within a handful of wavenumbers of experimentally measured positions. As a consequence, the next non-vanishing level of perturbation theory -- VPT4 -- offers only slight improvements over VPT2 and is not practical for most calculations since it requires information about force constants up through sextic. However, VPT4 (as well as VPT2) can be used for other applications such as the next vibrational correction to rotational constants (the ``gammas'') and other spectroscopic parameters. In addition, the marriage of VPT with the semi-classical transition state theory of Miller (SCTST) has recently proven to be a powerful and accurate treatment for chemical kinetics. In this talk, VPT4-based SCTST tunneling probabilities and cumulative reaction probabilities are give for the first time for selected low-dimensional model systems. The prospects for VPT4, both practical and intrinsic, will also be discussed.

  16. Recrystallized S-layer protein of a probiotic Propionibacterium: structural and nanomechanical changes upon temperature or pH shifts probed by solid-state NMR and AFM.

    PubMed

    de sa Peixoto, Paulo; Roiland, Claire; Thomas, Daniel; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Le Guellec, Rozenn; Parayre, Sandrine; Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Jan, Gwénaël; Guyomarc'h, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein layers (S layers) are common constituents of the bacterial cell wall and originate from the assembly of strain-dependent surface layer proteins (Slps). These proteins are thought to play important roles in the bacteria's biology and to have very promising technological applications as biomaterials or as part of cell-host cross-talk in probiotic mechanism. The SlpA from Propionibacterium freudenreichii PFCIRM 118 strain was isolated and recrystallized to investigate organization and assembly of the protein using atomic force microscopy and solid-state (1)H and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance. SlpA was found to form hexagonal p1 monolayer lattices where the protein exhibited high proportions of disordered regions and of bound water. The lattice structure was maintained, but softened, upon mild heating or acidification, probably in relation with the increasing mobilities of the disordered protein regions. These results gave structural insights on the mobile protein regions exposed by S layer films, upon physiologically relevant changes of their environmental conditions. PMID:25479375

  17. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  18. Improvement in metrology on new 3D-AFM platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Ingo; Osborn, Marc; Hand, Sean; Chen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    According to the 2007 edition of the ITRS roadmap, the requirement for CD uniformity of isolated lines on a binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 2.1nm (3σ) in 2008 and requires improvement to1.3 nm (3σ) in 2010. In order to meet the increasing demand for CD uniformity on photo masks, improved CD metrology is required. A next generation AFM, InSightTM 3DAFM, has been developed to meet these increased requirements for advanced photo mask metrology. The new system achieves 2X improvement in CD and depth precision on advanced photo masks features over the previous generation 3D-AFM. This paper provides measurement data including depth, CD, and sidewall angle metrology. In addition the unique capabilities of damage-free defect inspection and Nanoimprint characterization by 3D AFM are presented.

  19. Children's Understanding of Second-Order Mental States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    The most popular topic in theory-of-mind research has been first-order false belief: the realization that it is possible to hold false beliefs about events in the world. A more advanced development is second-order false belief: the realization that it is possible to hold a false belief about someone else's belief. This article reviews research…

  20. An Invariant of Topologically Ordered States Under Local Unitary Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haah, Jeongwan

    2016-03-01

    For an anyon model in two spatial dimensions described by a modular tensor category, the topological S-matrix encodes the mutual braiding statistics, the quantum dimensions, and the fusion rules of anyons. It is nontrivial whether one can compute the S-matrix from a single ground state wave function. Here, we define a class of Hamiltonians consisting of local commuting projectors and an associated matrix that is invariant under local unitary transformations. We argue that the invariant is equivalent to the topological S-matrix. The definition does not require degeneracy of the ground state. We prove that the invariant depends on the state only, in the sense that it can be computed by any Hamiltonian in the class of which the state is a ground state. As a corollary, we prove that any local quantum circuit that connects two ground states of quantum double models (discrete gauge theories) with non-isomorphic abelian groups must have depth that is at least linear in the system's diameter. As a tool for the proof, a manifestly Hamiltonian-independent notion of locally invisible operators is introduced. This gives a sufficient condition for a many-body state not to be generated from a product state by any small depth quantum circuit; this is a many-body entanglement witness.

  1. Controlling Molecular Ordering in Solution-State Conjugated Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiahua; Han, Youngkyu; Kumar, Rajeev; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-07-17

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in solution of conjugated polymers holds great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.

  2. Unbinding of Giant Vortices in States of Competing Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, J. M.; Carr, S. T.; Hooley, C. A.; Schmalian, J.

    2012-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional system with two order parameters, one with O(2) symmetry and one with O(M), near a point in parameter space where they couple to become a single O(2+M) order. While the O(2) sector supports vortex excitations, these vortices must somehow disappear as the high symmetry point is approached. We develop a variational argument which shows that the size of the vortex cores diverges as 1/Δ and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature of the O(2) order vanishes as 1/ln⁡(1/Δ), where Δ denotes the distance from the high-symmetry point. Our physical picture is confirmed by a renormalization group analysis which gives further logarithmic corrections, and demonstrates full symmetry restoration within the cores.

  3. Controlling molecular ordering in solution-state conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Han, Y.; Kumar, R.; He, Y.; Hong, K.; Bonnesen, P. V.; Sumpter, B. G.; Smith, S. C.; Smith, G. S.; Ivanov, I. N.; Do, C.

    2015-09-01

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in a solution of conjugated polymers hold great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with the desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in a solution of conjugated polymers hold great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with the desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution, we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering

  4. Controlling Molecular Ordering in Solution-State Conjugated Polymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Jiahua; Han, Youngkyu; Kumar, Rajeev; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Do, Changwoo

    2015-07-17

    Rationally encoding molecular interactions that can control the assembly structure and functional expression in solution of conjugated polymers holds great potential for enabling optimal organic optoelectronic and sensory materials. In this work, we show that thermally-controlled and surfactant-guided assembly of water-soluble conjugated polymers in aqueous solution is a simple and effective strategy to generate optoelectronic materials with desired molecular ordering. We have studied a conjugated polymer consisting of a hydrophobic thiophene backbone and hydrophilic, thermo-responsive ethylene oxide side groups, which shows a step-wise, multi-dimensional assembly in water. By incorporating the polymer into phase-segregated domains of an amphiphilic surfactant in solution,more » we demonstrate that both chain conformation and degree of molecular ordering of the conjugated polymer can be tuned in hexagonal, micellar and lamellar phases of the surfactant solution. The controlled molecular ordering in conjugated polymer assembly is demonstrated as a key factor determining the electronic interaction and optical function.« less

  5. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  6. Local suppression of the hidden-order phase by impurities in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzoli, Maria E.; Graf, Matthias J.; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-06-01

    We consider the effects of impurities on the enigmatic hidden order (HO) state of the heavy-fermion material URu2Si2. In particular, we focus on local effects of Rh impurities as a tool to probe the suppression of the HO state. To study local properties, we introduce a lattice free energy, where the time invariant HO order parameter Ψ and local antiferromagnetic (AFM) order parameter M are competing orders. Near each Rh atom, the HO order parameter is suppressed, creating a hole in which local AFM order emerges as a result of competition. These local holes are created in the fabric of the HO state like in a Swiss cheese and “filled” with droplets of AFM order. We compare our analysis with recent NMR results on U(RhxRu1-x)2Si2 and find good agreement with the data.

  7. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  8. Brane parity orders in the insulating state of Hubbard ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degli Esposti Boschi, Cristian; Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The Mott insulating state of the Hubbard model at half filling could be depicted as a spin liquid of singly occupied sites with holon-doublon quantum fluctuations localized in pairs. In one dimension the behavior is captured by a finite value of the charge parity string correlator, which fails to remain finite when generalized to higher dimensions. We recover a definition of parity brane correlator which may remain nonvanishing in the presence of interchain coupling, by assigning an appropriate fractional phase to the parity breaking fluctuations. In the case of Hubbard ladders at half filling, we find that the charge parity brane is nonzero at any repulsive value of interaction. The spin-parity brane instead becomes nonvanishing in the even-leg case, in correspondence to the onset of the spin gapped D-Mott phase, which is absent in the odd-leg case. The behavior of the parity correlators is also analyzed by means of a numerical DMRG analysis of the one- and two-leg ladder.

  9. 27 CFR 478.96 - Out-of-State and mail order sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is presumed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, to have had actual knowledge of the State... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Out-of-State and mail order... Conduct of Business § 478.96 Out-of-State and mail order sales. (a) The provisions of this section...

  10. 27 CFR 478.96 - Out-of-State and mail order sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... is presumed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, to have had actual knowledge of the State... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Out-of-State and mail order... Conduct of Business § 478.96 Out-of-State and mail order sales. (a) The provisions of this section...

  11. Even and Odd Charge Coherent States: Higher-Order Nonclassical Properties and Generation Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Truong Minh; Dinh, Dang Huu; Dat, Tran Quang

    2016-06-01

    We examine the higher-order nonclassical properties of the even and odd charge coherent states as well as proposing a scheme to generate these states whose modes can freely travel in open space. We show that the even and odd charge coherent states exhibit both higher-order antibunching and higher-order squeezing. While the two-mode higher-order antibunching occurs in any order and essentially depends on the charge number, the two-mode higher-order squeezing appears only in the even orders. We also prove that these states are genuinely entangled, and they can be generated by means of cross-Kerr media, beam splitters, phase shifts and threshold detectors. We find that the fidelity and the corresponding success probability to generate these states are dependent on the correlative parameters.

  12. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  13. Magnetic order driven by orbital ordering in the semiconducting KFe1.5Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing; Yao, Dao-Xin

    2016-04-01

    The two-orbital Hubbard model is studied numerically by using the Hartree-Fock approximation in both real space and momentum space, and the ground-state properties of the alkali metal iron selenide semiconducting KFe1.5Se2 are investigated. A rhombus-type Fe vacancy order with stripetype antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is found, as was observed in neutron scattering experiments [J. Zhao, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 267003 (2012)]. Hopping parameters are obtained by fitting the experimentally observed stripe AFM phase in real space. These hopping parameters are then used to study the ground-state properties of the semiconductor in momentum space. It is found to be a strongly correlated system with a large on-site Coulomb repulsion U, similar to the AFM Mott insulator — the parent compound of copper oxide superconductors. We also find that the electronic occupation numbers and magnetizations in the d xz and d yz orbitals become different simultaneously when U > U c (˜3.4 eV), indicating orbital ordering. These results imply that the rotational symmetry between the two orbitals is broken by orbital ordering and thus drives the strong anisotropy of the magnetic coupling that has been observed by experiments and that the stripe-type AFM order in this compound may be caused by orbital ordering together with the observed large anisotropy.

  14. Numerology, hydrogenic levels, and the ordering of excited states in one-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Lloyd, Jr.

    1982-03-01

    We show that the observed ordering of Rydberg states of one-electron atoms can be understood by assuming that these states are basically hydrogenic in nature. Much of the confusion concerning this point is shown to arise from the failure to differentiate between hydrogenic ordering as the nuclear charge approaches infinity, and hydrogenic ordering for an effective charge of one. The origin of κ ordering of Rydberg levels suggested by Sternheimer is considered within this picture, and the predictions of κ ordering are compared with those obtained by assuming hydrogenic ordering.

  15. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  16. Tuning the resonance of a photonic crystal microcavity with an AFM probe.

    PubMed

    Märki, Iwan; Salt, Martin; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2006-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results on switching and tuning of a two-dimensional photonic crystal resonant microcavity by means of a silicon AFM tip, probing the highly localized optical field in the vicinity of the cavity. On-off switching and modulation of the transmission signal in the kHz range is achieved by bringing an AFM tip onto the center of the microcavity, inducing a damping effect on the transmission resonance. Tuning of the resonant wavelength in the order of several nanometers becomes possible by inserting the AFM tip into one of the holes of the Bragg mirror forming the microcavity in the propagation direction. PMID:19516436

  17. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  18. Temporal second-order coherence function for displaced-squeezed thermal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the quantum mechanical, temporal second-order coherence function for a single-mode, degenerate parametric amplifier for a system in the Gaussian state, viz. a displaced-squeezed thermal state. The calculation involves first dynamical generation at time t of the Gaussian state from an initial thermal state and subsequent measurements of two photons a time ? apart. The generation of the Gaussian state by the parametric amplifier insures that the temporal second-order coherence function depends only on ?, via ?, for the given Gaussian state parameters, Gaussian state preparation time t, and average number ? of thermal photons. It is interesting that the time evolution for displaced thermal states shows a power decay in ? rather than an exponential one as is the case for general, displaced-squeezed thermal states.

  19. 27 CFR 478.96 - Out-of-State and mail order sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... is presumed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, to have had actual knowledge of the State... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Out-of-State and mail... Conduct of Business § 478.96 Out-of-State and mail order sales. (a) The provisions of this section...

  20. 27 CFR 478.96 - Out-of-State and mail order sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is presumed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, to have had actual knowledge of the State... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Out-of-State and mail... Conduct of Business § 478.96 Out-of-State and mail order sales. (a) The provisions of this section...

  1. 27 CFR 478.96 - Out-of-State and mail order sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is presumed, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, to have had actual knowledge of the State... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Out-of-State and mail... Conduct of Business § 478.96 Out-of-State and mail order sales. (a) The provisions of this section...

  2. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-10-03

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis.

  3. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  4. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  5. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  6. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  7. 78 FR 77368 - Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Amendment to Primary Peanut-Producing States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1216 Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Amendment to... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeanette Palmer, Marketing Specialist, Promotion and Economics Division... FR 39214; July 9, 2008). However, the Order does not require that a State produce 10,000 tons...

  8. AFM/CLSM data visualization and comparison using an open-source toolkit.

    PubMed

    Rajwa, Bartek; McNally, Helen A; Varadharajan, Padma; Sturgis, Jennifer; Robinson, J Paul

    2004-06-01

    There is a vast difference in the traditional presentation of AFM data and confocal data. AFM data are presented as surface contours while confocal data are usually visualized using either surface- or volume-rendering techniques. Finding a common meaningful visualization platform is not an easy task. AFM and CLSM technologies are complementary and are more frequently being used to image common biological systems. In order to provide a presentation method that would assist us in evaluating cellular morphology, we propose a simple visualization strategy that is comparative, intuitive, and operates within an open-source environment of ImageJ, SurfaceJ, and VolumeJ applications. In order to find some common ground for AFM-CLSM image comparison, we have developed a plug-in for ImageJ, which allows us to import proprietary image data sets into this application. We propose to represent both AFM and CLSM image data sets as shaded elevation maps with color-coded height. This simple technique utilizes the open source VolumeJ and SurfaceJ plug-ins. To provide an example of this visualization technique, we evaluated the three-dimensional architecture of living chick dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia measured independently with AFM and CLSM. PMID:15352089

  9. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  10. A Batch Fabricated SECM-AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. S.; Macpherson, J. V.; Holder, M.; Weaver, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A scheme for the fabrication of combined Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy — Atomic Force Microscopy (SECM-AFM) probes is presented for both silicon nitride and silicon cantilevers. The advantages over exsisting methods used for their production is explained. The process flow is described and initial results from electrodeposition of silver are presented.

  11. Research report: Summary of key state issues of FERC orders 888 and 889

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.; Burns, R.E.; Graniere, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 888 is perhaps the most important and far reaching FERC electricity order in decades. The consequences on the structure of the industry and how the industry is regulated are significant departures from past methods and regulatory philosophy. This will undoubtedly have a dramatic impact on the manner in which state public utility commissions, which are also undergoing or considering dramatic change, regulate their jurisdictional electric utilities. This report summarizes and discusses the actions that the FERC is taking and their profound repercussions on the industry and state commissions. The report is not a comprehensive summary of the entire order. Rather, it is intended to highlight the order`s more important features and discuss what this could mean for the states. The report is organized into eight sections; the first seven address Order 888 and the last section (section 8) addresses Order 889. Section 1 through 5 summarize and discuss the main features of Order 888. Section 6 (on jurisdiction) and Section 7 (on property rights) interpret the likely consequences of the order. Section 8, summarizes the FERC`s Open Access Same Time System (OASIS) and discusses some concerns about its real-world application.

  12. Robustness of reduced-order multivariable state-space self-tuning controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zhuzhi; Chen, Zengqiang

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we present a quantitative analysis of the robustness of a reduced-order pole-assignment state-space self-tuning controller for a multivariable adaptive control system whose order of the real process is higher than that of the model used in the controller design. The result of stability analysis shows that, under a specific bounded modelling error, the adaptively controlled closed-loop real system via the reduced-order state-space self-tuner is BIBO stable in the presence of unmodelled dynamics.

  13. State space orderings for Gauss-Seidel in Markov chains revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Dayar, T.

    1996-12-31

    Symmetric state space orderings of a Markov chain may be used to reduce the magnitude of the subdominant eigenvalue of the (Gauss-Seidel) iteration matrix. Orderings that maximize the elemental mass or the number of nonzero elements in the dominant term of the Gauss-Seidel splitting (that is, the term approximating the coefficient matrix) do not necessarily converge faster. An ordering of a Markov chain that satisfies Property-R is semi-convergent. On the other hand, there are semi-convergent symmetric state space orderings that do not satisfy Property-R. For a given ordering, a simple approach for checking Property-R is shown. An algorithm that orders the states of a Markov chain so as to increase the likelihood of satisfying Property-R is presented. The computational complexity of the ordering algorithm is less than that of a single Gauss-Seidel iteration (for sparse matrices). In doing all this, the aim is to gain an insight for faster converging orderings. Results from a variety of applications improve the confidence in the algorithm.

  14. Formation of Gapless Fermi Arcs and Fingerprints of Order in the Pseudogap State of Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Palczewski, Ari D.; Hamaya, Yoichiro; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Wen, J. S.; Gu, Genda; Kaminski, Adam

    2013-10-11

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and a new quantitative approach based on the partial density of states to study properties of seemingly disconnected portions of the Fermi surface (FS) that are present in the pseudogap state of cuprates called Fermi arcs. We find that the normal state FS collapses very abruptly into Fermi arcs at the pseudogap temperature (T∗). Surprisingly, the length of the Fermi arcs remains constant over an extended temperature range between T∗ and Tpair, consistent with the presence of an ordered state below T∗. These arcs collapse again at the temperature below which pair formation occurs (Tpair) either to a point or a very short arc, whose length is limited by our experimental resolution. The tips of the arcs span between points defining a set of wave vectors in momentum space, which are the fingerprints of the ordered state that causes the pseudogap.

  15. Formation of Gapless Fermi Arcs and Fingerprints of Order in the Pseudogap State of Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Palczewski, Ari; Hamaya, Yoichiro; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, Genda; Kaminski, Adam

    2013-10-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and a new quantitative approach based on the partial density of states to study properties of seemingly disconnected portions of the Fermi surface (FS) that are present in the pseudogap state of cuprates called Fermi arcs. We find that the normal state FS collapses very abruptly into Fermi arcs at the pseudogap temperature (T*). Surprisingly, the length of the Fermi arcs remains constant over an extended temperature range between (T*) and Tpair, consistent with the presence of an ordered state below T*. These arcs collapse again at the temperature below which pair formation occurs (Tpair) either to a point or a very short arc, whose length is limited by our experimental resolution. The tips of the arcs span between points defining a set of wave vectors in momentum space, which are the fingerprints of the ordered state that causes the pseudogap.

  16. Open-shell nuclei and excited states from multireference normal-ordered Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrerufael, Eskendr; Calci, Angelo; Roth, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the approximate inclusion of three-nucleon (3 N ) interactions into ab initio nuclear structure calculations using a multireference formulation of normal ordering and Wick's theorem. Following the successful application of single-reference normal ordering for the study of ground states of closed-shell nuclei, e.g., in coupled-cluster theory, multireference normal ordering opens a path to open-shell nuclei and excited states. Based on different multideterminantal reference states we benchmark the truncation of the normal-ordered Hamiltonian at the two-body level in no-core shell-model calculations for p -shell nuclei, including 6Li,12C, and 10B. We find that this multireference normal-ordered two-body approximation is able to capture the effects of the 3 N interaction with sufficient accuracy, both for ground-state and excitation energies, at the computational cost of a two-body Hamiltonian. It is robust with respect to the choice of reference states and has a multitude of applications in ab initio nuclear structure calculations of open-shell nuclei and their excitations as well as in nuclear reaction studies.

  17. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  18. Membrane-based actuation for high-speed single molecule force spectroscopy studies using AFM.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Krishna; Torun, Hamdi; Finkler, Ofer; Zhu, Cheng; Degertekin, Levent

    2010-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based dynamic force spectroscopy of single molecular interactions involves characterizing unbinding/unfolding force distributions over a range of pulling speeds. Owing to their size and stiffness, AFM cantilevers are adversely affected by hydrodynamic forces, especially at pulling speeds >10 microm/s, when the viscous drag becomes comparable to the unbinding/unfolding forces. To circumvent these adverse effects, we have fabricated polymer-based membranes capable of actuating commercial AFM cantilevers at speeds >or=100 microm/s with minimal viscous drag effects. We have used FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to simulate high-speed pulling and fast actuation of AFM cantilevers and membranes in different experimental configurations. The simulation results support the experimental findings on a variety of commercial AFM cantilevers and predict significant reduction in drag forces when membrane actuators are used. Unbinding force experiments involving human antibodies using these membranes demonstrate that it is possible to achieve bond loading rates >or=10(6) pN/s, an order of magnitude greater than that reported with commercial AFM cantilevers and systems. PMID:20054686

  19. Tunable negative thermal expansion related with the gradual evolution of antiferromagnetic ordering in antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag{sub 1−x}NMn{sub 3+x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J. C.; Tong, P. Lin, S.; Wang, B. S.; Song, W. H.; Tong, W.; Zou, Y. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-02-23

    The thermal expansion and magnetic properties of antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag{sub 1−x}NMn{sub 3+x} were reported. The substitution of Mn for Ag effectively broadens the temperature range of negative thermal expansion and drives it to cryogenic temperatures. As x increases, the paramagnetic (PM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition temperature decreases. At x ∼ 0.2, the PM-AFM transition overlaps with the AFM to glass-like state transition. Above x = 0.2, two new distinct magnetic transitions were observed: One occurs above room temperature from PM to ferromagnetic (FM), and the other one evolves at a lower temperature (T{sup *}) below which both AFM and FM orderings are involved. Further, electron spin resonance measurement suggests that the broadened volume change near T{sup *} is closely related with the evolution of Γ{sup 5g} AFM ordering.

  20. Tunable negative thermal expansion related with the gradual evolution of antiferromagnetic ordering in antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag1-xNMn3+x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. C.; Tong, P.; Tong, W.; Lin, S.; Wang, B. S.; Song, W. H.; Zou, Y. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal expansion and magnetic properties of antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag1-xNMn3+x were reported. The substitution of Mn for Ag effectively broadens the temperature range of negative thermal expansion and drives it to cryogenic temperatures. As x increases, the paramagnetic (PM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition temperature decreases. At x ˜ 0.2, the PM-AFM transition overlaps with the AFM to glass-like state transition. Above x = 0.2, two new distinct magnetic transitions were observed: One occurs above room temperature from PM to ferromagnetic (FM), and the other one evolves at a lower temperature (T*) below which both AFM and FM orderings are involved. Further, electron spin resonance measurement suggests that the broadened volume change near T* is closely related with the evolution of Γ5g AFM ordering.

  1. A sub-50 nm three-step height sample for AFM calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuming; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a sub-50 nm three-step height sample was made for vertical calibration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a new step height evaluation algorithm based on polynomial fitting is discussed. The influences of AFM artefacts such as particles, image bow and high-order errors on step height were studied. The experimental results showed that the polynomial order p2 and threshold t were not critical factors. However, the increment Δh and the polynomial order p used in the calculation of optimal shifting distance were important and must be carefully considered. Δh = 0.1 nm and p ≥ 4 were determined to get a stable step height. The sample had small roughness and good uniformity. It has the potential to serve as a high quality step height standard sample for AFM calibration.

  2. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in the interacting boson model: Spectral characteristics of 0+ states and effective order parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zuo, Yan; Pan, Feng; Draayer, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    The spectral characteristics of the Lπ=0+ excited states in the interacting boson model are systematically investigated. It is found that various types of excited-state quantum phase transitions may widely occur in the model as functions of the excitation energy, which indicates that the phase diagram of the interacting boson model can be dynamically extended along the direction of the excitation energy. It has also been justified that the d -boson occupation probability ρ (E ) is qualified to be taken as the effective order parameter to identify these excited-state quantum phase transitions. In addition, the underlying relation between the excite-state quantum phase transition and the chaotic dynamics is also stated.

  3. Probing the antiferromagnetic long-range order with Glauber spin states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Guillermo G.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the ground state of low-dimensional antiferromagnets deviates from Neel states due to strong quantum fluctuations. Even in the presence of long-range order, those fluctuations produce a substantial reduction of the magnetic moment from its saturation value. Numerical simulations in anisotropic antiferromagnetic chains suggest that quantum fluctuations over Neel order appear in the form of localized reversal of pairs of neighboring spins. In this paper, we propose a coherent state representation for the ground state to describe the above situation. In the one-dimensional case, our wave function corresponds to a two-mode Glauber state, when the Neel state is used as a reference, while the boson fields are associated to coherent flip of spin pairs. The coherence manifests itself through the antiferromagnetic long-range order that survives the action of quantum fluctuations. The present representation is different from the standard zero-point spin wave state, and is asymptotically exact in the limit of strong anisotropy. The fermionic version of the theory, obtained through the Jordan-Wigner transformation, is also investigated.

  4. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  5. Spin glass-like state, charge ordering, phase diagram and positive entropy change in Nd 0.5-xPr xSr 0.5MnO 3 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, N.; Tho, N. D.; Luong, N. H.; Giang, B. H.; Cong, B. T.

    2006-08-01

    The mixed rare earth manganites Nd 0.5-xPr xSr 0.5MnO 3 ( x=0.1-0.5) have been prepared using solid state reaction technique. All samples are of single phase with orthorhombic structure. The microstructure of the samples was determined by SEM. The field-cooled (FC) and zero-field-cooled (ZFC) curves showed that samples with x⩾0.25 exhibit the spin glass-like state at low field and low temperatures, whereas, in the samples with x<0.25, there is the charge ordering (coexisting with FM-AFM transition) established at low temperatures. The Curie temperature of the samples increases with increasing Pr content due to increase of < rA>. Interesting feature is that at the FM-AFM transition region, the magnetic entropy change has positive value, in contrary to that at FM-PM transition region. The electrical property of the samples from 10 K to room temperature is examined in detail.

  6. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results. PMID:26922493

  7. Charge-ordering cascade with spin-orbit Mott dimer states in metallic iridium ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Ko, K-T; Lee, H-H; Kim, D-H; Yang, J-J; Cheong, S-W; Eom, M J; Kim, J S; Gammag, R; Kim, K-S; Kim, H-S; Kim, T-H; Yeom, H-W; Koo, T-Y; Kim, H-D; Park, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Spin-orbit coupling results in technologically-crucial phenomena underlying magnetic devices like magnetic memories and energy-efficient motors. In heavy element materials, the strength of spin-orbit coupling becomes large to affect the overall electronic nature and induces novel states such as topological insulators and spin-orbit-integrated Mott states. Here we report an unprecedented charge-ordering cascade in IrTe2 without the loss of metallicity, which involves localized spin-orbit Mott states with diamagnetic Ir(4+)-Ir(4+) dimers. The cascade in cooling, uncompensated in heating, consists of first order-type consecutive transitions from a pure Ir(3+) phase to Ir(3+)-Ir(4+) charge-ordered phases, which originate from Ir 5d to Te 5p charge transfer involving anionic polymeric bond breaking. Considering that the system exhibits superconductivity with suppression of the charge order by doping, analogously to cuprates, these results provide a new electronic paradigm of localized charge-ordered states interacting with itinerant electrons through large spin-orbit coupling. PMID:26059464

  8. Study of higher order non-classical properties of squeezed Kerr state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Devendra Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Recently, Prakash and Mishra [J. Phys. B: at. Mol. Opt. Phys., 39, 2291(2006); 40, 2531(2007)] have studied higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistic conditions for non-classicality in the form of general inequalities for expectation values of products of arbitrary powers of photon number and of photon-number fluctuation. It is, therefore, vital to study the generation of these higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistics (phase-insensitive behavior) in a physically realizable medium and their relations to higher order squeezing (phase-sensitive behavior). In the present paper, we study higher order non-classical properties, such as Hong and Mandel squeezing, amplitude-squared squeezing and higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistics, of squeezed Kerr state which is generated by squeezing the output of a Kerr medium whose input is coherent light. Such states can be realized if laser light is sent through an optical fiber and then into a degenerate parametric amplifier. It is established that the squeezed Kerr state can exhibit higher order non-classical properties.

  9. Finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xing-Hui; Zhang, Kemei

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems. Based on the stochastic Lyapunov theorem on finite-time stability, by using the homogeneous domination method, the adding one power integrator and sign function method, constructing a ? Lyapunov function and verifying the existence and uniqueness of solution, a continuous state feedback controller is designed to guarantee the closed-loop system finite-time stable in probability.

  10. On the existence of touch points for first-order state inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seywald, Hans; Cliff, Eugene M.

    1993-01-01

    The appearance of touch points in state constrained optimal control problems with general vector-valued control is studied. Under the assumption that the Hamiltonian is regular, touch points for first-order state inequalities are shown to exist only under very special conditions. In many cases of practical importance these conditions can be used to exclude touch points a priori without solving an optimal control problem. The results are demonstrated on a simple example.

  11. Quasi-Long-Range Order and Vortex Lattice in the Three-State Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Soumyadeep; Ray, Purusattam

    2016-03-01

    We show that the order-disorder phase transition in the three-state Potts ferromagnet on a square lattice is driven by a coupled proliferation of domain walls and vortices. Raising the vortex core energy above a threshold value decouples the proliferation and splits the transition into two. The phase between the two transitions exhibits an emergent U(1) symmetry and quasi-long-range order. Lowering the core energy below a threshold value also splits the order-disorder transition but the system forms a vortex lattice in the intermediate phase.

  12. Critical competition between two distinct orbital-spin ordered states in perovskite vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, J.; Yasue, T.; Miyasaka, S.; Yamasaki, Y.; Arima, T.; Sagayama, H.; Inami, T.; Ishii, K.; Tokura, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the spin/orbital phase diagram in the perovskite orthovanadate RVO3 ( R=Eu , Y, Dy, and Ho) by measurements of magnetization, dielectric constant, specific heat, Raman scattering spectra, and x-ray diffraction, focusing on the interplay between the V3d spin and the 4f moment of the R ion. The thermally induced phase transition between the C-type spin/G-type orbital ordered state and the G-type spin/C-type orbital ordered state is observed for Eu1-xYxVO3 (x=0-0.52) without 4f moment. By comparing this phase diagram with the spin/orbital ordering in TbVO3 , it is evident that the critical competition between the C-type spin/G-type orbital ordered phase and the G-type spin/C-type orbital ordered one depends not only on the GdFeO3 -type lattice distortion but also on the presence of the 4f moment of the R ion. The magnetic field induced phase transition of the spin/orbital ordering is achieved concomitantly with polarizing R4f moments for DyVO3 and HoVO3 . For DyVO3 , the G-type spin/C-type orbital ordered phase is switched to the C-type spin/G-type orbital ordered one by applying a moderate magnetic field around 3 T. By contrast, the G-type spin/C-type orbital ordering is rather favored under the magnetic field in HoVO3 . The results cannot be uniquely explained in terms of the exchange interaction between the V3d spin and the R -ion 4f moment. The coupling of the R4f moment polarization with the lattice distortion tied with the orbital ordering of the V3d sublattice may also be relevant to this field induced phase transition.

  13. Nematic antiferromagnetic states in bulk FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Xiang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The existence of nematic order, which breaks the lattice rotational symmetry with nonequivalent a and b axes in iron-based superconductors, is a well-established experimental fact. An antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition is accompanying this order, observed in nearly all parent compounds, except bulk FeSe. The absence of the AFM order in FeSe casts doubt on the magnetic mechanism of iron-based superconductivity, since the nematic order is believed to be driven by the same interaction that is responsible for the superconducting pairing in these materials. Here we show, through systematic first-principles electronic structure calculations, that the ground state of FeSe is in fact strongly AFM correlated but without developing a magnetic long-range order. Actually, there are a series of staggered n -mer AFM states with corresponding energies below that of the single stripe AFM state, which is the ground state for the parent compounds of most iron-based superconductors. Here, the staggered n -mer (n any integer >1 ) means a set of n adjacent parallel spins on a line along the b axis with antiparallel spins between n -mers along both a and b axes. Moreover, different n -mers can antiparallelly mix with each other to coexist. Among all the states, we find that the lowest energy states formed by the staggered dimer, staggered trimer, and their random antiparallel aligned spin states along the b axis are quasidegenerate. The thermal average of these states does not show any magnetic long-range order, but it does possess a hidden one-dimensional AFM order along the a axis, which can be detected by elastic neutron scattering measurements. Our finding gives a natural account for the absence of long-range magnetic order and suggests that the nematicity is driven predominantly by spin fluctuations even in bulk FeSe, providing a unified description on the phase diagram of iron-based superconductors.

  14. Second- and Higher-Order Virial Coefficients Derived from Equations of State for Real Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of the second- and higher-order virial coefficients for models of the gaseous state is demonstrated by employing a direct differential method and subsequent term-by-term comparison to power series expansions. This communication demonstrates the application of this technique to van der Waals representations of virial coefficients.…

  15. 50 CFR 21.54 - Control order for muscovy ducks in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.54 Control order for muscovy ducks in the United States. (a... adversely affect other migratory birds or species designated as endangered or threatened under the...

  16. 50 CFR 21.54 - Control order for muscovy ducks in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.54 Control order for muscovy ducks in the United States. (a... adversely affect other migratory birds or species designated as endangered or threatened under the...

  17. States Resist Meeting K-12 Spending Levels Ordered by the Courts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Kansas, Montana, and New York are the states currently under orders from their highest courts to fix their school finance systems. In Kansas, House and Senate leaders have agreed to a plan that would increase per-pupil funding for at-risk, bilingual, and special education students. It would also create a $20 million program to help districts…

  18. The Status of Plain Language Legislation in the Fifty States and President Carter's Executive Order 12044.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan, Lina

    A study was conducted to examine plain language legislation in the 50 states and to evaluate the progress made in simplifying government regulations as a result of President Carter's executive order mandating the use of clear language in regulations. In the first part of the study, laws and bills relating to plain language in consumer contracts…

  19. Thermal ground-state ordering and elementary excitations in artificial magnetic square ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason P.; Stein, Aaron; Langridge, Sean; Marrows, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology allow model systems to be constructed, in which frustrated interactions can be tuned at will, such as artificial spin ice. The symmetry of the square ice lattice leads to the emergence of a long-range-ordered ground state from the manifold of frustrated states. However, it is experimentally very difficult to access using the effective thermodynamics of rotating-field demagnetization protocols, because the energy barriers to thermal equilibrium are extremely large. Here we study an as-fabricated sample that approaches the ground state very closely. We identify the small localized departures from the ground state as elementary excitations of the system, at frequencies that follow a Boltzmann law. We therefore identify the state we observe as the frozen-in residue of true thermodynamics that occurred during the fabrication of the sample. The relative proportions of different excitations are suggestive of monopole interactions during thermalization.

  20. Variational Study of Magnetic Ordered State in d-p Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, S.; Yokoyama, H.

    Recent experimental studies argued that, if carefully annealed, electron-doped (n-type) cuprates become superconducting (SC) in non-doped as well as weakly doped samples, in marked contrast to the conventional recognition. This metallic (SC) behavior is not likely to be understood by means of the t-J or Hubbard models, because their ground states at half filling are insulating with antiferromagnetic (AF) orders, even for moderately frustrated cases. Thus, we systematically study a d-p model including in-plain oxygen-p and copper-d orbitals, using a variational Monte Carlo method with refined correlation factors. It is found that an AF order becomes robust as charge transfer gap Δ or coulomb interaction on Cu sites Ud becomes large. As O-to-O hopping integral t‧ becomes large, the AF ordered state tends to be unstable.

  1. Theory of the interplay between the superconductivity and the blocked antiferromagnetic order in A(y)Fe(2-x)Se2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong-Min

    2012-09-26

    Based on an effective two-orbital tight-binding model, we examine the possible superconducting states in iron-vacancy-ordered A(y)Fe(2-x)Se(2). In the presence of ordered vacancies and blocked antiferromagnetic order, it is shown that the emergent SC pairing is the nodeless next-nearest-neighbor (NNN)-pairing due to the dominant antiferromagnetic (AFM) interaction between the inter-block NNN sites. In particular, we show that due to the ordered vacancies and the associated blocked AFM order, the interplay between the superconducting and AFM states results in three distinct states in the phase diagram as doping is varied. The divergent experimental observations can be accounted for by considering the different charge carrier concentrations in their respective compounds. PMID:22945016

  2. On the optimal minimum order observer-based compensator and the limited state variable feedback controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorens-Ortiz, B.

    1976-01-01

    Four design problems are considered: two on the optimal minimum order observer-based compensator design and two on the optimal limited state variable feedback controller. The problem of designing an optimal discrete time linear time-invariant observer-based compensator for the regulation of an n dimensional linear discrete time time-invariant plant with m independent outputs is considered. This is a stochastic design problem to the extent that the initial plant state is assumed to be a random vector with known first and second order statistics. The compensator parameters are obtained by minimizing the expectation, with respect to the initial conditions, of the standard cost, quadratic in the state and control vectors with the inclusion of cross terms.

  3. Incipient charge order observed by NMR in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Mayaffre, Hadrien; Krämer, Steffen; Horvatić, Mladen; Berthier, Claude; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Julien, Marc-Henri

    2015-03-01

    The pseudogap regime of high-temperature cuprates harbours diverse manifestations of electronic ordering whose exact nature and universality remain debated. Here, we show that the short-ranged charge order recently reported in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy corresponds to a truly static modulation of the charge density. We also show that this modulation impacts on most electronic properties, that it appears jointly with intra-unit-cell nematic, but not magnetic, order, and that it exhibits differences with the charge density wave observed at lower temperatures in high magnetic fields. These observations prove mostly universal, they place new constraints on the origin of the charge density wave and they reveal that the charge modulation is pinned by native defects. Similarities with results in layered metals such as NbSe2, in which defects nucleate halos of incipient charge density wave at temperatures above the ordering transition, raise the possibility that order-parameter fluctuations, but no static order, would be observed in the normal state of most cuprates if disorder were absent.

  4. Berry's phase observed in the ordered state of Fe(Se,S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Shigeru; Yamashita, T.; Shimoyama, Y.; Watashige, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Béard, J.; Nardone, M.; Knafo, W.; Watson, M. D.; Davis, N. R.; Coldea, A. I.; Suzuki, M.; Arita, R.; Ikeda, H.; Shibauchi, T.

    Among iron-based superconductors, FeSe offers a unique platform in that it exhibits a nematically ordered phase without long-range magnetic ordering. Several experiments have shown that the low-temperature Fermi surface of FeSe consists only of very small, shallow pockets [1-3]. Tuning the ground state via isoelectronic chemical substitution provides an ideal way to solve the puzzles regarding the nematic ordering in this material. Here, by using ultra-high magnetic fields up to ~ 90 T, we report observations of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations in isoelectronically substituted Fe(Se,S). For the smallest pocket of ~ 0 . 2 % of the Brillouin-zone, we observe non-zero π Berry's phase shift in the SdH oscillations. Our results indicate presence of Dirac cone, which would be a key to understand the mechanism of the nematic ordering in this system.

  5. Dual AFM probes alignment based on vision guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-kun; Gao, Si-tian; Lu, Ming-zhen; Wang, Long-long

    2013-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) with dual probes that operate together can measure both side walls excellently at the same time, which virtually eliminates the prevalent effect of probe width that contributes a large component of uncertainty in measurement results and finally obtains the critical dimension (CD)(e.g. the linewidth) through data synthesis. In calibration process, the dual probes must contact each other in advance, which realizes the alignment in the three dimensions, to establish a zero reference point and ensure the accuracy of measurement. Because nowadays the optical resolution of advanced lens have exceeded micrometer range, and the size of probes is within micro level, it is possible to acquire dual probes images in both horizontal and vertical directions, through which the movement of the probes can be controlled in time. In order to further enhance the alignment precision, sub-pixel edge detection method based on Zernike orthogonal moment is used to obtain relative position between these two probes, which helps the tips alignment attains sub-micron range. Piezoelectric nanopositioning stages calibrated by laser interferometer are used to implement fine movement of the probes to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. To simplify the system, novel self-sensing and self-actuating probe based on a quartz tuning fork combined with a micromachined cantilever is used for dynamic mode AFM. In this case, an external optical detection system is not needed, so the system is simple and small.

  6. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  7. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  8. Physical properties of polyacrylamide gels probed by AFM and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidine, Yara; Laurent, Valérie M.; Michel, Richard; Duperray, Alain; Iulian Palade, Liviu; Verdier, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Polymer gels have been shown to behave as viscoelastic materials but only a small amount of data is usually provided in the glass transition. In this paper, the dynamic moduli G\\prime and G\\prime\\prime of polyacrylamide hydrogels are investigated using both an AFM in contact force modulation mode and a classical rheometer. The validity is shown by the matching of the two techniques. Measurements are carried out on gels of increasing polymer concentration in a wide frequency range. A model based on fractional derivatives is successfully used, covering the whole frequency range. G\\text{N}0 , the plateau modulus, as well as several other parameters are obtained at low frequencies. The model also predicts the slope a of both moduli in the glass transition, and a transition frequency f\\text{T} is introduced to separate the gel-like behavior with the glassy state. Its variation with polymer content c gives a dependence f\\text{T}∼ c1.6 , in good agreement with previous theories. Therefore, the AFM data provides new information on the physics of polymer gels.

  9. Fractional-order modeling and State-of-Charge estimation for ultracapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hu, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhenpo; Sun, Fengchun; Dorrell, David G.

    2016-05-01

    Ultracapacitors (UCs) have been widely recognized as an enabling energy storage technology in various industrial applications. They hold several advantages including high power density and exceptionally long lifespan over the well-adopted battery technology. Accurate modeling and State-of-Charge (SOC) estimation of UCs are essential for reliability, resilience, and safety in UC-powered system operations. In this paper, a novel fractional-order model composed of a series resistor, a constant-phase-element (CPE), and a Walburg-like element, is proposed to emulate the UC dynamics. The Grünald-Letnikov derivative (GLD) is then employed to discretize the continuous-time fractional-order model. The model parameters are optimally extracted using genetic algorithm (GA), based on the time-domain data acquired through the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) test. By means of this fractional-order model, a fractional Kalman filter is synthesized to recursively estimate the UC SOC. Validation results prove that the proposed fractional-order modeling and state estimation scheme is accurate and outperforms current practice based on integer-order techniques.

  10. Incipient charge order observed by NMR in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Mayaffre, Hadrien; Krämer, Steffen; Horvatić, Mladen; Berthier, Claude; Hardy, W.N.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D.A.; Julien, Marc-Henri

    2015-01-01

    The pseudogap regime of high-temperature cuprates harbours diverse manifestations of electronic ordering whose exact nature and universality remain debated. Here, we show that the short-ranged charge order recently reported in the normal state of YBa2Cu3Oy corresponds to a truly static modulation of the charge density. We also show that this modulation impacts on most electronic properties, that it appears jointly with intra-unit-cell nematic, but not magnetic, order, and that it exhibits differences with the charge density wave observed at lower temperatures in high magnetic fields. These observations prove mostly universal, they place new constraints on the origin of the charge density wave and they reveal that the charge modulation is pinned by native defects. Similarities with results in layered metals such as NbSe2, in which defects nucleate halos of incipient charge density wave at temperatures above the ordering transition, raise the possibility that order–parameter fluctuations, but no static order, would be observed in the normal state of most cuprates if disorder were absent. PMID:25751448

  11. Theoretical analysis of high-order harmonic generation from a coherent superposition of states

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, Dejan B.

    2006-02-15

    A quantum theory of high-order harmonic generation by a strong laser field in the presence of more bound states is formulated. The obtained numerical and analytical results for a two-state hydrogenlike atom model show that the harmonic spectrum consists of two parts: a usual single-state harmonic spectrum of odd harmonics having the energies (2k+1){omega} and a resonant part with the peaks around the excitation energy {delta}{omega}. The energy of the harmonics in the resonant part of the spectrum is equal to {delta}{omega}{+-}{omega}, {delta}{omega}{+-}3{omega}, .... For energies higher than the excitation energy, the resonant part forms a plateau, followed by a cutoff. The emission rate of the harmonics in this resonant plateau is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the harmonics generated in the presence of the ground state alone. The influence of the depletion of the initial states, as well as of the pulse shape and intensity, is analyzed.

  12. Dynamics of a first-order transition to an absorbing state.

    PubMed

    Néel, Baptiste; Rondini, Ignacio; Turzillo, Alex; Mujica, Nicolás; Soto, Rodrigo

    2014-04-01

    A granular system confined in a quasi-two-dimensional box that is vertically vibrated can transit to an absorbing state in which all particles bounce vertically in phase with the box, with no horizontal motion. In principle, this state can be reached for any density lower than the one corresponding to one complete monolayer, which is then the critical density. Below this critical value, the transition to the absorbing state is of first order, with long metastable periods, followed by rapid transitions driven by homogeneous nucleation. Molecular dynamics simulations and experiments show that there is a dramatic increase on the metastable times far below the critical density; in practice, it is impossible to observe spontaneous transitions close to the critical density. This peculiar feature is a consequence of the nonequilibrium nature of this first-order transition to the absorbing state. A Ginzburg-Landau model, with multiplicative noise, describes qualitatively the observed phenomena and explains the macroscopic size of the critical nuclei. The nuclei become of small size only close to a second critical point where the active phase becomes unstable via a saddle node bifurcation. It is only close to this second critical point that experiments and simulations can evidence spontaneous transitions to the absorbing state while the metastable times grow dramatically moving away from it. PMID:24827240

  13. Multiple Charge Transfer States at Ordered and Disordered Donor/Acceptor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusella, Michael; Verreet, Bregt; Lin, Yunhui; Brigeman, Alyssa; Purdum, Geoffrey; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Giebink, Noel; Rand, Barry

    The presence of charge transfer (CT) states in organic solar cells is accepted, but their role in photocurrent generation is not well understood. Here we investigate solar cells based on rubrene and C60 to show that CT state properties are influenced by molecular ordering at the donor/acceptor (D/A) interface. Crystalline rubrene films are produced with domains of 100s of microns adopting the orthorhombic phase, as confirmed by grazing incidence XRD, with the (h00) planes parallel to the substrate. C60 grown atop these films adopts a highly oriented face-centered cubic phase with the (111) plane parallel to the substrate. For this highly ordered system we have discovered the presence of four CT states. Polarized external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements assign three of these to crystalline origins with the remaining one well aligned with the disordered CT state. Varying the thickness of a disordered blend of rubrene:C60 atop the rubrene template modulates the degree of crystallinity at the D/A interface. Strikingly, this process alters the prominence of the four CT states measured via EQE, and results in a transition from single to multiple electroluminescence peaks. These results underscore the impact of molecular structure at the heterojunction on charge photogeneration.

  14. Gaussian measures of entanglement versus negativities: Ordering of two-mode Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2005-09-15

    We study the entanglement of general (pure or mixed) two-mode Gaussian states of continuous-variable systems by comparing the two available classes of computable measures of entanglement: entropy-inspired Gaussian convex-roof measures and positive partial transposition-inspired measures (negativity and logarithmic negativity). We first review the formalism of Gaussian measures of entanglement, adopting the framework introduced in M. M. Wolf et al., Phys. Rev. A 69, 052320 (2004), where the Gaussian entanglement of formation was defined. We compute explicitly Gaussian measures of entanglement for two important families of nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian state: namely, the states of extremal (maximal and minimal) negativities at fixed global and local purities, introduced in G. Adesso et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 087901 (2004). This analysis allows us to compare the different orderings induced on the set of entangled two-mode Gaussian states by the negativities and by the Gaussian measures of entanglement. We find that in a certain range of values of the global and local purities (characterizing the covariance matrix of the corresponding extremal states), states of minimum negativity can have more Gaussian entanglement of formation than states of maximum negativity. Consequently, Gaussian measures and negativities are definitely inequivalent measures of entanglement on nonsymmetric two-mode Gaussian states, even when restricted to a class of extremal states. On the other hand, the two families of entanglement measures are completely equivalent on symmetric states, for which the Gaussian entanglement of formation coincides with the true entanglement of formation. Finally, we show that the inequivalence between the two families of continuous-variable entanglement measures is somehow limited. Namely, we rigorously prove that, at fixed negativities, the Gaussian measures of entanglement are bounded from below. Moreover, we provide some strong evidence suggesting that they

  15. High-order resting-state functional connectivity network for MCI classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Han; Gao, Yue; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Li, Gang; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    Brain functional connectivity (FC) network, estimated with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) technique, has emerged as a promising approach for accurate diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the conventional FC network is essentially low-order in the sense that only the correlations among brain regions (in terms of RS-fMRI time series) are taken into account. The features derived from this type of brain network may fail to serve as an effective disease biomarker. To overcome this drawback, we propose extraction of novel high-order FC correlations that characterize how the low-order correlations between different pairs of brain regions interact with each other. Specifically, for each brain region, a sliding window approach is first performed over the entire RS-fMRI time series to generate multiple short overlapping segments. For each segment, a low-order FC network is constructed, measuring the short-term correlation between brain regions. These low-order networks (obtained from all segments) describe the dynamics of short-term FC along the time, thus also forming the correlation time series for every pair of brain regions. To overcome the curse of dimensionality, we further group the correlation time series into a small number of different clusters according to their intrinsic common patterns. Then, the correlation between the respective mean correlation time series of different clusters is calculated to represent the high-order correlation among different pairs of brain regions. Finally, we design a pattern classifier, by combining features of both low-order and high-order FC networks. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the high-order FC network on disease diagnosis. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3282-3296, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27144538

  16. The post-mitotic state in neurons correlates with a stable nuclear higher-order structure.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2012-03-01

    Neurons become terminally differentiated (TD) post-mitotic cells very early during development yet they may remain alive and functional for decades. TD neurons preserve the molecular machinery necessary for DNA synthesis that may be reactivated by different stimuli but they never complete a successful mitosis. The non-reversible nature of the post-mitotic state in neurons suggests a non-genetic basis for it since no set of mutations has been able to revert it. Comparative studies of the nuclear higher-order structure in neurons and cells with proliferating potential suggest that the non-reversible nature of the post-mitotic state in neurons has a structural basis in the stability of the nuclear higher-order structure. PMID:22808316

  17. Coherent states, 6j symbols and properties of the next to leading order asymptotic expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2013-12-15

    We present the first complete derivation of the well-known asymptotic expansion of the SU(2) 6j symbol using a coherent state approach, in particular we succeed in computing the determinant of the Hessian matrix. To do so, we smear the coherent states and perform a partial stationary point analysis with respect to the smearing parameters. This allows us to transform the variables from group elements to dihedral angles of a tetrahedron resulting in an effective action, which coincides with the action of first order Regge calculus associated to a tetrahedron. To perform the remaining stationary point analysis, we compute its Hessian matrix and obtain the correct measure factor. Furthermore, we expand the discussion of the asymptotic formula to next to leading order terms, prove some of their properties and derive a recursion relation for the full 6j symbol.

  18. Persistence of magnetic order in a highly excited Cu2+ state in CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, U.; de Souza, R. A.; Beaud, P.; Möhr-Vorobeva, E.; Ingold, G.; Caviezel, A.; Scagnoli, V.; Delley, B.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Lee, W.-S.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Patthey, L.; Moore, R. G.; Lu, D.; Yi, M.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Trigo, M.; Denes, P.; Doering, D.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z. X.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Johnson, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    We use ultrafast resonant x-ray diffraction to study the magnetic order in CuO under conditions of high electronic excitation. By measuring changes in the spectral shape of the Cu2+ magnetic (1/2 0 -1/2) reflection we investigate how an intense optical pump pulse perturbs the electronic and magnetic states. We observe an energy shift in the magnetic resonance at short times after the pump pulse. This shift is compared with expectations from band structure calculations at different electronic temperatures. This spectral line shift indicates that although the electrons are heated to effective electron temperatures far above TN on a time scale faster than the experimental resolution, magnetic order persists in this highly excited state for several hundred femtoseconds.

  19. Observation of antiferromagnetic order collapse in the pressurized insulator LaMnPO

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Simonson, J. W.; Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi; Gao, Peiwen; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Dachun; Kotliar, Gabriel; Aronson, Meigan; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of superconductivity in the iron pnictide or cuprate high temperature superconductors usually accompanies the suppression of a long-ranged antiferromagnetic (AFM) order state in a corresponding parent compound by doping or pressurizing. A great deal of effort by doping has been made to find superconductivity in Mn-based compounds, which are thought to bridge the gap between the two families of high temperature superconductors, but the AFM order was not successfully suppressed. Here we report the first observations of the pressure-induced elimination of long-ranged AFM order at ~ 34 GPa and a crossover from an AFM insulating to an AFM metallic state at ~ 20 GPa in LaMnPO single crystals that are iso-structural to the LaFeAsO superconductor by in-situ high pressure resistance and ac susceptibility measurements. These findings are of importance to explore potential superconductivity in Mn-based compounds and to shed new light on the underlying mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. PMID:23989921

  20. Analytical models of steady-state plumes undergoing sequential first-order degradation.

    PubMed

    Burnell, Daniel K; Mercer, James W; Sims, Lawrence S

    2012-01-01

    An exact, closed-form analytical solution is derived for one-dimensional (1D), coupled, steady-state advection-dispersion equations with sequential first-order degradation of three dissolved species in groundwater. Dimensionless and mathematical analyses are used to examine the sensitivity of longitudinal dispersivity in the parent and daughter analytical solutions. The results indicate that the relative error decreases to less than 15% for the 1D advection-dominated and advection-dispersion analytical solutions of the parent and daughter when the Damköhler number of the parent decreases to less than 1 (slow degradation rate) and the Peclet number increases to greater than 6 (advection-dominated). To estimate first-order daughter product rate constants in advection-dominated zones, 1D, two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) steady-state analytical solutions with zero longitudinal dispersivity are also derived for three first-order sequentially degrading compounds. The closed form of these exact analytical solutions has the advantage of having (1) no numerical integration or evaluation of complex-valued error function arguments, (2) computational efficiency compared to problems with long times to reach steady state, and (3) minimal effort for incorporation into spreadsheets. These multispecies analytical solutions indicate that BIOCHLOR produces accurate results for 1D steady-state, applications with longitudinal dispersion. Although BIOCHLOR is inaccurate in multidimensional applications with longitudinal dispersion, these multidimensional multispecies analytical solutions indicate that BIOCHLOR produces accurate steady-state results when the longitudinal dispersion is zero. As an application, the 1D advection-dominated analytical solution is applied to estimate field-scale rate constants of 0.81, 0.74, and 0.69/year for trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride, respectively, at the Harris Palm Bay, FL, CERCLA site. PMID:21883193

  1. Kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye films: Two-state and diffusion models

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2009-07-15

    We theoretically study the kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye photoaligning layers and present the results of modeling performed using two different phenomenological approaches. A phenomenological two-state model is deduced from the master equation for the one-particle distribution functions of an ensemble of two-level molecular systems by specifying the angular redistribution probabilities and by expressing the order parameter correlation functions in terms of the order parameter tensor. Using an alternative approach that describes light-induced reorientation of azo-dye molecules in terms of a rotational Brownian motion, we formulate the two-dimensional diffusion model as the free energy Fokker-Planck equation simplified for the limiting regime of purely in-plane reorientation. The models are employed to interpret the irradiation time dependence of the absorption order parameters defined in terms of the principal extinction (absorption) coefficients. Using the exact solution to the light transmission problem for a biaxially anisotropic absorbing layer, these coefficients are extracted from the absorbance-vs-incidence angle curves measured at different irradiation doses for the probe light linearly polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. It is found that, in the azo-dye films, the transient photoinduced structures are biaxially anisotropic whereas the photosteady and the initial states are uniaxial.

  2. Modified Inverse First Order Reliability Method (I-FORM) for Predicting Extreme Sea States.

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-09-01

    Environmental contours describing extreme sea states are generated as the input for numerical or physical model simulation s as a part of the stand ard current practice for designing marine structure s to survive extreme sea states. Such environmental contours are characterized by combinations of significant wave height ( ) and energy period ( ) values calculated for a given recurrence interval using a set of data based on hindcast simulations or buoy observations over a sufficient period of record. The use of the inverse first - order reliability method (IFORM) i s standard design practice for generating environmental contours. In this paper, the traditional appli cation of the IFORM to generating environmental contours representing extreme sea states is described in detail and its merits and drawbacks are assessed. The application of additional methods for analyzing sea state data including the use of principal component analysis (PCA) to create an uncorrelated representation of the data under consideration is proposed. A reexamination of the components of the IFORM application to the problem at hand including the use of new distribution fitting techniques are shown to contribute to the development of more accurate a nd reasonable representations of extreme sea states for use in survivability analysis for marine struc tures. Keywords: In verse FORM, Principal Component Analysis , Environmental Contours, Extreme Sea State Characteri zation, Wave Energy Converters

  3. Typical density of states as an order parameter for the Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Ka-Ming; Moore, Conrad; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The typical medium theory and its recently proposed extensions for models with off-diagonal disorder and multiple bands are significant progress towards the study of localization phenomenon in real materials. The fundamental assumption of these methods is that the typical density of states can be treated as an order parameter. However, its justifications in lattice model is largely lacking. This is predominantly due to two factors. First, the lattice sizes amenable for exact diagonalization is rather limited. Second, the small lattice sizes lead to a very sensitive dependence on the broadening factor. In this work, we use the kernel polynomial method to perform simulation for large system sizes. By adapting the method for the study of criticality, we find that the typical density of states has a well defined finite size scaling behavior. In particular, from the kurtosis, Binder ratio, of the distribution of the density of states for different lattice sizes, we find a clear crossing to identify the critical point. This provides further support that the typical density of states can be used as an order parameter for the localization transition.

  4. Higher-order Multivariable Polynomial Regression to Estimate Human Affective States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Tong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-03-01

    From direct observations, facial, vocal, gestural, physiological, and central nervous signals, estimating human affective states through computational models such as multivariate linear-regression analysis, support vector regression, and artificial neural network, have been proposed in the past decade. In these models, linear models are generally lack of precision because of ignoring intrinsic nonlinearities of complex psychophysiological processes; and nonlinear models commonly adopt complicated algorithms. To improve accuracy and simplify model, we introduce a new computational modeling method named as higher-order multivariable polynomial regression to estimate human affective states. The study employs standardized pictures in the International Affective Picture System to induce thirty subjects’ affective states, and obtains pure affective patterns of skin conductance as input variables to the higher-order multivariable polynomial model for predicting affective valence and arousal. Experimental results show that our method is able to obtain efficient correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.96 for estimation of affective valence and arousal, respectively. Moreover, the method may provide certain indirect evidences that valence and arousal have their brain’s motivational circuit origins. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a novel one for efficiently estimating human affective states.

  5. Higher-order Multivariable Polynomial Regression to Estimate Human Affective States.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Tong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-01-01

    From direct observations, facial, vocal, gestural, physiological, and central nervous signals, estimating human affective states through computational models such as multivariate linear-regression analysis, support vector regression, and artificial neural network, have been proposed in the past decade. In these models, linear models are generally lack of precision because of ignoring intrinsic nonlinearities of complex psychophysiological processes; and nonlinear models commonly adopt complicated algorithms. To improve accuracy and simplify model, we introduce a new computational modeling method named as higher-order multivariable polynomial regression to estimate human affective states. The study employs standardized pictures in the International Affective Picture System to induce thirty subjects' affective states, and obtains pure affective patterns of skin conductance as input variables to the higher-order multivariable polynomial model for predicting affective valence and arousal. Experimental results show that our method is able to obtain efficient correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.96 for estimation of affective valence and arousal, respectively. Moreover, the method may provide certain indirect evidences that valence and arousal have their brain's motivational circuit origins. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a novel one for efficiently estimating human affective states. PMID:26996254

  6. Steady-state BOLD Response to Higher-order Cognition Modulates Low-Frequency Neural Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Dai, Gang-Shu; Liu, Feng; Long, Zhi-Liang; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2015-12-01

    Steady-state responses (SSRs) reflect the synchronous neural oscillations evoked by noninvasive and consistently repeated stimuli at the fundamental or harmonic frequencies. The steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs; the representative form of the SSRs) have been widely used in the cognitive and clinical neurosciences and brain-computer interface research. However, the steady-state evoked potentials have limitations in examining high-frequency neural oscillations and basic cognition. In addition, synchronous neural oscillations in the low frequency range (<1 Hz) and in higher-order cognition have received a little attention. Therefore, we examined the SSRs in the low frequency range using a new index, the steady-state BOLD responses (SSBRs) evoked by semantic stimuli. Our results revealed that the significant SSBRs were induced at the fundamental frequency of stimuli and the first harmonic in task-related regions, suggesting the enhanced variability of neural oscillations entrained by exogenous stimuli. The SSBRs were independent of neurovascular coupling and characterized by sensorimotor bias, an indication of regional-dependent neuroplasticity. Furthermore, the amplitude of SSBRs may predict behavioral performance and show the psychophysiological relevance. Our findings provide valuable insights into the understanding of the SSRs evoked by higher-order cognition and how the SSRs modulate low-frequency neural oscillations. PMID:26284992

  7. Higher-order Multivariable Polynomial Regression to Estimate Human Affective States

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Tong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-01-01

    From direct observations, facial, vocal, gestural, physiological, and central nervous signals, estimating human affective states through computational models such as multivariate linear-regression analysis, support vector regression, and artificial neural network, have been proposed in the past decade. In these models, linear models are generally lack of precision because of ignoring intrinsic nonlinearities of complex psychophysiological processes; and nonlinear models commonly adopt complicated algorithms. To improve accuracy and simplify model, we introduce a new computational modeling method named as higher-order multivariable polynomial regression to estimate human affective states. The study employs standardized pictures in the International Affective Picture System to induce thirty subjects’ affective states, and obtains pure affective patterns of skin conductance as input variables to the higher-order multivariable polynomial model for predicting affective valence and arousal. Experimental results show that our method is able to obtain efficient correlation coefficients of 0.98 and 0.96 for estimation of affective valence and arousal, respectively. Moreover, the method may provide certain indirect evidences that valence and arousal have their brain’s motivational circuit origins. Thus, the proposed method can serve as a novel one for efficiently estimating human affective states. PMID:26996254

  8. Role of Weak Measurements on States Ordering and Monogamy of Quantum Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng; Tian, Dong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The information-theoretic definition of quantum correlation, e.g., quantum discord, is measurement dependent. By considering the more general quantum measurements, weak measurements, which include the projective measurement as a limiting case, we show that while weak measurements can enable one to capture more quantumness of correlation in a state, it can also induce other counterintuitive quantum effects. Specifically, we show that the general measurements with different strengths can impose different orderings for quantum correlations of some states. It can also modify the monogamous character for certain classes of states as well which may diminish the usefulness of quantum correlation as a resource in some protocols. In this sense, we say that the weak measurements play a dual role in defining quantum correlation.

  9. Surface-enhanced spectroscopy on plasmonic oligomers assembled by AFM nanoxerography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutet, Pierre; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Ressier, Laurence; Vilar-Vidal, Noelia; Comesaña-Hermo, Miguel; Ravaine, Serge; Vallée, Renaud A. L.; Gabudean, Ana Maria; Astilean, Simion; Farcau, Cosmin

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) from individual plasmonic oligomers are investigated by confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence microscopy coupled to steady state micro-spectroscopy. The nanoparticle (NP) oligomers are made of either ligand protected Au or Au@SiO2 core-shell colloidal NPs, which were assembled into ordered arrays by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoxerography. A strong dependence of the SERS emission on the polarization of incident light relative to the specific geometry of the plasmonic oligomer was observed. The SEF studies, performed on a large collection of NP oligomers of various known configurations showed interesting fluorophore decay rate modification and red-shift of the emission spectra. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by employing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations on equivalent realistic structures, within the local density of optical states (LDOS) framework. The presented results, together with the proven potential of the LDOS approach as a useful common tool for analyzing both SERS and SEF effects further the general understanding of plasmon-related phenomena in nanoparticle oligomers.Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) from individual plasmonic oligomers are investigated by confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence microscopy coupled to steady state micro-spectroscopy. The nanoparticle (NP) oligomers are made of either ligand protected Au or Au@SiO2 core-shell colloidal NPs, which were assembled into ordered arrays by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoxerography. A strong dependence of the SERS emission on the polarization of incident light relative to the specific geometry of the plasmonic oligomer was observed. The SEF studies, performed on a large collection of NP oligomers of various known configurations showed interesting fluorophore decay rate

  10. AFM surface investigation of polyethylene modified by ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Arenholz, E.; Hnatowicz, V.; Rybka, V.; Öchsner, R.; Ryssel, H.

    1998-07-01

    Polyethylene (PE) was irradiated with 63 keV Ar + and 155 keV Xe + ions to fluences of 1 × 10 13 to 3 × 10 15 cm -2 with ion energies being chosen in order to achieve approximately the same penetration depth for both species. The PE surface morphology was examined by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereas the concentration of free radicals and conjugated double bonds, both created by the ion irradiation, were determined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-VIS spectroscopy, respectively. As expected, the degradation of PE was higher after irradiation with heavier Xe + ions but the changes in the PE surface morphology were more pronounced for Ar + ions. This newly observed effect can be explained by stronger compaction of the PE surface layer in the case of the Xe + irradiation, connected with a reduction of free volume available.

  11. Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins via a disordered high-density state: Phenomenological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weichun; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2005-05-01

    Nucleation of ordered solid phases of proteins triggers numerous phenomena in laboratory, industry, and in healthy and sick organisms. Recent simulations and experiments with protein crystals suggest that the formation of an ordered crystalline nucleus is preceded by a disordered high-density cluster, akin to a droplet of high-density liquid that has been observed with some proteins; this mechanism allowed a qualitative explanation of recorded complex nucleation kinetics curves. Here, we present a simple phenomenological theory that takes into account intermediate high-density metastable states in the nucleation process. Nucleation rate data at varying temperature and protein concentration are reproduced with high fidelity using literature values of the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the system. Our calculations show that the growth rate of the near-critical and supercritical ordered clusters within the dense intermediate is a major factor for the overall nucleation rate. This highlights the role of viscosity within the dense intermediate for the formation of the ordered nucleus. The model provides an understanding of the action of additives that delay or accelerate nucleation and presents a framework within which the nucleation of other ordered protein solid phases, e.g., the sickle cell hemoglobin polymers, can be analyzed.

  12. An equation of state for the financial markets: connecting order flow to price formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerig, Austin; Mike, Szabolcs; Doyne Farmer, J.

    2006-03-01

    Many of the peculiarities of price formation in the financial marketplace can be understood as the result of a few regularities in the placement and removal of trading orders. Based on a large data set from the London Stock Exchange we show that the distribution of prices where people place orders to buy or sell follows a surprisingly simple functional form that depends on the current best prices. In addition, whether or not an order is to buy or sell is described by a long-memory process, and the cancellation of orders can be described by a few simple rules. When these results are combined, simply by following the rules of the continuous double auction, the resulting simulation model produces good predictions for the distribution of price changes and transaction costs without any adjustment of parameters. We use the model to empirically derive equations of state relating order flow and the statistical properties of prices. In contrast to previous conjectures, our results demonstrate that these distributions are not universal, but rather depend on parameters of individual markets. They also show that factors other than supply and demand play an important role in price formation.

  13. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm2. For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm2, yielding good statistic results.

  14. Dissipative issue of high-order shock capturing schemes with non-convex equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, Olivier; Jaouen, Stéphane; Jourdren, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    It is well known that, closed with a non-convex equation of state (EOS), the Riemann problem for the Euler equations allows non-standard waves, such as split shocks, sonic isentropic compressions or rarefaction shocks, to occur. Loss of convexity then leads to non-uniqueness of entropic or Lax solutions, which can only be resolved via the Liu-Oleinik criterion (equivalent to the existence of viscous profiles for all admissible shock waves). This suggests that in order to capture the physical solution, a numerical scheme must provide an appropriate level of dissipation. A legitimate question then concerns the ability of high-order shock capturing schemes to naturally select such a solution. To investigate this question and evaluate modern as well as future high-order numerical schemes, there is therefore a crucial need for well-documented benchmarks. A thermodynamically consistent C∞ non-convex EOS that can be easily introduced in Eulerian as well as Lagrangian hydrocodes for test purposes is here proposed, along with a reference solution for an initial value problem exhibiting a complex composite wave pattern (the Bizarrium test problem). Two standard Lagrangian numerical approaches, both based on a finite volume method, are then reviewed (vNR and Godunov-type schemes) and evaluated on this Riemann problem. In particular, a complete description of several state-of-the-art high-order Godunov-type schemes applicable to general EOSs is provided. We show that this particular test problem reveals quite severe when working on high-order schemes, and recommend it as a benchmark for devising new limiters and/or next-generation highly accurate schemes.

  15. High-Order Photonic W-states for Random Number Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graefe, Markus; Heilmann, Rene; Perez-Leija, Armando; Keil, Robert; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Multipartite entanglement plays a key role in a number of counter-intuitive phenomena in quantum me- chances. A particular type of multipartite entangled states are the so called W-states which are in generalized form a coherent superposition of N single qubit states exhibiting equal probability amplitudes. The entanglement carried by these quantum entities has the remarkable property of being intrinsically robust to decoherence in one of the qubits. In our work, we experimentally realize high order W-states by forcing single photons to exist in a uniform coherent superposition of N (up to 16) spatial optical modes within a multi-port integrated system. Interestingly, in the generated W-states, a single photon will emerge from any of the N output ports with exactly the same probability. Based on that fact we have additionally developed a scheme for the generation of genuine random bits on chip, without the need of any post-processig. The authenticity of the random numbers is validated by applying the fifteen statistical tests suggested by National Institute of Standard Technology.

  16. Exact ground states and topological order in interacting Kitaev/Majorana chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Hosho; Schuricht, Dirk; Takahashi, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    We study a system of interacting spinless fermions in one dimension that, in the absence of interactions, reduces to the Kitaev chain [Kitaev, Phys. Usp. 44, 131 (2001), 10.1070/1063-7869/44/10S/S29]. In the noninteracting case, a signal of topological order appears as zero-energy modes localized near the edges. We show that the exact ground states can be obtained analytically even in the presence of nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions when the on-site (chemical) potential is tuned to a particular function of the other parameters. As with the noninteracting case, the obtained ground states are twofold degenerate and differ in fermionic parity. We prove the uniqueness of the obtained ground states and show that they can be continuously deformed to the ground states of the noninteracting Kitaev chain without gap closing. We also demonstrate explicitly that there exists a set of operators each of which maps one of the ground states to the other with opposite fermionic parity. These operators can be thought of as an interacting generalization of Majorana edge zero modes.

  17. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  20. CO-oxidation model with superlattice ordering of adsorbed oxygen. I. Steady-state bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, E. W.; Song, C.; Evans, J. W.

    1999-10-01

    We analyze a model for CO oxidation on surfaces which incorporates both rapid diffusion of adsorbed CO, and superlattice ordering of adsorbed immobile oxygen on a square lattice of adsorption sites. The superlattice ordering derives from an "eight-site adsorption rule," wherein diatomic oxygen adsorbs dissociatively on diagonally adjacent empty sites, provided that none of the six additional neighboring sites are occupied by oxygen. A "hybrid" formalism is applied to implement the model. Highly mobile adsorbed CO is assumed randomly distributed on sites not occupied by oxygen (which is justified if one neglects CO-CO and CO-O adspecies interactions), and is thus treated within a mean-field framework. In contrast, the distribution of immobile adsorbed oxygen is treated within a lattice-gas framework. Exact master equations are presented for the model, together with some exact relationships for the coverages and reaction rate. A precise description of steady-state bifurcation behavior is provided utilizing both conventional and "constant-coverage ensemble" Monte Carlo simulations. This behavior is compared with predictions of a suitable analytic pair approximation derived from the master equations. The model exhibits the expected bistability, i.e., coexistence of highly reactive and relatively inactive states, which disappears at a cusp bifurcation. In addition, we show that the oxygen superlattice ordering produces a symmetry-breaking transition, and associated coarsening phenomena, not present in conventional Ziff-Gulari-Barshad-type reaction models.

  1. High-order state estimation for space-plane with several antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shuji

    The real-time flight control and safety system on the ground for a launch rocket or a return spacecraft has ofter required a new tool, in order to evaluate the functioning of the on-board flight control system. This needs estimation of the high-order state vector of attitude angle, angular rate, thrust, its offset, and dynamic parameters, beyond the ordinary estimation of position and velocity. This paper presents new algorithms for both stochastic and deterministic estimation of the high-order state vectors of a space-plane equipped with several antennas, so as to distinguish the outer information (range & range rate, etc.) from each antenna. The simulation for a powered flight of return-to-Earth phase shows that the estimation has remarkably higher precision as the body scale becomes bigger. This paper would give one of fundamental guidelines both for the construction of the ground control system separate from telemeter data, and for the design of the on-board flight control system with the true robustness by two independent on-board logics, for future space-plane.

  2. Fragile charge order in the nonsuperconducting ground state of the underdoped high-temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, B. S.; Harrison, N.; Zhu, Z.; Balakirev, F.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Srivastava, A.; Sabok-Sayr, S. A.; Dabrowski, B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-01-01

    The normal state in the hole underdoped copper oxide superconductors has proven to be a source of mystery for decades. The measurement of a small Fermi surface by quantum oscillations on suppression of superconductivity by high applied magnetic fields, together with complementary spectroscopic measurements in the hole underdoped copper oxide superconductors, point to a nodal electron pocket from charge order in YBa2Cu3O6+δ. Here, we report quantum oscillation measurements in the closely related stoichiometric material YBa2Cu4O8, which reveals similar Fermi surface properties to YBa2Cu3O6+δ, despite the nonobservation of charge order signatures in the same spectroscopic techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, that revealed signatures of charge order in YBa2Cu3O6+δ. Fermi surface reconstruction in YBa2Cu4O8 is suggested to occur from magnetic field enhancement of charge order that is rendered fragile in zero magnetic fields because of its potential unconventional nature and/or its occurrence as a subsidiary to more robust underlying electronic correlations. PMID:26199413

  3. Fragile charge order in the nonsuperconducting ground state of the underdoped high-temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Tan, B S; Harrison, N; Zhu, Z; Balakirev, F; Ramshaw, B J; Srivastava, A; Sabok-Sayr, S A; Sabok, S A; Dabrowski, B; Lonzarich, G G; Sebastian, Suchitra E

    2015-08-01

    The normal state in the hole underdoped copper oxide superconductors has proven to be a source of mystery for decades. The measurement of a small Fermi surface by quantum oscillations on suppression of superconductivity by high applied magnetic fields, together with complementary spectroscopic measurements in the hole underdoped copper oxide superconductors, point to a nodal electron pocket from charge order in YBa2Cu3(6+δ). Here, we report quantum oscillation measurements in the closely related stoichiometric material YBa2Cu4O8, which reveals similar Fermi surface properties to YBa2Cu3(6+δ), despite the nonobservation of charge order signatures in the same spectroscopic techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, that revealed signatures of charge order in YBa2Cu3(6+δ). Fermi surface reconstruction in YBa2Cu4O8 is suggested to occur from magnetic field enhancement of charge order that is rendered fragile in zero magnetic fields because of its potential unconventional nature and/or its occurrence as a subsidiary to more robust underlying electronic correlations. PMID:26199413

  4. Computer-based physician order entry: the state of the art.

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, D F; Stead, W W

    1994-01-01

    Direct computer-based physician order entry has been the subject of debate for over 20 years. Many sites have implemented systems successfully. Others have failed outright or flirted with disaster, incurring substantial delays, cost overruns, and threatened work actions. The rationale for physician order entry includes process improvement, support of cost-conscious decision making, clinical decision support, and optimization of physicians' time. Barriers to physician order entry result from the changes required in practice patterns, roles within the care team, teaching patterns, and institutional policies. Key ingredients for successful implementation include: the system must be fast and easy to use, the user interface must behave consistently in all situations, the institution must have broad and committed involvement and direction by clinicians prior to implementation, the top leadership of the organization must be committed to the project, and a group of problem solvers and users must meet regularly to work out procedural issues. This article reviews the peer-reviewed scientific literature to present the current state of the art of computer-based physician order entry. PMID:7719793

  5. Dynamic modification of the fragmentation of COq+ excited states generated with high-order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W.; de, S.; Singh, K. P.; Chen, S.; Schöffler, M. S.; Alnaser, A. S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Laurent, G.; Ray, D.; Zherebtsov, S.; Kling, M. F.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Belkacem, A.; Osipov, T.; Rescigno, T.; Cocke, C. L.

    2010-10-01

    The dynamic process of fragmentation of COq+ excited states is investigated using a pump-probe approach. EUV radiation (32-48 eV) generated by high-order harmonics was used to ionize and excite CO molecules and a time-delayed infrared (IR) pulse (800 nm) was used to influence the evolution of the dissociating multichannel wave packet. Two groups of states, separable experimentally by their kinetic-energy release (KER), are populated by the EUV and lead to C+-O+ fragmentation: direct double ionization of the neutral molecule and fragmentation of the cation leading to C+-O*, followed by autoionization of O*. The IR pulse was found to modify the KER of the latter group in a delay-dependent way which is explained with a model calculation.

  6. Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition.

    PubMed

    James, G Andrew; Kearney-Ramos, Tonisha E; Young, Jonathan A; Kilts, Clinton D; Gess, Jennifer L; Fausett, Jennifer S

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e. highly structured patterns of communication between brain regions during wakeful rest) may encode cognitive ability. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited by between-study differences in statistical methodology and cognitive domains evaluated. To address this barrier, we evaluated resting-state neural representations of multiple cognitive domains within a relatively large normative adult sample. Forty-four participants (mean(sd) age=31(10) years; 18 male and 26 female) completed a resting-state functional MRI scan and neuropsychological assessments spanning motor, visuospatial, language, learning, memory, attention, working memory, and executive function performance. Robust linear regression related cognitive performance to resting-state connectivity among 200 a priori determined functional regions of interest (ROIs). Only higher-order cognitions (such as learning and executive function) demonstrated significant relationships between brain function and behavior. Additionally, all significant relationships were negative - characterized by moderately positive correlations among low performers and weak to moderately negative correlations among high performers. These findings suggest that functional independence among brain regions at rest facilitates cognitive performance. Our interpretation is consistent with graph theoretic analyses which represent the brain as independent functional nodes that undergo dynamic reorganization with task demand. Future work will build upon these findings by evaluating domain-specific variance in resting-state neural representations of cognitive impairment among patient populations. PMID:27105037

  7. Robust disturbance rejection control of a biped robotic system using high-order extended state observer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fonseca, Nadhynee; Castañeda, Luis Ángel; Uranga, Agustín; Luviano-Juárez, Alberto; Chairez, Isaac

    2016-05-01

    This study addressed the problem of robust control of a biped robot based on disturbance estimation. Active disturbance rejection control was the paradigm used for controlling the biped robot by direct active estimation. A robust controller was developed to implement disturbance cancelation based on a linear extended state observer of high gain class. A robust high-gain scheme was proposed for developing a state estimator of the biped robot despite poor knowledge of the plant and the presence of uncertainties. The estimated states provided by the state estimator were used to implement a feedback controller that was effective in actively rejecting the perturbations as well as forcing the trajectory tracking error to within a small vicinity of the origin. The theoretical convergence of the tracking error was proven using the Lyapunov theory. The controller was implemented by numerical simulations that showed the convergence of the tracking error. A comparison with a high-order sliding-mode-observer-based controller confirmed the superior performance of the controller using the robust observer introduced in this study. Finally, the proposed controller was implemented on an actual biped robot using an embedded hardware-in-the-loop strategy. PMID:26928517

  8. Exploring the high-order harmonic generation from Rydberg states with a fixed Keldysh parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata Bleda, Erdi; Yavuz, Ilhan; Altun, Zikri; Topcu, Turker

    2012-06-01

    The commonly adopted viewpoint that the Keldysh parameter γ determines the dynamical regime of ionization in strong field physics has long been demonstrated to be a misleading one. One can then ask what happens in strong field ionization as relevant parameters, such as laser intensity and frequency, are varied while keeping γ fixed. We present results from our simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from Rydberg states of a hydrogen atom. We calculate high harmonic spectra from various initial states with n up to 42, where the laser intensities and the frequencies are scaled from those for n=1 in order to maintain a fixed Keldysh parameter γ<1. We find that as we go up in n for a fixed γ, the position of the cut-off scales as ˜1/n^2 in terms of the cut-off law predicted by the three-step model for n=1. However, a secondary cut-off structure forms below this, which moves to lower harmonics as n is increased. This second cut-off splits the plateau into two regions, one higher in yield and below the second cut-off, and the second with lower yield following it. We further investigate the final n-distributions for some of the interesting cases to elucidate the physical mechanism leading to this structure

  9. Spin state ordering of strongly correlating LaCoO3 induced at ultrahigh magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Akihiko; Nomura, Toshihiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Matsuo, Akira; Kindo, Koichi; Sato, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    Magnetization measurements of LaCoO3 have been carried out up to 133 T, generated with a destructive pulse magnet at a wide temperature range from 2 to 120 K. A novel magnetic transition was found at B >100 T and T >T*=32 ±5 K, which is characterized by its transition field increasing with increasing temperature. At T orders of the spin states and possibly other degrees of freedom such as orbitals. An inherent strong correlation of spin states among cobalt sites should have triggered the emergence of the ordered phases in LaCoO3 at high magnetic fields.

  10. High-order nite volume WENO schemes for the shallow water equations with dry states

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yulong; Shu, Chi-wang

    2011-01-01

    The shallow water equations are used to model flows in rivers and coastal areas, and have wide applications in ocean, hydraulic engineering, and atmospheric modeling. These equations have still water steady state solutions in which the flux gradients are balanced by the source term. It is desirable to develop numerical methods which preserve exactly these steady state solutions. Another main difficulty usually arising from the simulation of dam breaks and flood waves flows is the appearance of dry areas where no water is present. If no special attention is paid, standard numerical methods may fail near dry/wet front and produce non-physical negative water height. A high-order accurate finite volume weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is proposed in this paper to address these difficulties and to provide an efficient and robust method for solving the shallow water equations. A simple, easy-to-implement positivity-preserving limiter is introduced. One- and two-dimensional numerical examples are provided to verify the positivity-preserving property, well-balanced property, high-order accuracy, and good resolution for smooth and discontinuous solutions.

  11. CO-oxidation model with superlattice ordering of adsorbed oxygen. I. Steady-state bifurcations

    SciTech Connect

    James, E.W.; Song, C.; Evans, J.W.

    1999-10-01

    We analyze a model for CO oxidation on surfaces which incorporates both rapid diffusion of adsorbed CO, and superlattice ordering of adsorbed immobile oxygen on a square lattice of adsorption sites. The superlattice ordering derives from an {open_quotes}eight-site adsorption rule,{close_quotes} wherein diatomic oxygen adsorbs dissociatively on diagonally adjacent empty sites, provided that none of the six additional neighboring sites are occupied by oxygen. A {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} formalism is applied to implement the model. Highly mobile adsorbed CO is assumed randomly distributed on sites not occupied by oxygen (which is justified if one neglects CO{endash}CO and CO{endash}O adspecies interactions), and is thus treated within a mean-field framework. In contrast, the distribution of immobile adsorbed oxygen is treated within a lattice{endash}gas framework. Exact master equations are presented for the model, together with some {ital exact} relationships for the coverages and reaction rate. A precise description of steady-state bifurcation behavior is provided utilizing both conventional and {open_quotes}constant-coverage ensemble{close_quotes} Monte Carlo simulations. This behavior is compared with predictions of a suitable analytic pair approximation derived from the master equations. The model exhibits the expected bistability, i.e., coexistence of highly reactive and relatively inactive states, which disappears at a cusp bifurcation. In addition, we show that the oxygen superlattice ordering produces a symmetry-breaking transition, and associated coarsening phenomena, not present in conventional Ziff{endash}Gulari{endash}Barshad-type reaction models. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Identification of a second-order mechanical system model from a state space realization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Dong-Huei; Longman, Richard W.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1993-01-01

    Many system identification algorithms produce models in modern state variable form. When a mechanical system is identified one knows that there must be a model in second order form. In structural dynamics one is interested in either a modal model of the system, or in a model including a mass matrix, stiffness matrix and a damping matrix. In this paper, algorithms are developed that convert a modern state space realization into the above two representations of interest in mechanical systems. The algorithm can be used with any identification methods that produce a modern state variable representation such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), its modified version by data correlation (ERA/DC), and combinations of these with Observer/Kalman Filter Identification (OKID). An algorithm is developed that allows one to identify the damping matrix in a model representation, so that one determines how near to modal the damping is in the system, and can therefore understand the degree to which the modes are coupled by the damping in the system. A second algorithm produced the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices, given the input and output matrices. It is assumed that the number of sensors (or the number of actuators) is greater than or equal to the number of modes in the system, and it is proved that this is a necessary condition to be able to uniquely identify these matrices. Experience with examples suggests that a singular value truncation involved in these algorithms can help one determine the true system order. This truncation has the benefit of knowledge of the correct form for a mechanical system model, which is not present in the modern control identification algorithm.

  13. Surface-enhanced spectroscopy on plasmonic oligomers assembled by AFM nanoxerography.

    PubMed

    Moutet, Pierre; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M; Ressier, Laurence; Vilar-Vidal, Noelia; Comesaña-Hermo, Miguel; Ravaine, Serge; Vallée, Renaud A L; Gabudean, Ana Maria; Astilean, Simion; Farcau, Cosmin

    2015-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) from individual plasmonic oligomers are investigated by confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence microscopy coupled to steady state micro-spectroscopy. The nanoparticle (NP) oligomers are made of either ligand protected Au or Au@SiO2 core-shell colloidal NPs, which were assembled into ordered arrays by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoxerography. A strong dependence of the SERS emission on the polarization of incident light relative to the specific geometry of the plasmonic oligomer was observed. The SEF studies, performed on a large collection of NP oligomers of various known configurations showed interesting fluorophore decay rate modification and red-shift of the emission spectra. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by employing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations on equivalent realistic structures, within the local density of optical states (LDOS) framework. The presented results, together with the proven potential of the LDOS approach as a useful common tool for analyzing both SERS and SEF effects further the general understanding of plasmon-related phenomena in nanoparticle oligomers. PMID:25553777

  14. Efficient evaluation of high-order moments and cumulants in tensor network states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Colin G.; Garcia-Saez, Artur; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2015-09-01

    We present a numerical scheme for efficiently extracting the higher-order moments and cumulants of various operators on spin systems represented as tensor product states, for both finite and infinite systems, and present several applications for such quantities. For example, the second cumulant of the energy of a state, <Δ H2> , gives a straightforward method to check the convergence of numerical ground-state approximation algorithms. Additionally, we discuss the use of moments and cumulants in the study of phase transitions. Of particular interest is the application of our method to calculate the so-called Binder cumulant, which we use to detect critical points and study the critical exponent of the correlation length with only small finite numerical calculations. We apply these methods to study the behavior of a family of one-dimensional models (the transverse Ising model, the spin-1 Ising model, and the spin-1 Ising model in a crystal field), as well as the two-dimensional Ising model on a square lattice. Our results show that in one dimension, cumulant-based methods can produce precise estimates of the critical points at a low computational cost. The method shows promise for two-dimensional systems as well.

  15. Valence states and possible charge ordering in LaCo(1-x)Rh(x)O₃.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Gapontsev, Vladimir V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-03-01

    An unusual effect was discovered in Li et al (2010 J. Solid State Chem. 183 1388): the substitution of nonmagnetic low-spin Co(3+) in LaCoO3 by the formally isoelectronic and also nonmagnetic Rh(3+) led, surprisingly, to a rapid appearance of magnetism in LaCo(1-x)Rh(x)O3, even for small amounts of doping. Different explanations for this effect were proposed in the literature. To clarify the situation we carried out unbiased ab initio calculations of this system. We concluded that, in agreement with the original assumption of Li et al, but in contrast with later statements (Knizek et al 2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 134401), this effect is caused by the valence change ('redox reaction') Co(3+) +  Rh(3+) → Co(2+) +  Rh(4+), which creates magnetic Co(2+) and Rh(4+) ions. For the half-filled case LaCo1/2Rh1/2O3 we obtained the state with charge ordering of Co(2+) and Rh(4+) ions, which according to our calculations are antiferromagnetically coupled. The obtained results reasonably explain the observed behavior of the magnetic susceptibility of LaCo(1-x)Rh(x)O3, and the novel state predicted at half-doping could be verified experimentally by detailed structural and magnetic studies and by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. PMID:26852883

  16. Zhang-Rice physics and anomalous copper states in A-site ordered perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D.; Mukherjee, Swarnakamal; Cheng, J.-G.; Middey, S.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Gray, B. A.; Freeland, J. W.; Saha-Dasgupta, T.; Chakhalian, J.

    2013-05-01

    In low dimensional cuprates several interesting phenomena, including high Tc superconductivity, are deeply connected to electron correlations on Cu and the presence of the Zhang-Rice (ZR) singlet state. Here, we report on direct spectroscopic observation of the ZR state responsible for the low-energy physical properties in two isostructural A-site ordered cuprate perovskites, CaCu3Co4O12 and CaCu3Cr4O12 as revealed by resonant soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy on the Cu L3,2- and O K-edges. These measurements reveal the signature of Cu in the high-energy 3+ (3d8), the typical 2+ (3d9), as well as features of the ZR singlet state (i.e., 3d9L, L denotes an oxygen hole). First principles GGA + U calculations affirm that the B-site cation controls the degree of Cu-O hybridization and, thus, the Cu valency. These findings introduce another avenue for the study and manipulation of cuprates, bypassing the complexities inherent to conventional chemical doping (i.e. disorder) that hinder the relevant physics.

  17. Valence states and possible charge ordering in LaCo1-x Rh x O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Sergey V.; Gapontsev, Vladimir V.; Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2016-03-01

    An unusual effect was discovered in Li et al (2010 J. Solid State Chem. 183 1388): the substitution of nonmagnetic low-spin Co3+ in LaCoO3 by the formally isoelectronic and also nonmagnetic Rh3+ led, surprisingly, to a rapid appearance of magnetism in LaCo1-x Rh x O3, even for small amounts of doping. Different explanations for this effect were proposed in the literature. To clarify the situation we carried out unbiased ab initio calculations of this system. We concluded that, in agreement with the original assumption of Li et al, but in contrast with later statements (Knizek et al 2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 134401), this effect is caused by the valence change (’redox reaction’) Co3+   +  Rh3+ \\to Co2+   +  Rh4+ , which creates magnetic Co2+ and Rh4+ ions. For the half-filled case LaCo1/2Rh1/2O3 we obtained the state with charge ordering of Co2+ and Rh4+ ions, which according to our calculations are antiferromagnetically coupled. The obtained results reasonably explain the observed behavior of the magnetic susceptibility of LaCo1-x Rh x O3, and the novel state predicted at half-doping could be verified experimentally by detailed structural and magnetic studies and by x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Helical order in one-dimensional magnetic atom chains and possible emergence of Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghyun; Cheng, Meng; Bauer, Bela; Lutchyn, Roman M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically obtain the phase diagram of localized magnetic impurity spins arranged in a one-dimensional chain on top of a one- or two-dimensional electron gas. The interactions between the spins are mediated by the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida mechanism through the electron gas. Recent work predicts that such a system may intrinsically support topological superconductivity without spin-orbit coupling when a helical spin-density wave is spontaneously formed in the spins, and superconductivity is induced in the electron gas. We analyze, using both analytical and numerical techniques, the conditions under which such a helical spin state is stable in a realistic situation in the presence of disorder. We show that (i) it appears only when the spins are coupled to a (quasi-) one-dimensional electron gas, and (ii) it becomes unstable towards the formation of (anti)ferromagnetic domains if the disorder in the impurity spin positions δR becomes comparable with the Fermi wavelength. We also examine the stability of the helical state against Gaussian potential disorder in the electronic system using a diagrammatic approach. Our results suggest that in order to stabilize the helical spin state and thus the emergent topological superconductivity under realistic experimental conditions, a sufficiently strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling, giving rise to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, is required.

  19. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Control of Interface Magnetic States in Vacancy Ordered Cobaltite Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Albina; Kim, Young-Min; Biegalski, Michael; He, Jun; Christen, Hans; Pantelides, Sokrates; Pennycook, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic properties of complex oxide thin films are strongly affected by strain, chemical composition, and octahedral tilt of the substrate. Here, we study lanthanum/strontium cobaltite (La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-x, LSCO) thin films via quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) to explore the coupling between magnetic properties, ionic behavior, and oxygen octahedral tilts. LSCO films were grown by PLD in identical conditions on two different substrates, LSAT (cubic) and NGO (orthorhombic). These substrates have nearly identical lattice parameters, but different octahedral tilts. The film on NGO appears to be La0.5Sr0.5CoO2.5, while the film on LSAT is less oxygen deficient. Comparison of measured lattice parameters with the first-principles calculations allows us to determine oxygen content in the film. In La0.5Sr0.5CoO2.5/NGO films, EELS reveals different valence states of Co at the interface depending on termination, resulting in different magnetic states. Therefore changes in octahedral tilts can induce changes in oxygen stoichiometry and interface magnetic states of the vacancy ordered structures.

  20. Zhang-Rice physics and anomalous copper states in A-site ordered perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, D.; Mukherjee, Swarnakamal; Cheng, J.-G.; Middey, S.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Gray, B. A.; Freeland, J. W.; Saha-Dasgupta, T.; Chakhalian, J.

    2013-01-01

    In low dimensional cuprates several interesting phenomena, including high Tc superconductivity, are deeply connected to electron correlations on Cu and the presence of the Zhang-Rice (ZR) singlet state. Here, we report on direct spectroscopic observation of the ZR state responsible for the low-energy physical properties in two isostructural A-site ordered cuprate perovskites, CaCu3Co4O12 and CaCu3Cr4O12 as revealed by resonant soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy on the Cu L3,2- and O K-edges. These measurements reveal the signature of Cu in the high-energy 3+ (3d8), the typical 2+ (3d9), as well as features of the ZR singlet state (i.e., 3d9L, L denotes an oxygen hole). First principles GGA + U calculations affirm that the B-site cation controls the degree of Cu-O hybridization and, thus, the Cu valency. These findings introduce another avenue for the study and manipulation of cuprates, bypassing the complexities inherent to conventional chemical doping (i.e. disorder) that hinder the relevant physics. PMID:23666066

  1. Two-dimensional magnetic correlations and partial long-range order in geometrically frustrated Sr2YRuO6.

    PubMed

    Granado, E; Lynn, J W; Jardim, R F; Torikachvili, M S

    2013-01-01

    Neutron diffraction on the double perovskite Sr(2)YRuO(6) with a quasi-fcc lattice of Ru moments reveals planar magnetic correlations that condense into a partial long-range ordered state with coupled alternate antiferromagnetic (AFM) YRuO(4) square layers coexisting with the short-range correlations below T(N1) = 32 K. A second transition to a fully ordered AFM state below T(N2) = 24 K is observed. The reduced dimensionality of the spin correlations is arguably due to a cancellation of the magnetic coupling between consecutive AFM square layers in fcc antiferromagnets, which is the simplest three-dimensional frustrated magnet model system. PMID:23383833

  2. Kambersky Damping in L10 Magnetic Materials of Ordered and Disordered States with Substitutional Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Tao; Victora, Randall

    2015-03-01

    L10 phase alloys with high magnetic anisotropy play a key role in spintronic devices. The damping constant α represents the elimination of the magnetic energy and affects the efficiency of devices. However, the intrinsic Kambersky damping reported experimentally differs among investigators and the effect of defects on α is never investigated. Here, we apply Kambersky's torque correlation technique, within the tight-binding method, to L10 ordered and disordered alloys FePt, FePd,CoPt and CoPd. In the ordered phase, CoPt has the largest damping of 0.067 while FePd has the minimum value of 0.009 at room temperature. The calculated damping value of FePt and FePd agrees well with experiment. Artificially shifting Ef, as might be accomplished by doping with impurity atoms, shows that α follows the density of states (DOS) at Ef in these four L10 alloys. We introduce lattice defects through exchanging the positions of 3d and non-3d transition elements in 36 atom supercells. The damping increases with reduced degree of chemical order, owing to the enhanced spin-flip channel allowed by the broken symmetry. This prediction is confirmed by measurements in FePt. It is demonstrated that this corresponds to an enhanced DOS at the Fermi level, owing to the rounding of the DOS with loss of long-range order. This work was supported primarily by C-SPIN (one of the six SRC STAR-net Centers) and partly by the MRSEC Program under Contract No. DMR-0819885.

  3. Particle deformation induced by AFM tapping under different setpoint voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John A.; He, Bo-Ching; Fu, Wei-En

    2014-09-01

    The measured height of polystyrene nanoparticles varies with setpoint voltage during atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping-mode imaging. Nanoparticle height was strongly influenced by the magnitude of the deformation caused by the AFM tapping forces, which was determined by the setpoint voltage. This influence quantity was studied by controlling the operational AFM setpoint voltage. A test sample consisting of well-dispersed 60-nm polystyrene and gold nanoparticles co-adsorbed on poly-l-lysine-coated mica was studied in this research. Gold nanoparticles have not only better mechanical property than polystyrene nanoparticles, but also obvious facets in AFM phase image. By using this sample of mixed nanoparticles, it allows us to confirm that the deformation resulted from the effect of setpoint voltage, not noise. In tapping mode, the deformation of polystyrene nanoparticles increased with decreasing setpoint voltage. Similar behavior was observed with both open loop and closed loop AFM instruments.

  4. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  5. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  6. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. MMPI-2 Characteristics of the Old Order Amish: A Comparison of Clinical, Nonclinical, and United States Normative Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knabb, Joshua J.; Vogt, Ronald G.; Newgren, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) characteristics in an Old Order Amish nonclinical sample (N = 84), comparing these data with both the United States normative sample (N = 2,600) and a sample of Old Order Amish outpatients (N = 136). Consistent with our hypothesis, the Old Order Amish…

  8. Homotopy Algorithm for Optimal Control Problems with a Second-order State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Hermant, Audrey

    2010-02-15

    This paper deals with optimal control problems with a regular second-order state constraint and a scalar control, satisfying the strengthened Legendre-Clebsch condition. We study the stability of structure of stationary points. It is shown that under a uniform strict complementarity assumption, boundary arcs are stable under sufficiently smooth perturbations of the data. On the contrary, nonreducible touch points are not stable under perturbations. We show that under some reasonable conditions, either a boundary arc or a second touch point may appear. Those results allow us to design an homotopy algorithm which automatically detects the structure of the trajectory and initializes the shooting parameters associated with boundary arcs and touch points.

  9. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility.

  10. Strong orbital fluctuations in multipolar ordered states of PrV2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Tsujimoto, Masaki; Tomita, Takahiro; Sakai, Akito; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    PrT2Al20 (T=Ti, V) are ideal systems to study the quadrupole Kondo effect and quantum criticality arising from orbital degrees of freedom. The both systems have the nonmagnetic cubic Γ3 crystal electric field ground doublet with the well separated excited state. In particular, PrV2Al20 exhibits anomalous metallic behavior above and below the multipolar ordering temperatures, reflecting the even stronger hybridization between f and conduction electrons possibly due to a proximity to an orbital quantum critical point. Here we report the anomalous metallic behaviors found in a pure single crystal of PrV2Al20. Our detailed analyses revealed that the resistivity indicates power law temperature dependence proportional to T3. Furthermore, we pointed out that the 4f electron contribution to the specific heat also exhibits power law behavior proportional to T4. Both observations are in a sharp contrast to the gapped behavior found in PrTi2Al20 and indicate the strong c-f hybridization and strong orbital fluctuations in PrV2Al20. In addition, the 4f electron contribution to the entropy in PrV2Al20 reaches only 50% of R ln 2 at an orbital ordering at T=0.75 K, suggesting another 50% of R ln 2 expected for Γ3 doublet is already released at higher temperature possibly due to quadrupole Kondo effect.

  11. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  12. Probing of Charge Transfer States at Buried Organic Interfaces with Even-Order Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ravindra; Moon, Aaron; Roberts, Sean

    Organic thin film photovoltaics (OPV) are an emerging economically competitive technology that combines manufacturing adaptability, low-cost processing and a lightweight, flexible device end-product. At junctions formed between organic electron-donating and electron-accepting materials, the abrupt change in the dielectric properties can strongly perturb the density of states of the OPV. This can substantially alter the driving force for charge transfer between these materials. Electronic Sum Frequency Generation (ESFG), owing to its inherent interfacial sensitivity, is ideally suited to probe buried interfaces. Here, we report the ESFG spectra of Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc) films, deposited on SiO2 measured for both reflection and transmission geometries. Three peaks are observed that roughly correlate with resonances that comprise CuPc's Q-band absorption but display slight shifts and amplitude changes with respect to CuPc's bulk absorption spectrum. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on a thin film interference model that accounts for ESFG emitted from both the CuPc:Air and CuPc:SiO2 interface as well as contributions to the signal from higher order source terms from the bulk. The model reveals a difference in the density of states between the two interfaces and suggests that by combining experimental transmission and reflection data it is possible to separate bulk and interfacial contributions to ESFG spectra.

  13. Zero modes, bosonization, and topological quantum order: The Laughlin state in second quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Tahereh; Ortiz, Gerardo; Nussinov, Zohar; Seidel, Alexander

    We introduce a ``second-quantized'' representation of the ring of symmetric functions to further develop a purely second-quantized approach to the study of zero modes of frustration-free Haldane-pseudopotential-type Hamiltonians, which in particular stabilize Laughlin ground states. We present three applications of this formalism. We start demonstrating how to systematically construct all zero modes of Laughlin-type parent Hamiltonians in a framework that is free of first-quantized polynomial wave functions, and show that they are in one-to-one correspondence with dominance patterns. Second, as a by-product, we make contact with the bosonization method, and obtain an alternative proof for the equivalence between bosonic and fermionic Fock spaces. Finally, we explicitly derive the second-quantized version of Read's nonlocal order parameter for the Laughlin state, extending an earlier description by Stone. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation under NSF Grant No. DMR-1206781 (AS) and under NSF Grant No. DMR-1106293 (ZN).

  14. Local Order in the Unfolded State: Conformational Biases and Nearest Neighbor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Toal, Siobhan; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, which contain significant levels of disorder yet perform complex biologically functions, as well as unwanted aggregation, has motivated numerous experimental and theoretical studies aimed at describing residue-level conformational ensembles. Multiple lines of evidence gathered over the last 15 years strongly suggest that amino acids residues display unique and restricted conformational preferences in the unfolded state of peptides and proteins, contrary to one of the basic assumptions of the canonical random coil model. To fully understand residue level order/disorder, however, one has to gain a quantitative, experimentally based picture of conformational distributions and to determine the physical basis underlying residue-level conformational biases. Here, we review the experimental, computational and bioinformatic evidence for conformational preferences of amino acid residues in (mostly short) peptides that can be utilized as suitable model systems for unfolded states of peptides and proteins. In this context particular attention is paid to the alleged high polyproline II preference of alanine. We discuss how these conformational propensities may be modulated by peptide solvent interactions and so called nearest-neighbor interactions. The relevance of conformational propensities for the protein folding problem and the understanding of IDPs is briefly discussed. PMID:25062017

  15. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results. PMID:26106951

  16. State derivative feedback in second-order linear systems: A comparative analysis of perturbed eigenvalues under coefficient variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, José M.; Dórea, Carlos E. T.; Gonçalves, Luiz M. G.; Datta, Biswa N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of sensitivity to parameter variation in two feedback techniques applied in second-order linear systems: state feedback technique and the less conventional state derivative feedback technique. The former uses information on displacements and velocities whereas the latter uses velocities and accelerations. Several contributions on the problem of partial or full eigenvalue/eigenstructure assignment using the state feedback technique are presented in the literature. Recently, some interesting possibilities, such as solving the regularization problem in singular mass second-order systems, are approached using state derivative feedback. In this work, a general equivalence between state feedback and state derivative feedback is first established. Then, figures of merit on the resulting perturbed spectrum are proposed in order to assess the sensitivity of the closed-loop system to variations on the system matrices. Numerical examples are presented to support the obtained results.

  17. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  18. Dynamics of the nanoneedle probe in trolling mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ahmad; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Keramati, Ramtin; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-05-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as an indispensable tool for nanoscale characterization, presents major drawbacks for operation in a liquid environment arising from the large hydrodynamic drag on the vibrating cantilever. The newly introduced 'Trolling mode' (TR-mode) AFM resolves this complication by using a specialized nanoneedle cantilever that keeps the cantilever outside of the liquid. Herein, a mechanical model with a lumped mass was developed to capture the dynamics of such a cantilever with a nanoneedle tip. This new developed model was applied to investigate the effects of the needle-liquid interface on the performance of the AFM, including the imaging capability in liquid. PMID:25915451

  19. AFM Studies of Conformational Changes in Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Sukthankar, Pinakin; Tomich, John; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present estimates of molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors for some examples of proteins and peptides. The results are obtained from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. To determine molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors we developed a model based on measuring several resonance frequencies of an AFM cantilever in contact with either single protein molecule or peptides adsorbed on arbitrary surface. We used compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio - a ratio of length to width - in air and in liquid, including biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium. Department of Physics.

  20. Nanoscopic polypyrrole AFM-SECM probes enabling force measurements under potential control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Higgins, M. J.; Kranz, C.

    2014-01-01

    Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well-defined geometry. Furthermore, such probes may be reversibly switched from an insulating to a conductive state. In addition, the hydrophilicity of such polymer tips is dependent on the dopant, and hence, on the oxidation state. Force studies applying different tip potentials were performed at plasma-treated glass surfaces providing localized information on the associated force interactions, which are dependent on the applied potential and the dopant.Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well

  1. Characterization of Local Mechanical Properties of Polymer Thin Films and Polymer Nanocomposites via AFM indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu

    AFM indentation has become a tool with great potential in the characterization of nano-mechanical properties of materials. Thanks to the nanometer sized probes, AFM indentation is capable of capturing the changes of multiple properties within the range of tens of nanometers, such task would otherwise be difficult by using other experiment instruments. Despite the great potentials of AFM indentation, it operates based on a simple mechanism: driving the delicate AFM probe to indent the sample surface, and recording the force-displacement response. With limited information provided by AFM indentation, efforts are still required for any practice to successfully extract the desired nano-scale properties from specific materials. In this thesis, we focus on the mechanical properties of interphase between polymer and inorganic materials. It is known that in nanocomposites, a region of polymer exist around nanoparticles with altered molecular structures and improved properties, which is named as interphase polymer. The system with polymer thin films and inorganic material substrates is widely used to simulate the interphase effect in nanocomposites. In this thesis, we developed an efficient and reliable method to process film/substrate samples and characterize the changes of local mechanical properties inside the interphase region with ultra-high resolution AFM mechanical mapping technique. Applying this newly developed method, the interphase of several film/substrate pairs were examined and compared. The local mechanical properties on the other side of the polymer thin film, the free surface side, was also investigated using AFM indentation equipped with surface modified probes. In order to extract the full spectrum of local elastic modulus inside the surface region in the range of only tens of nanometers, the different contact mechanics models were studied and compared, and a Finite Element model was also established. Though the film/substrate system has been wide used as

  2. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  3. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  4. Fragmentation of fast Josephson vortices and breakdown of ordered states by moving topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhzada, Ahmad; Gurevich, Alex

    2015-12-07

    Topological defects such as vortices, dislocations or domain walls define many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, magnetism, liquid crystals, and plasticity of solids. Here we address the breakdown of the topologically-protected stability of such defects driven by strong external forces. We focus on Josephson vortices that appear at planar weak links of suppressed superconductivity which have attracted much attention for electronic applications, new sources of THz radiation, and low-dissipative computing. Our numerical simulations show that a rapidly moving vortex driven by a constant current becomes unstable with respect to generation of vortex-antivortex pairs caused by Cherenkov radiation. As a result, vortices and antivortices become spatially separated and accumulate continuously on the opposite sides of an expanding dissipative domain. This effect is most pronounced in thin film edge Josephson junctions at low temperatures where a single vortex can switch the whole junction into a resistive state at currents well below the Josephson critical current. In conclusion, our work gives a new insight into instability of a moving topological defect which destroys global long-range order in a way that is remarkably similar to the crack propagation in solids.

  5. Fragmentation of fast Josephson vortices and breakdown of ordered states by moving topological defects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sheikhzada, Ahmad; Gurevich, Alex

    2015-12-07

    Topological defects such as vortices, dislocations or domain walls define many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, magnetism, liquid crystals, and plasticity of solids. Here we address the breakdown of the topologically-protected stability of such defects driven by strong external forces. We focus on Josephson vortices that appear at planar weak links of suppressed superconductivity which have attracted much attention for electronic applications, new sources of THz radiation, and low-dissipative computing. Our numerical simulations show that a rapidly moving vortex driven by a constant current becomes unstable with respect to generation of vortex-antivortex pairs caused by Cherenkov radiation. As a result,more » vortices and antivortices become spatially separated and accumulate continuously on the opposite sides of an expanding dissipative domain. This effect is most pronounced in thin film edge Josephson junctions at low temperatures where a single vortex can switch the whole junction into a resistive state at currents well below the Josephson critical current. In conclusion, our work gives a new insight into instability of a moving topological defect which destroys global long-range order in a way that is remarkably similar to the crack propagation in solids.« less

  6. Supramolecular Order of 2,5-Bis(dodecanoxy)phenyleneethynylene-Butadiyne Oligomers in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Edgar; Arias, Eduardo; Moggio, Ivana; Gallardo-Vega, Carlos; Ziolo, Ronald F; Jiménez-Barrera, Rosa M; Navarro, Damaso; Rodríguez, Oliverio; Fernández, Salvador; Herrera, Manuel

    2015-06-23

    The supramolecular order of a 2,5-bis(dodecanoxy)phenyleneethynylene-butadiyne series of rod-like oligomers with 2, 4, 6, and 8 phenyleneethynylene moieties was studied in the solid state by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature-dependent small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), polarized optical microscopy (POM), high-resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). It was found that all of the oligomers self-assemble in blocks of molecules that resemble bricks that are randomly oriented. These oligomers are described as sanidic liquid crystals as a term to classify their mesomorphic behavior because of their brick or board-like structure. The strong π-π interaction that governs the package of conjugated backbones was evidenced by the reiterative distances of 0.36 ± 0.017 nm found by SWAXS and 0.32 ± 0.017 nm found by HRTEM. A STM study of a cast film of the tetramer deposited on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) allowed for the visualization and determination of the conjugated backbone length of 2.48 nm and a phenyl-phenyl distance of 0.34 nm, suggesting that the molecules are stacked in lamellae perpendicularly aligned to the substrate. PMID:26023823

  7. Helical states with ordered magnetic topology in the Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S.; Gobbin, M.; Spizzo, G.

    2008-11-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration for magnetic confinement has shown to develop helical configurations characterized by good magnetic surfaces both in experiments and visco-resistive 3D MHD numerical computations [1]. In the RFX-mod experiment, quasi-single helicity (QSH) states with ordered magnetic topology have been found to develop both spontaneously during high current discharges [2] and in a stimulated way through the periodic oscillation of the toroidal flux (so-called OPCD technique) [3]. In both cases, the expulsion of the separatrix of the dominant mode has proved to be the key for significant chaos healing [4], as expected by theory [5]. In this work, we present results of visco-resistive 3D MHD numerical modeling aiming at clarifying the mechanism and the conditions for separatrix expulsion and chaos healing in spontaneous and stimulated cases. The effect is investigated by reconstruction of the magnetic topology through field line tracing algorithms and by study of test particle dynamics. [1] S. Cappello, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46, B313 (2004) & references therein. [2] M. Valisa et al., invited oral, EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (2008). [3] D. Terranova et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 095001 (2007). [4] R. Lorenzini et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 025005 (2008). [5] D. F. Escande, R. Paccagnella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3169 (2000).

  8. Fragmentation of Fast Josephson Vortices and Breakdown of Ordered States by Moving Topological Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhzada, Ahmad; Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Topological defects such as vortices, dislocations or domain walls define many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, magnetism, liquid crystals, and plasticity of solids. Here we address the breakdown of the topologically-protected stability of such defects driven by strong external forces. We focus on Josephson vortices that appear at planar weak links of suppressed superconductivity which have attracted much attention for electronic applications, new sources of THz radiation, and low-dissipative computing. Our numerical simulations show that a rapidly moving vortex driven by a constant current becomes unstable with respect to generation of vortex-antivortex pairs caused by Cherenkov radiation. As a result, vortices and antivortices become spatially separated and accumulate continuously on the opposite sides of an expanding dissipative domain. This effect is most pronounced in thin film edge Josephson junctions at low temperatures where a single vortex can switch the whole junction into a resistive state at currents well below the Josephson critical current. Our work gives a new insight into instability of a moving topological defect which destroys global long-range order in a way that is remarkably similar to the crack propagation in solids. PMID:26639165

  9. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  10. Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex state in CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Carlton, D.; Park, J. S.; Meng, Y.; Arenholz, E.; Doran, A.; Young, A.T.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, C.; Zhao, H. W.; Bokor, J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2010-12-21

    In magnetic thin films, a magnetic vortex is a state in which the magnetization vector curls around the center of a confined structure. A vortex state in a thin film disk, for example, is a topological object characterized by the vortex polarity and the winding number. In ferromagnetic (FM) disks, these parameters govern many fundamental properties of the vortex such as its gyroscopic rotation, polarity reversal, core motion, and vortex pair excitation. However, in antiferromagnetic (AFM) disks, though there has been indirect evidence of the vortex state through observations of the induced FM-ordered spins in the AFM disk, they have never been observed directly in experiment. By fabricating single crystalline NiO/Fe/Ag(001) and CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks and using X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD), we show direct observation of the vortex state in an AFM disk of AFM/FM bilayer system. We observe that there are two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analog in FM structures. Finally, we show that a frozen AFM vortex can bias a FM vortex at low temperature.

  11. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  12. Characterization of the interaction between AFM tips and surface nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-06-24

    While the presence of gaseous enclosures observed at various solid-water interfaces, the so-called "surface nanobubles", has been confirmed by many groups in recent years, their formation, properties, and stability have not been convincingly and exhaustively explained. Here we report on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of argon nanobubbles on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) in water to elucidate the properties of nanobubble surfaces and the mechanism of AFM tip-nanobubble interaction. In particular, the deformation of the nanobubble-water interface by the AFM tip and the question whether the AFM tip penetrates the nanobubble during scanning were addressed by this combined intermittent contact (tapping) mode and force volume AFM study. We found that the stiffness of nanobubbles was smaller than the cantilever spring constant and comparable with the surface tension of water. The interaction with the AFM tip resulted in severe quasi-linear deformation of the bubbles; however, in the case of tip-bubble attraction, the interface deformed toward the tip. We tested two models of tip-bubble interaction, namely, the capillary force and the dynamic interaction model, and found, depending on the tip properties, good agreement with experimental data. The results showed that the tip-bubble interaction strength and the magnitude of the bubble deformation depend strongly on tip and bubble geometry and on tip and substrate material, and are very sensitive to the presence of contaminations that alter the interfacial tension. In particular, nanobubbles interacted differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic AFM tips, which resulted in qualitatively and quantitatively different force curves measured on the bubbles in the experiments. To minimize bubble deformation and obtain reliable AFM results, nanobubbles must be measured with a sharp hydrophilic tip and with a cantilever having a very low spring constant in a contamination-free system. PMID:24856074

  13. 77 FR 15803 - Notice of Lodging of Stipulated Order Regarding Modification of Consent Decree in United States v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Stipulated Order Regarding Modification of Consent Decree in United States v. Kentucky Utilities Company Under the Clean Air Act Under 28 CFR 50.7, notice is hereby given that on March 12, 2012, a proposed Stipulated Order...

  14. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart J of... - Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Dividing Civil Service Retirement Benefits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Dividing Civil Service Retirement Benefits A Appendix A to Subpart J of Part 838 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court...

  15. Modeling the Interaction between AFM Tips and Pinned Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenjiang; Liu, Yawei; Xiao, Qianxiang; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Xianren

    2016-01-26

    Although the morphology of surface nanobubbles has been studied widely with different AFM modes, AFM images may not reflect the real shapes of the nanobubbles due to AFM tip-nanobubble interactions. In addition, the interplay between surface nanobubble deformation and induced capillary force has not been well understood in this context. In our work we used constraint lattice density functional theory to investigate the interaction between AFM tips and pinned surface nanobubbles systematically, especially concentrating on the effects of tip hydrophilicity and shape. For a hydrophilic tip contacting a nanobubble, its hydrophilic nature facilitates its departure from the bubble surface, displaying a weak and intermediate-range attraction. However, when the tip squeezes the nanobubble during the approach process, the nanobubble shows an elastic effect that prevents the tip from penetrating the bubble, leading to a strong nanobubble deformation and repulsive interactions. On the contrary, a hydrophobic tip can easily pierce the vapor-liquid interface of the nanobubble during the approach process, leading to the disappearance of the repulsive force. In the retraction process, however, the adhesion between the tip and the nanobubble leads to a much stronger lengthening effect on nanobubble deformation and a strong long-range attractive force. The trends of force evolution from our simulations agree qualitatively well with recent experimental AFM observations. This favorable agreement demonstrates that our model catches the main intergradient of tip-nanobubble interactions for pinned surface nanobubbles and may therefore provide important insight into how to design minimally invasive AFM experiments. PMID:26751634

  16. 50 CFR 22.31 - Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State. 22.31 Section 22.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION...

  17. 20 CFR 645.415 - What planning information must a State submit in order to receive a formula grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What planning information must a State submit... Grants Administration § 645.415 What planning information must a State submit in order to receive a... legislation must submit an annual plan meeting the requirements prescribed by the Secretary. This plan...

  18. Imprints of spin-orbit density wave in the hidden-order state of URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy

    2014-01-01

    The mysterious second-order quantum phase transition, commonly attributed to the "hidden-order" (HO) state, in heavy-fermion metal URu2Si2 exhibits a number of paradoxical electronic and magnetic properties which cannot be associated with any conventional order parameter. We characterize and reconcile these exotic properties of the HO state based on a spin-orbit density wave order (SODW), constructed on the basis of a realistic density functional theory band structure. We quantify the nature of the gapped electronic and magnetic excitation spectrum, in agreement with measurements, while the magnetic moment is calculated to be zero owing to the spin-orbit coupling induced time-reversal invariance. Furthermore, a new collective mode in the spin-1 excitation spectrum is predicted to localize at zero momentum transfer in the HO state which can be visualized, for example, by electron spin resonance at zero magnetic field or polarized inelastic neutron scattering measurements. The results demonstrate that the concomitant broken and invariant symmetries protected SODW order not only provides insights into numerous nontrivial hidden-order phenomena, but also offers a parallel laboratory to the formation of a topologically protected quantum state beyond the quantum spin Hall state and Weyl semimetals.

  19. Mesoscale Approach to Feldspar Dissolution: Quantification of Dissolution Incongruency Based on Al/Si Ordering State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Min, Y.; Jun, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of aluminosilicates is important for understanding natural and anthropogenic carbon cycles. The total mass of atmospheric CO2 is regulated by the weathering of silicate minerals, and the fate of geologically sequestered CO2 is affected by the interactions between brine, sandstone, caprock, and CO2, which is initiated by mineral dissolution. It has been shown through both experimental and ab initio studies that the dissolution/weathering reactivities of Al and Si in the matrix of an aluminosilicate can be different under many conditions. A subsequent observation is that the release rates of Al and Si, both from the same mineral, may not be stoichiometric when compared to the bulk chemistry of the mineral. For a very long time, the relationship between mineral dissolution incongruency and mineral crystallographic properties remain largely qualitative and descriptive. Here we study the dissolution incongruency of feldspars, the most abundant aluminosilicate on earth. Mineral dissolution experiments for a series of alkali feldspars (albite, anorthoclase, sanidine, and microcline) and plagioclases (oligoclase, andesine, labradorite, bytownite, and anorthite) were conducted at pH 1.68 under ambient conditions. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and water chemistry analysis (ICP-MS) are combined to examine the effect of Al/Si ordering on mineral dissolution. Our analysis based on a C1 structure model shows that the incongruency, stemming from the different reactivities of Al-O-Si and Si-O-Si linkages in feldspar's framework, is quantifiable and closely related to the Al/Si ordering state of a feldspar. Our results also suggest that the more random the Al/Si distribution of a mineral, the greater the dissolution incongruency. Our results have significant implications for understanding water-rock interactions. First, when studying the effect of water chemistry on water-rock interaction, smaller

  20. Higher-Orders of Squeezing, Sub-Poissonian Statistics and Anti-Bunching of Deformed Photon-Added Coherent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeineh, N.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the higher-order nonclassical properties of a particular class of generalized coherent states namely the deformed photon-added nonlinear coherent states (DPACS) A†m |α, f, m>. To achieve this purpose we pay attention to higher-orders of squeezing (both Hillery- and Hong-Mandel-types), sub-Poissonian statistics and anti-bunching of the mentioned states with a well-known nonlinearity function. It is shown that for enough large values of field intensity (|α|2) for a fixed N (the order of squeezing) by increasing m (the order of excitation) the degree of squeezing evaluated by Hillery and Hong-Mandel approaches increases, while for a chosen fixed value of m, by increasing N for Hillery (Hong-Mandel) type of squeezing the strength of squeezing decreases (increases). Similarly, the degree of higher-order sub-Poissonian statistics (with fixed K) becomes lower when m increases, while (with fixed m) it gets greater values when the order of sub-Poissonian K increases. At last, higher-order anti-bunching of the DPACS is evaluated, by which we established that its (always) negative values increase with increasing m, α and l (the order of anti-bunching) individually, i.e. the degree of anti-bunching increases.

  1. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  2. Delayed-state-derivative feedback for improving consensus performance of second-order delayed multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihai; Fang, Huajing

    2012-01-01

    In this article, delayed-state-derivative feedback is introduced into the existing delayed consensus protocol for improving the robustness against communication delay and the convergence speed of reaching the consensus simultaneously. Frequency-domain analysis and algebra graph theory are employed to derive the sufficient and necessary condition guaranteeing the second-order delayed multi-agent system applying the consensus protocol with the delayed-state-derivative feedback to achieve the stationary consensus asymptotically. It is proved that introducing delayed-state-derivative feedback with the proper intensity can improve the robustness against communication delay and that for two particular kinds of second-order delayed multi-agent systems, introducing the delayed-state-derivative feedback can also accelerate the convergence speed, provided that the intensity of the delayed-state-derivative feedback is chosen properly. Simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  3. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  4. An upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of state redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Nilanjana; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    State redistribution is the protocol in which given an arbitrary tripartite quantum state, with two of the subsystems initially being with Alice and one being with Bob, the goal is for Alice to send one of her subsystems to Bob, possibly with the help of prior shared entanglement. We derive an upper bound on the second order asymptotic expansion for the quantum communication cost of achieving state redistribution with a given finite accuracy. In proving our result, we also obtain an upper bound on the quantum communication cost of this protocol in the one-shot setting, by using the protocol of coherent state merging as a primitive.

  5. Tracer kinetic modeling of [(11)C]AFM, a new PET imaging agent for the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Mika; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lin, Shu-Fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Williams, Wendol; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    [(11)C]AFM, or [(11)C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenylthio]-5-fluoromethylphenylamine, is a new positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for the serotonin transporter (SERT). The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate kinetic model to quantify [(11)C]AFM binding in the healthy human brain. Positron emission tomography data and arterial input functions were acquired from 10 subjects. Compartmental modeling and the multilinear analysis-1(MA1) method were tested using the arterial input functions. The one-tissue model showed a lack of fit in low-binding regions, and the two-tissue model failed to estimate parameters reliably. Regional time-activity curves were well described by MA1. The rank order of [(11)C]AFM binding potential (BPND) matched well with the known regional SERT densities. For routine use of [(11)C]AFM, several noninvasive methods for quantification of regional binding were evaluated, including simplified reference tissue models (SRTM and SRTM2), and multilinear reference tissue models (MRTM and MRTM2). The best methods for region of interest (ROI) analysis were MA1, MRTM2, and SRTM2, with fixed population kinetic values ( or b') for the reference methods. The MA1 and MRTM2 methods were best for parametric imaging. These results showed that [(11)C]AFM is a suitable PET radioligand to image and quantify SERT in humans. PMID:23921898

  6. 76 FR 33967 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Southeastern States; Suspension of Marketing Order Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Potato Committee (Committee). The Committee believes advances in farming technology and production... believes advances in farming technology and production quality have reduced the need for the order. When... advances in farming technology and production quality have reduced the need for the order. When...

  7. Magnetic order and magnon coherent state in double exchange s=1/2 lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.

    2010-02-15

    Starting from trial wave functions and by minimizing the total energy, we obtain the ground state (GS) of a magnetic system in which there is competition between two exchange interactions: one of them between localized and unlocalized spins and another one among the spins of a Heisenberg s=1/2 lattice. This analysis allows us to analyze directly a particular case of a magnetic ground state: a magnon gas whose collective wave function presents similarities with the coherent state of the electromagnetic field which is the basis for the laser. The Kondo coupling becomes concomitant with the external magnetic field which can control the number of magnons. The corresponding Zeeman effect provoked by the magnetic external field plus the Kondo interaction energy compete with the spin-spin Heisenberg exchange of the localized magnetic lattices. The fruit of the competition of these three interactions is the existence of a collective state which can be represented with an oscillation with one only frequency which has a minimum uncertainty and therefore it is a most similar quantum state to a classical wave. This collective state for determined crystal conditions, values of Kondo coupling strength, external B values and Heisenberg J{sub ij}-parameters tends to be a minimal energy state, and then, this coherent state, can transit to a magnon Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The passing from the minimal coherent state towards the BEC condensation is thermodynamically analyzed and we have deduced the critical temperature of this phase transition.

  8. Inhomogeneous ordered states and translational nature of the gauge group in the landau continuum theory: I. General analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Braginsky, A. Ya.

    2007-07-15

    A phenomenological continuum theory of phase transitions to a global inhomogeneous state of a crystal must take into account the compensating fields that represent the fields of stresses caused by dislocations appearing at the boundaries between local homogeneous regions. These compensating fields, which are introduced in order to satisfy the condition of invariance of the Landau potential with respect to the operation of translation, enter into the theory via extended derivatives of the local order parameters with respect to macroscopic coordinates of the local homogeneous regions in the crystal. Because of this extension of derivatives, the theory of phase transitions to an inhomogeneous state must include the theory of elasticity, in which a potential of the stress field induced by the phase transition is proportional to the compensating field magnitude. The Kroener equation, which describes the state of dislocations induced by spatially inhomogeneous ordering, appears in this theory as a result of minimization of the Landau potential with respect to the compensating fields.

  9. The United States and the Developing Countries in the New Emerging International Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, James P.

    1974-01-01

    This article analyzes the position of the United States in light of the global shortage of food and energy. The United States has a unique opportunity to exercise leadership because it dominates the world's production of food and must initiate new global policies to help relieve the problems. (Author/DE)

  10. Second-order shaped pulsed for solid-state quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Pinaki

    2008-01-01

    We present the construction and detailed analysis of highly optimized self-refocusing pulse shapes for several rotation angles. We characterize the constructed pulses by the coefficients appearing in the Magnus expansion up to second order. This allows a semianalytical analysis of the performance of the constructed shapes in sequences and composite pulses by computing the corresponding leading-order error operators. Higher orders can be analyzed with the numerical technique suggested by us previously. We illustrate the technique by analyzing several composite pulses designed to protect against pulse amplitude errors, and on decoupling sequences for potentially long chains of qubits with on-site and nearest-neighbor couplings.

  11. Characterization of deep nanoscale surface trenches with AFM using thin carbon nanotube probes in amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of deep surface trenches with atomic force microscopy (AFM) presents significant challenges due to the sharp step edges that disturb the instrument and prevent it from faithfully reproducing the sample topography. Previous authors have developed AFM methodologies to successfully characterize semiconductor surface trenches with dimensions on the order of tens of nanometers. However, the study of imaging fidelity for features with dimensions smaller than 10 nm has not yet received sufficient attention. Such a study is necessary because small features in some cases lead to apparently high-quality images that are distorted due to tip and sample mechanical deformation. This paper presents multi-scale simulations, illustrating common artifacts affecting images of nanoscale trenches taken with fine carbon nanotube probes within amplitude-modulation and frequency-force-modulation AFM (AM-AFM and FFM-AFM, respectively). It also describes a methodology combining FFM-AFM with a step-in/step-out algorithm analogous to that developed by other groups for larger trenches, which can eliminate the observed artifacts. Finally, an overview of the AFM simulation methods is provided. These methods, based on atomistic and continuum simulation, have been previously used to study a variety of samples including silicon surfaces, carbon nanotubes and biomolecules.

  12. A phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13 in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Achim; Sasse, Stephanie; Topp, Max S.; Eichenauer, Dennis A.; Hummel, Horst; Reiners, Katrin S.; Dietlein, Markus; Kuhnert, Georg; Kessler, Joerg; Buerkle, Carolin; Ravic, Miroslav; Knackmuss, Stefan; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Borchmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AFM13 is a bispecific, tetravalent chimeric antibody construct (TandAb) designed for the treatment of CD30-expressing malignancies. AFM13 recruits natural killer (NK) cells via binding to CD16A as immune effector cells. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, 28 patients with heavily pretreated relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma received AFM13 at doses of 0.01 to 7 mg/kg body weight. Primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetics, antitumor activity, and pharmacodynamics. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Pharmacokinetics assessment revealed a half-life of up to 19 hours. Three of 26 evaluable patients achieved partial remission (11.5%) and 13 patients achieved stable disease (50%), with an overall disease control rate of 61.5%. AFM13 was also active in brentuximab vedotin–refractory patients. In 13 patients who received doses of ≥1.5 mg/kg AFM13, the overall response rate was 23% and the disease control rate was 77%. AFM13 treatment resulted in a significant NK-cell activation and a decrease of soluble CD30 in peripheral blood. In conclusion, AFM13 represents a well-tolerated, safe, and active targeted immunotherapy of Hodgkin lymphoma. A phase 2 study is currently planned to optimize the dosing schedule in order to further improve the therapeutic efficacy. This phase 1 study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01221571. PMID:25887777

  13. Nanoscale manipulation of the Mott insulating state coupled to charge order in 1T-TaS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Doohee; Cheon, Sangmo; Kim, Ki-Seok; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Heum; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Yeom, Han Woong

    2016-01-01

    The controllability over strongly correlated electronic states promises unique electronic devices. A recent example is an optically induced ultrafast switching device based on the transition between the correlated Mott insulating state and a metallic state of a transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2. However, the electronic switching has been challenging and the nature of the transition has been veiled. Here we demonstrate the nanoscale electronic manipulation of the Mott state of 1T-TaS2. The voltage pulse from a scanning tunnelling microscope switches the insulating phase locally into a metallic phase with irregularly textured domain walls in the charge density wave order inherent to this Mott state. The metallic state is revealed as a correlated phase, which is induced by the moderate reduction of electron correlation due to the charge density wave decoherence.

  14. Nanoscale manipulation of the Mott insulating state coupled to charge order in 1T-TaS2

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Doohee; Cheon, Sangmo; Kim, Ki-Seok; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Heum; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Yeom, Han Woong

    2016-01-01

    The controllability over strongly correlated electronic states promises unique electronic devices. A recent example is an optically induced ultrafast switching device based on the transition between the correlated Mott insulating state and a metallic state of a transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2. However, the electronic switching has been challenging and the nature of the transition has been veiled. Here we demonstrate the nanoscale electronic manipulation of the Mott state of 1T-TaS2. The voltage pulse from a scanning tunnelling microscope switches the insulating phase locally into a metallic phase with irregularly textured domain walls in the charge density wave order inherent to this Mott state. The metallic state is revealed as a correlated phase, which is induced by the moderate reduction of electron correlation due to the charge density wave decoherence. PMID:26795073

  15. Feasible Perturbations of Control Systems with Pure State Constraints and Applications to Second-Order Optimality Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehener, Daniel

    2013-10-15

    We propose second-order necessary optimality conditions for optimal control problems with very general state and control constraints which hold true under weak regularity assumptions on the data. In particular the pure state constraints are general closed sets, the optimal control is supposed to be merely measurable and the dynamics may be discontinuous in the time variable as well. These results are obtained by an approach based on local perturbations of the reference process by second-order tangent directions. This method allows direct and quite simple proofs.

  16. Comments on the present state of second-order closure models for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order closure models account for history and nonlocal effects of the mean velocity gradients on the Reynolds stress tensor. Turbulent flows involving body forces or curvature, Reynolds stress relaxational effects, and counter-gradient transport are usually better described. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: (1) the Reynolds stress transport equation; (2) issues in second-order closure modeling; and (3) near wall models.

  17. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R; Barth, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. PMID:26617348

  18. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  19. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  20. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  1. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  2. Surface Morphological Studies on Nerve Cells by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-03-01

    Surface morphological properties of fixed and living nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis have been studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Identified, individual neurons were removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis and plated into poly-L-lysine coated glass cover-slips. The growth of the nerve cells was stopped and fixed with 0.1% Glutaraldehyde and 4% Formaldehyde solution after extension of growth cones at the tip of the axons. Topography and softness of growth cone filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) were probed by AFM. Information obtained from AFM's amplitude and phase channels have been used for determination of softness of the region probed. The results of structural studies on the cells are linked to their mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution.

  3. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  4. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  5. AFM-porosimetry: density and pore volume measurements of particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Malin H; Valle-Delgado, Juan J; Corkery, Robert W; Rutland, Mark W; Alberius, Peter C

    2008-06-01

    We introduced the novel technique of AFM-porosimetry and applied it to measure the total pore volume of porous particles with a spherical geometry. The methodology is based on using an atomic force microscope as a balance to measure masses of individual particles. Several particles within the same batch were measured, and by plotting particle mass versus particle volume, the bulk density of the sample can be extracted from the slope of the linear fit. The pore volume is then calculated from the densities of the bulk and matrix materials, respectively. In contrast to nitrogen sorption and mercury porosimetry, this method is capable of measuring the total pore volume regardless of pore size distribution and pore connectivity. In this study, three porous samples were investigated by AFM-porosimetry: one ordered mesoporous sample and two disordered foam structures. All samples were based on a matrix of amorphous silica templated by a block copolymer, Pluronic F127, swollen to various degrees with poly(propylene glycol). In addition, the density of silica spheres without a template was measured by two independent techniques: AFM and the Archimedes principle. PMID:18503284

  6. Direct comparison of AFM and SEM measurements on the same set of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvallée, A.; Feltin, N.; Ducourtieux, S.; Trabelsi, M.; Hochepied, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    This article is the first step in the development of a hybrid metrology combining AFM and SEM techniques for measuring the dimensions of a nanoparticle population in 3D space (X,Y,Z). This method exploits the strengths of each technique on the same set of nanoparticles. AFM is used for measuring the nanoparticle height and the measurements along X and Y axes are deduced from SEM images. A sampling method is proposed in order to obtain the best deposition conditions of SiO2 and gold nanoparticles on mica or silicon substrates. Only the isolated nanoparticles are taken into account in the histogram of size distribution. Moreover, a semi-automatic Matlab routine has also been developed to process the AFM and SEM images, measure and count the nanoparticles. This routine allows the user to exclusively select the isolated nanoparticles through a control interface. The measurements have been performed on spherical-like nanoparticles to test the method by comparing the results obtained with both techniques.

  7. Ultrasharp high-aspect-ratio probe array for SECM and AFM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Fasching, Rainer J.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2004-07-01

    A powerful experimental tool, ultra-sharp nano-electrode array is designed, fabricated and characterized. The application on a combination of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) and the Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) is demonstrated. It can measure sample electrochemically initiated by SECM changes of topography while detecting topography using AFM. In order to realize this, a specialized probe system that is composed of a micro-mechanical bending structure necessary for the AFM mode and an electrochemical UME-tip required for a high performance SECM is crucial. The probe array is a row of silicon transducers embedded in silicon nitride cantilever array. The sharp high-aspect ratio (20:1) silicon tips are shaped and a thin layer of silicon nitride is deposited, which embeds the silicon tips in a silicon nitride layer so that they protrude through the nitride. Thus, the embedded silicon tips with a diameter less than 600 nm, the top radius less than 20 nm, and the aspect ratio as high as 20 can be achieved. A metal layer and an insulator layer are deposited on these tip structures to make each probe selectively conductive. Finally, cantilever structures are shaped and released by etching the silicon substrate from the backside. Electrochemical and impedance spectroscopic characterization show electrochemical functionality of the transducer system.

  8. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R.; Barth, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system.We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04541J

  9. On-chip generation of high-order single-photon W-states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Perez-Leija, Armando; Keil, Robert; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Moya-Cessa, Hector; Nolte, Stefan; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Quantum superposition is the quantum-mechanical property of a particle whereby it inhabits several of its possible quantum states simultaneously. Ideally, this permissible coexistence of quantum states, as defined on any degree of freedom, whether spin, frequency or spatial, can be used to fully exploit the information capacity of the associated physical system. In quantum optics, single photons are the quanta of light, and their coherence properties allow them to establish entangled superpositions between a large number of channels, making them favourable for realizations of quantum information processing schemes. In particular, single-photon W-states (that is, states exhibiting a uniform distribution of the photons across multiple modes) represent a class of multipartite maximally-entangled quantum states that are highly robust to dissipation. Here, we report on the generation and verification of single-photon W-states involving up to 16 spatial modes, and exploit their underlying multi-mode superposition for the on-chip generation of genuine random numbers.

  10. Recent CD AFM probe developments for sub-45 nm technology nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Chih; Osborne, Jason R.; Dahlen, Gregory A.; Greschner, Johann; Bayer, Thomas; Kalt, Samuel; Fritz, Georg

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on new developments of advanced CD AFM probes after the prior introduction of "trident probes" in SPIE Advanced Lithography 2007 [1]. Trident probes, having sharpened extensions in the tip apex region, make possible bottom CD measurements within a few nanometers of the feature bottom corner; an area where other CD probes have difficulties due to tip shape limitations. Moreover, new metrology applications of trident probes have been developed for novel devices such as FinFET and vertical read/write hard disk heads. For ever smaller technology nodes, new probes evolved from the design of the trident probe. For example, the number of sharpened tip flares was reduced from three (trident) to two (bi-pod) to prevent possible interference of the third leg in the slow scan direction, as shown in Figure 3. Maintaining tip lateral stiffness as the tip size shrinks to less than 30 nm is vital for successful scanning. Consequently, a significant recent improvement is the change of probe shank cross-sectional geometry in order to maintain tip vertical aspect ratio of 1:5 (and lateral stiffness > 1 N/m). Finally, modifications of probe substrate are proposed and evaluated for current and new CD AFM systems. Hydrophobic, self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings were applied on CD probes to reduced tip "pull-away" distance1 during CD AFM scanning. Test results show that the pull away distance can be reduced more than 5 times on average (in some cases, by a factor of 15). Consequently, use of hydrophobic SAM coatings on CD probes mitigates pull-away distance thus allowing narrow trench CD measurements. We discuss limitations of prior CD AFM probes and design considerations of new CD probes. The characterization of first prototypes and evaluation of scan performance are presented in this work.

  11. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  13. Phenomenological theory of the superconducting state inside the hidden-order phase of URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2015-08-01

    Recent experiments have unveiled important properties of the ground state of the elusive heavy fermion URu2Si2 . While tetragonal symmetry-breaking was reported below the hidden-order (HO) transition at THO≈17.5 K , time-reversal symmetry breaking was observed below the superconducting transition temperature Tcstate, such an order parameter is incompatible with broken tetragonal symmetry. Here, we employ a phenomenological model to investigate the properties of a chiral superconducting state that develops inside the hidden-order phase. In this case, there are actually two superconducting transition temperatures: while Tc marks a normal-state to superconducting transition, Tc*states ρ (ω ) is enhanced due to the crossing of two nodal lines, giving rise to an unusual ω ln(ω ) dependence of ρ (ω ) , which is manifested in several thermodynamic properties. We also investigate the emergence of a soft amplitude gap mode near Tc*. In contrast to the usual amplitude mode near a regular normal-state to superconducting transition, this mode becomes soft near a superconducting-to-superconducting transition, which in principle allows for its detection by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, we investigate the impact of twin domains on the anisotropic properties of the superconducting state, and propose experiments in mechanically strained samples to explore the interplay between hidden order and superconductivity in URu2Si2 .

  14. Charge Order in LuFe2O4: Antiferroelectric Ground State and Coupling to Magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Angst, Manuel; Hermann, Raphael P.; Christianson, Andrew D; Lumsden, Mark D; Lee, C; Whangbo, M.-H.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P J; Nagler, Stephen E; Tian, Wei; Jin, Rongying; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David

    2008-11-01

    X-ray scattering by multiferroic LuFe2O4 is reported. Below 320 K, superstructure reflections indicate an incommensurate charge order with propagation close to 1 3 1 3 3 2 . The corresponding charge configuration, also found by electronic structure calculations as most stable, contains polar Fe=O double layers with antiferroelectric stacking. Diffuse scattering at 360 K, with 1 3 1 3 0 propagation, indicates ferroelectric short-range correlations between neighboring double layers. The temperature dependence of the incommensuration indicates that charge order and magnetism are coupled.

  15. 45 CFR 303.73 - Applications to use the courts of the United States to enforce court orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications to use the courts of the United States to enforce court orders. 303.73 Section 303.73 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  16. Robustness of topological order and formation of quantum well states in topological insulators exposed to ambient environment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chaoyu; He, Shaolong; Weng, Hongming; Zhang, Wentao; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Haiyun; Jia, Xiaowen; Mou, Daixiang; Liu, Shanyu; He, Junfeng; Peng, Yingying; Feng, Ya; Xie, Zhuojin; Liu, Guodong; Dong, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Qinjun; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Shenjin; Yang, Feng; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhou, X. J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical property investigation (like transport measurements) and ultimate application of the topological insulators usually involve surfaces that are exposed to ambient environment (1 atm and room temperature). One critical issue is how the topological surface state will behave under such ambient conditions. We report high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements to directly probe the surface state of the prototypical topological insulators, Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3, upon exposing to various environments. We find that the topological order is robust even when the surface is exposed to air at room temperature. However, the surface state is strongly modified after such an exposure. Particularly, we have observed the formation of two-dimensional quantum well states near the exposed surface of the topological insulators. These findings provide key information in understanding the surface properties of the topological insulators under ambient environment and in engineering the topological surface state for applications. PMID:22355146

  17. Ordered vs. disordered states of the random-field model in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, Dmitry A.; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.

    2015-04-01

    We report numerical investigation of the glassy behavior of random-field exchange models in three dimensions. Correlation of energy with the magnetization for different numbers of spin components has been studied. There is a profound difference between the models with two and three spin components with respect to the stability of the magnetized state due to the different kinds of singularities: vortex loops and hedgehogs, respectively. Memory effects pertinent to such states have been investigated. Insight into the mechanism of the large-scale disordering is provided by numerically implementing the Imry-Ma argument in which the spins follow the random field averaged over correlated volumes. Thermal stability of the magnetized states is investigated by the Monte Carlo method.

  18. 76 FR 65360 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Southeastern States; Suspension of Marketing Order Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... interim rule concerning this action was published in the Federal Register on June 10, 2011 (76 FR 33967... at 76 FR 33967 on June 10, 2011, is adopted as a final rule, without change. Dated: October 14, 2011... farming technology and production quality have reduced the need for the order. When considering the...

  19. Refolding of lysozyme by quasistatic and direct dilution reaction paths: A first-order-like state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Yeh, Xu-Cheng; Lee, Hui-Ting; Lin, Po-Yen; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2004-07-01

    A first-order-like state transition model is considered to be a global reaction mechanism to directly folded proteins from an unfolded state to its native form. In order to verify the general applicability of this mechanism, we used lysozyme as a model protein. It was fully unfolded by 4.5M urea, 0.1M dithiothreitol (DTT) in pH3 and refolded to its native form by way of an overcritical reaction path (a quasistatic process) or directly crossing transition boundary path (a directly dilution process). In addition to the two states coexisting in the direct folding path, lyzosyme might be trapped in a glassy state. However, it can escape from the glassy state by concentration twice. This indicates the existence of a state transition line or boundary in the direct folding reaction. However, lysozyme can continuously fold from unfolded to native by an overcritical reaction path. During the overcritical path, four stable folding intermediates and native lysozyme were obtained. The secondary structures, particle size distributions, thermal stabilities, and oxidation state of disulfide bonds of folding intermediates were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra, dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and Raman spectra, respectively. According to the data, the intermediates of both the overcritical reaction and the direct crossing transition boundary paths can be described by a common concept pertaining to a model that undergoes collapse, sequential, and first-order-like state transition. This indicated that protein folding by way of different reaction paths might follow a similar folding mechanism—i.e., a mechanism of overcritical folding of intermediates. A protein folding reaction diagram is postulated and discussed. In spite of a global interaction mechanism the α -helix is formed prior to the β -sheet, which may indicate that protein folding is initiated by local interactions.

  20. Reversible Folding of Lysozyme by a Quasi-static Process: A First-Order-Like State Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu-Cheng, Yeh; Po-Yen, Lin; Chia-Ching, Chang; Lou-Sing, Kan

    2004-03-01

    First-order-like state transition is a novel global reaction model of protein folding. In order to elucidate the general applicability of this mechanism, a stepwise thermal equilibrate dialysis process is used, and a model protein, lysozyme is selected. Within this study, four stable intermediates and renature lysozyme were obtained and their secondary structure, particle size distribution, thermal stability, and oxidation state of disulfide bonds were analyzed by circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and Raman spectra, respectively. According to the experimental evidences in this study, not only first-order-like state transition model has been verified, both collapse and sequential models were observed and verified by an overcritical reaction folding process. We also found that the glassy state which obtained from directly folding process can convert into the molten globule state and this indicated the protein folding under difference reaction path may follow the same folding mechanism. Namely, the mechanism that is revealed by overcritical folding intermediates may represent the real mechanism of protein folding. The helix formed prior to the beta-sheet might indicate that the protein folding was initiated by local interactions.

  1. Synchronisation of a fractional-order chaotic system using finite-time input-to-state stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunlai; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    The issue of synchronisation for a fractional-order chaotic system with uncertainties and disturbance is studied in this paper. The finite-time input-to-state stable theory of fractional-order dynamical system is presented for the first time. A linear feedback controller is proposed to achieve synchronisation of this fractional-order system and guarantee the bounded state error for any bounded interference in finite time. Since the chaotic system displays special dynamical behaviours as invariable Lyapunov exponent spectrums and controllable signal amplitude, one can achieve complete synchronisation and projective synchronisation by only adjusting the system parameter. Numerical simulations are shown to verify the feasibility of the presented synchronisation scheme.

  2. Elastic modulus of polypyrrole nanotubes: AFM measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, Stéphane; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Nysten, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Polypyrrole nanotubes were electrochemically synthesized within the pores of nanoporous track-etched membranes. After dissolution of the template membrane, they were dispersed on PET membranes. Their tensile elastic modulus was measured by probing them in three points bending using an atomic force microscope. The elastic modulus was deduced from force-curve measurements. In this communication, the effect of the synthesis temperature and of the nanotube diameter will be presented. Especially it will be shown that the elastic modulus strongly increases when the nanotube outer diameter is reduced from 160 nm down to 35 nm. These results are in good agreement with previous results showing that the electrical conductivity of polypyrrole nanotubes increases by more than one order of magnitude when the diameter decreases in the same range. These behaviors could be explained by a larger ratio of well-oriented defect-free polymer chains in smaller tubes.

  3. Stochastic modeling analysis of sequential first-order degradation reactions and non-Fickian transport in steady state plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, Daniel K.; Mercer, James W.; Faust, Charles R.

    2014-02-01

    Stochastic analyses were performed to examine sequential first-order monomolecular reactions at the microscopic scale and both Fickian and non-Fickian plume reactive transport at the macroscopic scale. An analytical solution was derived for the chemical master equation (CME) for a closed system of irreversible first-order monomolecular reactions. Taking a Lagrangian reference frame of particles migrating from a source, analyses show that the relative concentration of each species in the deterministic analytical solution for 1-D steady state plug flow with first-order sequential degradation is mathematically equivalent to the mean of a multinomial distribution of plume particles moving at constant velocity with sequential transformations described by transition probabilities of a discrete state, continuous-time Markov chain. In order to examine the coupling of reaction and transport terms in subdiffusive-reactive transport equations, a closed-form multispecies analytical solution also was derived for steady state advection, dispersion, and sequential first-order reaction. Using a 1-D continuous-time random walk (CTRW) embedded in Markov chains, computationally efficient Monte Carlo simulations of particle movement were performed to more fully examine effects of subdiffusive-reactive transport with an application to steady state, sequentially degrading multispecies plumes at a site in Palm, Bay, FL. The simulation results indicated that non-Fickian steady state plumes can resemble Fickian plumes because linear reactions truncate the waiting time between particle jumps, which removes lower velocity particles from the broad spectrum of velocities in highly heterogeneous media. Results show that fitting of Fickian models to plume concentration data can lead to inaccurate estimates of rate constants because of the wide distribution of travel times in highly heterogeneous media.

  4. CONTROL OF ANIMAL PRODUCTION ORDERS: THE STATE-OF-THE-ART

    EPA Science Inventory

    Odors emanating from animal production facilities are the primary environmental cause for complaint resulting in great corrective expense and, in many instances, facility closure. The current state-of-the-art of odor control technology ranges from intensive waste management and g...

  5. Poverty, Inequality and the Future of Social Policy: Western States in the New World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFate, Katherine, Ed.; Lawson, Roger, Ed.; Wilson, William Julius, Ed.

    This book analyzes forces fraying the social fabric of many countries, and the reasons why some Western countries have been more successful than others in addressing these trends. Part 1, "Poverty, Income Inequality, and Labor Market Insecurity: A Comparative Perspective," includes (1) "Markets and States: Poverty Trends and Transfer System…

  6. Sharp high-aspect-ratio AFM tips fabricated by a combination of deep reactive ion etching and focused ion beam techniques.

    PubMed

    Caballero, David; Villanueva, Guillermo; Plaza, Jose Antonio; Mills, Christopher A; Samitier, Josep; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2010-01-01

    The shape and dimensions of an atomic force microscope tip are crucial factors to obtain high resolution images at the nanoscale. When measuring samples with narrow trenches, inclined sidewalls near 90 degrees or nanoscaled structures, standard silicon atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips do not provide satisfactory results. We have combined deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and focused ion beam (FIB) lithography techniques in order to produce probes with sharp rocket-shaped silicon AFM tips for high resolution imaging. The cantilevers were shaped and the bulk micromachining was performed using the same DRIE equipment. To improve the tip aspect ratio we used FIB nanolithography technique. The tips were tested on narrow silicon trenches and over biological samples showing a better resolution when compared with standard AFM tips, which enables nanocharacterization and nanometrology of high-aspect-ratio structures and nanoscaled biological elements to be completed, and provides an alternative to commercial high aspect ratio AFM tips. PMID:20352882

  7. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  8. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  10. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  11. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  12. Conductive supports for combined AFM SECM on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Chami, Mohamed; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Blackstock, Jason J.; Dooleweerdt, Karin; de Rooij, Nico F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Four different conductive supports are analysed regarding their suitability for combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) on biological membranes. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), MoS2, template stripped gold, and template stripped platinum are compared as supports for high resolution imaging of reconstituted membrane proteins or native membranes, and as electrodes for transferring electrons from or to a redox molecule. We demonstrate that high resolution topographs of the bacterial outer membrane protein F can be recorded by contact mode AFM on all four supports. Electrochemical feedback experiments with conductive cantilevers that feature nanometre-scale electrodes showed fast re-oxidation of the redox couple Ru(NH3)63+/2+ with the two metal supports after prolonged immersion in electrolyte. In contrast, the re-oxidation rates decayed quickly to unpractical levels with HOPG or MoS2 under physiological conditions. On HOPG we observed heterogeneity in the re-oxidation rate of the redox molecules with higher feedback currents at step edges. The latter results demonstrate the capability of conductive cantilevers with small electrodes to measure minor variations in an SECM signal and to relate them to nanometre-scale features in a simultaneously recorded AFM topography. Rapid decay of re-oxidation rate and surface heterogeneity make HOPG or MoS2 less attractive for combined AFM-SECM experiments on biological membranes than template stripped gold or platinum supports.

  13. Spontaneous ordering and vortex states of active fluids in circular confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theillard, Maxime; Ezhilan, Barath; Saintillan, David

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental, theoretical and simulation studies have shown that confinement can profoundly affect self-organization in active suspensions leading to striking features such as directed fluid pumping in planar confinement, formation of steady and spontaneous vortices in radial confinement. Motivated by this, we study the dynamics in a suspension of biologically active particles confined in spherical geometries using a mean-field kinetic theory for which we developed a novel numerical solver. In the case of circular confinement, we conduct a systematic exploration of the entire parameter space and distinguish 3 broad states: no-flow, stable vortex and chaotic and several interesting sub-states. Our efficient numerical framework is also employed to study 3D effects and dynamics in more complex geometries.

  14. Polarization state modifications in the propagation of high azimuthal order annular beams.

    PubMed

    Lapucci, A; Ciofini, M

    2001-12-01

    Using a vector Fresnel diffraction propagator we investigate the far-field distributions obtained from guided annular modes with different polarization states. Furthermore we demonstrate that a pure azimuthal polarization transforms into a mainly radial one in the propagation of annular beams with azimuthal mode number higher than 0. This property could enhance the performance of a laser metal-cutting system based on these kind of beams. PMID:19424296

  15. Robust Second Order Sliding mode Observer for the Estimation of the Vehicle States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibet, A.; Nouveliere, L.; Hima, S.; Mammar, S.

    2008-06-01

    This paper is dedicated to the observation of non measurable variables for automotive systems. A non linear observer, based on a sliding mode approach, is presented for the estimation of the dynamic states of the vehicle. The considered technique is applied to the estimation problem for an automated vehicle following. Both the simulation and the experimental results are addressed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the sliding mode observer for different maneuvers, in terms of performances and robustness.

  16. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  17. MOS-based nanocapacitor using C-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Daniel; Sadewasser, Sascha; Aymerich, Xavier

    2003-04-01

    This report details the attempts made to realise nanocapacitors for nanoscale MOS based integrated circuits by AFM anodic oxidation, and therefore isolation, of nano-sized squares of poly-silicon, titanium and aluminium on Si/SiO2. Conductive AFM (C-AFM) was used to perform topographical and electrical characterisation. The experiments were performed with contact mode C-AFM, in ambient air, using Pt-Ir, Co-Cr and Ti coated (20nm) n-type silicon cantilevers. Each sample consisted of a 3-5nm thick conductor deposited on 6nm of SiO2, which was thermally grown on Phosphorus doped (1019 cm-3) n-type Si(100) substrates. Standard cleaning and passivation processes were used. Poly-silicon was immediately found to be too rough to oxidise. Initial current-voltage measurements inside of the titanium-oxide squares suggest initial isolation followed by degradation through Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling. Measurement inconsistencies seen suggest charge storage on the surface or tip with the barrier height of the native titanium oxide thought to be responsible. Al has a thicker natural oxide. To overcome this we designed a series of structures consisting of a Ti finger on SiO2, that is connected to a Ti bond pad, allowing direct probing by a semiconductor parameter analyser. AFM anodic oxidation was performed upon these Ti fingers to reduce their in-plane dimensions towards the nanoscale. To confirm the existence of a nanocapacitor topographical and electrical measurements were then done on and around them.

  18. Influence of vibrational states on high-order-harmonic generation and an isolated attosecond pulse from a N2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Ge, Xin-Lei; Zhong, Huiying; Zhao, Xi; Zhang, Meixia; Jiang, Yuanfei; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2014-11-01

    The high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) from the N2 molecule in an intense laser field is investigated by applying the Lewenstein method. The initial state is constructed as a linear combination of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lower-lying orbital below the HOMO, which is well described by a Gaussian wave packet generated by using the gamess-uk package. The HHG with different vibrational states of N2 are calculated and our results show that the harmonic intensity can be enhanced by higher vibrational states, which can be explained by the ionization probability. We also compared the cases with a different full width at half maximum of laser fields together, which can be well understood by the time-frequency analysis and the three-step model. Finally, the attosecond pulse generation is studied with different vibrational states, where a series of attosecond pulses can be produced with the shortest being 91 as.

  19. On the optimum bit orders with respect to the state complexity of trellis diagrams for binary linear codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Lin, Shu

    1993-01-01

    It was shown earlier that for a punctured Reed-Muller (RM) code or a primitive BCH code, which contains a punctured RM code of the same minimum distance as a large subcode, the state complexity of the minimal trellis diagram is much greater than that for an equivalent code obtained by a proper permutation on the bit positions. To find a permutation on the bit positions for a given code that minimizes the state complexity of its minimal trellis diagram is an interesting and challenging problem. This permutation problem is related to the generalized Hamming weight hierarchy of a code, and is shown that for RM codes, the standard binary order of bit positions is optimum at every bit position with respect to the state complexity of a minimal trellis diagram by using a theorem due to Wei. The state complexity of trellis diagram for the extended and permuted (64, 24) BCH code is discussed.

  20. Magnetic-field penetration and structure of the mixed state in a superconductor with a multicomponent order parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltser, A. S.; Pashkevich, Yu. G.; Filippov, A. E.

    2000-10-01

    Magnetic-field penetration in superconductors with a multicomponent order parameter is discussed. Numerical simulation of the process is performed for a wide range of the external magnetic field and internal parameters of the system. It is found that the kinetic process of the vortex penetration regularly produces domain boundaries separating phases with different realizations of the equilibrium order parameter. As a result a new (mixed) vortex state can appear. It contains two different types of vortices connected to pairs and chains by the surface domain energy. The lattice formed by such vortices has a symmetry lower than hexagonal or tetragonal ones.

  1. Evolution of N defect states and optical transitions in ordered and disordered GaP1-xNx alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, C.; Lindsay, A.; O'Reilly, E. P.

    2008-07-01

    We show using an sp3s* tight-binding model that the band anti-crossing (BAC) model describes well the evolution of the lowest N-related conduction states in ordered GaP1-xNx alloys, including the evolution of the Γ character with increasing x. We obtain a good description of the lowest conduction states in disordered GaPN structures by explicitly treating the interaction between the GaP host Γ conduction band minimum and defect states associated with a random distribution of N atoms. We find a very similar value for the total Γ character mixed into the N levels in the ordered and disordered cases, but a wider distribution of states with Γ character in the disordered case. We show that the band gap reduction with increasing composition is dominated by the increasing formation of N cluster states. Overall key features of the band structure can be well described using a modified BAC model which explicitly includes the broad distribution of N levels in disordered GaPN alloys.

  2. Electronic states in vertically ordered Ge/Si quantum dots detected by photocurrent spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, A. I.; Kirienko, V. V.; Armbrister, V. A.; Bloshkin, A. A.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    We report on intraband photocurrent spectroscopy of sixfold stacked Ge/Si quantum dots embedded in a Si matrix and aligned along the growth direction. The dots are formed in a shape of pyramids with the average lateral size of 18 nm. The n-type heterostructures show broad spectral response ranging from 5 to 20 μm, depending on the polarization of the incoming infrared light. The normal incidence photocurrent peak centered around 12-15 μm is attributed to the transitions from the electron states localized in the Si region adjacent to the dots to continuum states of the Si matrix. The electron confinement is caused by a modification of the conduction band alignment induced by inhomogeneous tensile strain in Si around the buried Ge/Si quantum dots. Using the Ge content and dot shape determined by Raman and scanning tunneling microscopy analysis as input parameters for three-dimensional band structure simulations, a good agreement between measured and calculated electron binding energy is obtained. Photoluminescence spectroscopy and measurements of temperature dependence of dark conductance are used to correlate photocurrent results.

  3. Field-induced multiple order-by-disorder state selection in an antiferromagnetic honeycomb bilayer lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Albarracín, F. A.; Rosales, H. D.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a detailed study of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on a bilayer honeycomb lattice in a highly frustrated regime in the presence of a magnetic field. This study shows strong evidence of entropic order-by-disorder selection in different sectors of the magnetization curve. For antiferromagnetic couplings J1=Jx=Jp/3 , we find that at low temperatures there are two different regions in the magnetization curve selected by this mechanism with different number of soft and zero modes. These regions present broken Z2 symmetry and are separated by a not fully collinear classical plateau at M =1 /2 . At higher temperatures, there is a crossover from the conventional paramagnet to a cooperative magnet. Finally, we also discuss the low-temperature behavior of the system for a less frustrated region, J1=Jx

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation and the magnetically ordered state of TlCuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jens; Smith, Henrik

    2009-12-01

    The dimerized S=(1)/(2) spins of the Cu2+ ions in TlCuCl3 are ordered antiferromagnetically in the presence of a field larger than about 54 kOe in the zero-temperature limit. Within the mean-field approximation all thermal effects are frozen out below 6 K. Nevertheless, experiments show significant changes in the critical field and the magnetization below this temperature, which reflect the presence of low-energetic dimer-spin excitations. We calculate the dimer-spin correlation functions within a self-consistent random-phase approximation, using as input the effective exchange-coupling parameters obtained from the measured excitation spectra. The calculated critical field and magnetization curves exhibit the main features of those measured experimentally but differ in important respects from the predictions of simplified boson models.

  5. Asynchronous consensus of multiple second-order agents with partial state information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanping; Zuo, Min; Jiang, Tongqiang; Du, Junping; Ma, Jingwei

    2013-05-01

    This article studies the asynchronous consensus problem of multiple second-order agents in a sampled-data setting, where asynchrony means that the sampling period of each agent is independent of the others. It is assumed that each agent can only obtain the information of its positions relative to its neighbours at sampling instants. First, a discrete-time protocol is provided based on velocity estimation, and a sufficient and necessary condition for consensus under this protocol is established in virtue of properties of periodic systems. Second, a continuous-time protocol is presented by the theory of dynamic output feedback control, and a sufficient condition for consensus under this protocol is obtained by applying an input delay approach. Simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  6. Decay of Bloch oscillations in the charge-density-wave ordered phase of an all electronic charge density wave state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Oleg; Shvaika, Andrij; Devereaux, Thomas; Freericks, James

    The charge-density-wave phase of the Falicov-Kimball model displays a number of anomalous behavior including the appearance of subgap density of states as the temperature increases. These subgap states should have a significant impact on transport properties, particularly the nonlinear response of the system to a large dc electric field. Using the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh formalism, we employ nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to exactly solve for this nonlinear response. We examine both the current and the order parameter of the conduction electrons as the ordered system is driven by a dc electric field. Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv, Ukraine.

  7. Role of initial state and final quench temperature on aging properties in phase-ordering kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corberi, Federico; Villavicencio-Sanchez, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We study numerically the two-dimensional Ising model with nonconserved dynamics quenched from an initial equilibrium state at the temperature Ti≥Tc to a final temperature Tf below the critical one. By considering processes initiating both from a disordered state at infinite temperature Ti=∞ and from the critical configurations at Ti=Tc and spanning the range of final temperatures Tf∈[0 ,Tc[ we elucidate the role played by Ti and Tf on the aging properties and, in particular, on the behavior of the autocorrelation C and of the integrated response function χ . Our results show that for any choice of Tf, while the autocorrelation function exponent λC takes a markedly different value for Ti=∞ [λC(Ti=∞ ) ≃5 /4 ] or Ti=Tc [λC(Ti=Tc) ≃1 /8 ] the response function exponents are unchanged. Supported by the outcome of the analytical solution of the solvable spherical model we interpret this fact as due to the different contributions provided to autocorrelation and response by the large-scale properties of the system. As changing Tf is considered, although this is expected to play no role in the large-scale and long-time properties of the system, we show important effects on the quantitative behavior of χ . In particular, data for quenches to Tf=0 are consistent with a value of the response function exponent λχ=1/2 λC(Ti=∞ ) =5 /8 different from the one [λχ∈(0.5 -0.56 ) ] found in a wealth of previous numerical determinations in quenches to finite final temperatures. This is interpreted as due to important preasymptotic corrections associated to Tf>0 .

  8. Use of steady-state laurdan fluorescence to detect changes in liquid ordered phases in human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Vest, Rebekah; Wallis, Rachel; Jensen, Lauren B; Haws, Andrea C; Callister, Joseph; Brimhall, Brent; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2006-05-01

    In artificial phospholipid bilayers, dual measurements of laurdan steady-state anisotropy and emission spectra can be used to identify the presence of liquid ordered phases. Human erythrocytes were used as a model to test whether similar measurements could be applied to biological samples. Specifically, laurdan anisotropy and emission spectra were obtained from native erythrocytes before and after treatment with calcium ionophore and from the microvesicles (known to be enriched in liquid ordered domains) shed from the cells during calcium entry. Spectral and anisotropy data were consistent with an increased order and reduced fluidity of erythrocyte membrane lipids upon ionophore treatment. Microvesicle membranes appeared more ordered than native erythrocytes and similar to ionophore-treated cells based on laurdan emission. In contrast, the anisotropy value was lower in microvesicles compared to ionophore-treated cells, suggesting greater probe mobility. Parallel measurements of diphenylhexatriene anisotropy corroborated the laurdan data. These results were consistent with the liquid ordered property of microvesicle membranes based on comparisons to behavior in artificial membranes. Two-photon microscopy was used to examine the distribution of laurdan fluorescence along the surface of erythrocyte membranes before and after ionophore treatment. A dual spatial analysis of laurdan anisotropy, as revealed by the distribution of laurdan emission spectra, and intensity excited by polarized light suggested that the plasma membranes of ionophore-treated erythrocytes may also exhibit elevated numbers of liquid ordered domains. PMID:16988865

  9. Toroidal order in a partially disordered state on a layered triangular lattice: implication to UNi4B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A partial disorder on a layered triangular lattice is theoretically investigated from a viewpoint of toroidal ordering and magnetoelectric effects. We consider an extended periodic Anderson model including a site-dependent antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling between conduction and localized electrons. We show that, by the mean-field approximation, the model exhibits a coplanar vortex-lattice-type magnetic order as observed in a hexagonal uranium compound UNi4B, in the parameter region with intermediate hybridization and electron correlation. This peculiar state accommodates a toroidal order, which leads to the linear magnetoelectric effect. We discuss the implications of our results to UNi4B, focusing on the possible source of the site-dependent antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling.

  10. Novel Transrotational Solid State Order Discovered by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    Exotic thin crystals with unexpected transrotational microstructures have been discovered by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for crystal growth in thin (10-100 nm) amorphous films of different chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) prepared by various methods. Primarily we use our TEM bend contour technique. The unusual phenomenon can be traced in situ in TEM column: dislocation independent regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. Such transrotation (unit cell trans lation is complicated by small rotationrealized round an axis lying in the film plane) can result in strong regular lattice orientation gradients (up to 300 degrees per micrometer) of different geometries: cylindrical, ellipsoidal, toroidal, saddle, etc. Transrotation is increasing as the film gets thinner. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. Transrotational micro crystals have been eventually recognized by other authors in some vital thin film materials, i.e. PCMs for memory, silicides, SrTiO3. Atomic model and possible mechanisms of the phenomenon are discussed. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is also proposed Support of RF Ministry of Education and Science is acknowledged.

  11. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  12. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  13. Next-to-leading order predictions for Z gamma+jet and Z gamma gamma final states at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Hartanto, Heribertus B.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    We present next-to-leading order predictions for final states containing leptons produced through the decay of a Z boson in association with either a photon and a jet, or a pair of photons. The effect of photon radiation from the final state leptons is included and we also allow for contributions arising from fragmentation processes. Phenomenological studies are presented for the LHC in the case of final states containing charged leptons and in the case of neutrinos. We also use the procedure introduced by Stewart and Tackmann to provide a reliable estimate of the scale uncertainty inherent in our theoretical calculations of jet-binned Z gamma cross sections. These computations have been implemented in the public code MCFM.

  14. Simultaneous noncontact AFM and STM of Ag:Si(111)-(3×3)R30∘

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, Adam; Stannard, Andrew; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo; Moriarty, Philip

    2013-02-01

    The Ag:Si(111)-(3×3)R30∘ surface structure has attracted considerable debate concerning interpretation of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) images. In particular, the accepted interpretation of atomic resolution images in NC-AFM has been questioned by theoretical and STM studies. In this paper, we use combined NC-AFM and STM to conclusively show that the inequivalent trimer (IET) configuration best describes the surface ground state. Thermal-averaging effects result in a honeycomb-chained-trimer (HCT) appearance at room temperature, in contrast to studies suggesting that the IET configuration remains stable at higher temperatures [Zhang, Gustafsson, and Johansson, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.74.201304 74, 201304(R) (2006) and J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.1742-658810.1088/1742-6596/61/1/264 61, 1336 (2007)]. We also comment on results obtained at an intermediate temperature that suggest an intriguing difference between the imaging mechanisms of NC-AFM and STM on structurally fluctuating samples.

  15. Wedged AFM-cantilevers for parallel plate cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Hodel, Adrian W; Spielhofer, Andreas; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Helenius, Jonne

    2013-04-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy has gained popularity for mechanical analysis of living cells. In particular, recent AFM-based assays featuring tipless cantilevers and whole-cell deformation have yielded insights into cellular function, structure, and dynamics. However, in these assays the standard ≈10° tilt of the cantilever prevents uniaxial loading, which complicates assessment of cellular geometry and can cause cell sliding or loss of loosely adherent cells. Here, we describe an approach to modify tipless cantilevers with wedges and, thereby, achieve proper parallel plate mechanics. We provide guidance on material selection, the wedge production process, property and geometry assessment, and the calibration of wedged cantilevers. Furthermore, we demonstrate their ability to simplify the assessment of cell shape, prevent lateral displacement of round cells during compression, and improve the assessment of cell mechanical properties. PMID:23473778

  16. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Neugirg, Benedikt R; Koebley, Sean R; Schniepp, Hannes C; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-28

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches-AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation-proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field. PMID:27055900

  17. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation. PMID:26694687

  18. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugirg, Benedikt R.; Koebley, Sean R.; Schniepp, Hannes C.; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches--AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation--proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field.

  19. Molecular modeling of enzyme attachment on AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guedmiller S; Leite, Fabio L; Amarante, Adriano M; Franca, Eduardo F; Cunha, Richard A; Briggs, James M; Freitas, Luiz C G

    2013-09-01

    The immobilization of enzymes on atomic force microscope tip (AFM tip) surface is a crucial step in the development of nanobiosensors to be used in detection process. In this work, an atomistic modeling of the attachment of the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC enzyme) on a functionalized AFM tip surface is proposed. Using electrostatic considerations, suitable enzyme-surface orientations with the active sites of the ACC enzyme available for interactions with bulk molecules were found. A 50 ns molecular dynamics trajectory in aqueous solution was obtained and surface contact area, hydrogen bonding and protein stability were analyzed. The enzyme-surface model proposed here with minor adjustment can be applied to study antigen-antibody interactions as well as enzyme immobilization on silica for chromatography applications. PMID:24029365

  20. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  1. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  2. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, Bernard D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter M.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-02-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts on gold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurements silicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha solution. Interestingly, these different AFM tip cleaning procedures drastically affected the observed adhesion forces. Water contact angle measurements on the corresponding AFM probe chips showed that piranha treatment resulted in a significant increase of AFM probe chip surface hydrophilicity compared to the organic solvent treatment. Obviously this hydrophilicity change caused drastic, even opposite changes in the tip-PFS adhesive force measurement upon electrode potential change to reversibly oxidize and reduce the PFS grafts. Our findings are of pivotal importance for AFM tip adhesion measurements utilizing standard silicon nitride AFM tips. Probe hydrophilicity must be carefully taken into consideration and controlled.

  3. AFM and SThM Characterization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Christopher; Sidorov, Anton; Chen, Xunchi; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report on detailed characterization of epitaxial grown graphene on SiC and chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu foil using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). We focus on the electronic and thermal properties of graphene grain boundaries, and thus providing valuable feedback to materials growth. Specifically, we perform thermal conductivity contrast mapping and surface potential mapping of graphene, and compare with that obtained on the Au electrodes and the substrate.

  4. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  5. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  6. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  7. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  8. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Liashkovich, I.; Neves, V.; Danzberger, J.; Heister, E.; Rangl, M.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Flahaut, E.; Gruber, H. J.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Kienberger, F.; Ebner, A.

    2009-10-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  9. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  10. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes. PMID:21858377

  11. Nematic order-disorder state transition in a liquid crystal analogue formed by oriented and migrating amoeboid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemkemer, R.; Teichgräber, V.; Schrank-Kaufmann, S.; Kaufmann, D.; Gruler, H.

    2000-10-01

    In cell culture, liquid crystal analogues are formed by elongated, migrating, and interacting amoeboid cells. An apolar nematic liquid crystal analogue is formed by different cell types like human melanocytes (=pigment cells of the skin), human fibroblasts (=connective tissue cells), human osteoblasts (=bone cells), human adipocytes (=fat cells), etc. The nematic analogue is quite well described by i) a stochastic machine equation responsible for cell orientation and ii) a self-organized extracellular guiding signal, E_2, which is proportional to the orientational order parameter as well as to the cell density. The investigations were mainly made with melanocytes. The transition to an isotropic state analogue can be accomplished either by changing the strength of interaction (e.g. variation of the cell density) or by influencing the cellular machinery by an externally applied signal: i) An isotropic gaseous state analogue is observed at low cell density (ρ < 110melanocytes/mm^2) and a nematic liquid crystal state analogue at higher cell density. ii) The nematic state analogue disappears if the bipolar shaped melanocytes are forced to become a star-like shape (induced by colchicine or staurosporine). The analogy between nematic liquid crystal state analogue formed by elongated, migrating and interacting cells and the nematic liquid crystal phase formed by interacting elongated molecules is discussed.

  12. The higher-order structure in the cells nucleus as the structural basis of the post-mitotic state.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando; Dent, Myrna A R; Martínez-Gómez, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    In metazoan cells during the interphase nuclear DNA is organized in supercoiled, topologically constrained loops anchored to a proteinaceous compartment or substructure commonly known as the nuclear matrix (NM). The DNA-NM interactions result from a thermodynamically-driven process leading to the necessary dissipation of structural stress along chromosomal DNA, otherwise the chromosomes would break into pieces. Such DNA-NM interactions define a nuclear higher-order structure that is independent of chromatin proteins. On the other hand, a metazoan cell no longer able to undergo mitosis is defined as post-mitotic and this condition indicates a terminally differentiated cell that may survive in such a state for indefinite time. The non-reversible nature of the post-mitotic state suggests a non-genetic basis for it since no spontaneous or induced mutations can revert it. Yet in individual cells the loss of proliferative potential has both a developmental and a stochastic component. Here we discuss evidence suggesting that the stability of the nuclear higher-order structure is the factor that links the stochastic and developmental components leading to the post-mitotic state. PMID:24556025

  13. The order of three lowest-energy states of the six-electron harmonium at small force constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasburger, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    The order of low-energy states of six-electron harmonium is uncertain in the case of strong correlation, which is not a desired situation for the model system being considered for future testing of approximate methods of quantum chemistry. The computational study of these states has been carried out at the frequency parameter ω = 0.01, using the variational method with the basis of symmetry-projected, explicitly correlated Gaussian (ECG) lobe functions. It has revealed that the six-electron harmonium at this confinement strength is an octahedral Wigner molecule, whose order of states is different than in the strong confinement regime and does not agree with the earlier predictions. The results obtained for ω = 0.5 and 10 are consistent with the findings based on the Hund's rules for the s2p4 electron configuration. Substantial part of the computations has been carried out on the graphical processing units and the efficiency of these devices in calculation of the integrals over ECG functions has been compared with traditional processors.

  14. Detection of symmetry-protected topological order in AKLT states by exact evaluation of the strange correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, K.; Beach, K. S. D.

    2016-06-01

    The strange correlator [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247202 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.247202] has been proposed as a measure of symmetry protected topological order in one- and two-dimensional systems. It takes the form of a spin-spin correlation function, computed as a mixed overlap between the state of interest and a trivial local product state. We demonstrate that it can be computed exactly (asymptotically, in the Monte Carlo sense) for various Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states by direct evaluation of the wave function within the valence bond loop gas framework. We present results for lattices with chain, square, honeycomb, cube, diamond, and hyperhoneycomb geometries. In each case, the spin quantum number S is varied such that 2 S (the number of valence bonds emerging from each site) achieves various integer multiples of the lattice coordination number. We introduce the concept of strange correlator loop winding number and point to its utility in testing for the presence of symmetry protected topological order.

  15. Data fusion for CD metrology: heterogeneous hybridization of scatterometry, CDSEM, and AFM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazart, J.; Chesneau, N.; Evin, G.; Largent, A.; Derville, A.; Thérèse, R.; Bos, S.; Bouyssou, R.; Dezauzier, C.; Foucher, J.

    2014-04-01

    The manufacturing of next generation semiconductor devices forces metrology tool providers for an exceptional effort in order to meet the requirements for precision, accuracy and throughput stated in the ITRS. In the past years hybrid metrology (based on data fusion theories) has been investigated as a new methodology for advanced metrology [1][2][3]. This paper provides a new point of view of data fusion for metrology through some experiments and simulations. The techniques are presented concretely in terms of equations to be solved. The first point of view is High Level Fusion which is the use of simple numbers with their associated uncertainty postprocessed by tools. In this paper, it is divided into two stages: one for calibration to reach accuracy, the second to reach precision thanks to Bayesian Fusion. From our perspective, the first stage is mandatory before applying the second stage which is commonly presented [1]. However a reference metrology system is necessary for this fusion. So, precision can be improved if and only if the tools to be fused are perfectly matched at least for some parameters. We provide a methodology similar to a multidimensional TMU able to perform this matching exercise. It is demonstrated on a 28 nm node backend lithography case. The second point of view is Deep Level Fusion which works on the contrary with raw data and their combination. In the approach presented here, the analysis of each raw data is based on a parametric model and connections between the parameters of each tool. In order to allow OCD/SEM Deep Level Fusion, a SEM Compact Model derived from [4] has been developed and compared to AFM. As far as we know, this is the first time such techniques have been coupled at Deep Level. A numerical study on the case of a simple stack for lithography is performed. We show strict equivalence of Deep Level Fusion and High Level Fusion when tools are sensitive and models are perfect. When one of the tools can be considered as a

  16. Protein-DNA interactions in high speed AFM: single molecule diffusion analysis of human RAD54.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Humberto; Suzuki, Yuki; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Wyman, Claire

    2011-11-01

    High-speed AFM (atomic force microscopy also called scanning force microscopy) provides nanometre spatial resolution and sub-second temporal resolution images of individual molecules. We exploit these features to study diffusion and motor activity of the RAD54 DNA repair factor. Human RAD54 functions at critical steps in recombinational-DNA repair. It is a member of the Swi2/Snf2 family of chromatin remodelers that translocate on DNA using ATP hydrolysis. A detailed single molecular description of DNA-protein interactions shows intermediate states and distribution of variable states, usually hidden by ensemble averaging. We measured the motion of individual proteins using single-particle tracking and observed that random walks were affected by imaging-buffer composition. Non-Brownian diffusion events were characterized in the presence and in the absence of nucleotide cofactors. Double-stranded DNA immobilized on the surface functioned as a trap reducing Brownian motion. Distinct short range slides and hops on DNA were visualized by high-speed AFM. These short-range interactions were usually inaccessible by other methods based on optical resolution. RAD54 monomers displayed a diffusive behavior unrelated to the motor activity. PMID:21986699

  17. Excited-state absorption and third-order optical nonlinearities in symmetric π-electron organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. R. J.

    1996-07-01

    Excited-State Absorption (ESA), Two-Photon Absorption (TPA) and the third-order polarizability γ(ω;ω,ω, - ω) have been investigated for a model dichloride derivative of a symmetrically substituted benzylidene analine (SBAC), using a multielectron configuration-interaction procedure. The calculations indicate that SBAC exhibits ESA across the visible region of the spectrum, but that it is not as extensive as for molecules such as the phthalocyanines. The magnitude of the third-order polarizability is dominated by resonance enhancement from a very strong A g → B u one-photon absorption. The calculated off-resonance value for γ(ω;ω,ω, - ω) suggests that SBAC is a potential candidate for ultrafast switching applications.

  18. Communication: extended multi-state complete active space second-order perturbation theory: energy and nuclear gradients.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Toru; Gyorffy, Werner; Celani, Paolo; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-08-28

    The extended multireference quasi-degenerate perturbation theory, proposed by Granovsky [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 214113 (2011)], is combined with internally contracted multi-state complete active space second-order perturbation theory (XMS-CASPT2). The first-order wavefunction is expanded in terms of the union of internally contracted basis functions generated from all the reference functions, which guarantees invariance of the theory with respect to unitary rotations of the reference functions. The method yields improved potentials in the vicinity of avoided crossings and conical intersections. The theory for computing nuclear energy gradients for MS-CASPT2 and XMS-CASPT2 is also presented and the first implementation of these gradient methods is reported. A number of illustrative applications of the new methods are presented. PMID:21895152

  19. Short-Range Order of Mesomorphic Phase of a Semi-crystalline Polymer by Solid-State NMR: Isotactic Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shichen; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Mesophase is intermediate phase between crystalline and melt state. Characterization of short-range structures of disordered mesomorphic phase without long-range order is challenging issue in polymer characterization. The short range order was considered same as α or β i PP, or neither. In this work, a new strategy using 13C-13C through space interactions as well as molecular dynamics based on chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) re-orientation is proposed for evaluating short-range order of mesophase of isotactic-polypropylene (iPP). 13C-13C double quantum (DQ) build up curves of 13C 15 percent CH3 selectively labeled iPP and spin dynamics simulations elucidate that local packing structures in mesophase is very close to that in β phase. Moreover, exchange NMR proves that the crystalline chains perform large amplitude motions in all α, β, and mesophase. The correlation time of overall dynamics of stems in mesophase follows the same Arrhenius line with that of β phase but is largely deviated from the Arrhenius line of the α phase. Through the obtained results, it is concluded that short-range order in mesophase is exceedingly close or same to those in β phase. This work was financially supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-1105829) and by UA startup funds.

  20. Dynamic modification of the fragmentation of CO{sup q+} excited states generated with high-order harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; De, S.; Singh, K. P.; Chen, S.; Laurent, G.; Ray, D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C. L.; Schoeffler, M. S.; Belkacem, A.; Osipov, T.; Rescigno, T.; Alnaser, A. S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Zherebtsov, S.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-10-15

    The dynamic process of fragmentation of CO{sup q+} excited states is investigated using a pump-probe approach. EUV radiation (32-48 eV) generated by high-order harmonics was used to ionize and excite CO molecules and a time-delayed infrared (IR) pulse (800 nm) was used to influence the evolution of the dissociating multichannel wave packet. Two groups of states, separable experimentally by their kinetic-energy release (KER), are populated by the EUV and lead to C{sup +}-O{sup +} fragmentation: direct double ionization of the neutral molecule and fragmentation of the cation leading to C{sup +}-O*, followed by autoionization of O*. The IR pulse was found to modify the KER of the latter group in a delay-dependent way which is explained with a model calculation.

  1. Immigration, Statecraft and Public Health: The 1920 Aliens Order, Medical Examinations and the Limitations of the State in England

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Becky

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the medical measures of the 1920 Aliens Order barring aliens from Britain. Building on existing local and port public health inspection, the requirement for aliens to be medically inspected before landing significantly expanded the duties of these state agencies and necessitated the creation of a new level of physical infrastructure and administrative machinery. This article closely examines the workings and limitations of alien medical inspection in two of England’s major ports—Liverpool and London—and sheds light on the everyday working of the Act. In doing so it reflects on the ambitions, actions and limitations of the state and so extends research by historians of the nineteenth and early twentieth century on the disputed histories of public health and the complexities of statecraft. Overall it suggests the importance of developing nuanced understandings of the gaps and failures arising from the translation of legislation into practice. PMID:27482146

  2. Exploring high temperature magnetic order in CeTi1-xScxGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereni, J. G.; Pedrazzini, P.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Chacoma, A.; Encina, S.; Gruner, T.; Caroca-Canales, N.; Geibel, C.

    2015-03-01

    We studied the magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic properties of the alloy CeTi1-xScxGe in order to shed some light into the origin of the exceptionally large antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering temperature TN = 47 K in pure CeScGe. We observed a complex magnetic phase diagram, which present an interesting dichotomy: Despite strong changes in the nature of the ordered state, from ferromagnetic (FM) for x <= 0.55 to AFM for x > 0.55, the ordering temperature increases smoothly and continuously from TC = 7 K at x = 0.25 to TN = 47 K at x = 1. Within the AFM regime we observe a metamagnetic transition at a critical field increasing from H = 0 at x ≈ 0.55 to μ0 * H ≈ 6 Tesla at x = 1. Furthermore a second transition appears at TL <= TN for x >= 0.65. In contrast to observations in CeRh2Si2 or CeRh3B2, we found no evidence for a strong hybridization of the 4f electrons at large Sc contents. Therefore the exceptionally large TN of CeScGe could be attributed to the unusually strong RKKY interaction in this type of compounds.

  3. Low Order Uncertainty Dynamics in Ocean State Estimation: Reduced Hessian Method for Constraining Barotropic Drake Passage Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmikov, A.; Heimbach, P.; Wunsch, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) is of central practical and theoretical importance in Ocean State Estimation, enabling estimation of error bounds of model outputs as well as new dynamical insight by analyzing information propagation in ocean models. Key effort in developing UQ techniques applicable to realistic large scale ocean models is numerical scalability for high dimensionality imposed by high resolution discretization of infinite dimensional PDEs governing ocean dynamics. This scalability requirement conflicts with the "curse of dimensionality" restricting current non-Gaussian UQ approaches to low dimensional idealized problems. On the other hand, practical progress in large scale UQ was enabled by Hessian-based methodologies, relying on a Gaussian approximation of the nonlinear state-space statistics. Validity of this approximation is rooted in the experience that for many large scale ocean problems the dynamics are smooth and not chaotic, supported by the expectation that small scale turbulence cancels out in aggregate converging to asymptotic normality on the large scale. Here, the dynamics of large scale uncertainty is addressed directly by explicit analysis of propagation of assimilated information in a global ocean model. It is demonstrated that for the case of barotropic Drake Passage transport separate uncertainty propagation mechanisms can be identified on small and large scales, with aggregate balances governed by simple low order dynamics. Reduced order Hessian is derived to approximate the dominant uncertainty evolution patterns, explaining the physical mechanisms of uncertainty propagation and reduction in a global ocean model.

  4. Structural changes of polysulfone membrane use for hemodialysis in the consecutive regime: nanometric analysis by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batina, Nikola; Acosta García, Ma. Cristina; Avalos Pérez, Angélica; Alberto Ramírez, Mario; Franco, Martha; Pérez Gravas, Héctor; Cadena Méndez, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the hemodialytic treatment of patients with either acute or chronic renal failure has been improved by promoting biocompatibility in the use of new materials and improve membrane surface characteristics. Low and high flux polysulfone membranes (PM) used in dialysis and ultra filtration have been studied in order to understand the geometry and surface chemistry of the pores at inner (nanometric) and outer (micrometric) membrane parts. The surface changes of polysulfone cartridge membrane (PM) during different number of consecutive reuse trials: after 1st, 10th and 23th times of use. The morphology of the hollow fibers surfaces was studied by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and the surface roughness analysis. The roughness of both inner and outer part of PM surface increases with numbers of reuse trails. Thus, small and medium size pores were wiped out when the number of uses changed from zero to 23 on the outer surface. The pore density decreases. The inner part of membrane shows some nanometric size deformation in forms of new openings and raptures. The AFM analysis show differences in the PM morphology at the nanometric level, not previously revealed, which could be important in the evaluation of the PM.

  5. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  6. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  7. Imaging and manipulation of nanoscale materials with coaxial and triaxial AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2011-03-01

    We present coaxial and triaxial Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probes and demonstrate their applications to imaging and manipulating nanoscale materials. A coaxial probe with concentric electrodes at its tip creates a highly confined electric field that decays as a dipole field, making the coaxial probe useful for near field imaging of electrical properties. We show nearly an order of magnitude improvement in the step resolution of Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes. We further demonstrate that coaxial probes can image dielectric materials with the dielectrophoretic force. In addition to imaging, the capacitive structure that makes up the cantilever of a coaxial probe is used to locally mechanically drive the probe, making them self-driving probes. Finally, coaxial probes can create strong forces with dielectrophoresis (DEP) which we combine with the nanometer precision of the AFM to create a nanometer scale pick-and-place tool. We demonstrate 3D assembly of micrometer scale objects with coaxial probes using positive DEP and discuss the assembly of nanometer scale objects with triaxial probes using negative DEP.

  8. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I I; Chan, C T; Chan, H B; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  9. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  10. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  11. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  12. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  13. Evaluating High-Degree-and-Order Gravitational Harmonics and its Application to the State Predictions of a Lunar Orbiting Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Joo; Kim, Bang-Yeop

    2015-09-01

    In this work, an efficient method with which to evaluate the high-degree-and-order gravitational harmonics of the nonsphericity of a central body is described and applied to state predictions of a lunar orbiter. Unlike the work of Song et al. (2010), which used a conventional computation method to process gravitational harmonic coefficients, the current work adapted a well-known recursion formula that directly uses fully normalized associated Legendre functions to compute the acceleration due to the non-sphericity of the moon. With the formulated algorithms, the states of a lunar orbiting satellite are predicted and its performance is validated in comparisons with solutions obtained from STK/Astrogator. The predicted differences in the orbital states between STK/Astrogator and the current work all remain at a position of less than 1 m with velocity accuracy levels of less than 1 mm/s, even with different orbital inclinations. The effectiveness of the current algorithm, in terms of both the computation time and the degree of accuracy degradation, is also shown in comparisons with results obtained from earlier work. It is expected that the proposed algorithm can be used as a foundation for the development of an operational flight dynamics subsystem for future lunar exploration missions by Korea. It can also be used to analyze missions which require very close operations to the moon.

  14. The unusual normal state and charge-density-wave order in 2H-NbSe2.

    PubMed

    Koley, S; Mohanta, N; Taraphder, A

    2015-05-13

    Competition between collective states like charge-density-wave and superconductivity, unencumbered by the spin degrees of freedom, is played out in some of the transition metal dichalcogenides. Although 2H-NbSe2 has received much less attention than some of the other members of the family (such as 1T-TiSe2 and 2H-TaSe2) of late, it shows superconductivity at 7.2 K and incommensurate charge ordering at 33 K. Recent experiments, notably angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, have cast serious doubts on the theories based on Fermi surface nesting and electron-phonon interaction. The normal state has been found to be a poor, incoherent metal and remarkably, the coherence increases in the broken symmetry state. From a preformed excitonic liquid scenario, we show that there exists a natural understanding of the experimental data on 2H-NbSe2, based on electron-electron interaction. The collective instabilities, in this scenario, are viewed as a condensation of an incoherent excitonic liquid already present at high temperature. PMID:25880453

  15. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  16. Comparison of dynamic lever STM and noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Bammerlin, M.; Lüthi, R.; Loppacher, C.; Battiston, F.; Lü, J.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    We investigate interaction effects which occur in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by performing local force spectroscopy with an oscillating tip while imaging Si(111)7×7 terraces in the dynamic lever STM mode (constant time-averaged current). It is found that true atomic resolution is achieved close to the minimum of the resonance frequency vs. distance curve and even closer to the sample. On the other hand true atomic resolution in noncontact AFM (constant frequency shift) is expected several nm away from this minimum, in the range where the frequency shift becomes more negative with decreasing distance.

  17. The Emergence of AFM Applications to Cell Biology: How new technologies are facilitating investigation of human cells in health and disease at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Sinha, Animesh A.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobotics has been used for building nano devices in semiconductors for almost a decade. Leveraging the unparallel precision localization capabilities of this technology, high resolution imaging and mechanical property characterization is now increasingly being performed in biological settings. AFM also offers the prospect for handling and manipulating biological materials at nanometer scale. It has unique advantages over other methods, permitting experiments in the liquid phase where physiological conditions can be maintained. Taking advantage of these properties, our group has visualized membrane and cytoskeletal structures of live cells by controlling the interaction force of the AFM tip with cellular components at the nN or sub-nN range. Cell stiffness changes were observed by statistically analyzing the Young’s modulus values of human keratinocytes before and after specific antibody treatment. Furthermore, we used the AFM cantilever as a robotic arm for mechanical pushing, pulling and cutting to perform nanoscale manipulations of cell-associated structures. AFM guided nano-dissection, or nanosurgery was enacted on the cell in order to sever intermediate filaments connecting neighboring keratinocytes via sub 100 nm resolution cuts. Finally, we have used a functionalized AFM tip to probe cell surface receptors to obtain binding force measurements. This technique formed the basis for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS). In addition to enhancing our basic understanding of dynamic signaling events in cell biology, these advancements in AFM based biomedical investigations can be expected to facilitate the search for biomarkers related to disease diagnosis progress and treatment. PMID:24416719

  18. AFM Studies on Liquid Superlubricity between Silica Surfaces Achieved with Surfactant Micelles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Xinchun; Wang, Weiqi; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-06-01

    By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we showed that the liquid superlubricity with a superlow friction coefficient of 0.0007 can be achieved between two silica surfaces lubricated by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) solution. There exists a critical load that the lubrication state translates from superlow friction to high friction reversibly. To analyze the superlow friction mechanism and the factors influencing the critical load, we used AFM to measure the structure of adsorbed C16TAB molecules and the normal force between two silica surfaces. Experimental results indicate that the C16TAB molecules are firmly adsorbed on the two silica surfaces by electrostatic interaction, forming cylinder-like micelles. Meanwhile, the positively charged headgroups exposed to solution produce the hydration and double layer repulsion to bear the applied load. By controlling the concentration of C16TAB solution, it is confirmed that the critical load of superlow friction is determined by the maximal normal force produced by the hydration layer. Finally, the superlow friction mechanism was proposed that the adsorbed micellar layer forms the hydration layer, making the two friction surfaces be in the repulsive region and meanwhile providing excellent fluidity without adhesion between micelles. PMID:27192019

  19. XRD and AFM characterization of epitaxial Nb films before and after hydrogen exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Monica; Heuser, Brent; Durfee, Curtis

    2001-03-01

    Epitaxial Nb films have been characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after hydrogenation at 100 C and 760 Torr. Two 1000 Angstrom epitaxial Nb films were grown on a-plane sapphire with two different miscut angles, 0.08 and 1.4 degrees. Both Nb films were capped with a 100 Angstrom thick Pd layer to facilitate molecular hydrogen dissociation. While the as-grow film mosaic did not depend on miscut angle, the surface morphology was significantly different. In particular, the high miscut film exhibited a fingered topography that was absent in the low miscut film. Hydrogen absorption under the conditions stated above induce a complete conversion of Nb to the alpha prime hydride phase. The Nb hydride phase transformation process is known to create dislocations as incoherent phase boundaries pass through the lattice. The surface morphology and lattice mosaic from post-hydrogen AFM and XRD measurements, respectively, show the extreme effect of the phase transformation process. Discussion will focus on the lattice mosaic broadening, residual strain, and surface features after hydrogen exposure.

  20. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D; Fantner, Georg E

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  1. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  2. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  3. Possible enhancements of AFM spin-fluctuations in high-TC cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlborg, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Ab-initio band calculations for high-TC cuprates, together with modelling based of a free electron like band, show a strong interaction between anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) spin waves and periodic lattice distortions as for phonons, even though this type of spin-phonon coupling (SPC) is underestimated in calculations using the local density approximation. The SPC has a direct influence on the properties of the HTC cuprates and it can explain many observations. The strongest effects are seen for modulated waves in the CuO bond direction, and a band gap is formed near the X,Y points, but unusal band dispersion (like ``waterfalls'') might also be induced below the Fermi energy (EF) in the diagonal direction. The band results are used to propose different ways of increasing AFM spin-fluctuations locally, and to have a higher density-of-states (DOS) at EF. Static potential modulations, via periodic distribution of dopants or lattice distortions, can be tuned to increase the DOS. This opens for possibilities to enhance coupling for spin fluctuations (λsf) and superconductivity. The exchange enhancement is in general increased near a surface, which suggests a tendency towards static spin configurations. The sensivity of the band results to corrections of the local density potential are discussed.

  4. On the molecular interaction between albumin and ibuprofen: An AFM and QCM-D study.

    PubMed

    Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Etxebarria, Juan; Reichardt, Niels-Christian; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of proteins on surfaces often results in a change of their structural behavior and consequently, a loss of bioactivity. One experimental method to study interactions on a molecular level is single molecular force spectroscopy that permits to measure forces down to the pico-newton range. In this work, the binding force between human serum albumin (HSA), covalently immobilized on glutaraldehyde modified gold substrates, and ibuprofen sodium salt was studied by means of single molecular force spectroscopy. First of all, a protocol was established to functionalize atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips with ibuprofen. The immobilization protocol was additionally tested by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and contact angle measurements. AFM was used to characterize the adsorption of HSA on gold substrates, which lead to a packed monolayer of thickness slightly lower than the reported value in solution. Finally, single molecule spectroscopy results were used to characterize the binding force between albumin and ibuprofen and calculate the distance of the transition state (0.6 nm) and the dissociation rate constant (0.055 s(-1)). The results might indicate that part of the adsorbed protein still preserves its functionality upon adsorption. PMID:26218522

  5. Advanced Compatibility Characterization Of AF-M315E With Spacecraft Propulsion System Materials Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Greene, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    All spacecraft require propulsion systems for thrust and maneuvering. Propulsion systems can be chemical, nuclear, electrical, cold gas or combinations thereof. Chemical propulsion has proven to be the most reliable technology since the deployment of launch vehicles. Performance, storability, and handling are three important aspects of liquid chemical propulsion. Bipropellant systems require a fuel and an oxidizer for propulsion, but monopropellants only require a fuel and a catalyst for propulsion and are therefore simpler and lighter. Hydrazine is the state of the art propellant for monopropellant systems, but has drawbacks because it is highly hazardous to human health, which requires extensive care in handling, complex ground ops due to safety and environmental considerations, and lengthy turnaround times for reusable spacecraft. All users of hydrazine monopropellant must contend with these issues and their associated costs. The development of a new monopropellant, intended to replace hydrazine, has been in progress for years. This project will apply advanced techniques to characterize the engineering properties of materials used in AF-M315E propulsion systems after propellant exposure. AF-M315E monopropellant has been selected HQ's Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) to replace toxic hydrazine for improved performance and reduce safety and health issues that will shorten reusable spacecraft turn-around time. In addition, this project will fundamentally strengthen JSC's core competency to evaluate, use and infuse liquid propellant systems.

  6. State-Space Analysis of Time-Varying Higher-Order Spike Correlation for Multiple Neural Spike Train Data

    PubMed Central

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Amari, Shun-ichi; Brown, Emery N.; Grün, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Precise spike coordination between the spiking activities of multiple neurons is suggested as an indication of coordinated network activity in active cell assemblies. Spike correlation analysis aims to identify such cooperative network activity by detecting excess spike synchrony in simultaneously recorded multiple neural spike sequences. Cooperative activity is expected to organize dynamically during behavior and cognition; therefore currently available analysis techniques must be extended to enable the estimation of multiple time-varying spike interactions between neurons simultaneously. In particular, new methods must take advantage of the simultaneous observations of multiple neurons by addressing their higher-order dependencies, which cannot be revealed by pairwise analyses alone. In this paper, we develop a method for estimating time-varying spike interactions by means of a state-space analysis. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled as multi-variate binary processes using a log-linear model that provides a well-defined measure of higher-order spike correlation in an information geometry framework. We construct a recursive Bayesian filter/smoother for the extraction of spike interaction parameters. This method can simultaneously estimate the dynamic pairwise spike interactions of multiple single neurons, thereby extending the Ising/spin-glass model analysis of multiple neural spike train data to a nonstationary analysis. Furthermore, the method can estimate dynamic higher-order spike interactions. To validate the inclusion of the higher-order terms in the model, we construct an approximation method to assess the goodness-of-fit to spike data. In addition, we formulate a test method for the presence of higher-order spike correlation even in nonstationary spike data, e.g., data from awake behaving animals. The utility of the proposed methods is tested using simulated spike data with known underlying correlation dynamics. Finally, we apply the methods

  7. State-space analysis of time-varying higher-order spike correlation for multiple neural spike train data.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Hideaki; Amari, Shun-Ichi; Brown, Emery N; Grün, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Precise spike coordination between the spiking activities of multiple neurons is suggested as an indication of coordinated network activity in active cell assemblies. Spike correlation analysis aims to identify such cooperative network activity by detecting excess spike synchrony in simultaneously recorded multiple neural spike sequences. Cooperative activity is expected to organize dynamically during behavior and cognition; therefore currently available analysis techniques must be extended to enable the estimation of multiple time-varying spike interactions between neurons simultaneously. In particular, new methods must take advantage of the simultaneous observations of multiple neurons by addressing their higher-order dependencies, which cannot be revealed by pairwise analyses alone. In this paper, we develop a method for estimating time-varying spike interactions by means of a state-space analysis. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled as multi-variate binary processes using a log-linear model that provides a well-defined measure of higher-order spike correlation in an information geometry framework. We construct a recursive Bayesian filter/smoother for the extraction of spike interaction parameters. This method can simultaneously estimate the dynamic pairwise spike interactions of multiple single neurons, thereby extending the Ising/spin-glass model analysis of multiple neural spike train data to a nonstationary analysis. Furthermore, the method can estimate dynamic higher-order spike interactions. To validate the inclusion of the higher-order terms in the model, we construct an approximation method to assess the goodness-of-fit to spike data. In addition, we formulate a test method for the presence of higher-order spike correlation even in nonstationary spike data, e.g., data from awake behaving animals. The utility of the proposed methods is tested using simulated spike data with known underlying correlation dynamics. Finally, we apply the methods

  8. Theory of Metastable State Relaxation for Non-Critical Binary Systems with Non-Conserved Order Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izmailov, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1993-01-01

    A new mathematical ansatz for a solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau non-linear partial differential equation is developed for non-critical systems such as non-critical binary solutions (solute + solvent) described by the non-conserved scalar order parameter. It is demonstrated that in such systems metastability initiates heterogeneous solute redistribution which results in formation of the non-equilibrium singly-periodic spatial solute structure. It is found how the time-dependent period of this structure evolves in time. In addition, the critical radius r(sub c) for solute embryo of the new solute rich phase together with the metastable state lifetime t(sub c) are determined analytically and analyzed.

  9. Diabatic Mechanisms of Higher-Order Harmonic Generation in Solid-State Materials under High-Intensity Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaya, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Ogawa, T.; Tanaka, K.

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate mechanisms of higher-order harmonic generation in solid-state materials under a high-intensity ac electric field. A new theoretical framework presented in this Letter holds the legitimacy of Bloch's theorem even under the influence of the high-intensity electric field and provides an exact treatment of the diabatic processes of Bloch electrons. Utilizing this framework, we first discovered that the diabatic processes, namely, ac Zener tunneling and semimetallization of semiconductors, are key factors for nonperturbative mechanisms of HHG. These mechanisms are classified by the field intensity and could be understood by an extended simple man model based on an analogy between tunnel ionization in gaseous media and Zener tunneling in semiconductors. These conclusions would stimulate the universal understanding of HHG mechanisms in both atomic and solid cases.

  10. Non-linear generalised minimum variance control state space design for a second-order Volterra series model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maboodi, Mohsen; Camacho, Eduardo F.; Khaki-Sedigh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a non-linear generalised minimum variance (NGMV) controller for a second-order Volterra series model with a general linear additive disturbance. The Volterra series models provide a natural extension of a linear convolution model with the nonlinearity considered in an additive term. The design procedure is entirely carried out in the state space framework, which facilitates the application of other analysis and design methods in this framework. First, the non-linear minimum variance (NMV) controller is introduced and then by changing the cost function, NGMV controller is defined as an extended version of the linear cases. The cost function is used in the simplest form and can be easily extended to the general case. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed non-linear method.

  11. Charge states and magnetic ordering in LaMnO3/SrTiO3 superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W. S.; Jung, D. W.; Seo, Sung Seok A; Lee, Y. S.; Kim, T. H.; Jang, S. Y.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Myung-Whun, Kim

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the magnetic and optical properties of [(LaMnO{sub 3}){sub n}/(SrTiO{sub 3}){sub 8}]{sub 20} (n = 1, 2, and 8) superlattices grown by pulsed-laser deposition. We found that a weak ferromagnetic and semiconducting state developed in all superlattices. An analysis of the optical conductivity showed that the LaMnO{sub 3} layers in the superlattices were slightly doped. The amount of doping was almost identical regardless of the LaMnO{sub 3} layer thickness up to eight unit cells, suggesting that the effect is not limited to the interface. On the other hand, the magnetic ordering became less stable as the LaMnO{sub 3} layer thickness decreased, probably due to a dimensional effect.

  12. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  13. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  14. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  15. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  16. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  17. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  18. Higher Order π-Conjugated Polycyclic Hydrocarbons with Open-Shell Singlet Ground State: Nonazethrene versus Nonacene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Phan, Hoa; Herng, Tun Seng; Hu, Pan; Zeng, Wangdong; Dong, Shao-Qiang; Das, Soumyajit; Shen, Yongjia; Ding, Jun; Casanova, David; Wu, Jishan

    2016-08-17

    Higher order acenes (i.e., acenes longer than pentacene) and extended zethrenes (i.e., zethrenes longer than zethrene) are theoretically predicted to have an open-shell singlet ground state, and the radical character is supposed to increase with extension of molecular size. The increasing radical character makes the synthesis of long zethrenes and acenes very challenging, and so far, the longest reported zethrene and acene derivatives are octazethrene and nonacene, respectively. In addition, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the differences between these two closely related open-shell singlet systems. In this work, we report the first synthesis of a challenging nonazethrene derivative, HR-NZ, and its full structural and physical characterizations including variable temperature NMR, ESR, SQUID, UV-vis-NIR absorption and electrochemical measurements. Compound HR-NZ has an open-shell singlet ground state with a moderate diradical character (y0 = 0.48 based on UCAM-B3LYP calculation) and a small singlet-triplet gap (ΔES-T = -5.2 kcal/mol based on SQUID data), thus showing magnetic activity at room temperature. It also shows amphoteric redox behavior, with a small electrochemical energy gap (1.33 eV). Its electronic structure and physical properties are compared with those of Anthony's nonacene derivative JA-NA and other zethrene derivatives. A more general comparison between higher order acenes and extended zethrenes was also conducted on the basis of ab initio electronic structure calculations, and it was found that zethrenes and acenes have very different spatial localization of the unpaired electrons. As a result, a faster decrease of singlet-triplet energy gap and a faster increase of radical character with increase of the number of benzenoid rings were observed in zethrene series. Our studies reveal that spatial localization of the frontier molecular orbitals play a very important role on the nature of radical character as well as the excitation

  19. 2D coherent charge transport in highly ordered conducting polymers doped by solid state diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kang, Keehoon; Watanabe, Shun; Broch, Katharina; Sepe, Alessandro; Brown, Adam; Nasrallah, Iyad; Nikolka, Mark; Fei, Zhuping; Heeney, Martin; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-Ichi; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Doping is one of the most important methods to control charge carrier concentration in semiconductors. Ideally, the introduction of dopants should not perturb the ordered microstructure of the semiconducting host. In some systems, such as modulation-doped inorganic semiconductors or molecular charge transfer crystals, this can be achieved by spatially separating the dopants from the charge transport pathways. However, in conducting polymers, dopants tend to be randomly distributed within the conjugated polymer, and as a result the transport properties are strongly affected by the resulting structural and electronic disorder. Here, we show that in the highly ordered lamellar microstructure of a regioregular thiophene-based conjugated polymer, a small-molecule p-type dopant can be incorporated by solid state diffusion into the layers of solubilizing side chains without disrupting the conjugated layers. In contrast to more disordered systems, this allows us to observe coherent, free-electron-like charge transport properties, including a nearly ideal Hall effect in a wide temperature range, a positive magnetoconductance due to weak localization and the Pauli paramagnetic spin susceptibility. PMID:27159015

  20. Valence state control and third-order nonlinear optical properties of copper embedded in sodium borosilicate glass.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Weidong; Gao, Haihong; Ma, Li; Ma, Xin; Huang, Yunyun; Pei, Lang; Liang, Xiaojuan

    2015-05-20

    The integrated and transparent sodium borosilicate glasses that contain copper exhibiting different colors, that is, red, green, and blue were synthesized by combining the sol-gel process and heat treatment in H2 gas. To reveal substantially the cause of different colors in the glass, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) were systematically applied to investigate and determine the microstructure of the doped matter. The results showed three different crystals had formed in the red, green and blue glass, and the sizes of these crystals were range from 9 to 34, 1 to 6, and 1 to 5 nm, respectively. The valence state of copper was further analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The third-order nonlinear optical properties of the glasses were investigated by using Z-scan technique at the wavelength of 800 nm. Interestingly, the third-order nonlinear absorption of the red, green, and blue glass can be successfully controlled from reverse saturable absorption, no absorption to saturable absorption and the optical nonlinear susceptibility χ((3)) of the red, green and blue glass were estimated to be 6.4 × 10(-14), 1.6 × 10(-14), and 2.6 × 10(-14) esu in the single-pulse energy of 0.36 μJ, respectively. PMID:25928895

  1. The new spatial politics of (re)bordering and (re)ordering the state-education-citizen relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Susan L.

    2011-08-01

    One outcome of more than three decades of social and political transformation around the world, the result of processes broadly referred to as globalisation, has been the emergence of a complex (and at first glance, contradictory) conceptual language in the social sciences that has sought to grasp hold of these developments. Throughout the 1990s, theorists began to emphasise a world in motion, deploying concepts like "liquid modernity" (Zygmunt Bauman) to signal rapid and profound changes at work in the social structures, relations, and spatialities of societies (Neil Brenner) that were reconfiguring state-citizen relations (Saskia Sassen). Recently, however, researchers have concentrated on the study of borders and containers as a corrective to the preoccupation with mobility, arguing it is not possible to imagine a world which is only borderless and de-territorialised, because the basic ordering of social groups and societies requires categories and compartments. This paper focuses attention on processes of bordering and ordering in contemporary education systems, suggesting that comparative educators - whose main intellectual project is to understand how (different) education processes are re/produced within and across time, space and societies - would get much greater purchase on transformations currently under way.

  2. Interaction-enhanced magnetically ordered insulating state at the edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, Maxim

    2012-10-01

    We develop a theory of the correlated magnetically ordered insulating state at the edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator. We demonstrate that the gapped spin-polarized state, induced by the application of the magnetic field B, is naturally facilitated by electron interactions, which drive the critical easy-plane ferromagnetic correlations in the helical liquid. As the key manifestation, the gap Δ in the spectrum of collective excitations, which carry both spin and charge, is enhanced and exhibits a scaling dependence Δ∝B1/(2-K), controlled by the Luttinger liquid parameter K. This scaling dependence could be probed through the activation behavior G˜(e2/h)exp(-Δ/T) of the longitudinal conductance of a Hall-bar device at lower temperatures, providing a straightforward way to extract the parameter K experimentally. Our findings thus suggest that the signatures of the interaction-driven quantum criticality of the helical liquid could be revealed already in a standard Hall-bar measurement.

  3. Towards quantitative molecular mapping of cells by Raman microscopy: using AFM for decoupling molecular concentration and cell topography.

    PubMed

    Boitor, Radu; Sinjab, Faris; Strohbuecker, Stephanie; Sottile, Virginie; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-06-23

    Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) is a non-invasive technique for imaging live cells in vitro. However, obtaining quantitative molecular information from Raman spectra is difficult because the intensity of a Raman band is proportional to the number of molecules in the sampled volume, which depends on the local molecular concentration and the thickness of the cell. In order to understand these effects, we combined RMS with atomic force microscopy (AFM), a technique that can measure accurately the thickness profile of the cells. Solution-based calibration models for RNA and albumin were developed to create quantitative maps of RNA and proteins in individual fixed cells. The maps were built by applying the solution-based calibration models, based on partial least squares fitting (PLS), on raster-scan Raman maps, after accounting for the local cell height obtained from the AFM. We found that concentrations of RNA in the cytoplasm of mouse neuroprogenitor stem cells (NSCs) were as high as 25 ± 6 mg ml(-1), while proteins were distributed more uniformly and reached concentrations as high as ∼50 ± 12 mg ml(-1). The combined AFM-Raman datasets from fixed cells were also used to investigate potential improvements for normalization of Raman spectral maps. For all Raman maps of fixed cells (n = 10), we found a linear relationship between the scores corresponding to the first component (PC1) and the cell height profile obtained by AFM. We used PC1 scores to reconstruct the relative height profiles of independent cells (n = 10), and obtained correlation coefficients with AFM maps higher than 0.99. Using this normalization method, qualitative maps of RNA and protein were used to obtain concentrations for live NSCs. While this study demonstrates the potential of using AFM and RMS for measuring concentration maps for individual NSCs in vitro, further studies are required to establish the robustness of the normalization method based on principal component analysis when comparing

  4. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  5. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  6. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  7. Texture in the superconducting order parameter of CeCoIn5; FFLO state as evidenced by ultrasound and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yuji

    2005-03-01

    A myriad of fascinating properties have been proposed for unconventional superconductors in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Among the possible exotic superconducting (SC) phases, a spatially nonuniform SC state originating from the paramagnetism of conduction electrons has become a subject of particular interest after the pioneering work by Fulde and Ferrel and Larkin and Ovchinnikov (FFLO) in the mid-1960's. We present here ultrasound and NMR studies of the quasi-2D heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5 with extremely large Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility, which is believed to host a FFLO state. Ultrasound velocity measurements reveal an unusual structural transformation of the flux line lattice (FLL) in the vicinity of the upper critical field and with a magnetic field applied parallel to the ab plane. The transition field coincides with that at which heat capacity measurements reveal a second order phase transition. The lowering of the sound velocity at the transition is consistent with the collapse of the FLL tilt modulus and a crossover to quasi two-dimensional FLL pinning. In the vicinity of the upper critical field , the ^115In NMR spectrum also exhibits a dramatic change below T^*(H) which well coincides with the position of reported anomalies in specific heat and ultrasound velocity. Below T^*(H) a new resonance line appears at higher frequency, which can be attributed to the normal quasiparticle sheets formed in the SC regime. The NMR spectrum also indicate that the vortex core structure of CeCoIn5 appears to be markedly different from that of ordinary superconductors. On the basis of these results, we were able to establish a clear evidence of the spatially inhomogeneous SC state at high field and low temperatures, precisely as expected in a FFLO state. In collaboration with T.Watanabe, Y.Kasahara, K.Izawa (Univ. of Tokyo), C.J. van der Beek(Ecole Polytechnique),K.Kakuyanagi, K.Kumagai (Hokkaido Univ.), M.Nohara, T.Hanaguri, H.Takagi,(Univ. of

  8. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  9. Functionalisation of gold surfaces with thiolate SAMs: Topography/bioactivity relationship A combined FT-RAIRS, AFM and QCM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, E.; Gu, C.; Boujday, S.; Salmain, M.; Herry, J. M.; Pradier, C. M.

    2007-09-01

    Immobilisation of rabbit immunoglobulin G (rIgG) was performed by affinity binding to protein A (PrA) covalently bound to three different thiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (i) a mixed SAM of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and mercaptohexanol (C6OH) at a molar ratio of 1-3, (ii) a pure SAM of MUA and (iii) a pure SAM of cystamine (CA). A comparative study of anti-rIgG recognition process on these three surfaces was achieved in order to assess the influence of the attachment layer topography and composition upon the sensor quality. Functionalised gold-coated surfaces were characterised by three complementary analytical techniques, namely atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarization modulation-reflection-adsorption infrared spectroscopy (PM-RAIRS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). PM-RAIRS and AFM revealed that the three SAMs were formed on the gold surfaces. AFM observations made it clear that the thiolate and PrA layers were rather homogeneous in the case of pure MUA and CA SAMs, as compared to the MUA/C6OH mixed SAM on which PrA aggregates were observed. Though the highest amount of antibody was bound to the PrA on CA layer, higher anti-rIgG over IgG ratios were measured on the less dense layers of antibody.

  10. Effect of a magnetic order on the phase stability of the parent chalcogenide compound FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, S. L.; Leonov, I.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    We present results of first-principle calculation of the electronic structure and phase stability of the parent compound of Fe-based superconductors, FeSe, in a magnetically ordered state. In particular, we investigate ferromagnetic (FM) and two different types of antiferromagnetic (AFM) configurations (with magnetic structure vectors (π, 0) and (π, π)). Our results for the total energy exhibit a two-minimum shape for the FM and a standard parabolic-like behavior for the AFM configurations. We find a remarkable reconstruction of the electronic structure near the M point of the Brillouin zone, which is accompanied with a rapid increase in magnetic moment upon expansion of the lattice volume. On that basis we propose that both the anomalous behavior of FeSe upon expansion of the lattice reported for the paramagnetic state [Leonov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106402 (2015)] and that obtained in the present work have a common origin.

  11. FM-AFM crossover in vanadium oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demishev, S. V.; Chernobrovkin, A. L.; Glushkov, V. V.; Grigorieva, A. V.; Goodilin, E. A.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Samarin, N. A.; Semeno, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic properties of nanomaterials based on vanadium oxide (multiwall nanotubes, nanorods, and nanolayers) have been investigated in the temperature range of 1.8-220 K by high-frequency (60-GHz) EPR. A transition from a ferromagnetic temperature dependence to an antiferromagnetic temperature dependence has been observed in nanorods and nanotubes with a decrease in the temperature. The FM-AFM crossover observed near T C ˜ 110 K is accompanied by a low-temperature increase in the Curie constant by a factor of 2.7-7. The comparison of the experimental data for various VO x nanoparticles indicates that the most probable cause of the change in the type of magnetic interaction is a change in the concentration of V4+ magnetic ions.

  12. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. PMID:22472512

  13. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  15. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  16. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  17. Application of the Discrete Wavelet Transform to SEM and AFM Micrographs for Quantitative Analysis of Complex Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Workman, Michael J; Serov, Alexey; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2015-05-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has found significant utility in process monitoring, filtering, and feature isolation of SEM, AFM, and optical images. Current use of the DWT for surface analysis assumes initial knowledge of the sizes of the features of interest in order to effectively isolate and analyze surface components. Current methods do not adequately address complex, heterogeneous surfaces in which features across multiple size ranges are of interest. Further, in situations where structure-to-property relationships are desired, the identification of features relevant for the function of the material is necessary. In this work, the DWT is examined as a tool for quantitative, length-scale specific surface metrology without prior knowledge of relevant features or length-scales. A new method is explored for determination of the best wavelet basis to minimize variation in roughness and skewness measurements with respect to change in position and orientation of surface features. It is observed that the size of the wavelet does not directly correlate with the size of features on the surface, and a method to measure the true length-scale specific roughness of the surface is presented. This method is applied to SEM and AFM images of non-precious metal catalysts, yielding new length-scale specific structure-to-property relationships for chemical speciation and fuel cell performance. The relationship between SEM and AFM length-scale specific roughness is also explored. Evidence is presented that roughness distributions of SEM images, as measured by the DWT, is representative of the true surface roughness distribution obtained from AFM. PMID:25879382

  18. Using 2D correlation analysis to enhance spectral information available from highly spatially resolved AFM-IR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Hu, Qichi; Kjoller, Kevin; Boskey, Adele; Noda, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The recent combination of atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) has led to the ability to obtain IR spectra with nanoscale spatial resolution, nearly two orders-of-magnitude better than conventional Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. This advanced methodology can lead to significantly sharper spectral features than are typically seen in conventional IR spectra of inhomogeneous materials, where a wider range of molecular environments are coaveraged by the larger sample cross section being probed. In this work, two-dimensional (2D) correlation analysis is used to examine position sensitive spectral variations in datasets of closely spaced AFM-IR spectra. This analysis can reveal new key insights, providing a better understanding of the new spectral information that was previously hidden under broader overlapped spectral features. Two examples of the utility of this new approach are presented. Two-dimensional correlation analysis of a set of AFM-IR spectra were collected at 200-nm increments along a line through a nucleation site generated by remelting a small spot on a thin film of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate). There are two different crystalline carbonyl band components near 1720 cm-1 that sequentially disappear before a band at 1740 cm-1 due to more disordered material appears. In the second example, 2D correlation analysis of a series of AFM-IR spectra spaced every 1 μm of a thin cross section of a bone sample measured outward from an osteon center of bone growth. There are many changes in the amide I and phosphate band contours, suggesting changes in the bone structure are occurring as the bone matures.

  19. Recent advances in exchange bias of layered magnetic FM/AFM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ZhongYuan

    2013-01-01

    The exchange bias (EB) has been investigated in magnetic materials with the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) contacting interfaces for more than half a century. To date, the significant progress has been made in the layered magnetic FM/AFM thin film systems. EB mechanisms have shown substantive research advances. Here some of the new advances are introduced and discussed with the emphasis on the influence of AFM layer, the interlayer EB coupling across nonmagnetic spacer, and the interlayer coupling across AFM layer, as well as EB related to multiferrioc materials and electrical control.

  20. Semiclassical Transition-State Theory Based on Fourth-Order Vibrational Perturbation Theory: The Symmetrical Eckart Barrier.

    PubMed

    Stanton, John F

    2016-07-21

    Semiclassical transition-state theory based on fourth-order vibrational perturbation theory (VPT4-SCTST) is applied to compute the barrier transmission coefficient for the symmetric Eckart potential. For a barrier parametrized to mimic the H2 + H exchange reaction, the results obtained are in excellent agreement with exact quantum calculations over a range of energy that extends down to roughly 1% of the barrier height, V0, where tunneling is negligible. The VPT2-SCTST treatment, which is commonly used in chemical kinetics studies, also performs quite well but already shows an error of a few percent at ca. 0.8 V0 where tunneling is still important. This suggests that VPT4-SCTST could offer an improvement over VPT2-SCTST in applications studies. However, the computational effort for VPT4-SCTST treatments of molecules is excessive, and any improvement gained is unlikely to warrant the increased effort. Nevertheless, the treatment of the symmetric Eckart barrier problem here suggests a simple modification of the usual VPT2-SCTST protocol that warrants further investigation. PMID:27358083

  1. Supramolecular ordering of PTCDA molecules: the key role of dispersion forces in an unusual transition from physisorbed into chemisorbed state.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Tekiel, Antoni; Piskorz, Witold; Zasada, Filip; Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S; Sojka, Zbigniew; Szymonski, Marek

    2012-10-23

    Adsorption and self-assembly of large π-conjugated 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecules on rutile TiO(2)(110) surface have been investigated using a combination of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory calculations with inclusion of Grimme treatment of the dispersion forces (DFT-D). Evolution of the STM images as a function of PTCDA coverage is caused by transition of the adsorption mode from physisorbed single adspecies and meandering stripes into spontaneously ordered chemisorbed molecular assemblies. This change in the adsorption fashion is accompanied by significant bending of the intrinsically flat, yet elastic, PTCDA molecule, which allows for strong electronic coupling of the dye adspecies with the TiO(2) substrate. Extensive DFT-D modeling has revealed that adsorption is controlled by interfacial and intermolecular dispersion forces playing a dominant role in the adsorption of single PTCDA species, their self-organization into the meandering stripes, and at the monolayer coverage acting collectively to surmount the chemisorption energy barrier associated with the molecule bending. Analysis of the resulting density of states has revealed that alignment of the energy levels and strong electronic coupling at the PTCDA/TiO(2) interface are beneficial for dye sensitization purposes. PMID:22970745

  2. Elastic modulus, oxidation depth and adhesion force of surface modified polystyrene studied by AFM and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarsky, G. V.; Davidson, M. R.; Bradley, R. H.

    2004-06-01

    AFM and XPS have been used to investigate the surface and near-surface properties of polystyrene (PS) substrates which have been subjected to one of three controlled surface modification processes performed in situ in a specially constructed cell. The cell was fitted to a Digital Instruments Nanoscope III AFM measuring head and allowed close control of the gaseous environment and made it possible to UV irradiate the sample during AFM measurements. Treatments were carried out using UV at 184.9 and 253.7 nm wavelengths, in oxygen (UV-ozone), and in nitrogen (UV-only). Polystyrene surfaces were also modified by an exposure to an atmosphere of ozone in the absence of UV (ozone-only). Data show that adhesion force is highest between tip and sample for the UV-ozone exposed surfaces and that the adhesion force increases with sample exposure time. Exposure to UV-only or ozone alone results in lower ultimate adhesion levels with a slower rate of increase with exposure time. Evaluation of Young's modulus for unmodified PS gave a value of 3.37 (±0.52) GPa which agrees well with the textbook value which ranges from 2 to 4 GPa depending on the measurement technique. A 60 s exposure to combined UV-ozone resulted in the formation of a surface layer with a modulus at the surface of 1.25 (±0.19) GPa which increased to 2.5 (±0.37) GPa at a depth of 3.5 nm. The sample exposed for 60 s to UV-only had a Young's modulus of 2.6 (±0.39) GPa but showed no reduced modulus layer at the surface. The modulus of the ozone-only treated material was the least affected with a decrease of around 0.75 GPa with some evidence for a surface layer with a modulus ranging from 2.6 (±0.39) GPa at the surface to 3.2 (±0.48) GPa at a depth of 2 nm. XPS analyses reveal that the oxygen content of the modified surfaces decreased in the order of UV-ozone > UV > ozone with approximate concentrations for a 60 s exposure of 5, 0.7 and 0.05 at.%, respectively. Friction force imaging of patterned surfaces

  3. A Model for Step Height, Edge Slope and Linewidth Measurements Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Fu, Joseph; Song, John; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2003-09-01

    Nano-scale linewidth measurements are performed in semiconductor manufacturing and in the data storage industry and will become increasingly important in micro-mechanical engineering. With the development of manufacturing technology in recent years, the sizes of linewidths are steadily shrinking and are in the range of hundreds of nanometers. As a result, it is difficult to achieve accurate measurement results for nanometer scale linewidth, primarily because of the interaction volume of electrons in materials for an SEM probe or the tip size of an AFM probe. However, another source of methods divergence is the mathematical model of the line itself. In order to reduce the methods divergences caused by different measurement methods and instruments for an accurate determination of nanometer scale linewidth parameters, a metrological model and algorithm are proposed for linewidth measurements with AFM. The line profile is divided into 5 parts with 19 sections and 20 key derived points. Each section is fitted by a least squares straight line, so that the profile can be represented by a set of straight lines and 6 special points, or by a 20×2 matrix of fitted points and a 6×2 matrix of starter points. According to the algorithm, WT and WTF, WM and WMF, WB and WBF represent the widths at the top, the middle and the bottom of the line profile before and after the least squares fitting, respectively. AL and AR represent the left and right sidewall angles, and H represents the step height of the line profile. Based on this algorithm, software has been developed using MATLAB for the calculation of width and height parameters of the line profile. A NIST nanometer scale linewidth artifact developed at NIST's Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory (EEEL) was measured using a commercial AFM with nanotube tips. The measured linewidth profiles are analyzed using our model, algorithm and software. The model developed in this paper is straightforward to understand, and

  4. 5 CFR Appendix B to Subpart J of... - Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Awarding Survivor Annuity Benefits to Former Spouses

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Awarding Survivor Annuity Benefits to Former Spouses B Appendix B to Subpart J of Part 838 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT...

  5. Magnetic and ferroelectric orders in strained Gd{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, P. X.; Dong, S.; Xie, Y. L.; Yan, Z. B.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-05-07

    The emergent magnetic and ferroelectric orders in A-site ordered Gd{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} under lattice strain are investigated using the first-principles calculations. It is revealed that the lattice prefers the perovskite structure with alternatively stacked Ga-O and Na-O layers along the b-axis and the ground spin state favors the G-type antiferromagnetic (G-AFM) order. The ac-plane biaxial strain can remarkably tune the amplitude of ferroelectric polarization, while the G-AFM spin structure is robustly unaffected. The ±4% strains can trigger the change of polarization up to ±50% relative to the polarization value of unstrained structure. The present work suggests a possible scenario to control emergent multiferroic behaviors in Gd{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} via lattice strain.

  6. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    atomic resolution, the investigation of near-surface electronic states, the quantification of adhesion forces, and the lateral mapping of surface potentials. The origin of energy dissipation, which is closely related to an in-depth understanding of tip-surface interactions and imaging mechanisms, was the subject of an ongoing discussion and addressed by various theoretical, computational, and experimental contributions. A characteristic of the NC-AFM conference series is the lively and friendly atmosphere, which year after year stimulates scientific discussions between the participants. This time, the programme included 5 invited talks, 84 contributed presentations, and 113 participants; furthermore, three educational lectures were given as part of a pre-conference workshop targeted at NC-AFM newcomers, which was attended by 30 participants. I would like to thank the members of the international steering committee and the programme committee for their continued effort in organizing the meeting. Special thanks go to the chair of the programme and local organizing committees S Fain and the conference manager J Kvamme for making the meeting a success. Financial support is acknowledged from the corporate sponsors MikroMasch USA, Nanonis GmbH, Nanosurf AG, Omicron Nanotechnology, PSIA, Inc., and RHK Technology, as well as from the institutional sponsors National Science Foundation and PNNL/UW Joint Institute for Nanoscience. Finally, I would like to express my gratitude to everyone who participated in assembling this special issue including the authors, the reviewers, and, in particular, the excellent and experienced journal team from the Institute of Physics Publishing headed by Nina Couzin, for devoting their time and efforts so that we could make this issue a useful representation of the progress in NC-AFM while maintaining our tight publication schedule. In conclusion, I would like to mention that the Seattle conference was the first one of the NC-AFM series that took

  7. 7 CFR 2.8 - Delegations of authority to agency heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half-staff. Pursuant to section 5 of Proclamation 3044, 3 CFR, 1954-1958 Comp., p. 4, each general officer and agency head is delegated authority to... the United States flag be flown at half-staff. 2.8 Section 2.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary...

  8. 7 CFR 2.8 - Delegations of authority to agency heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half-staff. Pursuant to section 5 of Proclamation 3044, 3 CFR, 1954-1958 Comp., p. 4, each general officer and agency head is delegated authority to... the United States flag be flown at half-staff. 2.8 Section 2.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary...

  9. 7 CFR 2.8 - Delegations of authority to agency heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half-staff. Pursuant to section 5 of Proclamation 3044, 3 CFR, 1954-1958 Comp., p. 4, each general officer and agency head is delegated authority to... the United States flag be flown at half-staff. 2.8 Section 2.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary...

  10. 7 CFR 2.8 - Delegations of authority to agency heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half-staff. Pursuant to section 5 of Proclamation 3044, 3 CFR, 1954-1958 Comp., p. 4, each general officer and agency head is delegated authority to... the United States flag be flown at half-staff. 2.8 Section 2.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary...

  11. 7 CFR 2.8 - Delegations of authority to agency heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... heads to order that the United States flag be flown at half-staff. Pursuant to section 5 of Proclamation 3044, 3 CFR, 1954-1958 Comp., p. 4, each general officer and agency head is delegated authority to... the United States flag be flown at half-staff. 2.8 Section 2.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary...

  12. A Comparison of Higher-Order Thinking between the Common Core State Standards and the 2009 New Jersey Content Standards in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sforza, Dario; Tienken, Christopher H.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2016-01-01

    The creators and supporters of the Common Core State Standards claim that the Standards require greater emphasis on higher-order thinking than previous state standards in mathematics and English language arts. We used a qualitative case study design with content analysis methods to test the claim. We compared the levels of thinking required by the…

  13. Analysis and comparison of CVS-ADC approaches up to third order for the calculation of core-excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Jan Holzer, Andre; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-06-07

    The extended second order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)-x) scheme for the polarization operator in combination with core-valence separation (CVS) approximation is well known to be a powerful quantum chemical method for the calculation of core-excited states and the description of X-ray absorption spectra. For the first time, the implementation and results of the third order approach CVS-ADC(3) are reported. Therefore, the CVS approximation has been applied to the ADC(3) working equations and the resulting terms have been implemented efficiently in the adcman program. By treating the α and β spins separately from each other, the unrestricted variant CVS-UADC(3) for the treatment of open-shell systems has been implemented as well. The performance and accuracy of the CVS-ADC(3) method are demonstrated with respect to a set of small and middle-sized organic molecules. Therefore, the results obtained at the CVS-ADC(3) level are compared with CVS-ADC(2)-x values as well as experimental data by calculating complete basis set limits. The influence of basis sets is further investigated by employing a large set of different basis sets. Besides the accuracy of core-excitation energies and oscillator strengths, the importance of cartesian basis functions and the treatment of orbital relaxation effects are analyzed in this work as well as computational timings. It turns out that at the CVS-ADC(3) level, the results are not further improved compared to CVS-ADC(2)-x and experimental data, because the fortuitous error compensation inherent in the CVS-ADC(2)-x approach is broken. While CVS-ADC(3) overestimates the core excitation energies on average by 0.61% ± 0.31%, CVS-ADC(2)-x provides an averaged underestimation of −0.22% ± 0.12%. Eventually, the best agreement with experiments can be achieved using the CVS-ADC(2)-x method in combination with a diffuse cartesian basis set at least at the triple-ζ level.

  14. Analysis and comparison of CVS-ADC approaches up to third order for the calculation of core-excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Jan; Holzer, Andre; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The extended second order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)-x) scheme for the polarization operator in combination with core-valence separation (CVS) approximation is well known to be a powerful quantum chemical method for the calculation of core-excited states and the description of X-ray absorption spectra. For the first time, the implementation and results of the third order approach CVS-ADC(3) are reported. Therefore, the CVS approximation has been applied to the ADC(3) working equations and the resulting terms have been implemented efficiently in the adcman program. By treating the α and β spins separately from each other, the unrestricted variant CVS-UADC(3) for the treatment of open-shell systems has been implemented as well. The performance and accuracy of the CVS-ADC(3) method are demonstrated with respect to a set of small and middle-sized organic molecules. Therefore, the results obtained at the CVS-ADC(3) level are compared with CVS-ADC(2)-x values as well as experimental data by calculating complete basis set limits. The influence of basis sets is further investigated by employing a large set of different basis sets. Besides the accuracy of core-excitation energies and oscillator strengths, the importance of cartesian basis functions and the treatment of orbital relaxation effects are analyzed in this work as well as computational timings. It turns out that at the CVS-ADC(3) level, the results are not further improved compared to CVS-ADC(2)-x and experimental data, because the fortuitous error compensation inherent in the CVS-ADC(2)-x approach is broken. While CVS-ADC(3) overestimates the core excitation energies on average by 0.61% ± 0.31%, CVS-ADC(2)-x provides an averaged underestimation of -0.22% ± 0.12%. Eventually, the best agreement with experiments can be achieved using the CVS-ADC(2)-x method in combination with a diffuse cartesian basis set at least at the triple-ζ level.

  15. Analysis and comparison of CVS-ADC approaches up to third order for the calculation of core-excited states.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Holzer, Andre; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The extended second order algebraic-diagrammatic construction (ADC(2)-x) scheme for the polarization operator in combination with core-valence separation (CVS) approximation is well known to be a powerful quantum chemical method for the calculation of core-excited states and the description of X-ray absorption spectra. For the first time, the implementation and results of the third order approach CVS-ADC(3) are reported. Therefore, the CVS approximation has been applied to the ADC(3) working equations and the resulting terms have been implemented efficiently in the adcman program. By treating the α and β spins separately from each other, the unrestricted variant CVS-UADC(3) for the treatment of open-shell systems has been implemented as well. The performance and accuracy of the CVS-ADC(3) method are demonstrated with respect to a set of small and middle-sized organic molecules. Therefore, the results obtained at the CVS-ADC(3) level are compared with CVS-ADC(2)-x values as well as experimental data by calculating complete basis set limits. The influence of basis sets is further investigated by employing a large set of different basis sets. Besides the accuracy of core-excitation energies and oscillator strengths, the importance of cartesian basis functions and the treatment of orbital relaxation effects are analyzed in this work as well as computational timings. It turns out that at the CVS-ADC(3) level, the results are not further improved compared to CVS-ADC(2)-x and experimental data, because the fortuitous error compensation inherent in the CVS-ADC(2)-x approach is broken. While CVS-ADC(3) overestimates the core excitation energies on average by 0.61% ± 0.31%, CVS-ADC(2)-x provides an averaged underestimation of -0.22% ± 0.12%. Eventually, the best agreement with experiments can be achieved using the CVS-ADC(2)-x method in combination with a diffuse cartesian basis set at least at the triple-ζ level. PMID:26049476

  16. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    PubMed

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes. PMID:24767501

  17. Initial Growth Process of Magnetron Sputtering 321 Stainless Steel Films Observed by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yongzhong; Wu, Wei; Liu, Dongliang; Chen, Jian; Sun, Yali

    To investigate the initial morphological evolution of 321 stainless steel (SS) films, we examined the effect of sputtering time on the morphology of 321 SS film. In this study, a group of samples were prepared at nine different sputtering times within 20 s using radio-frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Only globular-like grains were formed on mica substrates within 6 s, whose average grain size is ~ 21-44 nm. Meanwhile, few grains with larger size are subject to settle at the defect sites of mica substrates. At 8 s, we found large columnar crystallites with the average grain size of 61 nm. From 10 to 14 s, islands grew continuously and coalesced in order to form an interconnected structure containing irregular channels or grooves, with a depth of ~ 3.5-5 nm. Up to 16 s, a nearly continuous film was formed and some new globular-like grains were again present on the film. Study of the AFM image at 20 s suggests that the watercolor masking method designed by us is an effective method, by which we can prepare thin films with steps for the measurement of the thickness of continuous thin films. It is also found that the coverage rate of films increases with the increase in sputtering time (from 2 to 16 s). On the other hand, the increase in root mean square (RMS) roughness is much more significant from 6 to 10 s, and there is a maximum value, 2.81 nm at 10 s due to more islands during deposition. However, RMS roughness decreases with the decrease in length and width of channels or grooves from 10 to 16 s. Especially, a lower RMS roughness of 0.73 nm occurs at 16 s, because of the continuous film produced with a large coverage rate of 98.43%.

  18. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplex. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. (2011) Journal of Organic Chemistry 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γMPPNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that γMPPNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ∼ 0.030 ± 0.01 sec-1 for γMPPNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs. 0.375 ± 0.18 sec-1 for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γMPPNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γMPPNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  19. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    PubMed

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations <150 mM spherical micelles are present and the oscillation period is close to the micelle diameter, slightly decreasing with the rise of concentration. For elongated micelles (at concentration 200 mM), no harmonic oscillations are observed anymore; instead, the period increases with the decrease of film thickness. In the case of Tween 20, the force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants. PMID:20067306

  20. Probing of miniPEGγ-PNA-DNA Hybrid Duplex Stability with AFM Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Samrat; Armitage, Bruce A; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-03-15

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are synthetic polymers, the neutral peptide backbone of which provides elevated stability to PNA-PNA and PNA-DNA hybrid duplexes. It was demonstrated that incorporation of diethylene glycol (miniPEG) at the γ position of the peptide backbone increased the thermal stability of the hybrid duplexes (Sahu, B. et al. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 5614-5627). Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single molecule force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) to test the strength and stability of the hybrid 10 bp duplex. This hybrid duplex consisted of miniPEGγ-PNA and DNA of the same length (γ(MP)PNA-DNA), which we compared to a DNA duplex with a homologous sequence. AFM force spectroscopy data obtained at the same conditions showed that the γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid is more stable than the DNA counterpart, 65 ± 15 pN vs 47 ± 15 pN, respectively. The DFS measurements performed in a range of pulling speeds analyzed in the framework of the Bell-Evans approach yielded a dissociation constant, koff ≈ 0.030 ± 0.01 s⁻¹ for γ(MP)PNA-DNA hybrid duplex vs 0.375 ± 0.18 s⁻¹ for the DNA-DNA duplex suggesting that the hybrid duplex is much more stable. Correlating the high affinity of γ(MP)PNA-DNA to slow dissociation kinetics is consistent with prior bulk characterization by surface plasmon resonance. Given the growing interest in γ(MP)PNA as well as other synthetic DNA analogues, the use of single molecule experiments along with computational analysis of force spectroscopy data will provide direct characterization of various modifications as well as higher order structures such as triplexes and quadruplexes. PMID:26898903

  1. An International Information Order? A Short Survey on the History and the Present State of a Challenging Concept. Communication Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keune, Reinhard

    The issue of a world-wide information order is the focus of this paper, which outlines the history, status, perspective, and consequences of the NIICO (International Information and Communication Order) debate. The first section explains the concerns and events that led to a unanimously passed resolution by UNESCO calling for a new order for the…

  2. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  3. Photoinduced Four-State Three-Step Ordering Transformation of Photochromic Terthiophene at a Liquid/Solid Interface Based on Two Principles: Photochromism and Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Soichi; Hirose, Takashi; Matsuda, Kenji

    2015-06-16

    We have investigated photoinduced ordering transformation of a photochromic terthiophene derivative by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the trichlorobenzene (TCB)/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) interface. The open-ring and annulated isomers of the terthiophene formed two-dimensional molecular orderings with different patterns while the closed-ring isomer did not form any ordering. The ordering of the open-ring isomer exhibited polymorphism depending on the concentration of supernatant solution. Upon UV light irradiation to a solution of the open-ring isomer or the closed-ring isomer, ordering composed of the annulated isomer was irreversibly formed. Upon visible light irradiation or thermal stimulus to the closed-ring isomer, the two kinds of polymorph composed of the open-ring isomer were formed due to the polymorphism. By controlling photochromism and polymorphism among four states made of three photochemical isomers, four-state three-step transformation was achieved by in situ photoirradiation from a solution of the closed-ring isomer (no ordering) into the ordering composed of the open-ring isomer (ordering α and β) followed by the orderings composed of the annulated isomer (ordering γ). PMID:26005903

  4. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  5. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  6. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  7. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  8. High speed AFM studies of 193 nm immersion photoresists during TMAH development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngunjiri, Johnpeter; Meyers, Greg; Cameron, Jim; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Jeon, Hyun; Lee, Dave; Choi, Kwang Mo; Kim, Jung Woo; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Lim, Hae-Jin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report on our studies of the dynamic process of resist development in real time. Using High Speed - Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM) in dilute developer solution, changes in morphology and nanomechanical properties of patterned resist were monitored. The Bruker Dimension FastScan AFMTM was applied to analyze 193 nm acrylic-based immersion resists in developer. HS-AFM operated in Peak Force mapping mode allowed for concurrent measurements of image topography resist stiffness, adhesion to AFM probe and deformation during development. In our studies we focused on HS-AFM topography data as it readily revealed detailed information about initial resist morphology, followed by a resist swelling process and eventual dissolution of the exposed resist areas. HS-AFM showed potential for tracking and understanding development of patterned resist films and can be useful in evaluating the dissolution properties of different resist designs.

  9. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  12. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  13. Relaxation Phenomenon in the Formation of the C-Type Orbital-Ordered State in the Simple Perovskite Manganite Sr1-xNdxMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yasuhide; Sato, Hiroki; Koyama, Yasumasa

    2016-02-01

    The formation of the C-type orbital-ordered (COO) state from the disordered cubic (DC) state in Sr1-xNdxMnO3 (SNMO) with the simple perovskite structure has been examined mainly by transmission electron microscopy. As the COO state has tetragonal I4/mcm symmetry, its formation is associated with the cubic-to-tetragonal structural transition. It was found that, when SNMO samples were cooled down from the DC state, the R25-type rotational displacement of MnO6 octahedra was first induced, together with the symmetry change into the tetragonal I4/mcm structure. The C-type orbital ordering then appeared due to the induction of the Jahn-Teller distortion as a response of a lattice system to this orbital ordering. Because no symmetry change occurred in the latter case, the Jahn-Teller distortion can be regarded as a dilatational distortion. One interesting feature is that the appearance of the dilatational Jahn-Teller distortion led to a nanometer-scale banded structure, characterized by an alternating array of two tetragonal variants with different c/a values. In addition, the formation of the COO state from the DC state exhibited a time-relaxation phenomenon. The origin of this relaxation phenomenon is also discussed here in terms of the competition between the tetragonal spontaneous strain for the rotational displacement and the dilatational Jahn-Teller distortion for orbital ordering.

  14. 3 CFR 13653 - Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013. Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Energy, and Economic Performance), and the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force led by the... Adaptation Plans developed pursuant to section 5 of this order. (b) In carrying out this section, agencies... agencies' Adaptation Plans, as discussed in section 5 of this order, as well as recent interagency...

  15. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  16. Long-range order and spin-liquid states of polycrystalline Tb2+xTi2-xO7+y

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, T; Kadowaki, Hiroaki; Takatsu, Hiroshi; Fak, B; Yamazaki, Teruo; Saito, Tomonori; Yoshizawa, H.; Shimura, Y; Sakakibara, T; Hong, T; Goto, K; Yaraskavitch, L; Kycia, J

    2013-01-01

    Low-temperature states of polycrystalline samples of a frustrated pyrochlore oxide Tb2+xTi2 xO7+y have been investigated by specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, and neutron scattering experiments. We have found that this system can be tuned by a minute change of x from a spin-liquid state (x < xc) to a partly ordered state with a small antiferromagnetic ordering of the order of 0.1 B. Specific heat shows a sharp peak at a phase transition at Tc = 0.5 K for x = 0.005. Magnetic excitation spectra for this sample change from a quasielastic to a gapped type through Tc. The possibility of a Jahn-Teller transition is discussed.

  17. Bi-stability of amplitude modulation AFM in air: deterministic and stochastic outcomes for imaging biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Thomson, Neil H

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of the oscillating microcantilever for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM AFM) operating in air is well understood theoretically but the experimental outcomes are still emerging. We use double-stranded DNA on mica as a model biomolecular system for investigating the connection between theory and experiment. A demonstration that the switching between the two cantilever oscillation states is stochastic in nature is achieved, and it can be induced by means of topographical anomalies on the surface. Whether one or the other attractor basin is accessed depends on the tip-sample separation history used to achieve the imaging conditions, and we show that the behaviour is reproducible when the tip is stable and well characterized. Emergence of background noise occurs in certain regions of parameter space regardless of whether two cantilever oscillation states coexist. The low state has been explored in detail and we note that at low to intermediate values of the free amplitude, noise-free imaging is achieved. The outcomes shown here are general and demonstrate that a thorough and systematic experimental approach in conjunction with standard modelling gives insight into the mechanisms behind image contrast formation in AM AFM in air. PMID:20453275

  18. 50 CFR 22.31 - Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... domesticated flocks and herds in such State, the Director shall make an investigation and if he determines that such taking is necessary to and will seasonally protect domesticated flocks and herds in such States he... seasonally protect domesticated flocks and herds must be submitted in writing to the Director listing...

  19. Decoupling of the antiferromagnetic and insulating states in Tb-doped Sr2IrO4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, J. C.; Aswartham, S.; Ye, Feng; Terzic, J.; Zheng, H.; Haskel, Daniel; Chikara, Shalinee; Choi, Yong; Schlottmann, P.; Custelcean, Radu; et al

    2015-12-08

    Sr2IrO4 is a spin-orbit coupled insulator with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at TN = 240 K. We report results of a comprehensive study of single-crystal Sr2Ir1-xTbxO4 (0≤x≤0.03). This study found that mere 3% (x=0.03) tetravalent Tb4+(4f7) substituting for Ir4+ (rather than Sr2+) completely suppresses the long-range collinear AFM transition but retains the insulating state, leading to a phase diagram featuring a decoupling of magnetic interactions and charge gap. The insulating state at x = 0.03 is characterized by an unusually large specific heat at low temperatures and an incommensurate magnetic state having magnetic peaks at (0.95, 0, 0) and (0,more » 0.95, 0) in the neutron diffraction, suggesting a spiral or spin density wave order. It is apparent that Tb doping effectively changes the relative strength of the SOI and the tetragonal CEF and enhances the Hund’s rule coupling that competes with the SOI, and destabilizes the AFM state. However, the disappearance of the AFM accompanies no metallic state chiefly because an energy level mismatch for the Ir and Tb sites weakens charge carrier hopping and renders a persistent insulating state. Furthermore, this work highlights an unconventional correlation between the AFM and insulating states in which the magnetic transition plays no critical role in the formation of the charge gap in the iridate.« less

  20. Decoupling of the antiferromagnetic and insulating states in Tb-doped S r2Ir O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. C.; Aswartham, S.; Ye, Feng; Terzic, J.; Zheng, H.; Haskel, Daniel; Chikara, Shalinee; Choi, Yong; Schlottmann, P.; Custelcean, Radu; Yuan, S. J.; Cao, G.

    2015-12-01

    S r2Ir O4 is a spin-orbit-coupled insulator with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at TN=240 K . We report results of a comprehensive study of single-crystal S r2I r1 -xT bxO4(0 ≤x ≤0.03 ) . This study found that a mere 3% (x =0.03 ) of tetravalent T b4 +(4 f7 ) substituting for I r4 + (rather than S r2 + ) completely suppresses the long-range collinear AFM transition but retains the insulating state, leading to a phase diagram featuring a decoupling of the magnetic interactions and charge gap. The insulating state at x =0.03 is characterized by an unusually large specific heat at low temperatures and an incommensurate magnetic state having magnetic peaks at (0.95,0,0) and (0,0.95,0) in the neutron diffraction, suggesting a spiral or spin-density-wave order. It is apparent that Tb doping effectively changes the relative strength of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and the tetragonal crystal electric field and enhances the Hund's rule coupling that competes with the SOI, and destabilizes the AFM state. However, the disappearance of the AFM is accompanied by no metallic state chiefly because an energy level mismatch for the Ir and Tb sites weakens charge carrier hopping and causes a persistent insulating state. This work highlights an unconventional correlation between the AFM and insulating states in which the magnetic transition plays no critical role in the formation of the charge gap in the iridate.

  1. Ground-state ordering of the J1-J2 model on the simple cubic and body-centered cubic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnell, D. J. J.; Götze, O.; Richter, J.

    2016-06-01

    The J1-J2 Heisenberg model is a "canonical" model in the field of quantum magnetism in order to study the interplay between frustration and quantum fluctuations as well as quantum phase transitions driven by frustration. Here we apply the coupled cluster method (CCM) to study the spin-half J1-J2 model with antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor bonds J1>0 and next-nearest-neighbor bonds J2>0 for the simple cubic (sc) and body-centered cubic (bcc) lattices. In particular, we wish to study the ground-state ordering of these systems as a function of the frustration parameter p =z2J2/z1J1 , where z1 (z2) is the number of nearest (next-nearest) neighbors. We wish to determine the positions of the phase transitions using the CCM and we aim to resolve the nature of the phase transition points. We consider the ground-state energy, order parameters, spin-spin correlation functions, as well as the spin stiffness in order to determine the ground-state phase diagrams of these models. We find a direct first-order phase transition at a value of p =0.528 from a state of nearest-neighbor Néel order to next-nearest-neighbor Néel order for the bcc lattice. For the sc lattice the situation is more subtle. CCM results for the energy, the order parameter, the spin-spin correlation functions, and the spin stiffness indicate that there is no direct first-order transition between ground-state phases with magnetic long-range order, rather it is more likely that two phases with antiferromagnetic long range are separated by a narrow region of a spin-liquid-like quantum phase around p =0.55 . Thus the strong frustration present in the J1-J2 Heisenberg model on the sc lattice may open a window for an unconventional quantum ground state in this three-dimensional spin model.

  2. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  3. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  4. Development of portable experimental set-up for AFM to work at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, D. H.; Bhatt, P. M.; Pathan, A. M.; Patel, Hitarthi; Joshi, U. S.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the designing aspects and fabrication of low temperature atomic force microscope (AFM) to study the surface structures of nanomaterials. Several key features of design including liquid nitrogen reservoir, vacuum chamber, vibration isolation table etc. have been presented. The whole set up was assembled in-house at a fairly low cost to be used with any commercial AFM system. The surface morphology of important oxide (In0.94Sn0.04)2O3 (ITO) thin film nanostructures has been investigated using the cryogenic AFM set up.

  5. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  6. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  7. Maintenance of a functional higher order chromatin structure: The role of the nuclear matrix in normal and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Amelia K.; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The ordered packaging of DNA within the nucleus of somatic cells reflects a dynamic supportive structure that facilitates stable transcription interrupted by intermittent cycles of extreme condensation. This dynamic mode of packing and unpacking chromatin is intimately linked to the ability of the genome to specifically complex with both histones and non-histone proteins. Understanding the underlying mechanism that governs the formation of higher order chromatin structures is a key to understanding how local architecture modulates transcription. In part, the formation of these structures appears to be regulated through genomic looping that is dynamically mediated by attachment to the nuclear scaffold/matrix at S/MARs, i.e., Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions. Although the mechanism guiding the formation and use of these higher-ordered structures remains unknown, S/MARs continue to reveal a multitude of roles in development and the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:20948980

  8. 45 CFR 270.11 - When must the States report the data and other information in order to compete for bonus awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When must the States report the data and other information in order to compete for bonus awards? 270.11 Section 270.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  9. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pea, M.; Maiolo, L.; Giovine, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Araneo, R.; Notargiacomo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  10. Reversible wetting of NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidities below deliquescence observed by environmental non-contact AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzewicz, D.A.; Lewis, E.; Ocko, B. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2009-12-14

    The behavior of NaCl nanoparticles as a function of relative humidity (RH) was characterized by depositing particles on a prepared hydrophobic surface and measuring their height via non-contact environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact AFM allows greater sensitivity to changes in the size of particles than does contact AFM or scanning electron microscopy, and greater sensitivity to changes in shape than do mass-based techniques. Crystalline cubic NaCl nanoparticles with sides of 35 to 150 nm were found to reversibly take up water with increasing RH, and to form a liquid-like surface layer of thickness 2 to 4 nm at humidities well below the deliquescence point of 75.0% at 20°C. Measurable uptake begins at 70% RH. The maximum thickness of the layer increases with increasing RH for a given particle size and, for a given RH, increases with increasing particle size over the range studied. The liquid-like behavior of the layer is indicated by a reversible “rounding” at the tops of the particles, where the ratio of particle height to radius of curvature increases from zero (flat top) at 68% RH to 0.7 at 74% RH. These observations suggest that a reorganization of mass occurs on the solid NaCl nanoparticle, and hence that the behavior of NaCl aerosol nanoparticles at RH between 70 and 75% RH is more complex than an abrupt first-order phase transition. Theoretical treatments of the phase transition should therefore account for both the presence of a liquid-like layer prior to deliquescence, and the RH-dependent thickness of the layer.

  11. Orientation and Order of the Amide Group of Sphingomyelin in Bilayers Determined by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Maeta, Yoshiko; Murata, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) are considered essential for the formation of lipid rafts; however, the types of molecular interactions involved in this process, such as intermolecular hydrogen bonding, are not well understood. Since, unlike other phospholipids, SM is characterized by the presence of an amide group, it is essential to determine the orientation of the amide and its order in the lipid bilayers to understand the nature of the hydrogen bonds in lipid rafts. For this study, 1′-13C-2-15N-labeled and 2′-13C-2-15N-labeled SMs were prepared, and the rotational-axis direction and order parameters of the SM amide in bilayers were determined based on 13C and 15N chemical-shift anisotropies and intramolecular 13C-15N dipole coupling constants. Results revealed that the amide orientation was minimally affected by Chol, whereas the order was enhanced significantly in its presence. Thus, Chol likely promotes the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond network involving the SM amide without significantly changing its orientation, providing a higher order to the SM amide. To our knowledge, this study offers new insight into the significance of the SM amide orientation with regard to molecular recognition in lipid rafts, and therefore provides a deeper understanding of the mechanism of their formation. PMID:26083921

  12. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart J of... - Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Dividing Civil Service Retirement Benefits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... require that payments to the former spouse begin before the employee actually retires (i.e., begins to receive benefits) and, unless the order expressly provides that the former spouse is entitled to a survivor annuity, the payments to the former spouse cannot continue after the employee dies....

  13. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart J of... - Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Dividing Civil Service Retirement Benefits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... require that payments to the former spouse begin before the employee actually retires (i.e., begins to receive benefits) and, unless the order expressly provides that the former spouse is entitled to a survivor annuity, the payments to the former spouse cannot continue after the employee dies....

  14. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart J of... - Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Dividing Civil Service Retirement Benefits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... require that payments to the former spouse begin before the employee actually retires (i.e., begins to receive benefits) and, unless the order expressly provides that the former spouse is entitled to a survivor annuity, the payments to the former spouse cannot continue after the employee dies....

  15. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart J of... - Guidelines for Interpreting State Court Orders Dividing Civil Service Retirement Benefits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... require that payments to the former spouse begin before the employee actually retires (i.e., begins to receive benefits) and, unless the order expressly provides that the former spouse is entitled to a survivor annuity, the payments to the former spouse cannot continue after the employee dies....

  16. 3 CFR 13486 - Executive Order 13486 of January 9, 2009. Strengthening Laboratory Biosecurity in the United States

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., with respect to Federal and nonfederal facilities that conduct research on, manage clinical or..., administrative, or legislative proposals. (b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and... Director of National Intelligence; (xii) the Director of the National Science Foundation; and (xiii)...

  17. Anomalous current-voltage characteristics along the c-axis in YBaCuO thin films prepared by MOCVD and AFM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shuu'ichirou; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Oda, Shunri

    1997-12-01

    We have proposed a fabrication process of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) using AFM lithography and successfully obtained IJJs in YBaCuO thin films deposited by MOCVD. A sample shows clear hysteresis and 23 voltage steps related to IJJs in the I- V curve. The maximum width of a step is about 2 mV at 5 K. We discuss the I- V characteristics and estimate the order of the parameters for the IJJ.

  18. Theoretical prediction of nematic orbital-ordered state in the Ti oxypnictide superconductor BaTi2(As,Sb ) 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, Hironori; Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    The electronic nematic state without magnetization emerges in various strongly correlated metals such as Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. To understand this universal phenomenon, we focus on the nematic state in Ti oxypnictide BaTi2(As,Sb ) 2O , which is expressed as the three-dimensional ten-orbital Hubbard model. The antiferromagnetic fluctuations are caused by the Fermi surface nesting. Interestingly, we find the spin-fluctuation-driven orbital order due to the strong orbital-spin interference, which is described by the Aslamazov-Larkin vertex correction (AL-VC). The predicted intra-unit-cell nematic orbital order is consistent with the recent experimental reports on BaTi2(As,Sb ) 2O . Thus, the spin-fluctuation-driven orbital order due to the AL-VC mechanism is expected to be universal in various two- and three-dimensional multiorbital metals.

  19. Exploring the Construction of Social Class in Educational Discourse: The Rational Order of the Nation State versus Global Uncertainties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rassool, Naz

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to create intellectual space in which issues of social inequality and education can be analyzed and discussed in relation to the multifaceted and multi-levelled complexities of the modern world. It is divided into three sections. Section One locates the concept of social class in the context of the modern nation state during the…

  20. 20 CFR 667.120 - What planning information must a State submit in order to receive a formula grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... grant? Each State seeking financial assistance under WIA sections 127 (youth) or 132 (adults and... plan content and the plan review process are described in WIA section 112, Wagner-Peyser Act section 8, and 20 CFR 661.220, 661.240 and 652.211 through 652.214....

  1. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  2. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  3. An Ancestral Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase Precursor Achieves High Catalytic Rate Enhancement without Ordered Ground-State Tertiary Structures.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Paul J; Li, Li; Williams, Tishan; Lee, Andrew L; Carter, Charles W

    2016-06-17

    Urzymes-short, active core modules derived from enzyme superfamilies-prepared from the two aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) classes contain only the modules shared by all related family members. They have been described as models for ancestral forms. Understanding them currently depends on inferences drawn from the crystal structures of the full-length enzymes. As aaRS Urzymes lack much of the mass of modern aaRS's, retaining only a small portion of the hydrophobic cores of the full-length enzymes, it is desirable to characterize their structures. We report preliminary characterization of (15)N tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase Urzyme by heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectroscopy supplemented by circular dichroism, thermal melting, and induced fluorescence of bound dye. The limited dispersion of (1)H chemical shifts (0.5 ppm) is inconsistent with a narrow ensemble of well-packed structures in either free or substrate-bound forms, although the number of resonances from the bound state increases, indicating a modest, ligand-dependent gain in structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows the presence of helices and evidence of cold denaturation, and all ligation states induce Sypro Orange fluorescence at ambient temperatures. Although the term "molten globule" is difficult to define precisely, these characteristics are consistent with most such definitions. Active-site titration shows that a majority of molecules retain ∼60% of the transition state stabilization free energy observed in modern synthetases. In contrast to the conventional view that enzymes require stable tertiary structures, we conclude that a highly flexible ground-state ensemble can nevertheless bind tightly to the transition state for amino acid activation. PMID:27008438

  4. Numerical simulation of free evolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using low-order correlations in Liouville space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Butler, Mark C.; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-12-01

    The design of simulations of free evolution in dipolar-coupled nuclear-spin systems using low-order correlations in Liouville space (LCL) is discussed, and a computational scheme relying on the Suzuki-Trotter algorithm and involving minimal memory requirements is described. The unusual nature of the approximation introduced by Liouville-space reduction in a spinning solid is highlighted by considering the accuracy of LCL simulations at different spinning frequencies, the quasiequilibria achieved by spin systems in LCL simulations, and the growth of high-order coherences in the exact dynamics. In particular, it is shown that accurate LCL simulations of proton spin diffusion occur in a regime where the reduced space excludes the coherences that make the dominant contribution to Vert σ Vert ^2, the norm-squared of the density matrix.

  5. Analysis of propulsion system dynamics in the validation of a high-order state space model of the UH-60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Frederick D.

    1992-01-01

    Frequency responses generated from a high-order linear model of the UH-60 Black Hawk have shown that the propulsion system influences significantly the vertical and yaw dynamics of the aircraft at frequencies important to high-bandwidth control law designs. The inclusion of the propulsion system comprises the latest step in the development of a high-order linear model of the UH-60 that models additionally the dynamics of the fuselage, rotor, and inflow. A complete validation study of the linear model is presented in the frequency domain for both on-axis and off-axis coupled responses in the hoverflight condition, and on-axis responses for forward speeds of 80 and 120 knots.

  6. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  7. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  8. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  9. Reconciling measurements in AFM reference metrology when using different probing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Narender; Archie, Charles; Foucher, Johann

    2011-03-01

    CD-AFM can report CD measurements to several nanometer differences when different probing techniques including probe types, scan methods, or data analyses are employed on the same sample despite using standard calibration techniques. This potentially weakens the assertion that this instrument is inherently accurate. It is particularly important to resolve these discrepancies given the measurement challenges where multiple probing techniques need to be employed to get complete CD information. Probe type refers to tip construction methods that can significantly affect geometrical aspects of probe such as effective length, width, and edge height as well as material composition and coating. Scan code refers to CD or DT mode of tool operation. Analysis includes probe geometry deconvolution and measurement algorithms. These challenges in measurement accuracy are especially significant for the foot or bottom CD metrology of 3D structures. This paper explores the impact of these different probing techniques on the measurement accuracy. In one series of experiments, measurements for different probing techniques are compared when the test and the referencing structures are composed of similar material and possess smooth vertical profiles. The investigation is then extended to explore the accuracy of bottom CD measurement of non vertical profiles encountered in actual process development. A hybrid method using CD and DT modes has been tested to measure the bottom CD of challenging pitch structures. The limited space for the probe is particularly problematic for CD mode but the accuracy of DT mode for CD measurement is a concern. Other challenges will also be discussed along with possible solutions. CD-AFM has increased uncertainty when it comes to measuring within 15 nm of the bottom of a structure. In this regime details of the shape of the probe and the method by which this shape is extracted from the raw data become important. Measured CDs can vary by a few nanometers

  10. AFM study of glucagon fibrillation via oligomeric structures resulting in interwoven fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingdong; Bruun Hovgaard, Mads; Xu, Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2006-08-01

    Glucagon is a 29-residue amphiphatic hormone involved in the regulation of blood glucose levels in conjunction with insulin. In concentrated aqueous solutions, glucagon spontaneously aggregates to form amyloid fibrils, destroying its biological activity. In this study we utilize the atomic force microscope (AFM) to elucidate the fibrillation mechanism of glucagon at the nanoscale under acidic conditions (pH 2.0) by visualizing the nanostructures of fibrils formed at different stages of the incubation. Hollow disc-shaped oligomers form at an early stage in the process and subsequently rearrange to more solid oligomers. These oligomers co-exist with, and most likely act as precursors for, protofibrils, which subsequently associate to form at least three different classes of higher-order fibrils of different heights. A repeat unit of around 50 nm along the main fibril axis suggests a helical arrangement of interwoven protofibrils. The diversity of oligomeric and fibrillar arrangements formed at pH 2.0 complements previous spectroscopic analyses that revealed that fibrils formed under different conditions can differ substantially in stability and secondary structure.

  11. Vortex chains due to nonpairwise interactions and field-induced phase transitions between states with different broken symmetry in superconductors with competing order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, Julien; Babaev, Egor

    2015-01-01

    We study superconductors with two order components and phase separation driven by intercomponent density-density interaction, focusing on the phase where only one condensate has nonzero ground-state density and a competing order parameter exists only in vortex cores. We demonstrate there that multibody intervortex interactions can be strongly nonpairwise, leading to some unusual vortex patterns in an external field, such as vortex pairs and vortex chains. We demonstrate that in an external magnetic field such a system undergoes a field-driven phase transition from (broken) U (1 ) to (broken) U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetries when a subdominant order parameter in the vortex cores acquires global coherence. Observation of these characteristic ordering patterns in surface probes may signal the presence of a subdominant condensate in the vortex core.

  12. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  13. The role of symmetry breaking and disorder in the control of phase-ordered states in globally coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Thomas W.; Schwartz, Ira B.

    1997-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of splay-phase states, special out-of-phase states, in an array of globally coupled phase oscillators. Using asymptotic methods and a dimension reducing coordinate transformation we derive explicit representation for saddle shaped surfaces on which the dynamics is confined. The restricted motion is due to a high degree of neutral stability possessed by the splay-phase and related incoherent states. An additional consequence of the neutral stability is an extreme sensitivity to intrinsic noise which leads to diffusive drift. The elimination of this drift motivates an examination of the effect of parameter perturbations and their use for control. We have found that the system is uncontrollable using symmetry-preserving perturbations, but that symmetry-breaking perturbations effectively allow for the prevention of noise-induced drift. Finally, we have made observations on how general disorder affects the dynamics of the system; in particular, for small disorder certain sums of the phases become unbounded while others remain fixed.

  14. Investigation on conformational order and mobility of diamondbond-C18 and C18-alkyl modified silica gels by Fourier transform infrared and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Gokulakrishnan; Kyrlidis, Angelos; McNeff, Clayton; Müller, Klaus

    2005-07-22

    The effect of surface coverage and solid supports on the conformational order of alkyl chains of commercially available carbon clad zirconia based supports and synthesised C18-alkyl modified silica based supports are probed in the dry state for the first time using variable temperature Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. From FT-IR spectroscopy, the conformational order of alkyl chains tethered to the substrates is examined by the analysis of CH2 symmetric and anti-symmetric stretching bands. Through solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, the order is inferred from the relative intensity of the main methylene carbon resonance assigned to trans and trans-gauche conformations. It is found that molecules tethered to the graphite layer experience a strongly diamagnetic component of the highly anisotropic magnetic susceptibility of the graphite lattice, which reflects upfield shift in the 13C NMR spectra of commercially available octadecyl-modified carbon clad zirconia based column materials. The present results prove that temperature, surface coverage and solid supports have an influence on the conformational order and mobility of alkyl chains tethered to the carbon clad inorganic metal oxides. PMID:16038202

  15. Photoresponse from single upright-standing ZnO nanorods explored by photoconductive AFM

    PubMed Central

    Beinik, Igor; Kratzer, Markus; Wachauer, Astrid; Wang, Lin; Piryatinski, Yuri P; Brauer, Gerhard; Chen, Xin Yi; Hsu, Yuk Fan; Djurišić, Aleksandra B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: ZnO nanostructures are promising candidates for the development of novel electronic devices due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Here, photoconductive atomic force microscopy (PC-AFM) has been applied to investigate transient photoconductivity and photocurrent spectra of upright-standing ZnO nanorods (NRs). With a view to evaluate the electronic properties of the NRs and to get information on recombination kinetics, we have also performed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements macroscopically. Results: Persistent photoconductivity from single ZnO NRs was observed for about 1800 s and was studied with the help of photocurrent spectroscopy, which was recorded locally. The photocurrent spectra recorded from single ZnO NRs revealed that the minimum photon energy sufficient for photocurrent excitation is 3.1 eV. This value is at least 100 meV lower than the band-gap energy determined from the photoluminescence experiments. Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that the photoresponse in ZnO NRs under ambient conditions originates preferentially from photoexcitation of charge carriers localized at defect states and dominates over the oxygen photodesorption mechanism. Our findings are in agreement with previous theoretical predictions based on density functional theory calculations as well as with earlier experiments carried out at variable oxygen pressure. PMID:23616940

  16. The role of atomic excited states of Au on N2O capture and activation: A multireference second-order perturbation theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera-Neria, Oscar; Bertin, Virineya; Poulain, Enrique

    2010-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an intermediate compound formed during catalysis occurring in automobile exhaust pipes. Atomic Au in its ground state is unable to react with N2O, however, several Au excited states are bound to N2O, but not all of these states are able to activate N2O bonds. In this work, N2O capture and activation by a single Au atom are studied considering Au in the ground and excited states with multiplicities = 2, 4 and 6. The Au + N2O reactions are studied at multireference second-order perturbation level of theory using Cs symmetry. The AuN2O (4A', 4A'', 6A' and 6A'') adducts are spontaneously created from Au excited states. From these complexes, only the 4A', 6A' and 6A'' states exhibit N2O activation reaction paths yielding N2, NO and O atoms as end products when N2O approaches Au excited states side-on. Cations both ground and excited states, capture N2O although only the Au+ (5A') + N2O (1Σ+) → NAuNO+ (5A') reaction (for the end-on and side-on approaches) shows N2O activation with N-N bond breaking. In the case of Au anions, the ground state and most of the excited states capture N2O and activation takes place according to Au- (3A', 5A', 5A'') + N2O (1Σ+) → AuO- (3A', 5A', 5A'') + N2(g) for the N2O end-on approach by the oxygen atom. The reaction paths show a metal-gas dative covalent bonding character. Mulliken charge population analysis obtained for the active states shows that the binding is done through charge donation and retro-donation between the metal and the N2O molecule.

  17. Complex Field-Induced States in Linarite PbCuSO4(OH )2 with a Variety of High-Order Exotic Spin-Density Wave States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenberg, B.; Schäpers, M.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Drechsler, S.-L.; Reehuis, M.; Hoffmann, J.-U.; Büchner, B.; Studer, A. J.; Rule, K. C.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Süllow, S.; Nishimoto, S.

    2016-01-01

    Low-temperature neutron diffraction and NMR studies of field-induced phases in linarite are presented for magnetic fields H ∥b axis. A two-step spin-flop transition is observed, as well as a transition transforming a helical magnetic ground state into an unusual magnetic phase with sine-wave-modulated moments ∥H . An effective J˜ 1-J˜ 2 single-chain model with a magnetization-dependent frustration ratio αeff=-J˜2/J˜1 is proposed. The latter is governed by skew interchain couplings and shifted to the vicinity of the ferromagnetic critical point. It explains qualitatively the observation of a rich variety of exotic longitudinal collinear spin-density wave, SDWp , states (9 ≥p ≥2 ).

  18. Nature of the insulating ground state of the 5d postperovskite CaIrO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Sun -Woo; Liu, Chen; Kim, Hyun -Jung; Lee, Jun -Ho; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Cho, Jun -Hyung

    2015-08-26

    In this study, the insulating ground state of the 5d transition metal oxide CaIrO3 has been classified as a Mott-type insulator. Based on a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study with local, semilocal, and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, we reveal that the Ir t2g states exhibit large splittings and one-dimensional electronic states along the c axis due to a tetragonal crystal field. Our hybrid DFT calculation adequately describes the antiferromagnetic (AFM) order along the c direction via a superexchange interaction between Ir4+ spins. Furthermore, the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) hybridizes the t2g states to open an insulating gap. These results indicate thatmore » CaIrO3 can be represented as a spin-orbit Slater insulator, driven by the interplay between a long-range AFM order and the SOC. Such a Slater mechanism for the gap formation is also demonstrated by the DFT + dynamical mean field theory calculation, where the metal-insulator transition and the paramagnetic to AFM phase transition are concomitant with each other.« less

  19. Origin of selectivity of Tsuji-Trost allylic alkylation of lactones: highly ordered transition states with lithium-containing enolates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2012-08-13

    We report computational investigations on the mechanism and the selectivity of Pd-catalyzed allylic alkylation of γ-valerolactone. Density functional calculations using the B3LYP functional are performed on the selectivity-determining nucleophilic addition step of this reaction. The B3LYP results of commonly assumed pathways fail to reproduce the observed selectivity of the reaction. Therefore, alternative pathways are considered for the nucleophilic addition step, to explain the experimentally established role of the additives LiCl and lithium diisopropyl amide (LDA) in the Pd-catalyzed reaction. These pathways involve different approaches of the enolate toward the η(3)-allylpalladium complex that are mainly guided by stabilizing Cl(δ-)···Li(δ+)···O(enolate) interactions in the transition state. In the calculations, the experimentally observed trans-product selectivity for the prototypical reaction with (S)-BINAP ligands is found only when assuming the addition of a "mixed" Li-enolate/LiCl adduct to the η(3)-allylpalladium complex. This mechanism provides a reasonable explanation for the experimental results and sheds light on the role of LiCl in the reaction. The analysis of the different transition-state models allows us to identify steric and electronic factors that stabilize or destabilize the relevant diastereomeric transition states. Calculations for different combinations of substrates (γ-valerolactone and δ-caprolactone) and catalysts (with (R)- and (S)-BINAP ligands) reproduce the experimentally observed selectivities well and thus provide further support for the proposed mechanism. PMID:22736518

  20. Decoupling of the antiferromagnetic and insulating states in Tb-doped Sr2IrO4

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. C.; Aswartham, S.; Ye, Feng; Terzic, J.; Zheng, H.; Haskel, Daniel; Chikara, Shalinee; Choi, Yong; Schlottmann, P.; Custelcean, Radu; Yuan, S. J.; Cao, G.

    2015-12-08

    Sr2IrO4 is a spin-orbit coupled insulator with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition at TN = 240 K. We report results of a comprehensive study of single-crystal Sr2Ir1-xTbxO4 (0≤x≤0.03). This study found that mere 3% (x=0.03) tetravalent Tb4+(4f7) substituting for Ir4+ (rather than Sr2+) completely suppresses the long-range collinear AFM transition but retains the insulating state, leading to a phase diagram featuring a decoupling of magnetic interactions and charge gap. The insulating state at x = 0.03 is characterized by an unusually large specific heat at low temperatures and an incommensurate magnetic state having magnetic peaks at (0.95, 0, 0) and (0, 0.95, 0) in the neutron diffraction, suggesting a spiral or spin density wave order. It is apparent that Tb doping effectively changes the relative strength of the SOI and the tetragonal CEF and enhances the Hund’s rule coupling that competes with the SOI, and destabilizes the AFM state. However, the disappearance of the AFM accompanies no metallic state chiefly because an energy level mismatch for the Ir and Tb sites weakens charge carrier hopping and renders a persistent insulating state. Furthermore, this work highlights an unconventional correlation between the AFM and insulating states in which the magnetic transition plays no critical role in the formation of the charge gap in the iridate.

  1. Full-order sliding mode control of uncertain chaos in a permanent magnet synchronous motor based on a fuzzy extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Nan, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Heng-Huo; Ren, Xue-Mei

    2015-11-01

    A full-order sliding mode control based on a fuzzy extended state observer is proposed to control the uncertain chaos in the permanent magnet synchronous motor. Through a simple coordinate transformation, the chaotic PMSM model is transformed into the Brunovsky canonical form, which is more suitable for the controller design. Based on the fuzzy control theory, a fuzzy extended state observer is developed to estimate the unknown states and uncertainties, and the restriction that all the system states should be completely measurable is avoided. Thereafter, a full-order sliding mode controller is designed to ensure the convergence of all system states without any chattering problem. Comparative simulations show the effectiveness and superior performance of the proposed control method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61403343 and 61433003), the Scientific Research Foundation of Education Department of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. Y201329260), and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang University of Technology, China (Grant No. 1301103053408).

  2. The co-design of interface sensing and tailoring of ultra-thin film with ultrasonic vibration-assisted AFM system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jialin; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Guangyong

    2016-06-10

    Ultra-thin films (e.g., graphene, MoS2, and black phosphorus) have shown amazing performance in a variety of applications. The tailoring or machining of these ultra-thin films is often the preliminary step to manufacturing them into functional devices. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a flexible, high-efficiency and low-cost tailoring or machining tool with the advantages of high resolution and precision. However, the current AFM-based tailoring methods are often set up as an open loop regarding the machined depth and state. Thus, because of a lack of real-time feedback, an inappropriate applied force leads to over-cutting or under-cutting, which limits the performance of the manufactured devices. In this study, we propose a real-time tailoring and sensing method based on an ultrasonic vibration-assisted (USV-assisted) AFM system to solve the above problems. With the proposed method, the machined depth and state can be sensed in real time by detecting the phase value of the vibrating cantilever. To characterize and gain insight into the phase responses of the cantilever to the machined depth and sample material, a theoretical dynamic model of a cantilever-film vibrating system is introduced to model the machining process, and a sensing theory of machined depth and state is developed based on a USV-assisted AFM system. The experimental results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method, which in turn lay the foundation for a closed-loop tailoring control strategy for ultra-thin films. PMID:27146083

  3. The co-design of interface sensing and tailoring of ultra-thin film with ultrasonic vibration-assisted AFM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jialin; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Guangyong

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-thin films (e.g., graphene, MoS2, and black phosphorus) have shown amazing performance in a variety of applications. The tailoring or machining of these ultra-thin films is often the preliminary step to manufacturing them into functional devices. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a flexible, high-efficiency and low-cost tailoring or machining tool with the advantages of high resolution and precision. However, the current AFM-based tailoring methods are often set up as an open loop regarding the machined depth and state. Thus, because of a lack of real-time feedback, an inappropriate applied force leads to over-cutting or under-cutting, which limits the performance of the manufactured devices. In this study, we propose a real-time tailoring and sensing method based on an ultrasonic vibration-assisted (USV-assisted) AFM system to solve the above problems. With the proposed method, the machined depth and state can be sensed in real time by detecting the phase value of the vibrating cantilever. To characterize and gain insight into the phase responses of the cantilever to the machined depth and sample material, a theoretical dynamic model of a cantilever-film vibrating system is introduced to model the machining process, and a sensing theory of machined depth and state is developed based on a USV-assisted AFM system. The experimental results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method, which in turn lay the foundation for a closed-loop tailoring control strategy for ultra-thin films.

  4. Graphene sheet versus two-dimensional electron gas: A relativistic Fano spin filter via STM and AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seridonio, A. C.; Siqueira, E. C.; Souza, F. M.; Machado, R. S.; Lyra, S. S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2013-11-01

    We explore theoretically the density of states (LDOS) probed by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip of two-dimensional systems hosting an adatom and a subsurface impurity, both capacitively coupled to atomic force microscope (AFM) tips and traversed by antiparallel magnetic fields. Two kinds of setups are analyzed, a monolayer of graphene and a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The AFM tips set the impurity levels at the Fermi energy, where two contrasting behaviors emerge: The Fano factor for the graphene diverges, while in the 2DEG it approaches zero. As result, the spin degeneracy of the LDOS is lifted exclusively in the graphene system, in particular, for the asymmetric regime of Fano interference. The aftermath of this limit is a counterintuitive phenomenon, which consists of a dominant Fano factor due to the subsurface impurity even with a stronger STM-adatom coupling. Thus we find a full polarized conductance, achievable just by displacing vertically the position of the STM tip. Our work proposes the Fano effect as the mechanism to filter spins in graphene. This feature arises from the massless Dirac electrons within the band structure and allows us to employ the graphene host as a relativistic Fano spin filter.

  5. Neutron-diffraction measurements of an antiferromagnetic semiconducting phase in the vicinity of the high-temperature superconducting state of K(x)Fe(2-y)Se2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Cao, Huibo; Bourret-Courchesne, E; Lee, D-H; Birgeneau, R J

    2012-12-28

    The recently discovered K-Fe-Se high-temperature superconductor has caused heated debate regarding the nature of its parent compound. Transport, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and STM measurements have suggested that its parent compound could be insulating, semiconducting, or even metallic [M. H. Fang, H.-D. Wang, C.-H. Dong, Z.-J. Li, C.-M. Feng, J. Chen, and H. Q. Yuan, Europhys. Lett. 94, 27009 (2011); F. Chen et al., Phys. Rev. X 1, 021020 (2011); and W. Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 057003 (2012)]. Because the magnetic ground states associated with these different phases have not yet been identified and the relationship between magnetism and superconductivity is not fully understood, the real parent compound of this system remains elusive. Here, we report neutron-diffraction experiments that reveal a semiconducting antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase with rhombus iron vacancy order. The magnetic order of the semiconducting phase is the same as the stripe AFM order of the iron pnictide parent compounds. Moreover, while the sqrt[5]×sqrt[5] block AFM phase coexists with superconductivity, the stripe AFM order is suppressed by it. This leads us to conjecture that the new semiconducting magnetic ordered phase is the true parent phase of this superconductor. PMID:23368605

  6. A piece of cake: the ground-state energies in γ i -deformed = 4 SYM theory at leading wrapping order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokken, Jan; Sieg, Christoph; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    In the non-supersymmetric γi-deformed = 4 SYM theory, the scaling dimensions of the operators tr[ Z L ] composed of L scalar fields Z receive finite-size wrapping and prewrapping corrections in the 't Hooft limit. In this paper, we calculate these scaling dimensions to leading wrapping order directly from Feynman diagrams. For L ≥ 3, the result is proportional to the maximally transcendental `cake' integral. It matches with an earlier result obtained from the integrability-based Lüscher corrections, TBA and Y-system equations. At L = 2, where the integrability-based equations yield infinity, we find a finite rational result. This result is renormalization-scheme dependent due to the non-vanishing β-function of an induced quartic scalar double-trace coupling, on which we have reported earlier. This explicitly shows that conformal invariance is broken — even in the 't Hooft limit. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. QCD equation of state at nonzero chemical potential: continuum results with physical quark masses at order μ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Sz.; Endrődi, G.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Krieg, S.; Ratti, C.; Szabó, K. K.

    2012-08-01

    We determine the equation of state of QCD for nonzero chemical potentials via a Taylor expansion of the pressure. The results are obtained for N f = 2 + 1 flavors of quarks with physical masses, on various lattice spacings. We present results for the pressure, interaction measure, energy density, entropy density, and the speed of sound for small chemical potentials. At low temperatures we compare our results with the Hadron Resonance Gas model. We also express our observables along trajectories of constant entropy over particle number. A simple parameterization is given (the Matlab/Octave script parameterization.m, submitted to the arXiv along with the paper), which can be used to reconstruct the observables as functions of T and μ, or as functions of T and S/N.

  8. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Spin waves in the (0, π) and (0, π, π) ordered SDW states of the t-t' Hubbard model: application to doped iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuvanshi, Nimisha; Singh, Avinash

    2010-10-01

    Spin waves in the (0, π) and (0, π, π) ordered spin-density-wave (SDW) states of the t-t' Hubbard model are investigated at finite doping. In the presence of small t', these composite ferro-antiferromagnetic (F-AF) states are found to be strongly stabilized at finite hole doping due to enhanced carrier-induced ferromagnetic spin couplings as in metallic ferromagnets. Anisotropic spin-wave velocities, a spin-wave energy scale of around 200 meV, reduced magnetic moment and rapid suppression of magnetic order with electron doping x (corresponding to F substitution of O atoms in LaO1 - xFxFeAs or Ni substitution of Fe atoms in BaFe2 - xNixAs2) obtained in this model are in agreement with observed magnetic properties of doped iron pnictides.

  9. Nanospot soldering polystyrene nanoparticles with an optical fiber probe laser irradiating a metallic AFM probe based on the near-field enhancement effect.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianlei; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Wenjun; Hou, Chaojian

    2015-02-01

    With the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology for the bottom-up nanofabrication of nanostructures formed from polystyrene nanoparticles, joining technology is an essential step in the manufacturing and assembly of nanodevices and nanostructures in order to provide mechanical integration and connection. To study the nanospot welding of polystyrene nanoparticles, we propose a new nanospot-soldering method using the near-field enhancement effect of a metallic atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip that is irradiated by an optical fiber probe laser. On the basis of our theoretical analysis of the near-field enhancement effect, we set up an experimental system for nanospot soldering; this approach is carried out by using an optical fiber probe laser to irradiate the AFM probe tip to sinter the nanoparticles, providing a promising technical approach for the application of nanosoldering in nanoscience and nanotechnology. PMID:25582678

  10. Complex field-induced states in Linarite PbCuSO4(OH)2 with a variety of high-order exotic SDWp states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süllow, Stefan

    Low-temperature neutron diffraction and NMR studies of field-induced phases in linarite are presented for magnetic fields H ∥ b axis. This way, we establish the magnetic phase diagram up to saturation. A two-step spin-flop transition is observed as well as a transition transforming a helical magnetic ground state into an unusual magnetic phase with sine-wave modulated moments ∥ H enclosing all other magnetic phases in the T - H phase diagram. An effective J~1 -J~2 single-chain model with a magnetization-dependent frustration ratio αeff = -J~1 /J~2 is proposed. The latter is governed by skew interchain couplings and shifted to the vicinity of the ferromagnetic critical point. It explains qualitatively the observation of a rich variety of exotic (for strongly correlated cuprate spin-1/2 Heisenberg systems) longitudinal collinear spin-density wave SDWp states (9 >= p >= 2). Work supported by the DFG under Contracts WO 1532/3-1 and SU 229/9-1.

  11. Decoupled phase of frustrated spin-(1)/(2) antiferromagnetic chains with and without long-range order in the ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Soos, Z. G.

    2013-10-01

    The quantum phases of one-dimensional spin s=1/2 chains are discussed for models with two parameters, frustrating exchange g=J2>0 between second neighbors and normalized nonfrustrating power-law exchange with exponent α and distance dependence r-α. The ground state (GS) at g=0 has a long-range order (LRO) for α<2 and long-range spin fluctuations for α>2. The models conserve total spin S=SA+SB, have singlet GS for any g, α≥0 and decouple at 1/g=0 to linear Heisenberg antiferromagnets on sublattices A and B of odd- and even-numbered sites. Exact diagonalization of finite chains gives the sublattice spin , the magnetic gap Em to the lowest triplet state, and the excitation Eσ to the lowest singlet with opposite inversion symmetry to the GS. An analytical model that conserves sublattice spin has a first-order quantum transition at gc=1/4ln2 from a GS with perfect LRO to a decoupled phase with SA=SB=0 for g≥4/π2 and no correlation between spins in different sublattices. The model with α=1 has a first-order transition to a decoupled phase that closely resembles the analytical model. The bond order wave (BOW) phase and continuous quantum phase transitions of finite models with α≥2 are discussed in terms of GS degeneracy where Eσ(g)=0, excited state degeneracy where Eσ(g)=Em(g), and . The decoupled phase at large frustration has nondegenerate GS for any exponent α and excited states related to sublattice excitations.

  12. Are drought vulnerability indices useful tools in order to evaluate the state of a water supply system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi, E.; Del Bon, A.; Romano, E.; Petrangeli, A. B.; Casadei, S.

    2012-04-01

    Water resources availability is affected both by anthropic drivers (increasing demand, modification in the uses) and natural ones such as precipitation decrease related to global climate changes. Water managers and water policy makers are more and more aware that they are facing a changing climate in which the availability of water is claimed to be decreasing in many parts of the world. The possibility that droughts will be more frequent and severe in the next decades is getting a real possibility and a wise manager should know in advance how to face this new reality. Hence new tools and, more important, a methodology to assess the weakest points of a complex water supply system to water scarcity scenarios, are necessary. The importance of simulation models to assess in advance the impacts of possible conditions of severe water shortage and the effects of feasible mitigation options on water supply systems is well known. Vulnerability is commonly used to characterize the performance of water supply systems, and it can be a helpful indicator in the evaluation of the most likely failures in a complex system in ordinary as well as in more severe climatic conditions. However a common procedure about the exploitation of modeling results is not established yet. In this research the water supply network of a case study area in Central Italy was modeled under different climatic and management hypothesis. In this area both ground water resources (well fields in alluvial aquifers and Apennine springs) and surface water resources stored in two large reservoirs, are exploited mainly for drinking water supply and irrigation. Climate scenarios were drawn based on three simplistic hypothesis: firstly a progressive reduction of precipitation in 55 years, secondly an increase in its variance during time, lastly a combination of the two. The model results were elaborated to calculate different indices, in order to analyze the variation of vulnerability of the water supply system to

  13. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  14. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  15. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  16. High-order determinantal equation-of-motion coupled-cluster calculations for ionized and electron-attached states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, So; Nooijen, Marcel; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2000-10-01

    General-order equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods for ionization potentials and electron affinities (IP-EOM-CC and EA-EOM-CC) are developed by employing a determinantal algorithm. With these, principal ionization potentials or electron affinities of diatomic molecules and the excitation energies of their ionized or electron-attached counterparts are computed across different approximations of the cluster operator and the ionization (electron-attachment) operator. IP-EOM-CC(2,2h-1p)=IP-EOM-CCSD and EA-EOM-CC(2,1h-2p)=EA-EOM-CCSD or EA-EOM-CC(2,2h-3p) prove to be well-balanced models for principal ionization potentials and electron affinities, whereas for the quantitative descriptions of non-Koopmans ionization or electron-attachment processes IP-EOM-CC(3,3h-2p)=IP-EOM-CCSDT and EA-EOM-CC(2,2h-3p) appear to be the minimal levels.

  17. A scalable algorithm to order and annotate continuous observations reveals the metastable states visited by dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöchliger, Nicolas; Vitalis, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2013-11-01

    Advances in IT infrastructure have enabled the generation and storage of very large data sets describing complex systems continuously in time. These can derive from both simulations and measurements. Analysis of such data requires the availability of scalable algorithms. In this contribution, we propose a scalable algorithm that partitions instantaneous observations (snapshots) of a complex system into kinetically distinct sets (termed basins). To do so, we use a combination of ordering snapshots employing the method's only essential parameter, i.e., a definition of pairwise distance, and annotating the resultant sequence, the so-called progress index, in different ways. Specifically, we propose a combination of cut-based and structural annotations with the former responsible for the kinetic grouping and the latter for diagnostics and interpretation. The method is applied to an illustrative test case, and the scaling of an approximate version is demonstrated to be O(NlogN) with N being the number of snapshots. Two real-world data sets from river hydrology measurements and protein folding simulations are then used to highlight the utility of the method in finding basins for complex systems. Both limitations and benefits of the approach are discussed along with routes for future research.

  18. Intermediate magnetization state and competing orders in Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7

    PubMed Central

    Borzi, R. A.; Gómez Albarracín, F. A.; Rosales, H. D.; Rossini, G. L.; Steppke, A.; Prabhakaran, D.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Cabra, D. C.; Grigera, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the frustrated magnetic materials, spin-ice stands out as a particularly interesting system. Residual entropy, freezing and glassiness, Kasteleyn transitions and fractionalization of excitations in three dimensions all stem from a simple classical Hamiltonian. But is the usual spin-ice Hamiltonian a correct description of the experimental systems? Here we address this issue by measuring magnetic susceptibility in the two most studied spin-ice compounds, Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7, using a vector magnet. Using these results, and guided by a theoretical analysis of possible distortions to the pyrochlore lattice, we construct an effective Hamiltonian and explore it using Monte Carlo simulations. We show how this Hamiltonian reproduces the experimental results, including the formation of a phase of intermediate polarization, and gives important information about the possible ground state of real spin-ice systems. Our work suggests an unusual situation in which distortions might contribute to the preservation rather than relief of the effects of frustration. PMID:27558021

  19. Intermediate magnetization state and competing orders in Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7.

    PubMed

    Borzi, R A; Gómez Albarracín, F A; Rosales, H D; Rossini, G L; Steppke, A; Prabhakaran, D; Mackenzie, A P; Cabra, D C; Grigera, S A

    2016-01-01

    Among the frustrated magnetic materials, spin-ice stands out as a particularly interesting system. Residual entropy, freezing and glassiness, Kasteleyn transitions and fractionalization of excitations in three dimensions all stem from a simple classical Hamiltonian. But is the usual spin-ice Hamiltonian a correct description of the experimental systems? Here we address this issue by measuring magnetic susceptibility in the two most studied spin-ice compounds, Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7, using a vector magnet. Using these results, and guided by a theoretical analysis of possible distortions to the pyrochlore lattice, we construct an effective Hamiltonian and explore it using Monte Carlo simulations. We show how this Hamiltonian reproduces the experimental results, including the formation of a phase of intermediate polarization, and gives important information about the possible ground state of real spin-ice systems. Our work suggests an unusual situation in which distortions might contribute to the preservation rather than relief of the effects of frustration. PMID:27558021

  20. Ferri-magnetic order in Mn induced spinel Co3-xMnxO4 (0.1≤x≤1.0) ceramic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, P. L.; Sreenivas, K.; Singh, M. R.; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    We report structural and magnetic properties of spinel Co3-xMnxO4 (x=0.1-1.0) synthesized by solid state reaction technique. Rietveld refinement analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data, revealed the formation of polycrystalline single phase Co3-xMnxO4 without any significant structural change in cubic crystal symmetry with Mn substitution, except change in lattice parameter. Temperature dependent magnetization data show changes in magnetic ordering temperature, indicating formation of antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferrimagnetic (FM) phase at low Mn concentration (x≤0.3) and well-defined FM phase at high Mn concentration (x≥0.5). The isothermal magnetization records established an AFM/FM mixed phase for composition ranging 0.10.5.

  1. Antiferromagnetic ordering in spin-chain multiferroic Gd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} studied by electronic spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y. M.; Ruan, M. Y.; Cheng, J. J.; Sun, Y. C.; Ouyang, Z. W. Xia, Z. C.; Rao, G. H.

    2015-06-14

    High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) has been employed to study the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering state (T < T{sub N} = 55 K) of spin-chain multiferroic Gd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5}. The spin reorientation at T{sub SR} = 24 K is well characterized by the temperature-dependent ESR spectra. The magnetization data evidence a field-induced spin-flop transition at 2 K. The frequency-field relationship of the ESR data can be explained by conventional AFM resonance theory with uniaxial anisotropy, in good agreement with magnetization data. Related discussion on zero-field spin gap is presented.

  2. Hybrid Metrology and 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.

    2011-11-10

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R and D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials...). Therefore, time for R and D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam.In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R and D and production. The final goal for 'chip makers' is to improve yield and save R and D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2{sup nd} part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  3. Hybrid Metrology & 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.; Irmer, B.; Penzkofer, C.

    2011-11-01

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R&D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials…). Therefore, time for R&D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam. In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R&D and production. The final goal for "chip makers" is to improve yield and save R&D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2nd part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  4. Sequential adaptation in latent tuberculosis bacilli: observation by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Zhavnerko, Gennady Konstantinovich; Merza, Muayad Aghali; Ghanavi, Jalladein; Tabarsi, Payam; Farnia, Poopak; Poleschuyk, Nikolai Nikolaevich; Ignatyev, George

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can persist within the human host for years without causing disease, in a syndrome known as latent tuberculosis. The mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis establishes a latent metabolic state is unknown, but it is hypothesized that reduced oxygen tension may trigger the bacillus to enter a state of latency. Therefore, we are studying anaerobic culture of M. tuberculosis (H37RV) as a model of latency. For the first time, the sequential adaptation of latent bacilli (every 90 days for 48 months) viewed under Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Two types of adaptation were observed and are described here. First, cells are undergoing temporary adaptation (from 1 to 18 months of latency) that includes; thickening of cell wall (20.5±1.8 nm versus 15.2±1.8 nm, P<0.05), formation of ovoid cells by "folding phenomena"(65-70%), size reduction (0.8±0.1 μm versus 2.5±0.5 μm), and budding type of cell division (20-25%).A second feature include changes that accompany development of specialized cells i.e., production of spore like cells (0.5±0.2 μm) and their progeny (filterable non -acid fast forms; 150 to 300 μm in size). Although, these cells were not real spore because they fail to form a heat resistant colony forming units, after incubation for 35-40 min at 65°C. The filterable non-acid fast forms of bacilli are metabolically active and increased their number by symmetrical type of cell-division. Therefore, survival strategies that developed by M. tuberculosis under oxygen limited condition are linked to its shape, size and conspicuous loss of acid fastness. PMID:21977232

  5. Spin excitations used to uncover the nature of the magnetically ordered ground state of Pr0.5Ca0.5MnO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ewings, Russell A.; Perring, T. G.; Sikora, O.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have used time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin wave spectrum of the canonical half-doped manganite Pr0.5Ca0.5MnO3 in its magnetic and orbitally ordered phase. Comparison of the data, which cover multiple Brillouin zones and the entire energy range of the excitations, with several different models shows that only the CE-type ordered state provides an adequate description of the magnetic ground state, provided interactions beyond nearest neighbor are included. We are able to rule out a ground state in which there exist pairs of dimerized spins which interact only with their nearest neighbors. The Zener polaron ground state, whichmore » comprises strongly bound magnetic dimers, can be ruled out on the basis of gross features of the observed spin wave spectrum. A model with weaker dimerization reproduces the observed dispersion but can be ruled out on the basis of subtle discrepancies between the calculated and observed structure factors at certain positions in reciprocal space. Adding further neighbor interactions results in almost no dimerization, i.e. interpolating back to the CE model. These results are consistent with theoretical analysis of the degenerate double exchange model for half-doping.« less

  6. Spin excitations used to uncover the nature of the magnetically ordered ground state of Pr0.5Ca0.5MnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Ewings, Russell A.; Perring, T. G.; Sikora, O.; Abernathy, Douglas L; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have used time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin wave spectrum of the canonical half-doped manganite Pr0.5Ca0.5MnO3 in its magnetic and orbitally ordered phase. Comparison of the data, which cover multiple Brillouin zones and the entire energy range of the excitations, with several different models shows that only the CE-type ordered state provides an adequate description of the magnetic ground state, provided interactions beyond nearest neighbor are included. We are able to rule out a ground state in which there exist pairs of dimerized spins which interact only with their nearest neighbors. The Zener polaron ground state, which comprises strongly bound magnetic dimers, can be ruled out on the basis of gross features of the observed spin wave spectrum. A model with weaker dimerization reproduces the observed dispersion but can be ruled out on the basis of subtle discrepancies between the calculated and observed structure factors at certain positions in reciprocal space. Adding further neighbor interactions results in almost no dimerization, i.e. interpolating back to the CE model. These results are consistent with theoretical analysis of the degenerate double exchange model for half-doping.

  7. The C terminus of apocytochrome b562 undergoes fast motions and slow exchange among ordered conformations resembling the folded state.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Czisch, Michael; Barker, Paul; Kaptein, Rob

    2002-04-30

    The present work describes the dynamics of the apo form of cytochrome b(562), a small soluble protein consisting of 106 amino acid residues [Itagaki, E., and Hager, L. P. (1966) J. Biol. Chem. 241, 3687-3695]. The presence of exchange in the millisecond time scale is demonstrated for the last part of helix IV (residues 95-105 in the holo form). The chemical shift index analysis [Wishart, D. S., and Sykes, B. D. (1994) J. Biomol. NMR 4, 171-180] based on H(alpha), C(alpha), C(beta), and C' chemical shifts suggests a larger helical content than shown in the NMR structure based on NOEs. These results indicate the presence of helical-like conformations participating in the exchange process. This hypothesis is consistent with amide deuterium exchange rates and the presence of some hydrogen bonds identified from amide chemical shift temperature coefficients [Baxter, N. J., and Williamson, M. P. (1997) J. Biomol. NMR 9, 359-369]. (15)N relaxation indicates limited mobility for the amide protons of this part of the helix in the picosecond time scale. A 30 ns stochastic dynamics simulation shows small fluctuations around the helical conformation on this time scale. These fluctuations, however, do not result in a significant decrease of the calculated order parameters which are consistent with the experimental (15)N relaxation data. These results resolve an apparent discrepancy in the NMR structures between the disorder observed in helix IV due to a lack of NOEs and the secondary structure predictions based on H(alpha) chemical shifts [Feng, Y., Wand, A. J., and Sligar, S. G. (1994) Struct. Biol. 1, 30-35]. PMID:11969411

  8. Influence of higher-order dispersion coefficients on near-threshold bound and continuum states: Application to {sup 88}Sr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Alexander; Mueller, Tim-Oliver; Friedrich, Harald

    2011-12-07

    We give a simple description of quantum states near the dissociation threshold of deep interatomic potentials. The influence of the potential tail is separated from effects due to the interaction at short distances. We present a general formalism which is valid for weakly bound and low-energy continuum states, both for vanishing and non-vanishing angular momentum. Its applicability is demonstrated for the example of the electronic ground state of the strontium dimer {sup 88}Sr{sub 2}. With an appropriate choice of the potential tail that includes higher-order dispersion coefficients, all short-range effects are incorporated via the threshold quantum number v{sub D} and one further parameter accounting for residual short-range effects.

  9. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects. PMID:25554131

  10. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  11. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  12. Nematic and spin-charge orders driven by hole-doping a charge-transfer insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Mark H.; Wu, Si; Lawler, Michael; Paramekanti, Arun; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2014-09-01

    Recent experimental discoveries have brought a diverse set of broken symmetry states to the center stage of research on cuprate superconductors. Here, we focus on a thematic understanding of the diverse phenomenology by exploring a strong-coupling mechanism of symmetry breaking driven by frustration of antiferromagnetic (AFM) order. We achieve this through a variational study of a three-band model of the CuO2 plane with Kondo type exchange couplings between doped oxygen holes and classical copper spins. Two main findings from this strong-coupling multi-band perspective are (1) that the symmetry hierarchy of spin stripe, charge stripe, intra-unit-cell nematic order and isotropic phases are all accessible microscopically within the model, (2) many symmetry-breaking patterns compete with energy differences within a few meV per Cu atom to produce a rich phase diagram. These results indicate that the diverse phenomenology of broken-symmetry states in hole-doped AFM charge-transfer insulators may indeed arise from hole-doped frustration of antiferromagnetism.

  13. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Hiesgen, Renate; Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium-sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)(-1) after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  14. Sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube-polymer composites using dynamic AFM methods.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Maria J; Misiego, Rocio; Smith, Kyle C; Avila, Alba; Pipes, Byron; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks within polymer nanocomposites is demonstrated through electrical characterization techniques based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). We compare three techniques implemented in the single-pass configuration: DC-biased amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in terms of the physics of sub-surface image formation and experimental robustness. The methods were applied to study the dispersion of sub-surface networks of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in a polyimide (PI) matrix. We conclude that among these methods, the KPFM channel, which measures the capacitance gradient (∂C/∂d) at the second harmonic of electrical excitation, is the best channel to obtain high-contrast images of the CNT network embedded in the polymer matrix, without the influence of surface conditions. Additionally, we propose an analysis of the ∂C/∂d images as a tool to characterize the dispersion and connectivity of the CNTs. Through the analysis we demonstrate that these AFM-based sub-surface methods probe sufficiently deep within the SWNT composites, to resolve clustered networks that likely play a role in conductivity percolation. This opens up the possibility of dynamic AFM-based characterization of sub-surface dispersion and connectivity in nanostructured composites, two critical parameters for nanocomposite applications in sensors and energy storage devices. PMID:23478510

  15. Nanoscale crystallization of phase change Ge2Sb2Te5 film with AFM lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, JunHo

    2010-01-01

    We have made nanoindents on Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5)(GST) films using electric field-assisted atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. GST shows increase of material density and electric conductivity as it changes from amorphous to crystalline phases. By applying electric field between AFM probe-tip and GST surface, nanoscale crystallization could be induced on tip contact area. As the crystallized GST exhibits increase of material density, that is to say depression of volume, nanoindented surface with crystallization is created on host amorphous GST (a-GST) film. For the AFM lithography, a highly conductive tip, which showed voltage-switching characteristics in current-voltage spectroscopy of GST film, was found to be very suitable for recording and sensing crystallized nanoindents on the GST film. By varying sample bias voltages, we performed nanoscale crystallization, and measured the nanostructured film in AFM conductance-image (C-image) mode and topography-image (T-image) mode, simultaneously. Two types of crystallized wires were fabricated on (a-GST) film. Type-I was sensed in only C-image, whereas Type-II was sensed in both C-image and T-image. These nanowires are discussed in terms of crystallization of GST and sensitivity of current (or topography) sensing. By repeated lithography, larger size of nanoindented wires were also produced, which indicates line-dimension controllability of AFM lithography. PMID:20853405

  16. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)−1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  17. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  18. Development of a new generation of active AFM tools for applications in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollier, A.-S.; Jenkins, D.; Dogheche, E.; Legrand, B.; Faucher, M.; Buchaillot, L.

    2010-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful imaging tool with high-resolution imaging capability. AFM probes consist of a very sharp tip at the end of a silicon cantilever that can respond to surface artefacts to produce an image of the topography or surface features. They are intrinsically passive devices. For imaging soft biological samples, and also for samples in liquid, it is essential to control the AFM tip position, both statically and dynamically, and this is not possible using external actuators mounted on the AFM chip. AFM cantilevers have been fabricated using silicon micromachining to incorporate a piezoelectric thin film actuator for precise control. The piezoelectric thin films have been fully characterized to determine their actuation performance and to characterize the operation of the integrated device. Examples of the spatial and vertical response are presented to illustrate their imaging capability. For operation in a liquid environment, the dynamic behaviour has been modelled and verified experimentally. The optimal drive conditions for the cantilever, along with their dynamic response, including frequency and phase in air and water, are presented.

  19. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials.

    PubMed

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized. PMID:26201503

  20. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694