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Sample records for afm ordering temperature

  1. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  2. Morphology of Vapor-Deposited Ice at Low Temperatures by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, , Jr.; Donev, J. M. K.; Tait, B. R. Long, Jr.; Yu, Q.

    2002-03-01

    The morphology of multilayer films of ice on various substrates is measured by AFM as a function of vapor-deposition and annealing temperatures below 150K. The films are deposited in-situ in UHV from an effusive doser at 67 degrees from the surface normal. For depositions near 100K on clean Au(111), previous measurements by Donev et al. using needle-sensor AFM indicate that 3-D clustering starts near 120K for initially flat thin films of amorphous solid water (ASW). For depositions below 85K on clean Au(111), preliminary measurements using non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) indicate that clustering does not occur during annealing until bulk diffusion becomes operative at T>140K. Deposition at glancing angle at the lower temperatures is known to increase porosity and is also expected to decrease the number of crystalline nuclei in the ASW. For depositions near 100K on mica that had been annealed in UHV, preliminary measurements using ncAFM show clustering near 120K. Supported by U. W. Nanotechnology Fellowship (J.M.K.D.), Mary Gates Fellowship (B. R. L.), and M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

  3. AFM study of excimer laser patterning of block-copolymer: Creation of ordered hierarchical, hybrid, or recessed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švanda, Jan; Siegel, Jakub; Švorčík, Vaclav; Lyutakov, Oleksiy

    2016-05-01

    We report fabrication of the varied range of hierarchical structures by combining bottom-up self-assembly of block copolymer poly(styrene-block-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) with top-down excimer laser patterning method. Different procedures were tested, where laser treatment was applied before phase separation and after phase separation or phase separation and surface reconstruction. Laser treatment was performed using either polarized laser light with the aim to create periodical pattern on polymer surface or non-polarized light for preferential removing of polystyrene (PS) part from PS-b-P4VP. Additionally, dye was introduced into one part of block copolymer (P4VP) with the aim to modify its response to laser light. Resulting structures were analyzed by XPS, UV-vis and AFM techniques. Application of polarized laser light leads to creation of structures with hierarchical, recessed or hybrid geometries. Non-polarized laser beam allows pronouncing the block copolymer phase separated structure. Tuning the order of steps or individual step conditions enables the efficient reorientation of block-copolymer domain at large scale, fabrication of hierarchical, hybrid or recessed structures. The obtained structures can find potential applications in nanotechnology, photonics, plasmonics, information storage, optical devices, sensors and smart surfaces.

  4. First principles simulation of temperature dependent electronic transition of FM-AFM phase BFO.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liang; Xu, Jin-bao; Song, Mian-xin; Dong, Fa-qin; Dong, Hai-liang; Shi, Fa-Nian; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Duan, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how temperature affects the electronic transitions of BFO is important for design of BiFeO3 (BFO)-based temperature-sensitive device. Hitherto, however, there have been only very limited reports of the quantitative simulation. Here, we used density functional theory (DFT) and two-dimensional correlation analysis (2D-CA) techniques to calculate the systematic variations in electronic transitions of BFO crystal, over a range of temperature (50~1500 K). The results suggest that the heat accumulation accelerates the O-2p(4) orbital splitting, inducing the Fe(3+)-3d(5) → Fe(2+)-3d(5)d(0) charge disproportionation. The origin is observed as the temperature-dependent electron transfer process changes from threefold degeneracy to twofold degeneracy. Additionally, the crystallographic orientation (111) can be used to control the 2p-hole-induced electronic transition as O → unoccupied Fe(3+)-3d(5), in comparison to the O → Bi-6p(3) + Fe(3+)-3d(5)d(0) on the orientations (001) and (101). This study offers new perspective on the improvement of BFO-based temperature-sensitive device.

  5. The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompl, René; Jamitzky, Ferdinand; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Steffes, Bernd; Bunk, Wolfram; Schmidt, Hans-Ulrich; Georgi, Matthias; Ramrath, Katrin; Stolz, Wilhelm; Stark, Robert W.; Urayama, Takuya; Fujii, Shuitsu; Eugen Morfill, Gregor

    2009-11-01

    Research on low-temperature atmospheric plasma sources (LTAPS) has grown strongly over the last few years, in part driven by possible medical 'in vivo' applications. LTAPS offer new technology for medicine and biomedical engineering. Important application examples include in situ production of reactive molecules and ions, delivery at the molecular level, contact-free and self-sterilizing devices. An important issue is the efficient bactericidal effect of LTAPS, which has already been studied widely in vitro. In spite of the many investigations, details of the plasma effect on bacteria are still largely unknown. To contribute to a better understanding of the sterilization process, we investigated the morphological changes of bacteria using atomic force microscopy before and after plasma treatment at high resolution. We examined both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at different plasma exposure times. Additionally, the effect of UV radiation as one agent in the plasma was investigated separately. Our results suggest that several sterilizing mechanisms exist and they proceed at different timescales.

  6. Quantitative study of temperature-dependent order in thin films of cylindrical morphology block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vindhya; Kramer, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Disordering and defect generation in block copolymer systems at high temperatures is of significance to get a better understanding of the physics governing these systems, which can also direct efforts to minimize them. We have studied the smectic-nematic-isotropic transition in confined monolayers and bilayers of cylindrical morphology poly (styrene-b-2vinyl pyridine) diblock copolymer. Previous studies of melting phenomena in block copolymer thin films have relied on quantitative AFM studies alone. We have supplemented AFM studies with grazing incidence small angle X-ray diffraction lineshape analysis to quantify the decay of translational and orientational order with increasing temperature. The results have been interpreted in the context of the Toner-Nelson theory of melting for layered systems.

  7. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  8. Effect of incubation temperature on the self-assembly of regenerated silk fibroin: a study using AFM.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Liu, Xunwei; Wei, Daixu; Yan, Juan; Wang, Ping; Sun, Gang; He, Dannong

    2015-05-01

    Understanding effect of temperature on the molecular self-assembly process will be helpful to unravel the structure-function relationship of biomolecule and to provide important information for the bottom-up approach to nanotechnology. In this work, the effect of incubation temperature on the secondary structures and morphological structures of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) was systematically studied using atomic force microscopy and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The effect of incubation temperature on RSF self-assembly was dependent on RSF concentration. For the RSF solution with relatively low concentrations (15 μg/mL and 60 μg/mL), the increase of the incubation temperature mainly accelerated the formation and aggregation of antiparallel β-sheet protofibrils and decreased the formation of random coil protofilaments/globule-like molecules. For the RSF solution with relatively high concentrations (300 μg/mL and 1.5mg/mL), the increase of the incubation temperature mainly accelerated the formation and aggregation of antiparallel β-sheet RSF features (protofibrils and globule-like features) and decreased the formation of random coil bead-like features. This work implies that the morphology and conformation of biomacromolecules could be tuned by controlling the incubation temperature. Further, it will be beneficial to basic understanding of the nanoscale structure formation in different silk-based biomaterials.

  9. Order in dense hydrogen at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, B.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2004-01-01

    By increase in density, impelled by pressure, the electronic energy bands in dense hydrogen attain significant widths. Nevertheless, arguments can be advanced suggesting that a physically consistent description of the general consequences of this electronic structure can still be constructed from interacting but state-dependent multipoles. These reflect, in fact self-consistently, a disorder-induced localization of electron states partially manifesting the effects of proton dynamics; they retain very considerable spatial inhomogeneity (as they certainly do in the molecular limit). This description, which is valid provided that an overall energy gap has not closed, leads at a mean-field level to the expected quadrupolar coupling, but also for certain structures to the eventual emergence of dipolar terms and their coupling when a state of broken charge symmetry is developed. A simple Hamiltonian incorporating these basic features then leads to a high-density, low-temperature phase diagram that appears to be in substantial agreement with experiment. In particular, it accounts for the fact that whereas the phase I–II phase boundary has a significant isotope dependence, the phase II–III boundary has very little. PMID:15028839

  10. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) thin films densely grafted onto gold surface: preparation, characterization, and dynamic AFM study of temperature-induced chain conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Franck; Polesel-Maris, Jérome; Pugin, Raphael; Heinzelmann, Harry

    2009-01-20

    Thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) films are attracting considerable attention since they offer the possibility to achieve reversible control over surface wettability and biocompatibility. In this paper, we first report a new and simple method for the grafting under melt of amine-terminated PNIPAM chains onto gold surfaces modified with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of reactive thiols. The formation of homogeneous tethered PNIPAM films, whose thickness can be tuned by adjusting polymer molecular weight or SAM reactivity, is evidenced by using the combination of ellipsometry, X-ray photon spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and atomic force microscopy. The calculation of grafting parameters from experimental measurements indicated the synthesis of densely grafted PNIPAM films and allowed us to predict a "brushlike" regime for the chains in good solvent. In a second part, the temperature-induced responsive properties are studied in situ by conducting dynamic AFM measurements using the amplitude modulation technique. Imaging in water environment first revealed the reversible modification of surface morphology below and above the theoretical lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAM. Then, the determination of amplitude and phase approach curves at various temperatures provided direct measurement of the evolution of the damping factor, or similarly the dissipated energy, as a function of the probe indentation into the PNIPAM film. Most interestingly, we clearly showed the subtle and progressive thermally induced chain conformational change occurring at the scale of several nanometers around the expected LCST.

  11. An AFM Study of the Effects of Silanization Temperature, Hydration, and Annealing on the Nucleation and Aggregation of Condensed OTS Domains on Mica.

    PubMed

    Britt, David W; Hlady, Vladimir

    1996-03-25

    Partial monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) were formed on mica under different reaction conditions in which the silanization temperature, time, and amount of water adsorbed on the mica substrates were varied. OTS surface coverage increased with silanization time for all samples; however, the amount and distribution of adsorbed OTS varied greatly under these different reaction conditions. AFM analysis showed that OTS formed two phases on mica silanized at 25°C: condensed "island-like" domains and expanded "liquid-like" domains. Partially dehydrated mica silanized at 9°C, however, displayed only condensed domains which were of smaller size compared to those on the 25°C samples. The lateral diffusion and aggregation of small condensed OTS domains to form larger aggregates was evident on all surfaces except the 25°C partially dehydrated mica. A uniform distribution of many small condensed domains surrounded by expanded OTS phases was seen instead. Extended annealing resulted in surface diffusion and aggregation of these domains and nucleation of new condensed domains from the surrounding expanded OTS phases. These observations are consistent with a deposition, diffusion, and aggregation model (DDA) which allows for activated diffusion; however, rigorous modeling is not presented here.

  12. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy for Si surfaces by taking account of chemical forces Masaru Tsukada, Akira Masago and Mamoru Shimizu Reversal of atomic contrast in scanning probe microscopy on (111) metal surfaces M Ondrácek, C González and P Jelínek Mechanical properties of H2Pc self-assembled monolayers at the single molecule level by noncontact atomic force microscopy Han-Qing Mao, Na Li, Xi Chen and Qi-Kun Xue High-resolution imaging of C60 molecules using tuning-fork-based non-contact atomic force microscopy R Pawlak, S Kawai, S Fremy, T Glatzel and E Meyer NC-AFM contrast formation on the calcite (101¯4) surface Philipp Rahe, Jens Schütte and Angelika Kühnle Imaging and manipulation of adatoms on an alumina surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy G H Simon, M Heyde and H-J Freund Three-dimensional scanning force/tunneling spectroscopy at room temperature Yoshiaki Sugimoto, Keiichi Ueda, Masayuki Abe and Seizo Morita Imaging and manipulation of the Si(100) surface by small-amplitude NC-AFM at zero and very low applied biasA Sweetman, R Danza, S Gangopadhyay and P Moriarty Manipulation of individual water molecules on CeO2(111) S Torbrügge, O Custance, S Morita and M Reichling FM-AFM imaging of a commercial polyethylene film immersed in n-dodecaneTakumi Hiasa, Tomoki Sugihara, Kenjiro Kimura and Hiroshi Onishi

  13. Colloquium: Theory of intertwined orders in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Kivelson, Steven A.; Tranquada, John M.

    2015-04-01

    The electronic phase diagrams of many highly correlated systems, and, in particular, the cuprate high temperature superconductors, are complex, with many different phases appearing with similar (sometimes identical) ordering temperatures even as material properties, such as dopant concentration, are varied over wide ranges. This complexity is sometimes referred to as "competing orders." However, since the relation is intimate, and can even lead to the existence of new phases of matter such as the putative "pair-density wave," the general relation is better thought of in terms of "intertwined orders." Some of the experiments in the cuprates which suggest that essential aspects of the physics are reflected in the intertwining of multiple orders, not just in the nature of each order by itself, are selectively analyzed. Several theoretical ideas concerning the origin and implications of this complexity are also summarized and critiqued.

  14. Temperature and Depth Dependence of Order in Liquid Crystal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Miranda,L.; Hu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the depth dependence and temperature behavior of the ordering of smectic-A films close to the smectic A-nematic transition, deposited on grated glass. X-ray grazing incidence geometry in reflection mode through the glass substrate was used to characterize the samples. Our results indicate the presence of a structure similar to the helical twist grain boundary phase. The structure has two maxima, one close to the glass-liquid crystal interface and another about 8 {mu}m above the surface. The structure at 8 {mu}m is the one that dominates at higher temperatures. In addition, we find that order is preserved to temperatures close to the nematic-isotropic transition temperature for the deeper gratings. We find also a dependence of the orientation of the structure with the depth of the grating and the elastic constant of the liquid crystal.

  15. Theory of intertwined orders in high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Tranquada, John M.; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2015-03-26

    The electronic phase diagrams of many highly correlated systems, and in particular the cuprate high temperature superconductors, are complex, with many different phases appearing with similar—sometimes identical—ordering temperatures even as material properties, such as a dopant concentration, are varied over wide ranges. This complexity is sometimes referred to as “competing orders.” However, since the relation is intimate, and can even lead to the existence of new phases of matter such as the putative “pair-density-wave,” the general relation is better thought of in terms of “intertwined orders.” We selectively analyze some of the experiments in the cuprates which suggest that essential aspects of the physics are reflected in the intertwining of multiple orders—not just in the nature of each order by itself. We also summarize and critique several theoretical ideas concerning the origin and implications of this complexity.

  16. Theory of intertwined orders in high temperature superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Tranquada, John M.; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2015-03-26

    The electronic phase diagrams of many highly correlated systems, and in particular the cuprate high temperature superconductors, are complex, with many different phases appearing with similar—sometimes identical—ordering temperatures even as material properties, such as a dopant concentration, are varied over wide ranges. This complexity is sometimes referred to as “competing orders.” However, since the relation is intimate, and can even lead to the existence of new phases of matter such as the putative “pair-density-wave,” the general relation is better thought of in terms of “intertwined orders.” We selectively analyze some of the experiments in the cuprates which suggest that essentialmore » aspects of the physics are reflected in the intertwining of multiple orders—not just in the nature of each order by itself. We also summarize and critique several theoretical ideas concerning the origin and implications of this complexity.« less

  17. Room-temperature Magnetic Ordering in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeongmin; Bekyarova, Elena; Liang, Ping; de Heer, Walt A.; Haddon, Robert C.; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2012-01-01

    Despite theoretical predictions, the question of room-temperature magnetic order in graphene must be conclusively resolved before graphene can fully achieve its potential as a spintronic medium. Through scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and point I-V measurements, the current study reveals that unlike pristine samples, graphene nanostructures, when functionalized with aryl radicals, can sustain magnetic order. STM images show 1-D and 2-D periodic super-lattices originating from the functionalization of a single sub-lattice of the bipartite graphene structure. Field-dependent super-lattices in 3-nm wide “zigzag” nanoribbons indicate local moments with parallel and anti-parallel ordering along and across the edges, respectively. Anti-parallel ordering is observed in 2-D segments with sizes of over 20 nm. The field dependence of STM images and point I-V curves indicates a spin polarized local density of states (LDOS), an out-of-plane anisotropy field of less than 10 Oe, and an exchange coupling field of 100 Oe at room temperature. PMID:22953045

  18. Ductile long range ordered alloys with high critical ordering temperature and wrought articles fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry

    1979-01-01

    Malleable long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the V(Fe, Co).sub.3 and V(Fe, Co, Ni).sub.3 systems. These alloys have the following compositions comprising by weight: 22-23% V, 14-30% Fe, and the remainder Co or Co and Ni with an electron density no more than 7.85. The maximum combination of high temperature strength, ductility and creep resistance are manifested in the alloy comprising by weight 22-23% V, 14-20% Fe and the remainder Co and having an atomic composition of V(Fe .sub.0.20-0.26 C Co.sub.0.74-0.80).sub.3. The alloy comprising by weight 22-23% V, 16-17% Fe and 60-62% Co has excellent high temperature properties. The alloys are fabricable into wrought articles by casting, deforming, and annealing for sufficient time to provide ordered structure.

  19. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  20. Zero temperature holographic superfluids with two competing orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Li; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao; Zhao, Junkun

    2016-08-01

    We initiate the investigation of the zero temperature holographic superfluids with two competing orders, where besides the vacuum phase, two one component superfluid phases, the coexistent superfluid phase has also been found in the anti-de Sitter soliton background for the first time. We construct the complete phase diagram in the e - μ plane by numerics, which is consistent with our qualitative analysis. Furthermore, we calculate the corresponding optical conductivity and sound speed by the linear response theory. The onset of the pole of optical conductivity at ω =0 indicates that the spontaneous breaking phase always represents the superfluid phase, and the residue of the pole is increased with the chemical potential, which is consistent with the fact that the particle density is essentially the superfluid density for zero temperature superfluids. In addition, the resulting sound speed demonstrates the nonsmoothness at the critical points as the order parameter of the condensate, which indicates that the phase transitions can also be identified by the behavior of the sound speed. Moreover, as expected from the boundary conformal field theory, the sound speed saturates to 1/√{2 } at the large chemical potential limit for our two component holographic superfluid model.

  1. Genesis of charge orders in high temperature superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wei-Lin; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most puzzling facts about cuprate high-temperature superconductors in the lightly doped regime is the coexistence of uniform superconductivity and/or antiferromagnetism with many low-energy charge-ordered states in a unidirectional charge density wave or a bidirectional checkerboard structure. Recent experiments have discovered that these charge density waves exhibit different symmetries in their intra-unit-cell form factors for different cuprate families. Using a renormalized mean-field theory for a well-known, strongly correlated model of cuprates, we obtain a number of charge-ordered states with nearly degenerate energies without invoking special features of the Fermi surface. All of these self-consistent solutions have a pair density wave intertwined with a charge density wave and sometimes a spin density wave. Most of these states vanish in the underdoped regime, except for one with a large d-form factor that vanishes at approximately 19% doping of the holes, as reported by experiments. Furthermore, these states could be modified to have a global superconducting order, with a nodal-like density of states at low energy. PMID:26732076

  2. Absence of dipolar ordering in Co doped CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, N. Vijay Prakash; Murthy, J. Krishna; Venimadhav, A.

    2016-12-01

    Polycrystalline CuO samples with Co doping were prepared by solid state method with flowing oxygen condition and examined their structural and multiferroic properties. Structural studies have confirmed single phase monoclinic crystal structure of all samples, however, in Co doped samples a decrease in volume with an increase in monoclinic distortion is found. For pristine sample, temperature dependent magnetization has confirmed two antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 213 K and 230 K and frequency independent dielectric peaks at these AFM transitions suggesting the ferroelectric nature. Magnetization of the Co doped samples has showed a marginal increase in ordering temperature of the high-temperature AFM transition and decrease in low temperature AFM ordering temperature. Further, doped samples have shown giant dielectric constant with no signature of ferroelectricity. The X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy study has revealed multiple valance states for both Co and Cu in the doped samples that simultaneously explain the giant dielectric constant and suppression of ferroelectric order.

  3. Combined force spectroscopy, AFM and calorimetric studies to reveal the nanostructural organization of biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Germà, C; Morros, A; Montero, M T; Hernández-Borrell, J; Domènech, Ò

    2014-10-01

    In this work we studied a binary lipid matrix of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (POPG), a composition that mimics the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. More specifically, liposomes with varying fractions of POPG were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a binary phase diagram of the system was created. Additionally, we performed atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of similar compositions at different temperatures, in order to create a pseudo-binary phase diagram specific to this membrane model. AFM study of SLBs is of particular interest, as it is conceived as the most adequate technique not only for studying lipid bilayer systems but also for imaging and even nanomanipulating inserted membrane proteins. The construction of the above-mentioned phase diagram enabled us to grasp better the thermodynamics of the thermal lipid transition from a gel-like POPE:POPG phase system to a more fluid phase system. Finally, AFM force spectroscopy (FS) was used to determine the nanomechanics of these two lipid phases at 27°C and at different POPG fractions. The resulting data correlated with the specific composition of each phase was calculated from the AFM phase diagram obtained. All the experiments were done in the presence of 10 mM of Ca(2+), as this ion is commonly used when performing AFM with negatively charged phospholipids.

  4. Cryogenic AFM-STM for mesoscopic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sueur, H.

    Electronic spectroscopy based on electron tunneling gives access to the electronic density of states (DOS) in conductive materials, and thus provides detailed information about their electronic properties. During this thesis work, we have developed a microscope in order to perform spatially resolved (10 nm) tunneling spectroscopy, with an unprecedented energy resolution (10 μeV), on individual nanocircuits. This machine combines an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM mode) together with a Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope (STS mode) and functions at very low temperatures (30 mK). In the AFM mode, the sample topography is recorded using a piezoelectric quartz tuning fork, which allows us to locate and image nanocircuits. Tunneling can then be performed on conductive areas of the circuit. With this microscope, we have measured the local DOS in a hybrid Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor (S-N-S) structure. In such circuit, the electronic properties of N and S are modified by the superconducting proximity effect. In particular, for short N wires, we have observed a minigap independent of position in the DOS of the N wire, as was previously predicted. Moreover, when varying the superconducting phase difference between the S electrodes, we have measured the modification of the minigap and its disappearance when the phase difference equals π. Our experimental results for the DOS, and its dependences (on phase, position, N length), are quantitatively accounted for by the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity. Some predictions of this theory are observed for the first time. La spectroscopie électronique basée sur l'effet tunnel donne accès à la densité d'états des électrons (DOS) dans les matériaux conducteurs, et renseigne ainsi en détail sur leurs propriétés électroniques. Au cours de cette thèse, nous avons développé un microscope permettant d'effectuer la spectroscopie tunnel résolue spatialement (10 nm) de nanocircuits individuels, avec une r

  5. Temperature-induced variations of magnetization kinetics of FeNi in the FM/SC and FM/AFM heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskaya, L. S.; Egorov, S. V.

    2009-03-01

    Remagnetization kinetics of the bilayer ferromagnetic/superconductor (FeNi/Nb) and ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FeNi/FeMn) ultra-thin films is investigated. Experimental results are obtained by direct observation of domain structure using the magneto-optic visualization technique in a wide temperature range. It is found that proximity of a second layer varies drastically the FeNi magnetic properties, such as domain and domain boundary structures, domain boundary mobility, coercivity. Moreover, the mechanism of magnetization is found to be temperature dependent. The effect of temperature becomes especially pronounced below 50 K.

  6. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  7. Topological order, entanglement, and quantum memory at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mazac, Dalimil Hamma, Alioscia

    2012-09-15

    We compute the topological entropy of the toric code models in arbitrary dimension at finite temperature. We find that the critical temperatures for the existence of full quantum (classical) topological entropy correspond to the confinement-deconfinement transitions in the corresponding Z{sub 2} gauge theories. This implies that the thermal stability of topological entropy corresponds to the stability of quantum (classical) memory. The implications for the understanding of ergodicity breaking in topological phases are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We calculate the topological entropy of a general toric code in any dimension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find phase transitions in the topological entropy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transitions coincide with the appearance of quantum/classical memory.

  8. Vibration signature analysis of AFM images

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, G.A.; Fu, J.; Pandit, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Vibration signature analysis has been commonly used for the machine condition monitoring and the control of errors. However, it has been rarely employed for the analysis of the precision instruments such as an atomic force microscope (AFM). In this work, an AFM was used to collect vibration data from a sample positioning stage under different suspension and support conditions. Certain structural characteristics of the sample positioning stage show up as a result of the vibration signature analysis of the surface height images measured using an AFM. It is important to understand these vibration characteristics in order to reduce vibrational uncertainty, improve the damping and structural design, and to eliminate the imaging imperfections. The choice of method applied for vibration analysis may affect the results. Two methods, the data dependent systems (DDS) analysis and the Welch`s periodogram averaging method were investigated for application to this problem. Both techniques provide smooth spectrum plots from the data. Welch`s periodogram provides a coarse resolution as limited by the number of samples and requires a choice of window to be decided subjectively by the user. The DDS analysis provides sharper spectral peaks at a much higher resolution and a much lower noise floor. A decomposition of the signal variance in terms of the frequencies is provided as well. The technique is based on an objective model adequacy criterion.

  9. [Application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Milka, Michał; Mróz, Iwona; Jastrzebska, Maria; Wrzalik, Roman; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Roszkowska, Anna M; Moćko, Lucyna; Wylegała, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows to examine surface of different biological objects in the nearly physiological conditions at the nanoscale. The purpose of this work is to present the history of introduction and the potential applications of the AFM in ophthalmology research and clinical practice. In 1986 Binnig built the AFM as a next generation of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The functional principle of AFM is based on the measurement of the forces between atoms on the sample surface and the probe. As a result, the three-dimensional image of the surface with the resolution on the order of nanometres can be obtained. Yamamoto used as the first the AFM on a wide scale in ophthalmology. The first investigations used the AFM method to study structure of collagen fibres of the cornea and of the sclera. Our research involves the analysis of artificial intraocular lenses (IOLs). According to earlier investigations, e.g. Lombardo et al., the AFM was used to study only native IOLs. Contrary to the earlier investigations, we focused our measurements on lenses explanted from human eyes. The surface of such lenses is exposed to the influence of the intraocular aqueous environment, and to the related impacts of biochemical processes. We hereby present the preliminary results of our work in the form of AFM images depicting IOL surface at the nanoscale. The images allowed us to observe early stages of the dye deposit formation as well as local calcinosis. We believe that AFM is a very promising tool for studying the structure of IOL surface and that further observations will make it possible to explain the pathomechanism of artificial intraocular lens opacity formation.

  10. Non--Cubic Symmetry of the Electronic Response in AFM Late Transition--Metal Oxides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posternak, M.; Baldereschi, A.; Massidda, S.; Resta, R.

    1998-03-01

    The late transition--metal monoxides (MnO, FeO, CoO, NiO) have the rocksalt structure in their paramagnetic phase, while below the Neel temperature a weak structural distortion accompanies an AFM ordering of type II. Therefore, it is generally assumed that most nonmagnetic (i.e. spin--integrated) crystalline properties are essentially cubic: we give here convincing evidence of the contrary. We focus on the half--filled d shell oxide MnO as the most suitable case study, on which we perform accurate ab--initio, all--electron calculations, within different one--particle schemes. In order to study the symmetry lowering due to AFM ordering, we assume an ideal cubic geometry throughout. The calculated TO frequencies and Born effective charge tensor do not have cubic symmetry. The standard LSD severely exaggerates the deviations from cubic symmetry, confirming its unreliability for calculating properties of insulating AFM oxides, while a model self--energy correction scheme(S. Massidda et al.), Phys. Rev. B 55, 13494 (1997). reduces considerably the anisotropy. We also explain the origin and the magnitude of this effect in terms of the mixed charge--transfer/Mott--Hubbard character of MnO.

  11. Low-temperature ordering of FePt by formation of silicides in underlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chih-Huang; Chiang, C. C.; Yang, C. H.

    2005-05-01

    A low-temperature ordering of FePt was achieved by introducing dynamic stress. The ordering temperature of FePt was reduced to 300°C by using a Cu underlayer on the HF-cleaned Si (001) substrate. An in-plane coercivity as high as 6900Oe can be obtained after post-annealing at 300°C. The formation of copper silicide, Cu3Si, during post-annealing induces a dynamic stress on FePt films, which greatly reduces the ordering temperature. Pt silicides also help to reduce the ordering temperature. The low-temperature ordering of FePt can be realized with Si /Cu underlayers on glass substrates.

  12. Tunable negative thermal expansion related with the gradual evolution of antiferromagnetic ordering in antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag1-xNMn3+x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. C.; Tong, P.; Tong, W.; Lin, S.; Wang, B. S.; Song, W. H.; Zou, Y. M.; Sun, Y. P.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal expansion and magnetic properties of antiperovskite manganese nitrides Ag1-xNMn3+x were reported. The substitution of Mn for Ag effectively broadens the temperature range of negative thermal expansion and drives it to cryogenic temperatures. As x increases, the paramagnetic (PM) to antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition temperature decreases. At x ˜ 0.2, the PM-AFM transition overlaps with the AFM to glass-like state transition. Above x = 0.2, two new distinct magnetic transitions were observed: One occurs above room temperature from PM to ferromagnetic (FM), and the other one evolves at a lower temperature (T*) below which both AFM and FM orderings are involved. Further, electron spin resonance measurement suggests that the broadened volume change near T* is closely related with the evolution of Γ5g AFM ordering.

  13. Determining surface properties with bimodal and multimodal AFM.

    PubMed

    Forchheimer, D; Borysov, Stanislav S; Platz, D; Haviland, David B

    2014-12-05

    Conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be extended to bimodal and multimodal AFM in which the cantilever is simultaneously excited at two or more resonance frequencies. Such excitation schemes result in one additional amplitude and phase images for each driven resonance, and potentially convey more information about the surface under investigation. Here we present a theoretical basis for using this information to approximate the parameters of a tip-surface interaction model. The theory is verified by simulations with added noise corresponding to room-temperature measurements.

  14. The order parameter dependence of transition temperature in FeRhPd alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideo; Yu, Jian; Mankey, Gary; Mryasov, Oleg; Leclair, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    FeRh alloys and FeRh-TM alloys have recently attracted great interest because well-ordered films exhibit a phase transition with antiferromagnetism observed at lower temperatures and ferromagnetism at higher temperatures. Here, the order parameter dependence of transition temperature in Fe47Rh47Pd6 films is reported. FeRhPd/Co films were fabricated such that different order parameters were obtained. A higher transition temperature was observed for a film with lower order parameter in sharp contrast to prior experiments with FeRh that show that the transition temperature monotonically increasing with order parameter [1]. The shift to lower transition temperature for the ordered film is accompanied by a sharpening of the phase transition. This is surprising, since disordered films are ferromagnetic throughout the temperature range of the measurements. These results, along with a possible explanation for the anomalous behavior including the effect of lattice constant on the transition temperature will be presented. Funded by the US DOE 1. Jiangwei Cao et al., J. Appl. Phys. 103, 07F501 (2008)

  15. AFM-Based Mechanical Nanomanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolsi, Fakhreddine

    2011-12-01

    Advances in several research areas increase the need for more sophisticated fabrication techniques and better performing materials. Tackling this problem from a bottom-up perspective is currently an active field of research. The bottom-up fabrication procedure offers sub-nanometer accurate manipulation. At this time, candidates to achieve nanomanipulation include chemical (self-assembly), biotechnology methods (DNA-based), or using controllable physical forces (e.g. electrokinetic forces, mechanical forces). In this thesis, new methods and techniques for mechanical nanomanipulation using probe force interaction are developed. The considered probes are commonly used in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) for high resolution imaging. AFM-based mechanical nanomanipulation will enable arranging nanoscale entities such as nanotubes and molecules in a precise and controlled manner to assemble and produce novel devices and systems at the nanoscale. The novelty of this research stems from the development of new modeling of the physics and mechanics of the tip interaction with nanoscale entities, coupled with the development of new smart cantilevers with multiple degrees of freedom. The gained knowledge from the conducted simulations and analysis is expected to enable true precision and repeatability of nanomanipulation tasks which is not feasible with existing methods and technologies.

  16. Evidence of Higher-Order Solar Periodicities in China Temperature Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Rajesh, R.; Padmavathi, B.

    2016-07-01

    We examine here a 2000-year-long record of surface air temperature from China using powerful spectral and statistical analysis techniques to assess the trend and harmonics, if any. Our analyses reveal statistically significant periodicities of order ~900 ± 50, ~480 ± 20, 340 ± 10, ~190 ± 10 and ~130 ± 5 years, which closely match with the known higher-order solar cycles. These periodicities are also similar to quasi-periodicities reported in the climate records of sedimentary cores of subarctic and subpolar regions of North America and North Pacific, thus attesting to the global signature of solar signals in temperature variability. A visual comparison of the temperature series shows that the nodes and antinodes of the underlying temperature variation also match with sunspot variations. We also compare the China temperature (CT) with temperature of northern and southern hemispheres of the past 1000 years. The study reveals strong correlation between the southern hemispheric temperatures and CT during the past 1000 years. However, the northern hemisphere temperature shows strong correlation with CT only during the past century. Interestingly, the variations in the correlation coefficient also have shown periodicities that are nearly identical to the periods observed from CT and higher-order solar cycles. We suggest that the solar irradiance induces global periodic oscillations in temperature records by transporting heat and thermal energy, possibly through the coupling of ocean-atmospheric processes and thereby reinforcing the Sun-ocean-climate link.

  17. Interactions between assembly order and temperature can alter both short- and long-term community composition

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Christopher F; Warren, Philip H; Collen, Ben; Blackburn, Tim; Worsfold, Nicholas; Petchey, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Both the order in which species arrive in a community, and environmental conditions, such as temperature, are known to affect community structure. Little is known, however, about the potential for, and occurrence of, interactions between assembly history and the environment. Of particular, interest may be the interaction between temperature and community assembly dynamics, especially in the light of predicted global climatic change and the fundamental processes that are governed, through metabolic rate, by an individual's environmental temperature. We present, to our knowledge, the first experimental exploration of how the influence of assembly history, temperature, and the interaction between the two alters the structure of communities of competitors, using small-scale protist microcosm communities where temperature and assembly order were manipulated factorially. In our experiment, the most important driver of long-term abundance was temperature but long-lasting assembly order effects influenced the relationship between temperature and abundance. Any advantage of early colonization proved to be short-lived, and there was rarely any long-term advantage to colonizing a habitat before other species. The results presented here suggest that environmental conditions shape community composition, but that occasionally temperature could interact with the stochastic nature of community assembly to significantly alter future community composition, especially where temperature change has been large. This could have important implications for the dynamics of both rare and invasive species. PMID:24455149

  18. Interactions between assembly order and temperature can alter both short- and long-term community composition.

    PubMed

    Clements, Christopher F; Warren, Philip H; Collen, Ben; Blackburn, Tim; Worsfold, Nicholas; Petchey, Owen

    2013-12-01

    Both the order in which species arrive in a community, and environmental conditions, such as temperature, are known to affect community structure. Little is known, however, about the potential for, and occurrence of, interactions between assembly history and the environment. Of particular, interest may be the interaction between temperature and community assembly dynamics, especially in the light of predicted global climatic change and the fundamental processes that are governed, through metabolic rate, by an individual's environmental temperature. We present, to our knowledge, the first experimental exploration of how the influence of assembly history, temperature, and the interaction between the two alters the structure of communities of competitors, using small-scale protist microcosm communities where temperature and assembly order were manipulated factorially. In our experiment, the most important driver of long-term abundance was temperature but long-lasting assembly order effects influenced the relationship between temperature and abundance. Any advantage of early colonization proved to be short-lived, and there was rarely any long-term advantage to colonizing a habitat before other species. The results presented here suggest that environmental conditions shape community composition, but that occasionally temperature could interact with the stochastic nature of community assembly to significantly alter future community composition, especially where temperature change has been large. This could have important implications for the dynamics of both rare and invasive species.

  19. Crystallographic order and decomposition of [MnIII6CrIII]3+ single-molecule magnets deposited in submonolayers and monolayers on HOPG studied by means of molecular resolved atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy in UHV

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Monolayers and submonolayers of [Mn III 6 Cr III ] 3+ single-molecule magnets (SMMs) adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) using the droplet technique characterized by non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) as well as by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) show island-like structures with heights resembling the height of the molecule. Furthermore, islands were found which revealed ordered 1D as well as 2D structures with periods close to the width of the SMMs. Along this, islands which show half the heights of intact SMMs were observed which are evidences for a decomposing process of the molecules during the preparation. Finally, models for the structure of the ordered SMM adsorbates are proposed to explain the observations. PMID:24495692

  20. Second order gravitational effects on CMB temperature anisotropy in {lambda} dominated flat universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-05-15

    We study second order gravitational effects of local inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background radiation in flat universes with matter and a cosmological constant {lambda}. We find that the general relativistic correction to the Newtonian approximation is negligible at second order provided that the size of the inhomogeneous region is sufficiently smaller than the horizon scale. For a spherically symmetric top-hat type quasilinear perturbation, the first order temperature fluctuation corresponding to the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is enhanced (suppressed) by the second order one for a compensated void (lump). As a function of redshift of the local inhomogeneity, the second order temperature fluctuations due to evolution of the gravitational potential have a peak before the matter-{lambda} equality epoch for a fixed comoving size and a density contrast. The second order gravitational effects from local quasilinear inhomogeneities at a redshift z{approx}1 may significantly affect the cosmic microwave background.

  1. Temperature-programmed microwave-assisted synthesis of SBA-15 ordered mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Celer, Ewa B; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2006-11-08

    The currently available microwave technology permits the development and implementation of a temperature-programmed microwave-assisted synthesis (TPMS) of ordered mesoporous silicas (OMSs). Unlike in previously reported syntheses of OMSs, in which only the final hydrothermal treatment was carried out under microwave irradiation, this work takes advantage of the existing capabilities of modern microwave systems to program the temperature and time for the entire synthesis of these materials. To demonstrate the flexibility of the proposed microwave-assisted synthesis, besides programming two consecutive steps involving initial stirring of the gel at a lower temperature and static hydrothermal treatment at a higher temperature, we explored the possibility of temperature programming of the latter step. A major advantage of microwave technology is the feasibility of temperature and time programming, which has been demonstrated by the synthesis of one of the most popular OMSs, SBA-15, over an unprecedented range of temperatures from 40 to 200 degrees C. Since the synthesis of OMSs has not yet been explored and reported at temperatures exceeding 150 degrees C, this work is focused on the SBA-15 samples prepared at higher temperatures (such as 160, 180, and even 200 degrees C). These SBA-15 samples show better thermal stability than those synthesized at commonly used temperatures either under conventional or microwave conditions. Moreover, a partial decomposition of the template during high-temperature microwave-assisted syntheses does not compromise the formation of well-ordered SBA-15 materials. This study shows that the simplicity and capability of temperature and time programming in TPMS allows one not only to tune the adsorption and structural properties of OMSs but also to easily screen a wide range of conditions in order to optimize and scale-up their preparation as well as to significantly reduce the time of synthesis from days to hours.

  2. An ergodic configurational thermostat using selective control of higher order temperatures.

    PubMed

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-05-21

    The conventional Nosé-Hoover type deterministic thermostat scheme for controlling temperature by configurational variables (Braga-Travis (BT) thermostat) is non-ergodic for systems with a few degrees of freedom. While for the original Nosé-Hoover kinetic thermostat ergodicity has been achieved by controlling the higher order moments of kinetic energy, the issues of nonergodicity of BT thermostat persists. In this paper, we introduce two new measures of configurational temperature (second and third order) based on the generalized temperature-curvature relationship and obtain a family of deterministic thermostatting schemes by selectively (and simultaneously) controlling the different orders of temperatures through pseudo-friction terms. The ergodic characteristics of the proposed thermostats are tested using a single harmonic oscillator through statistical (normality of joint distributions at different Poincare sections) as well as dynamical tests (difference of the minimum and maximum largest Lyapunov exponent). Our results indicate that simultaneously controlling the first and the second order configurational temperatures (C(1,2) thermostat) is sufficient to make the dynamics ergodic. A 2000 particle Lennard-Jones system is subjected to (i) equilibrium and (ii) sudden temperature change under BT and C(1,2) thermostatting schemes. The C(1,2) thermostat is found to be more robust than the BT thermostat without increasing computational costs.

  3. Temperature dependence of the structural order in the {gamma}{prime} phase of nickel base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, A.; Bastie, P.; Veron, M.

    1999-03-19

    Single crystal nickel base superalloys are used for the high-temperature parts of aircraft engines like turbine blades. Their good mechanical properties at high temperature are related to the precipitation of an ordered {gamma}{prime} phase which induces a structural hardening of the material. The {gamma}{prime} phase has an ordered L1{sub 2} structure while the {gamma} matrix is disordered and has a FCC structure. The volume fraction of f{gamma}{prime} of the {gamma}{prime} phase evolves with the temperature and a complete solutionizing occurs above 1,280 C in the AM1 superalloy. The {gamma}{prime} phase of Ni based superalloys is usually analyzed through its prototype Ni{sub 3}Al. As the Ni{sub 3}Al structure remains totally ordered up to temperature very close to the melting point, it is commonly assumed in superalloys that the {gamma}{prime} phase precipitates are fully ordered up to their solutionizing and that the volume fraction of the precipitates is equivalent to the volume fraction of the ordered phase. However, in superalloys, it is difficult to separate experimentally the effects related to the solutionizing of the precipitates from those due to a possible partial disordering of the {gamma}{prime} phase and this assumption has not been verified yet. The aim of this paper is to study the structural order in the {gamma}{prime} phase of a superalloy.

  4. Partial spin ordering and complex magnetic structure in BaYFeO4: a neutron diffraction and high temperature susceptibility study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corey M; Greedan, John E; Garlea, V Ovidiu; Flacau, Roxana; Tan, Malinda; Nguyen, Phuong-Hieu T; Wrobel, Friederike; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2014-01-21

    The novel iron-based compound, BaYFeO4, crystallizes in the Pnma space group with two distinct Fe(3+) sites, that are alternately corner-shared [FeO5](7-) square pyramids and [FeO6](9-) octahedra, forming into [Fe4O18](24-) rings, which propagate as columns along the b-axis. A recent report shows two discernible antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 36 and 48 K in the susceptibility, yet heat capacity measurements reveal no magnetic phase transitions at these temperatures. An upturn in the magnetic susceptibility measurements up to 400 K suggests the presence of short-range magnetic behavior at higher temperatures. In this Article, variable-temperature neutron powder diffraction and high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed to clarify the magnetic behavior. Neutron powder diffraction confirmed that the two magnetic transitions observed at 36 and 48 K are due to long-range magnetic order. Below 48 K, the magnetic structure was determined as a spin-density wave (SDW) with a propagation vector, k = (0, 0, (1)/3), and the moments along the b-axis, whereas the structure becomes an incommensurate cycloid [k = (0, 0, ∼0.35)] below 36 K with the moments within the bc-plane. However, for both cases the ordered moments on Fe(3+) are only of the order ∼3.0 μB, smaller than the expected values near 4.5 μB, indicating that significant components of the Fe moments remain paramagnetic to the lowest temperature studied, 6 K. Moreover, new high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a peak maximum at ∼550 K indicative of short-range spin correlations. It is postulated that most of the magnetic entropy is thus removed at high temperatures which could explain the absence of heat capacity anomalies at the long-range ordering temperatures. Published spin dimer calculations, which appear to suggest a k = (0, 0, 0) magnetic structure, and allow for neither low dimensionality nor geometric frustration, are inadequate to explain the

  5. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  6. Room Temperature Magnetically Ordered Polar Corundum GaFeO3 Displaying Magnetoelectric Coupling.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongjun; Pitcher, Michael J; Corkett, Alex J; Ling, Sanliang; Mandal, Pranab; Zanella, Marco; Dawson, Karl; Stamenov, Plamen; Batuk, Dmitry; Abakumov, Artem M; Bull, Craig L; Smith, Ronald I; Murray, Claire A; Day, Sarah J; Slater, Ben; Cora, Furio; Claridge, John B; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2017-02-01

    The polar corundum structure type offers a route to new room temperature multiferroic materials, as the partial LiNbO3-type cation ordering that breaks inversion symmetry may be combined with long-range magnetic ordering of high spin d(5) cations above room temperature in the AFeO3 system. We report the synthesis of a polar corundum GaFeO3 by a high-pressure, high-temperature route and demonstrate that its polarity arises from partial LiNbO3-type cation ordering by complementary use of neutron, X-ray, and electron diffraction methods. In situ neutron diffraction shows that the polar corundum forms directly from AlFeO3-type GaFeO3 under the synthesis conditions. The A(3+)/Fe(3+) cations are shown to be more ordered in polar corundum GaFeO3 than in isostructural ScFeO3. This is explained by DFT calculations which indicate that the extent of ordering is dependent on the configurational entropy available to each system at the very different synthesis temperatures required to form their corundum structures. Polar corundum GaFeO3 exhibits weak ferromagnetism at room temperature that arises from its Fe2O3-like magnetic ordering, which persists to a temperature of 408 K. We demonstrate that the polarity and magnetization are coupled in this system with a measured linear magnetoelectric coupling coefficient of 0.057 ps/m. Such coupling is a prerequisite for potential applications of polar corundum materials in multiferroic/magnetoelectric devices.

  7. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  8. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; ...

    2014-04-03

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal Dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to extreme conditions of pressure to 69 GPa and temperature to 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were only able to track magnetic ordering temperature till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This ismore » followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hexagonal close packed phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Lastly, our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remain localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.« less

  9. Partial Spin Ordering and Complex Magnetic Structure in BaYFeO4: A Neutron Diffraction and High Temperature Susceptibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Corey; Greedan, John; Garlea, Vasile O; Flacau, Roxana; Tan, Malinda; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    The novel iron-based compound, BaYFeO4, crystallizes in the Pnma space group with two distinct Fe3+ sites, that are alternately corner-shared [FeO5]7 square pyramids and [FeO6]9 octahedra, forming into [Fe4O18]24 rings, which propagate as columns along the b-axis. A recent report shows two discernible antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 36 and 48 K in the susceptibility, yet heat capacity measurements reveal no magnetic phase transitions at these temperatures. An upturn in the magnetic susceptibility measurements up to 400 K suggests the presence of shortrange magnetic behavior at higher temperatures. In this Article, variable-temperature neutron powder diffraction and hightemperature magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed to clarify the magnetic behavior. Neutron powder diffraction confirmed that the two magnetic transitions observed at 36 and 48 K are due to long-range magnetic order. Below 48 K, the magnetic structure was determined as a spin-density wave (SDW) with a propagation vector, k = (0, 0, 1/3), and the moments along the b-axis, whereas the structure becomes an incommensurate cycloid [k = (0, 0, 0.35)] below 36 K with the moments within the bc-plane. However, for both cases the ordered moments on Fe3+ are only of the order 3.0 B, smaller than the expected values near 4.5 B, indicating that significant components of the Fe moments remain paramagnetic to the lowest temperature studied, 6 K. Moreover, new high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a peak maximum at 550 K indicative of short-range spin correlations. It is postulated that most of the magnetic entropy is thus removed at high temperatures which could explain the absence of heat capacity anomalies at the long-range ordering temperatures. Published spin dimer calculations, which appear to suggest a k = (0, 0, 0) magnetic structure, and allow for neither low dimensionality nor geometric frustration, are inadequate to explain the observed complex magnetic

  10. Temperature dependence of the first-order metal-insulator transition in VO2 and programmable critical temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong-Jun; Lee, Yong Wook; Chae, Byung-Gyu; Yun, Sun Jin; Oh, Soo-Young; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Lim, Yong-Sik

    2007-01-01

    For VO2-based two-terminal devices, the first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT, jump) is controlled by an applied voltage and temperature, and an intermediate monoclinic metal phase between the MIT and the structural phase transition (SPT) is observed. The conductivity of this phase linearly increases with increasing temperature up to TSPT≈68°C and becomes maximum at TSPT. Optical microscopic observation reveals the absence of a local current path in the metal phase. The current uniformly flows throughout the surface of the VO2 film when the MIT occurs. This device can be used as a programmable critical temperature sensor where the applied voltage is controlled by a program.

  11. Temperature-dependent ordering phenomena in single crystals of germanium antimony tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Philipp; Schneider, Matthias N.; Oeckler, Oliver

    2015-07-15

    The temperature-dependent behavior of quenched single-crystalline (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (n~2.8, n~5 and n~11) was investigated by semiquantitative modeling of diffuse X-ray scattering. The structure at room temperature exhibits trigonal twin domains, each comprising a stacking-disordered sequence of distorted rocksalt-type slabs with variable thicknesses. Ge and Sb share the cation position and vacancies are partially ordered in defect layers (van der Waals gaps) between the slabs. The average structure determined with resonant diffraction data corresponds to a rocksalt-type structure whose cation position is split along the stacking direction. Upon heating, cation ordering leads to a metastable superstructure of the rocksalt type at ~400 °C, which transforms to a rocksalt-type high-temperature phase with randomly distributed cations and vacancies at ~500 °C; this structure was also refined using resonant diffraction. Cooling at high or intermediate rates does not yield the long-range ordered phase, but directly leads to the twinned disordered phase. - Graphical abstract: Development of the diffraction patterns of (GeTe){sub ~11}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} upon heating; the insets symbolically sketch the real structure at the corresponding temperatures. - Highlights: • The structure of disordered (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is described as a function of temperature. • Structural changes are tracked by modeling diffuse X-ray scattering. • Quenched crystals exhibit distorted NaCl-type slabs with different thicknesses. • Vacancy ordering upon heating leads to a metastable superstructure of the NaCl type. • Further heating leads to an undistorted disordered NaCl-type high-temperature phase.

  12. Communication: Anomalous temperature dependence of the intermediate range order in phosphonium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hettige, Jeevapani J.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2014-03-21

    In a recent article by the Castner and Margulis groups [Faraday Discuss. 154, 133 (2012)], we described in detail the structure of the tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide ionic liquid as a function of temperature using X-ray scattering, and theoretical partitions of the computationally derived structure function. Interestingly, and as opposed to the case in most other ionic-liquids, the first sharp diffraction peak or prepeak appears to increase in intensity as temperature is increased. This phenomenon is counter intuitive as one would expect that intermediate range order fades as temperature increases. This Communication shows that a loss of hydrophobic tail organization at higher temperatures is counterbalanced by better organization of polar components giving rise to the increase in intensity of the prepeak.

  13. Self-ordered nanopore arrays through hard anodization assisted by anode temperature ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadniaei, M.; Maleki, K.; Kashi, M. Almasi; Ramezani, A.; Mayamei, Y.

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, hard anodization assisted by anode temperature ramp was employed to fabricate self-ordered nanoporous alumina in the wide range of interpore distances (259-405 nm) in pure oxalic acid and mixture of oxalic and phosphoric acid solutions. Anode temperature ramp technique was employed to adjust the anodization current density to optimize the self-ordering of the nanopore arrays in the interpore range in which no ordered self-assembled hard anodized anodic aluminum oxide has reported. It is found that the certain ratios of oxalic and phosphoric acid solutions in this anodization technique increased self-ordering of the nanopores especially for anodization voltages over the 170 V by increasing alumina's viscous flow which could lead to decrease the overall current density of anodization, yet leveled up by anode temperature ramp. However, below 150 V anodization voltage, the ratio of interpore distance to the anodization voltage of the both anodization techniques was the same (~2 nm/V), while above this voltage, it increased to about 2.2 nm/V.

  14. Reducing the ordering temperature of CoPt nanoparticles by B additive

    SciTech Connect

    Khemjeen, Yutthaya; Pinitsoontorn, Supree Chompoosor, Apiwat; Maensiri, Santi

    2014-08-07

    We reported the effect of boron addition on magnetic properties and structure of CoPt nanoparticles prepared by a polyol method. The magnetic property measurement showed that the CoPt-B sample exhibited a much larger coercivity compared to the sample without B additive at the same annealing temperature. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the average particle size was about 2 nm for the as-synthesized sample with the ratio of Co and Pt close to 1:1. After annealing, the particle sizes increased but the composition was maintained. The phase transformation of the nanoparticles versus temperature was investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction and in-situ X-ray absorption analysis. It was shown that the phase transition temperature at which the nanoparticles change from the disordered A1 phase to the ordered L1{sub 0} phase occurs at temperature of 600 °C. We concluded that boron additives could reduce the ordering temperature of CoPt of about 100 °C.

  15. Spin-orbital order in the undoped manganite LaMnO3 at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snamina, Mateusz; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of spin and orbital order in undoped LaMnO3 under increasing temperature with a model including both superexchange and Jahn-Teller interactions. We used several cluster mean field calculation schemes and find coexisting A -type antiferromagnetic and C -type alternating orbital order at low temperature. The value of the Jahn-Teller coupling between strongly correlated eg orbitals is estimated from the orbital transition temperature at TOO≃780 K. By a careful analysis of onsite and on-bond correlations, we demonstrate that spin-orbital entanglement is rather weak. We have verified that the magnetic transition temperature is influenced by entangled spin-orbital operators as well as by entangled orbital operators on the bonds, but the errors introduced by decoupling such operators partly compensate each other. Altogether, these results justify why the commonly used disentangled spin-orbital model is so successful in describing the magnetic properties and the temperature dependence of the optical spectral weights for LaMnO3.

  16. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-12-07

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  17. Temperature dependence of third-order elastic constants of potassium manganese fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenwu; Barsch, Gerhard R.; Jiang, Wenhua; Breazeale, Mack A.

    1988-11-01

    The nonlinearity parameters along the three principal symmetry directions have been measured for KMnF3 from 298 to 350 K by means of acoustic second-harmonic generation. In conjunction with our earlier data on the temperature dependence of the pressure derivatives of the elastic constants, the complete set of the six third-order elastic (TOE) constants has been determined in this temperature range. For c111, c123, and c166 the temperature dependence is linear, suggesting that the effect of the improper ferroelastic transition at 186 K is no longer present above 300 K. This permits us to eliminate the effects of zero-point and thermal motion and of the structural phase transition by linear extrapolation of the data to absolute zero temperature. The bare TOE constants thus obtained differ significantly from the room-temperature values. The bare (and the room-temperature) values exhibit large deviations from the Cauchy relations, indicating significant contributions from many-body forces.

  18. Fractional Order Two-Temperature Dual-Phase-Lag Thermoelasticity with Variable Thermal Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sudip; Mallik, Sadek Hossain; Kanoria, M

    2014-01-01

    A new theory of two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity is constructed in the context of a new consideration of dual-phase-lag heat conduction with fractional orders. The theory is then adopted to study thermoelastic interaction in an isotropic homogenous semi-infinite generalized thermoelastic solids with variable thermal conductivity whose boundary is subjected to thermal and mechanical loading. The basic equations of the problem have been written in the form of a vector-matrix differential equation in the Laplace transform domain, which is then solved by using a state space approach. The inversion of Laplace transforms is computed numerically using the method of Fourier series expansion technique. The numerical estimates of the quantities of physical interest are obtained and depicted graphically. Some comparisons of the thermophysical quantities are shown in figures to study the effects of the variable thermal conductivity, temperature discrepancy, and the fractional order parameter.

  19. Fractional Order Two-Temperature Dual-Phase-Lag Thermoelasticity with Variable Thermal Conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Sadek Hossain; Kanoria, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new theory of two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity is constructed in the context of a new consideration of dual-phase-lag heat conduction with fractional orders. The theory is then adopted to study thermoelastic interaction in an isotropic homogenous semi-infinite generalized thermoelastic solids with variable thermal conductivity whose boundary is subjected to thermal and mechanical loading. The basic equations of the problem have been written in the form of a vector-matrix differential equation in the Laplace transform domain, which is then solved by using a state space approach. The inversion of Laplace transforms is computed numerically using the method of Fourier series expansion technique. The numerical estimates of the quantities of physical interest are obtained and depicted graphically. Some comparisons of the thermophysical quantities are shown in figures to study the effects of the variable thermal conductivity, temperature discrepancy, and the fractional order parameter. PMID:27419210

  20. Dynamic stress-induced low-temperature ordering of FePt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chih-Huang; Yang, Cheng-Han; Chiang, C. C.; Balaji, T.; Tseng, T. K.

    2004-11-01

    The ordering temperature of FePt was significantly reduced to 275°C by introducing a Cu underlayer on the HF-cleaned Si(001) substrate. A coercivity Hc as high as 6200Oe can be achieved after postannealing at 275°C, and Hc can be further increased to 7000Oe after 300°C postannealing. During the formation of copper silicide Cu3Si, the expanded volume induces a dynamic in-plane tensile stress on FePt films, which accelerates the formation of the ordered FePt phase at low temperature. Different from the static stress induced by the lattice mismatch between films and underlayers, the dynamic stress is relaxed after the formation of Cu3Si is completed; therefore, the low-temperature ordering of FePt mainly takes place simultaneously with the evolution of dynamic stress during the formation of Cu3Si. The coercivity of FePt depends on the amount of Cu3Si and on the stress developed by Cu3Si.

  1. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  2. Magnetic ordering at anomalously high temperatures in Dy at extreme pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; ...

    2015-01-15

    In an attempt to destabilize the magnetic state of the heavy lanthanide Dy, extreme pressures were applied in an electrical resistivity measurement to 157 GPa over the temperature range 1.3 - 295 K. The magnetic ordering temperature To and spin-disorder resistance Rsd of Dy, as well as the superconducting pair-breaking effect ΔTc in Y(1 at.% Dy), are found to track each other in a highly non-monotonic fashion as a function of pressure. Above 73 GPa, the critical pressure for a 6% volume collapse in Dy, all three quantities increase sharply (dTo=dP≃5.3 K/GPa), To appearing to rise above ambient temperature formore » P > 107 GPa. In contrast, To and ΔTc for Gd and Y(0.5 at.% Gd), respectively, show no such sharp increase with pressure (dTo=dP≃ 0.73 K/GPa). Altogether, these results suggest that extreme pressure transports Dy into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  3. Magnetic ordering at anomalously high temperatures in Dy at extreme pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-01-15

    In an attempt to destabilize the magnetic state of the heavy lanthanide Dy, extreme pressures were applied in an electrical resistivity measurement to 157 GPa over the temperature range 1.3 - 295 K. The magnetic ordering temperature To and spin-disorder resistance Rsd of Dy, as well as the superconducting pair-breaking effect ΔTc in Y(1 at.% Dy), are found to track each other in a highly non-monotonic fashion as a function of pressure. Above 73 GPa, the critical pressure for a 6% volume collapse in Dy, all three quantities increase sharply (dTo=dP≃5.3 K/GPa), To appearing to rise above ambient temperature for P > 107 GPa. In contrast, To and ΔTc for Gd and Y(0.5 at.% Gd), respectively, show no such sharp increase with pressure (dTo=dP≃ 0.73 K/GPa). Altogether, these results suggest that extreme pressure transports Dy into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  4. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  5. Room temperature ordering of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine bilayers induced by short chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, E; Bach, D; Miller, I R

    2013-01-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry and small and wide angle X-ray diffraction, we show that, following extended incubation at room temperature, methanol, propanol, and three of the isomers of butanol can induce ordering in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine (DPPS) gel phase bilayers. The organization of the bilayers in the presence of ethanol, described previously, is now observed to be a general effect of short chain alcohols. Evidence is presented for tilting of the acyl chains with respect to the bilayer normal in the presence of ethanol or propanol. However, the different chain lengths of the alcohols, and isomeric form, influence the thermal stability of the ordered gel to different extents. This behavior is unlike that of the gel state phosphatidylcholine analog which, in the presence of short chain alcohols, undergoes hydrocarbon chain interdigitation. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine added to DPPS in the presence of 20 vol% ethanol, acts to suppress the ordered gel phase.

  6. Tip Characterization Method using Multi-feature Characterizer for CD-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chumei; Dixson, Ronald G.; Walecki, Peter S.; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Irmer, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) metrology, the tip is a key source of uncertainty. Images taken with an AFM show a change in feature width and shape that depends on tip geometry. This geometric dilation is more pronounced when measuring features with high aspect ratios, and makes it difficult to obtain absolute dimensions. In order to accurately measure nanoscale features using an AFM, the tip dimensions should be known with a high degree of precision. We evaluate a new AFM tip characterizer, and apply it to critical dimension AFM (CD-AFM) tips used for high aspect ratio features. The characterizer is made up of comb-shaped lines and spaces, and includes a series of gratings that could be used as an integrated nanoscale length reference. We also demonstrate a simulation method that could be used to specify what range of tip sizes and shapes the characterizer can measure. Our experiments show that for non re-entrant features, the results obtained with this characterizer are consistent to 1 nm with the results obtained by using widely accepted but slower methods that are common practice in CD-AFM metrology. A validation of the integrated length standard using displacement interferometry indicates a uniformity of better than 0.75%, suggesting that the sample could be used as highly accurate and SI traceable lateral scale for the whole evaluation process. PMID:26720439

  7. Anomalies in nanostructure size measurements by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechler, Ádám; Kopniczky, Judit; Kokavecz, János; Hoel, Anders; Granqvist, Claes-Göran; Heszler, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Anomalies in atomic force microscopy (AFM) based size determination of nanoparticles were studied via comparative analysis of experiments and numerical calculations. Single tungsten oxide nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 3nm were deposited on mica and graphite substrates and were characterised by AFM. The size (height) of the nanoparticles, measured by tapping mode AFM, was found to be sensitive to the free amplitude of the oscillating tip, thus indicating that the images were not purely topographical. By comparing the experimental results to model calculations, we demonstrate that the dependence of the nanoparticle size on the oscillation amplitude of the tip is an inherent characteristic of the tapping mode AFM; it is also a function of physical properties such as elasticity and surface energy of the nanoparticle and the sample surface, and it depends on the radius of curvature of the tip. We show that good approximation of the real size can easily be obtained from plots of particle height vs free amplitude of the oscillating tip, although errors might persist for individual experiments. The results are valid for size (height) determination of any nanometer-sized objects imaged by tapping mode AFM.

  8. Thickness and ordering temperature of surface NiO/Ni systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Ying-Ta; Su, Chien-Yu; Tsai, Chung-Wei; Pan, Wei

    2014-02-15

    We estimate the thickness and ordering temperature of an antiferromagnetic and passivation surface oxide through exchange bias coupling. The surface NiO, which is generated through the exposure of a Ni/Cu(001) surface to oxygen, is taken as a model system on which to perform the estimation. Since no exchange bias is found in the surface NiO/Ni/Cu(001), we have built a sandwich structure of NiO/n ML Ni/10 ML Co/Cu(001) to measure the n dependence of exchange bias. With n ⩽ 2, a large exchange bias field is found above 300 K, which could be due to the direct contact between the oxides and the Co layer. With 3 ⩽ n ⩽ 6, a smaller exchange bias field is found with a blocking temperature of 190 K. This implies that the thickness of NiO is, at most, 3 ML. Discovering the thickness and ordering temperature of the surface NiO provides us to explore the potential applications by using surface NiO.

  9. Pressure induced enhancement of the magnetic ordering temperature in rhenium(IV) monomers

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, Christopher H.; Craig, Gavin A.; Prescimone, Alessandro; Misek, Martin; Cano, Joan; Faus, Juan; Probert, Michael R.; Parsons, Simon; Moggach, Stephen; Martínez-Lillo, José; Murrie, Mark; Kamenev, Konstantin V.; Brechin, Euan K.

    2016-01-01

    Materials that demonstrate long-range magnetic order are synonymous with information storage and the electronics industry, with the phenomenon commonly associated with metals, metal alloys or metal oxides and sulfides. A lesser known family of magnetically ordered complexes are the monometallic compounds of highly anisotropic d-block transition metals; the ‘transformation' from isolated zero-dimensional molecule to ordered, spin-canted, three-dimensional lattice being the result of through-space interactions arising from the combination of large magnetic anisotropy and spin-delocalization from metal to ligand which induces important intermolecular contacts. Here we report the effect of pressure on two such mononuclear rhenium(IV) compounds that exhibit long-range magnetic order under ambient conditions via a spin canting mechanism, with Tc controlled by the strength of the intermolecular interactions. As these are determined by intermolecular distance, ‘squeezing' the molecules closer together generates remarkable enhancements in ordering temperatures, with a linear dependence of Tc with pressure. PMID:28000676

  10. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  11. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  12. Nanoscale Nucleosome Dynamics Assessed with Time-lapse AFM

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental challenge associated with chromosomal gene regulation is accessibility of DNA within nucleosomes. Recent studies performed by various techniques, including single-molecule approaches, led to the realization that nucleosomes are dynamic structures rather than static systems, as it was once believed. Direct data is required in order to understand the dynamics of nucleosomes more clearly and answer fundamental questions, including: What is the range of nucleosome dynamics? Does a non-ATP dependent unwrapping process of nucleosomes exist? What are the factors facilitating the large scale opening and unwrapping of nucleosomes? This review summarizes the results of nucleosome dynamics obtained with time-lapse AFM, including a high-speed version (HS-AFM) capable of visualizing molecular dynamics on the millisecond time scale. With HS-AFM, the dynamics of nucleosomes at a sub-second time scale was observed allowing one to visualize various pathways of nucleosome dynamics, such as sliding and unwrapping, including complete dissociation. Overall, these findings reveal new insights into the dynamics of nucleosomes and the novel mechanisms controlling spontaneous chromatin dynamics. PMID:24839467

  13. Diffraction studies of order-disorder at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John B; Antao, Sytle M; Martin, Charles D; Crichton, Wilson

    2008-06-18

    Recent developments at synchrotron X-ray beamlines now allow collection of data suitable for structure determination and Rietveld structure refinement at high pressures and temperatures on challenging materials. These include materials, such as dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}) that tends to calcine at high temperatures, and Fe-containing materials, such as the spinel MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which tend to undergo changes in oxidation state. Careful consideration of encapsulation along with the use of radial collimation produced powder diffraction patterns virtually free of parasitic scattering from the cell in the case of large volume high-pressure experiments. These features have been used to study a number of phase transitions, especially those where superior signal-to-noise discrimination is required to distinguish weak ordering reflections. The structures adopted by dolomite, and CaSO4, anhydrite, were determined from 298 to 1466 K at high pressures. Using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells to achieve simultaneous high pressure and temperature conditions, we have observed CaSO{sub 4} undergo phase transitions to the monazite type and at highest pressure and temperature to crystallize in the barite-type structure. On cooling, the barite structure distorts, from an orthorhombic to a monoclinic lattice, to produce the AgMnO{sub 4}-type structure.

  14. Study of spin-temperature effects using energy-ordered gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated a new continuum {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique which is based on the detection of all emitted {gamma} rays in a 4{pi} detector system, and ordering them according to their energies on an event-by-event basis. The technique allows determination of growth strength functions, and rotational damping width as a function of spin and temperature. Thus, it opens up the possibility of studying the onset of motional narrowing and the mapping of the evolution of nuclear collectivity with spin and temperature. Application of the technique for preferential entry-state population, exit-channel selection, and feeding of the discrete states via selective pathways will be discussed. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Structure, temperature effect and bonding order analysis of hydrated bromide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hui; Huang, Teng; Liu, Yi-Rong; Jiang, Shuai; Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Miao, Shou-Kui; Wang, Chun-Yu; Hong, Yu; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Halide ions have been received intense interest in charactering and understanding their implications in atmospheric chemistry since they are related to the ozone destruction in the stratosphere. In the current study, structures, thermodynamic properties, and spectroscopic signatures of hydrated bromide Br-(H2O)n (n = 1-8) clusters are thoroughly studied and compared with available studies, the new global minima were observed for the larger size Br-(H2O)7,8 clusters. The numbers of isomer increase with the increasing water molecules, considering the growing complexity, the isomer populations of each size clusters are provided under a wide temperature range, it was shown that different type of structures possess different temperature dependences. In addition, the bond order of different bond types of hydrated bromide has been systematically investigated for the first time.

  16. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  17. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  18. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  19. Mass, phylogeny, and temperature are sufficient to explain differences in metabolic scaling across mammalian orders?

    PubMed

    Griebeler, Eva Maria; Werner, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Whether basal metabolic rate-body mass scaling relationships have a single exponent is highly discussed, and also the correct statistical model to establish relationships. Here, we aimed (1) to identify statistically best scaling models for 17 mammalian orders, Marsupialia, Eutheria and all mammals, and (2) thereby to prove whether correcting for differences in species' body temperature and their shared evolutionary history improves models and their biological interpretability. We used the large dataset from Sieg et al. (The American Naturalist174, 2009, 720) providing species' body mass (BM), basal metabolic rate (BMR) and body temperature (T). We applied different statistical approaches to identify the best scaling model for each taxon: ordinary least squares regression analysis (OLS) and phylogenetically informed analysis (PGLS), both without and with controlling for T. Under each approach, we tested linear equations (log-log-transformed data) estimating scaling exponents and normalization constants, and such with a variable normalization constant and a fixed exponent of either ⅔ or ¾, and also a curvature. Only under temperature correction, an additional variable coefficient modeled the influence of T on BMR. Except for Pholidata and Carnivora, in all taxa studied linear models were clearly supported over a curvature by AICc. They indicated no single exponent at the level of orders or at higher taxonomic levels. The majority of all best models corrected for phylogeny, whereas only half of them included T. When correcting for T, the mathematically expected correlation between the exponent (b) and the normalization constant (a) in the standard scaling model y = a x(b) was removed, but the normalization constant and temperature coefficient still correlated strongly. In six taxa, T and BM correlated positively or negatively. All this hampers a disentangling of the effect of BM, T and other factors on BMR, and an interpretation of linear BMR-BM scaling

  20. General approach for studying first-order phase transitions at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fiore, C E; da Luz, M G E

    2011-12-02

    By combining different ideas, a general and efficient protocol to deal with discontinuous phase transitions at low temperatures is proposed. For small T's, it is possible to derive a generic analytic expression for appropriate order parameters, whose coefficients are obtained from simple simulations. Once in such regimes simulations by standard algorithms are not reliable; an enhanced tempering method, the parallel tempering-accurate for small and intermediate system sizes with rather low computational cost-is used. Finally, from finite size analysis, one can obtain the thermodynamic limit. The procedure is illustrated for four distinct models, demonstrating its power, e.g., to locate coexistence lines and the phase density at the coexistence.

  1. Interaction of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine with ethanol: induction of an ordered gel phase at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wachtel, E; Bach, D; Miller, I R; Borochov, N

    2007-05-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry and small and wide-angle X-ray diffraction, we show that, unlike the saturated phosphatidylcholines, for which ethanol induces chain interdigitation in the gel state, and unlike natural phosphatidylserine in which the gel state is almost unaffected by the addition of ethanol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine (DPPS) assumes an ordered structure after incubation at room temperature in the presence of as little as 5% (v/v) ethanol. In the liquid crystalline state, a progressive decrease in the interbilayer spacing is observed as a function of ethanol concentration, similar to what is found for natural phosphatidylserine (PS) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine (POPS). The 0.37 molar fraction of cholesterol in the DPPS dispersion in the presence of 10% (v/v) ethanol, does not prevent the formation of the ordered gel.

  2. Graphene MEMS: AFM probe performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Rasool, Haider Imad; Weiller, Bruce H; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-05-28

    We explore the feasibility of growing a continuous layer of graphene in prepatterned substrates, like an engineered silicon wafer, and we apply this as a mold for the fabrication of AFM probes. This fabrication method proves the fabrication of SU-8 devices coated with graphene in a full-wafer parallel technology and with high yield. It also demonstrates that graphene coating enhances the functionality of SU-8 probes, turning them conductive and more resistant to wear. Furthermore, it opens new experimental possibilities such as studying graphene-graphene interaction at the nanoscale with the precision of an AFM or the exploration of properties in nonplanar graphene layers.

  3. Magnetic and structural phase transitions in erbium at low temperatures and high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Wenger, Lowell E.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2012-02-07

    Electrical resistance and crystal structure measurements have been carried out on polycrystalline erbium (Er) at temperatures down to 10 K and pressures up to 20 GPa. An abrupt change in the slope of the resistance is observed with decreasing temperature below 84 K, which is associated with the c-axis modulated (CAM) antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering of the Er moments. With increasing pressure the temperature of the resistance slope change and the corresponding AFM ordering temperature decrease until vanishing above 10.6 GPa. The disappearance of the slope change in the resistance occurs at similar pressures where the hcp structural phase of Er is transformed to a nine-layer {alpha}-Sm structural phase, as confirmed by our high-pressure synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies. These results suggest that the disappearance in the AFM ordering of Er moments is strongly correlated to the structural phase transition at high pressures and low temperatures.

  4. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  5. Nanoscale thermal AFM of polymers: transient heat flow effects.

    PubMed

    Duvigneau, Joost; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G Julius

    2010-11-23

    Thermal transport around the nanoscale contact area between the heated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and the specimen under investigation is a central issue in scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Polarized light microscopy and AFM imaging of the temperature-induced crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films in the region near the tip were used in this study to unveil the lateral heat transport. The radius of the observed lateral surface isotherm at 133 °C ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 18.7 ± 0.5 μm for tip-polymer interface temperatures between 200 and 300 °C with contact times varying from 20 to 120 s, respectively. In addition, the heat transport into polymer films was assessed by measurements of the thermal expansion of poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) films with variable thickness on silicon supports. Our data showed that heat transport in the specimen normal (z) direction occurred to depths exceeding 1000 μm using representative non-steady-state SThM conditions (i.e., heating from 40 to 180 °C at a rate of 10 °C s(-1)). On the basis of the experimental results, a 1D steady-state model for heat transport was developed, which shows the temperature profile close to the tip-polymer contact. The model also indicates that ≤1% of the total power generated in the heater area, which is embedded in the cantilever end, is transported into the polymer through the tip-polymer contact interface. Our results complement recent efforts in the evaluation and improvement of existing theoretical models for thermal AFM, as well as advance further developments of SThM for nanoscale thermal materials characterization and/or manipulation via scanning thermal lithography (SThL).

  6. High-temperature ordered intermetallic alloys VIII. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings: Volume 552

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.P.; Mills, M.J.; Yamaguchi, Masaharu

    1999-07-01

    The symposium, High-Temperature Ordered Intermetallic Alloys VIII, was held November 30--December 3, 1998, in Boston, Massachusetts, during the MRS Fall Meeting. A number of talks in the titanium-aluminides session focused on dislocation-level mechanisms to explain the observed microstructure-property relationships. Recent work has also focused on creep, fatigue and processing as titanium-aluminide systems mature toward application. Several talks focused on the critical role that point defects play in the mechanical properties of iron-aluminides and nickel-aluminides. Advances in several promising transition-metal silicides were also presented. In particular, niobium-silicides were shown to have excellent fracture toughness and creep strength, although oxidation resistance remains a concern. Molybdenum-silicides, on the other hand, have excellent oxidation resistance at high temperature, but suffer from poor fracture toughness. Several presentations on Laves phase alloys focused on mechanisms for promoting twinning as a means of improving low-temperature toughness. Finally, the importance of computational modeling, coupled with detailed experimental analysis of dislocations and interfaces, was demonstrated in several presentations on nickel-aluminide-based systems. One hundred and nineteen papers were processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Higher-order contributions to transport coefficients in two-temperature hydrogen thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Kuldip

    2011-06-15

    Within the framework of Chapman-Enskog method, electron transport properties and their higher-order contributions have been studied in temperature range 5000-40 000 K at different pressures for hydrogen thermal plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) regimes. Two cases of thermal plasma have been considered: (i) Ground state (GS) plasma in which all atomic hydrogen has been assumed to be in ground state and (ii) the excited state (ES) plasma in which hydrogen atoms are distributed in various possible electronically excited states (EES). The plasma composition is calculated by modified Saha equation of van de Sanden et al. The influence of non-equilibrium parameter {theta} (=T{sub e}/T{sub h}) on these properties has been examined in both the cases. It has been observed that both EES and {theta} modify the plasma composition and consequently affect the electron transport properties (viz., electron thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, thermal diffusion and thermal diffusion ratio). It is shown that non-equilibrium parameter {theta} has meager effect on the higher-order convergence in comparison to EES. The unique behaviour observed for third-order contribution to these transport properties in GS plasma for small values of {theta} could be explained only when EES are taken into account. It is noted that EES show their influence on higher-orders to a considerable extent even when e-H(n) cross-sections are replaced by the ground state ones. Thus electron transport coefficients and their higher-order contributions are affected significantly due to inclusion of EES in LTE and NLTE plasmas.

  8. Electronic Transport through Self Assembled Thiol Molecules: Effect of Monolayer Order, Dynamics and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dholakia, Geetha; Fan, Wendy; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the charge transport and tunneling conductance of self assembled organic thiol molecules and discuss the influence of order and dynamics in the monolayer on the transport behavior and the effect of temperature. Conjugated thiol molecular wires and organometals such as terpyridine metal complexes provide a new platform for molecular electronic devices and we study their self assembly on Au(111) substrates by the scanning tunneling microscope. Determining the organization of the molecule and the ability to control the nature of its interface with the substrate is important for reliable performance of the molecular electronic devices. By concurrent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies on SAMs formed from oligo (phenelyne ethynelyne) monolayers with and without molecular order, we show that packing and order determine the response of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) to competing interactions. Molecular resolution STM imaging in vacuum shows that the OPES adopt an imcommensurate SAM structure on Au(111) with a rectangular unit cell. Tunneling spectroscopic measurements were performed on the SAM as a function of junction resistance. STS results show that the I-Vs are non linear and asymmetric due to the inherent asymmetry in the molecular structure, with larger currents at negative sample biases. The asymmetry increases with increasing junction resistance due to the asymmetry in the coupling to the leads. This is brought out clearly in the differential conductance, which also shows a gap at the Fermi level. We also studied the effect of order and dynamics in the monolayer on the charge transport and found that competing forces between the electric field, intermolecular interactions, tip-molecule physisorption and substrate-molecule chemisorption impact the transport measurements and its reliability and that the presence of molecular order is very important for reproducible transport measurements. Thus while developing new electronic platforms

  9. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  10. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  11. High-sensitivity temperature sensing using higher-order Stokes stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Victor Lambin; Loranger, Sébastien; Marois, Mikaël; Kashyap, Raman

    2014-02-15

    In an effort to reduce the cost of sensing systems and make them more compact and flexible, Brillouin scattering has been demonstrated as a useful tool, especially for distributed temperature and strain sensing (DTSS), with a resolution of a few centimeters over several tens of kilometers of fiber. However, sensing is limited by the Brillouin frequency shift's sensitivity to these parameters, which are of the order of ~1.3  MHz/°C and of ~0.05  MHz/με for standard fiber. In this Letter, we demonstrate a new and simple technique for enhancing the sensitivity of sensing by using higher-orders Stokes shifts with stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). By this method, we multiply the sensitivity of the sensor by the number of the Stokes order used, enhanced by six-fold, therefore reaching a sensitivity of ~7  MHz/°C, and potentially ~0.30  MHz/με. To do this, we place the test fiber within a cavity to produce a frequency comb. Based on a reference multiorder SBS source for heterodyning, this system should provide a new distributed sensing technology with significantly better resolution at a potentially lower cost than currently available DTSS systems.

  12. Supercapacitors based on ordered mesoporous carbon derived from furfuryl alcohol: effect of the carbonized temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Xu, Jianxiong; Chen, Han; Wang, Xianyou

    2014-07-01

    Supercapacitors are successfully prepared from ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) synthesized by employing the mesoporous silica, SBA-15 as template and furfuryl alcohol as carbon source. It is found that the carbonized temperature greatly influences the physical properties of the synthesized mesoporous carbon materials. The optimal carbonized temperature is measured to be 600 degrees C under which OMC with the specific surface area of 1219 m2/g and pore volume of 1.31 cm3/g and average pore diameter of - 3 nm are synthesized. The OMC materials synthesized under different carbonized temperature are used as electrode material of supercapacitors and the electrochemical properties of the OMC materials are compared by using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, galvanostatic charge-discharge and self-discharge tests. The results show that the electrochemical properties of the OMC materials are directly related to the specific surface area and pore volume of the mesoporous carbon and the electrode prepared from the OMC synthesized under the carbonized temperature of 600 degrees C (OMC-600) exhibits the most excellent electrochemical performance with the specific capacitance of 207.08 F/g obtained from cyclic voltammetry at the scan rate of 1 mV/s, small resistance and low self-discharge rate. Moreover, the supercapacitor based on the OMC-600 material exhibits good capacitance properties and stable cycle behavior with the specific capacitance of 105 F/g at the current density of 700 mA/g, and keeps a specific capacitance of 98 F/g after 20000 consecutive charge/discharge cycles.

  13. Observation of antiferromagnetic order collapse in the pressurized insulator LaMnPO

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing; Simonson, J. W.; Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi; Gao, Peiwen; Zhang, Chao; Gu, Dachun; Kotliar, Gabriel; Aronson, Meigan; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of superconductivity in the iron pnictide or cuprate high temperature superconductors usually accompanies the suppression of a long-ranged antiferromagnetic (AFM) order state in a corresponding parent compound by doping or pressurizing. A great deal of effort by doping has been made to find superconductivity in Mn-based compounds, which are thought to bridge the gap between the two families of high temperature superconductors, but the AFM order was not successfully suppressed. Here we report the first observations of the pressure-induced elimination of long-ranged AFM order at ~ 34 GPa and a crossover from an AFM insulating to an AFM metallic state at ~ 20 GPa in LaMnPO single crystals that are iso-structural to the LaFeAsO superconductor by in-situ high pressure resistance and ac susceptibility measurements. These findings are of importance to explore potential superconductivity in Mn-based compounds and to shed new light on the underlying mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. PMID:23989921

  14. Ubiquitous Interplay between Charge Ordering and High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we will report on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and resonant elastic x-ray scattering measurements that are used to establish the formation of charge ordering in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x. Depending on the hole concentration, the charge ordering in this system occurs with the same period as those in Y-based or La-based cuprates, but also displays the analogous competition with superconductivity. These results indicate the universality of charge organization competing with superconductivity across different families of cuprates. Our spectroscopic STM measurements demonstrate that this charge ordering leaves a distinct signature in its energy-dependence, which allows us to distinguish the charge order from impurity-induced quasiparticle interference, and to connect it to the physics of a doped Mott insulator. Finally, we will comment on recent claims of electronic nematicity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x from STM studies. We show that anisotropic STM tip structures can induce energy-dependent features in spectroscopic maps on different correlated electron systems (cuprates and heavy-fermions) that can be misidentified as signatures of a nematic phase. Our findings show that such experimental features, which can be reproduced by a simple toy model calculation, can be understood as a generic tunneling interference phenomenon within an STM junction. Work done in collaboration with: P. Aynajian, A. Frano, R. Comin, E. Schierle, E. Weschke, A. Gyenis, J. Wen, J. Schneeloch, Z. Xu, R. Baumbach, E. D. Bauer, J. Mydosh, S. Ono, G. Gu, M. Le Tacon, and A. Yazdani Work supported by: DOE-BES, NSF-DMR1104612, NSF-MRSEC (DMR-0819860), Linda and Eric Schmidt Transformative Fund, W. M. Keck Foundation, The Max Planck - UBC Centre for Quantum Materials, CIFAR Quantum Materials, and DOE (DE-AC02-98CH10886).

  15. Hidden spin-order-induced room-temperature ferroelectricity in a peculiar conical magnetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shi-Peng; Liu, Xin-Zhi; Chai, Yi-Sheng; Studer, Andrew; Rule, Kirrily; Zhai, Kun; Yan, Li-Qin; Shang, Da-Shan; Klose, Frank; Liu, Yun-Tao; Chen, Dong-Feng; Sun, Young

    2017-03-01

    A novel mechanism of spin-induced ferroelectricity is unraveled in the alternating longitudinal conical (ALC) magnetic structure. Because the noncollinear ALC structure possesses a c -axis component with collinear ↑-↑-↓-↓ spin order, spin-driven ferroelectricity along the c axis due to the exchange striction mechanism is predicted. Our experiments verify this prediction in the Y-type hexaferrite B a0.3S r1.7C o2F e11Al O22 , where ferroelectricity along the c axis is observed up to room temperature. Neutron diffraction data clearly reveal the ALC phase and its evolution with magnetic fields. The c -axis electric polarization can be well modulated by applying either a b -plane or c -axis magnetic fields, even at 305 K. This kind of spin-induced ferroelectricity associated with the ALC magnetic structure provides a new resource of type II multiferroics.

  16. Sequestration and speciation of Eu(iii) on gamma alumina: role of temperature and contact order.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yawen; Ren, Xuemei; Lang, Yue; Liu, Zhiyong; Zong, Pengfei; Wang, Xiangke; Yang, Shitong

    2015-11-01

    The speciation, migration and transport of radionuclides in the environment are significantly influenced by their interactions with the natural minerals and humic substances therein. In view of this, the effect of temperature and contact order on the sorption behaviors of trivalent Eu(iii) in the γ-Al2O3/Eu(iii) and γ-Al2O3/HA/Eu(iii) systems was studied using batch experiments and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) technique. The endothermic sorption behavior of Eu(iii) in the γ-Al2O3/Eu(iii) systems was induced by the hydrolysis reaction of Eu(iii) in solution and the complexation of Eu(iii) with the γ-Al2O3 surface sites. The endothermic sorption of Eu(iii) in the γ-Al2O3/HA/Eu(iii) systems was attributed to the endothermic binding of HA on γ-Al2O3 and the endothermic complexation between Eu(iii) and HA. EXAFS analysis suggested the formation of type B ternary complexes and their thermodynamic stability improves with rising temperature. The different sorption percentages under various contact orders were closely related to the binding mode of Eu(iii) on the exposed γ-Al2O3 surfaces or the γ-Al2O3/HA colloids. The findings obtained herein are important to evaluate the security of the radioactive waste repository and predict the fate of trivalent actinides (e.g., Am(iii), Cm(iii), Pu(iii), etc.) near the geological repository.

  17. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; ...

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  19. High-Temperature Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Aluminosilicates from ZSM-5 Nanoseeds with Improved Acidic Properties.

    PubMed

    Vu, Xuan Hoan; Eckelt, Reinhard; Armbruster, Udo; Martin, Andreas

    2014-08-18

    Ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analogs with different Si/Al ratios were successfully prepared in a two-step process from self-assembly of ZSM-5 nanoseeds at high temperature in mildly acidic media (473 K, pH 3.5). The obtained products were characterized as SAXS, XRD, N₂ sorption, FTIR, TEM, NH₃-TPD, AAS and ICP. The results show that the initial Si/Al molar ratio of ZSM-5 precursors strongly affects the final materials' properties. A highly condensed, well-ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analog with improved hydrothermal stability and acidic properties can be prepared from low aluminum containing ZSM-5 precursors (Si/Al ≥ 20). Reducing the initial Si/Al molar ratio to 10, however, leads to the formation of a disordered mesoporous SBA-15 type material accompanied by degraded textural and acidic properties. The gas phase cracking of cumene, carried out as probe reaction to evaluate Brønsted acidity, reveals that an increased density of Brønsted acid sites has been achieved over the SBA-15 analogs compared to conventional Al-SBA-15 due to the preservation of zeolite building units in the mesopore walls of the SBA-15 analogs.

  20. High-Temperature Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Aluminosilicates from ZSM-5 Nanoseeds with Improved Acidic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Xuan Hoan; Eckelt, Reinhard; Armbruster, Udo; Martin, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analogs with different Si/Al ratios were successfully prepared in a two-step process from self-assembly of ZSM-5 nanoseeds at high temperature in mildly acidic media (473 K, pH 3.5). The obtained products were characterized as SAXS, XRD, N2 sorption, FTIR, TEM, NH3-TPD, AAS and ICP. The results show that the initial Si/Al molar ratio of ZSM-5 precursors strongly affects the final materials’ properties. A highly condensed, well-ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analog with improved hydrothermal stability and acidic properties can be prepared from low aluminum containing ZSM-5 precursors (Si/Al ≥ 20). Reducing the initial Si/Al molar ratio to 10, however, leads to the formation of a disordered mesoporous SBA-15 type material accompanied by degraded textural and acidic properties. The gas phase cracking of cumene, carried out as probe reaction to evaluate Brønsted acidity, reveals that an increased density of Brønsted acid sites has been achieved over the SBA-15 analogs compared to conventional Al-SBA-15 due to the preservation of zeolite building units in the mesopore walls of the SBA-15 analogs.

  1. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  2. Measurement of the Order Parameter in a Room Temperature Liquid Crystal: An Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPre, Donald B.; Chapoy, L. Lawrence

    1979-01-01

    Presented here is a laboratory experiment for a course in physical chemistry. Students are requested to directly measure the degree of orientational order in a liquid crystal at room temperature. A minimum amount of equipment is necessary. (Author/SA)

  3. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  4. Nanomechanics of Yeast Surfaces Revealed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dague, Etienne; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David

    Despite the large and well-documented characterization of the microbial cell wall in terms of chemical composition, the determination of the mechanical properties of surface molecules in relation to their function remains a key challenge in cell biology.The emergence of powerful tools allowing molecular manipulations has already revolutionized our understanding of the surface properties of fungal cells. At the frontier between nanophysics and molecular biology, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and more specifically single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), has strongly contributed to our current knowledge of the cell wall organization and nanomechanical properties. However, due to the complexity of the technique, measurements on live cells are still at their infancy.In this chapter, we describe the cell wall composition and recapitulate the principles of AFM as well as the main current methodologies used to perform AFM measurements on live cells, including sample immobilization and tip functionalization.The current status of the progress in probing nanomechanics of the yeast surface is illustrated through three recent breakthrough studies. Determination of the cell wall nanostructure and elasticity is presented through two examples: the mechanical response of mannoproteins from brewing yeasts and elasticity measurements on lacking polysaccharide mutant strains. Additionally, an elegant study on force-induced unfolding and clustering of adhesion proteins located at the cell surface is also presented.

  5. Temperature and isotope effects on water cluster ions with path integral molecular dynamics based on the fourth order Trotter expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kimichi; Shiga, Motoyuki; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2008-10-01

    Path integral molecular dynamics simulation based on the fourth order Trotter expansion has been performed to elucidate the geometrical isotope effect of water dimer anions, H3O2-, D3O2-, and T3O2-, at different temperatures from 50 to 600 K. At low temperatures below 200 K the hydrogen-bonded hydrogen nucleus is near the center of two oxygen atoms with mostly O⋯X⋯O geometry (where X =H, D, or T), while at high temperatures above 400 K, hydrogen becomes more delocalized, showing the coexistence between O⋯X-O and O-X⋯O. The OO distance tends to be shorter as the isotopomer is heavier at low temperatures, while this ordering becomes opposite at high temperatures. It is concluded that the coupling between the OO stretching mode and proton transfer modes is a key to understand such a temperature dependence of a hydrogen-bonded structure.

  6. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Matlashov, A.

    1998-01-01

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). {open_quotes}Analog{close_quotes} gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels (ability to reject a uniform background magnetic field) achieved are 2{times}10{sup 3} and 1{times}10{sup 3} at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods, respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effects which time delays (phase differences) in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on these balance levels are presented and discussed. It is shown that these delays, along with geometrical considerations, are the limiting factor for balance level for any electronic gradiometer system using two (or more) SQUIDs, a very different situation from the case with wire-wound gradiometers. Results using a dipole field to study the performance of both the parallel and series devices functioning as gradiometers in an unshielded laboratory are presented and compared with theory. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Dynamics of ordering in highly degenerate models with anisotropic grain-boundary potential: Effects of temperature and vortex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1989-11-01

    Monte Carlo computer-simulation techniques are used to elucidate the equilibrium phase behavior as well as the late-stage ordering dynamics of some two-dimensional models with ground-state ordering of a high degeneracy Q. The models are Q-state Potts models with anisotropic grain-boundary potential on triangular lattices-essentially clock models, except that the potential is not a cosine, but a sine function of the angle between neighboring grain orientations. For not too small Q, these models display two thermally driven phase transitions, one which takes the system from a low-temperature Potts-ordered phase to an intermediate phase which lacks conventional long-range order, and another transition which takes the system to the high-temperature disordered phase. The linear nature of the sine potential used makes it a marginal case in the sense that it favors neither hard domain boundaries, like the standard Potts models do, nor a wetting of the boundaries, as the standard clock models do. Thermal fluctuations nevertheless cause wetting to occur for not too small temperatures. Specifically, we have studied models with Q=12 and 48. The models are quenched from infinity to zero as well as finite temperatures within the two low-temperature phases. The order parameter is a nonconserved quantity during these quenches. The nonequilibrium ordering process subsequent to the quench is studied as a function of time by calculating the interfacial energy, ΔE, associated with the entire grain-boundary network. The time evolution of this quantity is shown to obey the growth law, ΔE(t)~t-n, over an extended time range at late times. It is found that the zero-temperature dynamics is characterized by a special exponent value which for the Q=48 model is n~=0.25 in accordance with earlier work. However, for quenches to finite temperatures in the Potts-ordered phase there is a distinct crossover to the classical Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn exponent value, n=(1/2, for both values of Q. This

  8. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.

  9. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; ...

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function ofmore » pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.« less

  10. Controlling morphology, mesoporosity, crystallinity, and photocatalytic activity of ordered mesoporous TiO{sub 2} films prepared at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Elgh, Björn; Yuan, Ning; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.; Cho, Hae Sung; Terasaki, Osamu; Magerl, David; Philipp, Martine; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V.; Yoon, Kyung Byung

    2014-11-01

    Partly ordered mesoporous titania films with anatase crystallites incorporated into the pore walls were prepared at low temperature by spin-coating a microemulsion-based reaction solution. The effect of relative humidity employed during aging of the prepared films was studied using SEM, TEM, and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering to evaluate the mesoscopic order, porosity, and crystallinity of the films. The study shows unambiguously that crystal growth occurs mainly during storage of the films and proceeds at room temperature largely depending on relative humidity. Porosity, pore size, mesoscopic order, crystallinity, and photocatalytic activity of the films increased with relative humidity up to an optimum around 75%.

  11. AFM/MFM hybrid nanocharacterization of martensitic transformation and degradation for Fe-Pd shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Nagatani, Kohei; Hirano, Kazumi; Teramoto, Tokuo; Taya, Minoru

    2003-07-01

    Martensitic transformation and degradation characteristics for Fe-Pd ferromagnetic shape memory alloy were investigated by the developed AFM (Atomic Force Microscope)/MFM (Magnetic Force Microscope) hybrid nano-characterization technique. In AFM martensitic transformation was detected by the changes of surface topography of martensite plates. In MFM martensitic transformation was detected by the changes of magnetic domain structures. This technique has an advantage that martensitic transformation characteristics such as martensitic transformation temperature and reverse transformation temperature can be measured at microscopic and nanoscopic small area. Degradation characteristics of martensitic transformation under cyclic loading were also detected by the changes of AFM and MFM images. In AFM images surface topography of martensite plates became flat and in MFM images the morphology of magnetic domain structures became unfocused under cyclic loading. Then it was found that the hybrid nano-characterization was very high sensitive technique to evaluate degradation for Fe-Pd ferromagnetic shape memory alloy.

  12. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  13. Isotopic ordering in eggshells reflects body temperatures and suggests differing thermophysiology in two Cretaceous dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagle, Robert A.; Enriquez, Marcus; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Hu, David; Tütken, Thomas; Montanari, Shaena; Loyd, Sean J.; Ramirez, Pedro; Tripati, Aradhna K.; Kohn, Matthew J.; Cerling, Thure E.; Chiappe, Luis M.; Eiler, John M.

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary transitions leading to the modern endothermic state of birds and mammals is incomplete, partly because tools available to study the thermophysiology of extinct vertebrates are limited. Here we show that clumped isotope analysis of eggshells can be used to determine body temperatures of females during periods of ovulation. Late Cretaceous titanosaurid eggshells yield temperatures similar to large modern endotherms. In contrast, oviraptorid eggshells yield temperatures lower than most modern endotherms but ~6 °C higher than co-occurring abiogenic carbonates, implying that this taxon did not have thermoregulation comparable to modern birds, but was able to elevate its body temperature above environmental temperatures. Therefore, we observe no strong evidence for end-member ectothermy or endothermy in the species examined. Body temperatures for these two species indicate that variable thermoregulation likely existed among the non-avian dinosaurs and that not all dinosaurs had body temperatures in the range of that seen in modern birds.

  14. Temperature affects leaf litter decomposition in low-order forest streams: field and microcosm approaches.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Aingeru; Larrañaga, Aitor; Pérez, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Despite predicted global warming, the temperature effects on headwater stream functioning are poorly understood. We studied these effects on microbial-mediated leaf decomposition and the performance of associated aquatic hyphomycete assemblages. Alder leaves were incubated in three streams differing in winter water temperature. Simultaneously, in laboratory, leaf discs conditioned in these streams were incubated at 5, 10 and 15 °C. We determined mass loss, leaf N and sporulation rate and diversity of aquatic hyphomycete communities. In the field, decomposition rate correlated positively with temperature. Decomposition rate and leaf N presented a positive trend with dissolved nutrients, suggesting that temperature was not the only factor determining the process velocity. Under controlled conditions, it was confirmed that decomposition rate and leaf N were positively correlated with temperature, leaves from the coldest stream responding most clearly. Sporulation rate correlated positively with temperature after 9 days of incubation, but negatively after 18 and 27 days. Temperature rise affected negatively the sporulating fungi richness and diversity only in the material from the coldest stream. Our results suggest that temperature is an important factor determining leaf processing and aquatic hyphomycete assemblages and that composition and activity of fungal communities adapted to cold environments could be more affected by temperature rises. Highlight: Leaf decomposition rate and associated fungal communities respond to temperature shifts in headwater streams.

  15. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. The AFM Observation of Single Polyethylene Molecules in Coiled State on Mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. V.; Yaminsky, I. V.

    2003-12-01

    Single polyethylene molecules and their small aggregates have been deposited on mica from diluted solutions at elevated temperatures and visualized by AFM in coiled and crystalline states. Coils have two-dimensional conformations with both highly tangled sites and locally extended segments with a length much exceeding the persistent length in a solution. The length measurements of coils reveal a wide distribution with the length of a maximum much smaller than the length of fully stretched molecules, moreover the long coils have been observed indicating the existence of linear multimolecular aggregates. Two models have been considered for the explanation of the observed deficit in the coils length, correspondingly the model implying the substantial smoothing of a winding chain trajectory due to the lack of the AFM resolution and the model of locally extended surface conformations with the long intramolecular folds. The roots of the apparent negative AFM height contrast of coils have been discussed.

  17. Low temperature time resolved photoluminescence in ordered and disordered Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raadik, Taavi; Krustok, Jüri; Kauk-Kuusik, M.; Timmo, K.; Grossberg, M.; Ernits, K.; Bleuse, J.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we performed time-resolved micro-photoluminescence (TRPL) studies of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) single crystals grown in molten KI salt. The order/disorder degree of CZTS was varied by the thermal post treatment temperature. Photoluminescence spectra measured at T=8 K showed an asymmetric band with a peak position of 1.33 eV and 1.27 eV for partially ordered and disordered structures, respectively. Thermal activation energies were found to be ET (PO) =65±9 meV for partially ordered and ET (PD) =27±4 meV for partially disordered. These low activation energy values indicating to the defect cluster recombination model for both partially ordered and disordered structures. TRPL was measured for both crystals and their decay curves were fitted with a stretched exponential function, in order to describe the charge carriers' recombination dynamics at low temperature.

  18. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  19. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution.

  20. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  1. Temperature dependence of the crystal structure and charge ordering in Yb{sub 4}As{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, U.; Shi, M.; Schulze-Briese, C.; Patterson, B.D.; Fauth, F.; Dooryhee, E.; Soderholm, L.; Cross, J.O.; Mannix, D.; Ochiai, A.

    2005-02-15

    Resonant and nonresonant x-ray scattering, combined with x-ray absorption data, are presented on Yb{sub 4}As{sub 3}. The nonresonant data allow a detailed determination of the low-temperature crystal structure and its evolution as a function of temperature. Bond-valence-sum calculations are performed and compared with theoretical predictions. Using the structural knowledge, the energy dependence, near the Yb L{sub 3} edge, of particular x-ray reflections are calculated and compared with experiment, and the temperature dependence of the charge order is extracted. A united picture of the temperature-dependent crystal structure and charge ordering in Yb{sub 4}As{sub 3} emerges and is compared with theory.

  2. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.

  3. Isotopic ordering in eggshells reflects body temperatures and suggests differing thermophysiology in two Cretaceous dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Robert A; Enriquez, Marcus; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Hu, David; Tütken, Thomas; Montanari, Shaena; Loyd, Sean J; Ramirez, Pedro; Tripati, Aradhna K; Kohn, Matthew J; Cerling, Thure E; Chiappe, Luis M; Eiler, John M

    2015-10-13

    Our understanding of the evolutionary transitions leading to the modern endothermic state of birds and mammals is incomplete, partly because tools available to study the thermophysiology of extinct vertebrates are limited. Here we show that clumped isotope analysis of eggshells can be used to determine body temperatures of females during periods of ovulation. Late Cretaceous titanosaurid eggshells yield temperatures similar to large modern endotherms. In contrast, oviraptorid eggshells yield temperatures lower than most modern endotherms but ∼ 6 °C higher than co-occurring abiogenic carbonates, implying that this taxon did not have thermoregulation comparable to modern birds, but was able to elevate its body temperature above environmental temperatures. Therefore, we observe no strong evidence for end-member ectothermy or endothermy in the species examined. Body temperatures for these two species indicate that variable thermoregulation likely existed among the non-avian dinosaurs and that not all dinosaurs had body temperatures in the range of that seen in modern birds.

  4. Electron holography study of the temperature variation of the magnetic order parameter within circularly chained nickel nanoparticle rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Akira; Fukunaga, Kei-ichi; Scheinfein, M. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Kitagawa, H.; Tonomura, A.

    2007-12-24

    The magnetic structure within circular chains composed of 30-nm-diameter, polymer-coated nickel particles was studied by electron holography. The magnetic flux closure due to dipolar coupling was confirmed at zero external magnetic field. Its long-range order parameter was determined from the magnitude of the electron phase shift, and it was found to decrease more rapidly than that of bulk nickel as a function of temperature. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicated that the temperature variation of the order-parameter was explained in terms of weakened dipolar coupling field ascribed to the decay of the bulk magnetization and enhanced thermal fluctuations.

  5. Temperature dependence of the first-order Raman scattering in GaS layered crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, N. M.; Aydınlı, A.; Özkan, H.; Kocabaş, C.

    2000-09-01

    The temperature dependence (15-293 K) of the six Raman-active mode frequencies and linewitdhs in gallium sulfide has been measured in the frequency range from 15 to 380 cm -1. We observed softening and broadening of the optical phonon lines with increasing temperature. Comparison between the experimental data and theories of the shift and broadening of the interlayer and intralayer phonon lines during the heating of the crystal showed that the experimental dependencies can be explained by the contributions from thermal expansion and lattice anharmonicity. The pure-temperature contribution (phonon-phonon coupling) is due to three- and four-phonon processes.

  6. Magnetic ordering in relation to the room-temperature magnetoelectric effect of Sr3Co2Fe24O41.

    PubMed

    Soda, Minoru; Ishikura, Taishi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2011-02-25

    The origin of a room-temperature magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been examined by means of neutron powder diffraction measurements for a Z-type hexaferrite Sr(3)Co(2)Fe(24)O(41). The temperature and magnetic-field dependence of the electric polarization P and several magnetic Bragg reflections show that a commensurate magnetic order with a (0,0,1) propagation vector has an intimate connection with the ME effect. The room-temperature ME effect can be understood in terms of the appearance of P which is induced by a transverse conical spin structure through the inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya mechanism in analogy with Y-type hexaferrites.

  7. Improved photoluminescence characteristics of order-disorder AlGaInP quantum wells at room and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Deotare, Parag B.

    2015-04-06

    A set of nominally undoped CuPt-B type ordered (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P quantum-wells with disordered (Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P barriers were grown and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Such structures are potentially beneficial for light emitting devices due to the possibility of greater carrier confinement, reduced scattering into the indirect valleys, and band-offset adjustment beyond what is possible with strain and composition. Furthermore, the possibility of independently tuning the composition and the order-parameter of the quantum-well allows for the decoupling of the carrier confinement and the aluminum content and aids in the identification of carrier loss mechanisms. In this study, sharp order-disorder interfaces were achieved via the control of growth temperature between 650 °C and 750 °C using growth pauses. Improved high-temperature (400 K) photoluminescence intensity was obtained from quantum-wells with ordered Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P as compared to disordered Ga{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}P due to greater confinement. Additionally, in the ordered samples with a higher Al/Ga ratio to counter the band-gap reduction, the photoluminescence intensity at high temperature was as bright as that from conventional disordered heterostructures and had slightly improved wavelength stability. Room-temperature time-resolved luminescence measurements indicated a longer radiative lifetime in the ordered quantum-well with reduced scattering into the barrier. These results show that in samples of good material quality, the property controlling the luminescence intensity is the carrier confinement and not the presence of ordering or the aluminum content.

  8. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. A temperature-induced order-disorder phase transition in a 4-substituted 4,2':6',4''-terpyridine.

    PubMed

    Granifo, Juan; Westermeyer, Marleen; Riquelme, Maricel; Gaviño, Rubén; Suárez, Sebastián; Halac, Emilia B; Baggio, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    Crystals of 4'-(isoquinolin-4-yl)-4,2':6',4''-terpyridine (iqtp), C24H16N4, grown from an ethanol solution, undergo a reversible first-order single-crystal to single-crystal phase transition at Tc in the range 273-275 K, from a disordered higher-temperature phase [form (I)] in the space group P21/c, with one single molecule in the asymmetric unit, to an ordered lower-temperature one [form (II)] in the space group P21/n, with two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. There is a group-subgroup relationship linking (I)-(II), due to cell doubling and the disappearance of a number of symmetry operations. In addition to X-ray diffraction, the transition has been monitored by Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, the latter disclosing an enthalpy change of 0.72 (6) kJ mol(-1). Variations of the unit-cell parameters with temperature between 170 and 293 K are presented. The evolution of diffraction spots in the vicinity of the transition temperature shows the coexistence of both phases, confirming the first-order character of the transition. Structural details of both phases are analyzed and intermolecular interactions compared in order to investigate the mechanism of the phase transition. A three-dimensional Hirshfeld surface analysis was performed to corroborate the significant changes in the intermolecular features.

  11. Axi-symmetric generalized thermoelastic diffusion problem with two-temperature and initial stress under fractional order heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deswal, Sunita; Kalkal, Kapil Kumar; Sheoran, Sandeep Singh

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model of fractional order two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity with diffusion and initial stress is proposed to analyze the transient wave phenomenon in an infinite thermoelastic half-space. The governing equations are derived in cylindrical coordinates for a two dimensional axi-symmetric problem. The analytical solution is procured by employing the Laplace and Hankel transforms for time and space variables respectively. The solutions are investigated in detail for a time dependent heat source. By using numerical inversion method of integral transforms, we obtain the solutions for displacement, stress, temperature and diffusion fields in physical domain. Computations are carried out for copper material and displayed graphically. The effect of fractional order parameter, two-temperature parameter, diffusion, initial stress and time on the different thermoelastic and diffusion fields is analyzed on the basis of analytical and numerical results. Some special cases have also been deduced from the present investigation.

  12. Room Temperature Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Nanocrystalline Tb1.90Ni0.10O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, J.; Dalal, M.; Sarkar, B. J.; Chakrabarti, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-doped terbium oxide (Tb1.90Ni0.10O3) has been synthesized by the co-precipitation method followed by annealing at 700°C for 6 h in vacuum. The crystallographic phase and the substitution of Ni2+ ions in the lattice of Tb2O3 are confirmed by Rietveld analysis of the x-ray diffraction pattern using the software MAUD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is also carried out to study the morphology of the sample. Magnetic measurements are carried out at different temperatures from 5 K to 300 K using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The dependence of the magnetization of Tb1.90Ni0.10O3 as a function of temperature ( M- T) and magnetic field ( M- H) suggests the presence of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature, but antiferromagnetic phase dominates below ˜120 K. The lack of saturation in the M- H curve and good fitting of the M- T curve by the Johnston formula also indicate the presence of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. Interestingly, an antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition is observed below ˜40 K. The result also shows a high value of magnetization at 5 K.

  13. Pressure-induced amorphization of charge ordered spinel AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Malavi, Pallavi S. Karmakar, S. Sharma, S. M.; Maurizio, P.

    2014-04-24

    Structural properties of charge ordered spinel AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been investigated under high pressure at low temperature (80K) by synchrotron based x-ray diffraction measurements. It is observed that upon increasing pressure the structure becomes progressively disordered due to the distortion of the AlO{sub 4} tetrahedral unit and undergoes amorphization above ∼12 GPa. While releasing pressure, the rhombohedral phase is only partially recovered at a much lower pressure (below 5 GPa). Within the stability of the rhombohedral phase, the distortion in the vanadium heptamer increases monotonically with pressure, suggesting enhanced charge ordering. This result is in sharp contrast with the recent observation of pressure-induced frustration in the charge ordered state leading to structural transition to the cubic phase at room temperature [JPCM 25, 292201, 2013].

  14. Role of initial state and final quench temperature on aging properties in phase-ordering kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corberi, Federico; Villavicencio-Sanchez, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We study numerically the two-dimensional Ising model with nonconserved dynamics quenched from an initial equilibrium state at the temperature Ti≥Tc to a final temperature Tf below the critical one. By considering processes initiating both from a disordered state at infinite temperature Ti=∞ and from the critical configurations at Ti=Tc and spanning the range of final temperatures Tf∈[0 ,Tc[ we elucidate the role played by Ti and Tf on the aging properties and, in particular, on the behavior of the autocorrelation C and of the integrated response function χ . Our results show that for any choice of Tf, while the autocorrelation function exponent λC takes a markedly different value for Ti=∞ [λC(Ti=∞ ) ≃5 /4 ] or Ti=Tc [λC(Ti=Tc) ≃1 /8 ] the response function exponents are unchanged. Supported by the outcome of the analytical solution of the solvable spherical model we interpret this fact as due to the different contributions provided to autocorrelation and response by the large-scale properties of the system. As changing Tf is considered, although this is expected to play no role in the large-scale and long-time properties of the system, we show important effects on the quantitative behavior of χ . In particular, data for quenches to Tf=0 are consistent with a value of the response function exponent λχ=1/2 λC(Ti=∞ ) =5 /8 different from the one [λχ∈(0.5 -0.56 ) ] found in a wealth of previous numerical determinations in quenches to finite final temperatures. This is interpreted as due to important preasymptotic corrections associated to Tf>0 .

  15. Magnetic-field-induced charge-stripe order in the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3Oy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Mayaffre, Hadrien; Krämer, Steffen; Horvatić, Mladen; Berthier, Claude; Hardy, W N; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Julien, Marc-Henri

    2011-09-07

    Electronic charges introduced in copper-oxide (CuO(2)) planes generate high-transition-temperature (T(c)) superconductivity but, under special circumstances, they can also order into filaments called stripes. Whether an underlying tendency towards charge order is present in all copper oxides and whether this has any relationship with superconductivity are, however, two highly controversial issues. To uncover underlying electronic order, magnetic fields strong enough to destabilize superconductivity can be used. Such experiments, including quantum oscillations in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(y) (an extremely clean copper oxide in which charge order has not until now been observed) have suggested that superconductivity competes with spin, rather than charge, order. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance measurements showing that high magnetic fields actually induce charge order, without spin order, in the CuO(2) planes of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(y). The observed static, unidirectional, modulation of the charge density breaks translational symmetry, thus explaining quantum oscillation results, and we argue that it is most probably the same 4a-periodic modulation as in stripe-ordered copper oxides. That it develops only when superconductivity fades away and near the same 1/8 hole doping as in La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO(4) (ref. 1) suggests that charge order, although visibly pinned by CuO chains in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(y), is an intrinsic propensity of the superconducting planes of high-T(c) copper oxides.

  16. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  17. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  18. Fragile charge order in the nonsuperconducting ground state of the underdoped high-temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Tan, B S; Harrison, N; Zhu, Z; Balakirev, F; Ramshaw, B J; Srivastava, A; Sabok-Sayr, S A; Sabok, S A; Dabrowski, B; Lonzarich, G G; Sebastian, Suchitra E

    2015-08-04

    The normal state in the hole underdoped copper oxide superconductors has proven to be a source of mystery for decades. The measurement of a small Fermi surface by quantum oscillations on suppression of superconductivity by high applied magnetic fields, together with complementary spectroscopic measurements in the hole underdoped copper oxide superconductors, point to a nodal electron pocket from charge order in YBa2Cu3(6+δ). Here, we report quantum oscillation measurements in the closely related stoichiometric material YBa2Cu4O8, which reveals similar Fermi surface properties to YBa2Cu3(6+δ), despite the nonobservation of charge order signatures in the same spectroscopic techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, that revealed signatures of charge order in YBa2Cu3(6+δ). Fermi surface reconstruction in YBa2Cu4O8 is suggested to occur from magnetic field enhancement of charge order that is rendered fragile in zero magnetic fields because of its potential unconventional nature and/or its occurrence as a subsidiary to more robust underlying electronic correlations.

  19. Magnetocaloric effect and negative thermal expansion in hexagonal Fe doped MnNiGe compounds with a magnetoelastic AFM-FM-like transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Li, Zhe; Liu, Enke; Zhou, Haichun; Zhang, Yuanlei; Jing, Chao

    2017-01-01

    We report a detailed study of two successive first-order transitions, including a martensitic transition (MT) and an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ferromagnetic (FM)-like transition, in Mn1-xFexNiGe (x = 0, 0.06, 0.11) alloys by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization and linear thermal expansion measurements. Such an AFM-FM-like transition occurring in the martensitic state has seldom been observed in the M(T) curves. The results of Arrott plot and linear relationship of the critical temperature with M2 provide explicit evidence of its first-order magnetoelastic nature. On the other hand, their performances as magnetocaloric and negative thermal expansion materials were characterized. The isothermal entropy change for a field change of 30 kOe reaches an impressive value of ‑25.8 J/kg K at 203 K for x = 0.11 compared to the other two samples. It demonstrates that the magneto-responsive ability has been significantly promoted since an appropriate amount of Fe doping can break the local Ni-6Mn AFM configuration. Moreover, the Fe-doped samples reveal both the giant negative thermal expansion and near-zero thermal expansion for different temperature ranges. For instance, the average thermal expansion coefficient ā of x = 0.06 reaches ‑60.7 × 10‑6/K over T = 231–338 K and 0.6 × 10‑6/K over T = 175–231 K during cooling.

  20. Magnetocaloric effect and negative thermal expansion in hexagonal Fe doped MnNiGe compounds with a magnetoelastic AFM-FM-like transition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Li, Zhe; Liu, Enke; Zhou, Haichun; Zhang, Yuanlei; Jing, Chao

    2017-01-30

    We report a detailed study of two successive first-order transitions, including a martensitic transition (MT) and an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ferromagnetic (FM)-like transition, in Mn1-xFexNiGe (x = 0, 0.06, 0.11) alloys by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization and linear thermal expansion measurements. Such an AFM-FM-like transition occurring in the martensitic state has seldom been observed in the M(T) curves. The results of Arrott plot and linear relationship of the critical temperature with M(2) provide explicit evidence of its first-order magnetoelastic nature. On the other hand, their performances as magnetocaloric and negative thermal expansion materials were characterized. The isothermal entropy change for a field change of 30 kOe reaches an impressive value of -25.8 J/kg K at 203 K for x = 0.11 compared to the other two samples. It demonstrates that the magneto-responsive ability has been significantly promoted since an appropriate amount of Fe doping can break the local Ni-6Mn AFM configuration. Moreover, the Fe-doped samples reveal both the giant negative thermal expansion and near-zero thermal expansion for different temperature ranges. For instance, the average thermal expansion coefficient ā of x = 0.06 reaches -60.7 × 10(-6)/K over T = 231-338 K and 0.6 × 10(-6)/K over T = 175-231 K during cooling.

  1. Magnetocaloric effect and negative thermal expansion in hexagonal Fe doped MnNiGe compounds with a magnetoelastic AFM-FM-like transition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Li, Zhe; Liu, Enke; Zhou, Haichun; Zhang, Yuanlei; Jing, Chao

    2017-01-01

    We report a detailed study of two successive first-order transitions, including a martensitic transition (MT) and an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ferromagnetic (FM)-like transition, in Mn1-xFexNiGe (x = 0, 0.06, 0.11) alloys by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization and linear thermal expansion measurements. Such an AFM-FM-like transition occurring in the martensitic state has seldom been observed in the M(T) curves. The results of Arrott plot and linear relationship of the critical temperature with M2 provide explicit evidence of its first-order magnetoelastic nature. On the other hand, their performances as magnetocaloric and negative thermal expansion materials were characterized. The isothermal entropy change for a field change of 30 kOe reaches an impressive value of −25.8 J/kg K at 203 K for x = 0.11 compared to the other two samples. It demonstrates that the magneto-responsive ability has been significantly promoted since an appropriate amount of Fe doping can break the local Ni-6Mn AFM configuration. Moreover, the Fe-doped samples reveal both the giant negative thermal expansion and near-zero thermal expansion for different temperature ranges. For instance, the average thermal expansion coefficient ā of x = 0.06 reaches −60.7 × 10−6/K over T = 231–338 K and 0.6 × 10−6/K over T = 175–231 K during cooling. PMID:28134355

  2. Effect of grain size on charge and magnetic ordering in Bi{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Ramesh Singh, R.

    2014-04-24

    In the present work we report the electron spin resonance(ESR) and magnetic measurements to understand the effect of grain size on the charge ordering (CO), orbital ordering (OO), long range anti ferromagnetic (AFM) ordering in Bi{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} manganite synthesized by sol-gel method. The temperature dependence of linewidth (ΔH) of the ESR signal and magnetization have been used to get information about magnetic interactions. The CO is suppressed and AFM ordering remains unaffected with increase in grain size of the sample. The competition between FM and AFM correlations is strongly dependent on the grain size of the sample.

  3. Temperature-dependent first-order reversal curve measurements on unusually hard magnetic low-temperature phase of MnBi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, Shreyas; Gräfe, Joachim; Chen, Yu-Chun; Etter, Martin; Gregori, Giuliano; Ener, Semih; Sawatzki, Simon; Hono, Kazuhiro; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Kronmüller, Helmut; Schütz, Gisela; Goering, Eberhard J.

    2017-01-01

    We have performed first-order reversal curve (FORC) measurements to investigate the irreversible magnetization processes in the low-temperature phase of MnBi. Using temperature-dependent FORC analysis, we are able to provide a clear insight into the effects of microstructural parameters such as grain diameter, shape, and surface composition on the coercivity of nucleation hardened permanent magnet MnBi. FORC diagrams of MnBi show a unique broadening and narrowing of the coercive field distribution with increasing temperature. We were able to microscopically identify the reason for this behavior, based on the shift in the single domain critical diameter from nearly 1 to 2 μ m , thereby changing the dependence of coercivity with particle size. This is based on a strong increase in the uniaxial anisotropy constant with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the results also give an additional confirmation that the magnetic hardening in low-temperature phase MnBi occurs due to nucleation mechanisms. In our case, we show that temperature-dependent FORC measurements provide a powerful tool for the microscopic understanding of high-performance permanent magnet systems.

  4. Two-component energy spectrum of cuprates in the pseudogap phase and its evolution with temperature and at charge ordering

    PubMed Central

    Gor'kov, Lev P.; Teitel'baum, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    In the search for mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity it is critical to know the electronic spectrum in the pseudogap phase from which superconductivity evolves. The lack of angle-resolved photoemission data for every cuprate family precludes an agreement as to its structure, doping and temperature dependence and the role of charge ordering. Here we show that, in the entire Fermi-liquid-like regime that is ubiquitous in underdoped cuprates, the spectrum consists of holes on the Fermi arcs and an electronic pocket. We argue that experiments on the Hall coefficient identify the latter as a permanent feature at doped hole concentration x > 0.08–0.10, in contrast to the idea of the Fermi surface reconstruction via charge ordering. The longstanding issue of the origin of the negative Hall coefficient in YBCO and Hg1201 at low temperature is resolved: the electronic contribution prevails as mobility of the latter (evaluated by the Dingle temperature) becomes temperature independent, while the mobility of holes scattered by the short-wavelength charge density waves decreases. PMID:25688011

  5. Extraction and absorption of higher order modes in room temperature accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes methods for extracting and absorbing unwanted higher-order modes (HOMs) from normal-conducting accelerator structures. An introduction to the problems caused by HOMs is followed by a brief history of the development of techniques to suppress them, and some examples taken from existing and planned accelerators. These include damped radio frequency (RF) cavities for storage rings such as the proposed PEP-II B factory and accelerating structures for future linear collider projects.

  6. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  7. Preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein samples for AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    Sample preparation techniques allowing reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA with various structures, topologies and complexes with proteins are reviewed. The major emphasis is given to methods utilizing chemical functionalization of mica, enabling preparation of the surfaces with required characteristics. The methods are illustrated by examples of imaging of different DNA structures. Special attention is given to the possibility of AFM to image the dynamics of DNA at the nanoscale. The capabilities of time-lapse AFM in aqueous solutions are illustrated by imaging of dynamic processes as transitions of local alternative structures (transition of DNA between H and B forms). The application of AFM to studies of protein-DNA complexes is illustrated by a few examples of imaging site-specific complexes, as well as such systems as chromatin. The time-lapse AFM studies of protein-DNA complexes including very recent advances with the use of high-speed AFM are reviewed. PMID:20864349

  8. Room temperature ferromagnetic ordering in indium substituted nano-nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Sangeeta; Katyal, S. C.; Gupta, A.; Reddy, V. R.; Singh, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nano-nickel-zinc-indium ferrite (NZIFO)(Ni0.58Zn0.42InxFe2-xO4) with varied quantities of indium (x =0,0.1,0.2) have been synthesized via reverse micelle technique. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size, structure, and morphology of the nanoferrites. The addition of indium in nickel-zinc ferrite (NZFO) has been shown to play a crucial role in enhancing the magnetic properties. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra revealed that the nano-NZFO ferrite exhibit collective magnetic excitations, while indium doped NZFO samples have the ferromagnetic phase. The dependence of Mössbauer parameters, viz. isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, linewidth, and hyperfine magnetic field, on In3+ concentration has been studied. Mössbauer study on these nanosystems shows that the cation distribution not only depends on the particle size but also on the preparation route. Mössbauer results are also supported by magnetization data. Well defined sextets and appearance of hysteresis at room temperature indicate the existence of ferromagnetic couplings which makes nano-NZIFO ferrite suitable for magnetic storage data.

  9. Long-range order in a high-density electron-hole system at room temperature during superradiant phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, Peter P.; Olle, Vojtech; Penty, Richard V.; White, Ian H.

    2013-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the formation of off-diagonal long-range order and non-equilibrium BEC-like condensation in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures during superradiant (SR) emission at room temperature. The conclusive evidence of the establishment of phase coherence over a macroscopic range during the superradiant quantum phase transition is reported. The first-order spatial correlation function of the e-h system is determined by evaluating interference patterns of SR emission using Young's double slit.

  10. A Form of Ge-Fe-oxide With Antiferromagnetic Ordering Temperature Near 265 K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghout, K.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Ho, J. C.; Willey, R. J.; O'Shea, M. J.

    1997-03-01

    Fine powders with nominal composition of GeFe_2O4 were prepared by the aerogel method, and were calcined in air at 950^0C for 10 hours. Preliminary, x-ray diffraction data show the as-prepared to comprise of small crystallites, smaller than 3 nm, in a mixture of an amo rphous matrix and the calcined powders of multiple phases. However, Mossbauer data show the calcined powder to have multiple sites but with a sharp magnetic order near 265 K, and magnetization data depict a complex magnetic structure.

  11. Temperature-modulated annealing of c-plane sapphire for long-range-ordered atomic steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsui, Takashi; Kuribara, Kazunori; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2016-03-01

    High-quality single-crystalline sapphire is used to prepare various semiconductors because of its thermal stability. Here, we applied the tempering technique, which is well known in the production of chocolate, to prepare a sapphire substrate. Surprisingly, we successfully realised millimetre-range ordering of the atomic step of the sapphire substrate. We also obtained a sapphire atomic step with nanometre-scale uniformity in the terrace width and atomic-step height. Such sapphire substrates will find applications in the preparation of various semiconductors and devices.

  12. Magnetism and charge ordering in high- and low-temperature phases of Nb2O2F3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapontsev, Vladimir V.; Khomskii, Daniel I.; Streltsov, Sergey V.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown using ab initio band structure calculations that Nb2O2F3 is in the orbital-selective regime in the high-temperature phase (T > 90 K), when two electrons occupy singlet molecular orbital, while the magnetic response comes from the remaining single electron in Nb23.5+ dimer. The charge order occurs at low temperatures, resulting in the formation of Nb3+-Nb3+ and Nb4+-Nb4+ dimers, which makes this system nonmagnetic. The single electron with unpaired spin is transferred to Nb3+-Nb3+ dimer, but due to a strong splitting of the bonding xz / yz molecular orbitals the low-spin state with S=0 is stabilized. We argue that the mechanism of the charge ordering in Nb2O2F3 is the gain in kinetic energy related to the formation of molecular orbitals, which occurs due to a strong nonlinear distance dependence of the hopping parameters.

  13. Low temperature synthesis of ordered mesoporous stable anatase nanocrystals: the phosphorus dendrimer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmi, Younes; Katir, Nadia; Ianchuk, Mykhailo; Collière, Vincent; Essassi, El Mokhtar; Ouali, Armelle; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Bousmina, Mosto; Majoral, Jean Pierre; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2013-03-01

    The scarcity of low temperature syntheses of anatase nanocrystals prompted us to explore the use of surface-reactive fourth generation phosphorus-dendrimers as molds to control the nucleation and growth of titanium-oxo-species during the sol-gel mineralization process. Unexpectedly, the dendritic medium provides at low temperature, discrete anatase nanocrystals (4.8 to 5.2 nm in size), in marked contrast to the routinely obtained amorphous titanium dioxide phase under standard conditions. Upon thermal treatment, heteroatom migration from the branches to the nanoparticle surface and the ring opening polymerization of the cyclophosphazene core provide stable, interpenetrating mesoporous polyphosphazene-anatase hybrid materials (-P&z.dbd;N-)n-TiO2. The steric hindrance of the dendritic skeleton, the passivation of the anatase surface by heteroatoms and the ring opening of the core limit the crystal growth of anatase to 7.4 nm and prevent, up to 800 °C, the commonly observed anatase-to-rutile phase transformation. Performing this mineralization in the presence of similar surface-reactive but non-dendritic skeletons (referred to as branch-mimicking dendrimers) failed to generate crystalline anatase and to efficiently limit the crystal growth, bringing thus clear evidence of the virtues of phosphorus dendrimers in the design of novel nanostructured materials.The scarcity of low temperature syntheses of anatase nanocrystals prompted us to explore the use of surface-reactive fourth generation phosphorus-dendrimers as molds to control the nucleation and growth of titanium-oxo-species during the sol-gel mineralization process. Unexpectedly, the dendritic medium provides at low temperature, discrete anatase nanocrystals (4.8 to 5.2 nm in size), in marked contrast to the routinely obtained amorphous titanium dioxide phase under standard conditions. Upon thermal treatment, heteroatom migration from the branches to the nanoparticle surface and the ring opening polymerization of

  14. Room-Temperature Ordered Photon Emission from Multiexciton States in Single CdSe Core-Shell Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Brent; Caruge, Jean Michel; Zehnder, Don; Bawendi, Moungi

    2005-03-01

    We report room-temperature ordered multiphoton emission from multiexciton states of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(-shell) colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) that are synthesized by wet chemical methods. Spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of biexciton and triexciton emission from single NCs are also presented. A simple four level system models the results accurately and provides estimates for biexciton and triexciton radiative lifetimes and quantum yields.

  15. Room-temperature ordered photon emission from multiexciton states in single CdSe core-shell nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Brent; Caruge, Jean Michel; Zehnder, Don; Bawendi, Moungi

    2005-03-04

    We report room-temperature ordered multiphoton emission from multiexciton states of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(-shell) colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) that are synthesized by wet chemical methods. Spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of biexciton and triexciton emission from single NCs are also presented. A simple four level system models the results accurately and provides estimates for biexciton and triexciton radiative lifetimes and quantum yields.

  16. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  17. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  18. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  20. Magnetic ordering temperature of nanocrystalline Gd: enhancement of magnetic interactions via hydrogenation-induced “negative” pressure

    PubMed Central

    Tereshina, E. A.; Khmelevskyi, S.; Politova, G.; Kaminskaya, T.; Drulis, H.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium is a nearly ideal soft-magnetic material. However, one cannot take advantage of its properties at temperatures higher than the room temperature where Gd loses the ferromagnetic ordering. By using high-purity bulk samples with grains ~200 nm in size, we present proof-of-concept measurements of an increased Curie point (TC) and spontaneous magnetization in Gd due to hydrogenation. From first-principles we explain increase of TC in pure Gd due to the addition of hydrogen. We show that the interplay of the characteristic features in the electronic structure of the conduction band at the Fermi level in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase of Gd and “negative” pressure exerted by hydrogen are responsible for the observed effect. PMID:26931775

  1. Formation of hierarchical molecular assemblies from poly(oxypropylene)-segmented amido acids under AFM tapping.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Chi-He

    2007-04-10

    Molecular self-aligning of amphiphilic molecules into bundles with a constant width of 7-13 nm was observed under tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The requisite amphiphile, a poly(oxypropylene)-trimellitic amido acid sodium salt, is constituted of a symmetric amido acid structure with potential noncovalent forces of ionic charges, hydrogen bonds, pi-pi aromatic stacking, and hydrophobic interactions for intermolecular interaction. The amphiphiles are able to self-align into orderly hierarchical assemblies after simply being dissolved in water and dried under spin-coated evaporation. Under the TM-AFM tapping process, the bundles increased their length from an initial 20 to 600 nm. A sequential TM-AFM scanning and interval heating process was designed to probe the morphological transformations from the molecular bundles to lengthy strips (nearly micrometer scale) and to columns (with 5-7 nm spacing between the parallel strips). The formation of hierarchical arrays via molecular stretching, aligning, and connecting to each other was simultaneously observed and accelerated under the TM-AFM vibration energy. The molecular self-alignment caused by vibrations is envisioned to be a potential methodology for manipulating molecules into assembled templates, sensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  2. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  4. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  5. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe.

    PubMed

    Sun, J P; Matsuura, K; Ye, G Z; Mizukami, Y; Shimozawa, M; Matsubayashi, K; Yamashita, M; Watashige, T; Kasahara, S; Matsuda, Y; Yan, J-Q; Sales, B C; Uwatoko, Y; Cheng, J-G; Shibauchi, T

    2016-07-19

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.

  6. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J. -Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J. -G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-07-19

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ~15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ~6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc ≤ 38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. In conclusion, the obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.

  7. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; ...

    2016-07-19

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ~15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ~6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc ≤ 38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order,more » demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. In conclusion, the obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.« less

  8. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J.-Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J.-G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ~15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ~6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc<=38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates.

  9. Dome-shaped magnetic order competing with high-temperature superconductivity at high pressures in FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J. P.; Matsuura, K.; Ye, G. Z.; Mizukami, Y.; Shimozawa, M.; Matsubayashi, K.; Yamashita, M.; Watashige, T.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Yan, J. -Q.; Sales, B. C.; Uwatoko, Y.; Cheng, J. -G.; Shibauchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence and competition between superconductivity and electronic orders, such as spin or charge density waves, have been a central issue in high transition-temperature (Tc) superconductors. Unlike other iron-based superconductors, FeSe exhibits nematic ordering without magnetism whose relationship with its superconductivity remains unclear. Moreover, a pressure-induced fourfold increase of Tc has been reported, which poses a profound mystery. Here we report high-pressure magnetotransport measurements in FeSe up to ∼15 GPa, which uncover the dome shape of magnetic phase superseding the nematic order. Above ∼6 GPa the sudden enhancement of superconductivity (Tc≤38.3 K) accompanies a suppression of magnetic order, demonstrating their competing nature with very similar energy scales. Above the magnetic dome, we find anomalous transport properties suggesting a possible pseudogap formation, whereas linear-in-temperature resistivity is observed in the normal states of the high-Tc phase above 6 GPa. The obtained phase diagram highlights unique features of FeSe among iron-based superconductors, but bears some resemblance to that of high-Tc cuprates. PMID:27431724

  10. Non-collinear magnetism and exchange bias at the FM NiFe/AFM NiMn interface: local spin density FLAPW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Freeman, A. J.; Wang, D.-S.; Zhong, L.; Fernandez-de-Castro, J.

    2001-03-01

    Magnetism at interfaces, such as the exchange bias between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials, has attracted great attention because of technological applications. In order to investigate magnetic structures at the FM/AFM interface, we have implemented the FLAPW (E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A.J. Freeman, PRB 24, 864(1981)) methodologies including non-collinear magnetism, in which the magnetic moment direction as well as the magnitude can vary continuously all over space. We first demonstrate this approach to determine the structure of a magnetic structure at an interface between FM NiFe and AFM NiMn. Although both bulk systems each show collinear FM and AFM structures, we found that a perpendicular magnetic orientation at their interface is energetically favorable, where the magnetic moments of the FM NiFe tend to lie perpendicular to those of AFM NiMn.

  11. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  12. AFM imaging of fenestrated liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Braet, F; Wisse, E

    2012-12-01

    Each microscope with its dedicated sample preparation technique provides the investigator with a specific set of data giving an instrument-determined (or restricted) insight into the structure and function of a tissue, a cell or parts thereof. Stepwise improvements in existing techniques, both instrumental and preparative, can sometimes cross barriers in resolution and image quality. Of course, investigators get really excited when completely new principles of microscopy and imaging are offered in promising new instruments, such as the AFM. The present paper summarizes a first phase of studies on the thin endothelial cells of the liver. It describes the preparation-dependent differences in AFM imaging of these cells after isolation. Special point of interest concerned the dynamics of the fenestrae, thought to filter lipid-carrying particles during their transport from the blood to the liver cells. It also describes the attempts to image the details of these cells when alive in cell cultures. It explains what physical conditions, mainly contributed to the scanning stylus, are thought to play a part in the limitations in imaging these cells. The AFM also offers promising specifications to those interested in cell surface details, such as membrane-associated structures, receptors, coated pits, cellular junctions and molecular aggregations or domains. The AFM also offers nano-manipulation possibilities, strengths and elasticity measurements, force interactions, affinity measurements, stiffness and other physical aspects of membranes and cytoskeleton. The potential for molecular approaches is there. New developments in cantilever construction and computer software promise to bring real time video imaging to the AFM. Home made accessories for the first generation of AFM are now commodities in commercial instruments and make the life of the AFM microscopist easier. Also, the combination of different microscopies, such as AFM and TEM, or AFM and SEM find their way to the

  13. High-speed AFM of human chromosomes in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picco, L. M.; Dunton, P. G.; Ulcinas, A.; Engledew, D. J.; Hoshi, O.; Ushiki, T.; Miles, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Further developments of the previously reported high-speed contact-mode AFM are described. The technique is applied to the imaging of human chromosomes at video rate both in air and in water. These are the largest structures to have been imaged with high-speed AFM and the first imaging in liquid to be reported. A possible mechanism that allows such high-speed contact-mode imaging without significant damage to the sample is discussed in the context of the velocity dependence of the measured lateral force on the AFM tip.

  14. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  15. Constant temperature molecular dynamics of a protein in water by high-order decomposition of the Liouville operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hisashi; Kidera, Akinori

    1998-08-01

    Among algorithms that are used to solve the equations of motion, the symplectic integrator (SI) has the advantage of conserving the phase space volume and ensuring a stable simulation. However, incorporating the explicit formula of the SI in a molecular simulation is feasible only for the systems whose Hamiltonian is described by K(p)+V(q), where the kinetic energy K and the potential energy V depend only on momenta p and coordinates q, respectively. Due to this limitation, explicit SI integrators cannot directly be applied to the Nosé-Hoover equations of motion for the constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In this article, by applying the formula of the decomposition of the exponential Liouville operator to the Nosé-Hoover equations, we have obtained a series of integrators for the constant temperature simulation which have the correct form of the Jacobian of the Nosé-Hoover equations. The systems examined here are liquid water and a protein in water. From the results of the constant temperature simulations, where several variations of the integrators were employed, we show that a combination of the Suzuki's second order formula and the fourth order symplectic integrator of Calvo and Sanz-Serna generates a trajectory of much higher accuracy than the nonsymplectic Gear predictor-corrector method for a given amount of CPU time.

  16. Impact of Fe on structural modification and room temperature magnetic ordering in BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Soumya; Gazzali, P. M. Mohammed; Chandrasekaran, G.

    2017-01-01

    Ba1 - xFexTiO3 (x = 0, 0.005, 0.01) polycrystalline ceramics are prepared using solid state reaction method. Structural studies through XRD, Raman and XPS confirm single tetragonal phase for BaTiO3 whereas a structural disorder tends to intervene with the introduction of smaller Fe ions which reduces the tolerance factor and tetragonality ratio. Grain size of the samples is estimated using SEM micrographs with ImageJ software and chemical composition is confirmed using EDX spectra. Raman spectra measured in the temperature range of 303 K to 573 K showers light on the structural phase transition exploiting a significant disappearance of the 306 cm- 1 mode. Further, structural analyses suggest the entry of Fe into the B-site upon increasing its concentration in BaTiO3. The dopant sensitive modes lying at around 640 cm- 1 and 650 cm- 1 are assigned to lattice strain. A reduction in ferroelectric to paraelectric transition temperature is observed with a transformation from diffused type to normal ferroelectric upon the increased Fe content. The oxidation state of Fe in the BaTiO3 lattice has been decided using EPR Spectra precisely. Room temperature magnetic ordering is observed in Fe substituted BaTiO3 using PPMS. The coexistence of ferroelectric and magnetic ordering is established in the present study for optimized Fe substituted BaTiO3.

  17. Limited grain growth and chemical ordering during high-temperature sintering of PtNiCo nanoparticle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundan, V.; Wanjala, B. N.; Loukrakpam, R.; Luo, J.; Yin, J.; Zhong, C. J.; Malis, O.

    2012-08-01

    High-temperature sintering of ternary PtxNi100-x-yCoy (x = 28-44%, y = 40-54%) nanoparticles of interest in catalysis was studied in situ and in real-time with synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction. For the first time we were able to experimentally capture the early stage of the thermal treatment, and found the nanoparticles to undergo an unusual two-step coalescence process that involves transient growth and restructuring of the nanoparticles. The coalescence process is accompanied by lattice contraction, likely due to composition evolution towards a random alloy. In the late stage of sintering, evidence was found for self-limited grain growth and L10 chemical ordering. The order-disorder transition temperature was found to be around 800 °C in all four ternary alloy compositions studied. Fitting of the experimental data with the model for grain growth with size-dependent impediment leads to an activation energy for mass transport of about 100 kJ mol-1, and may be used as a predictive tool to estimate particle size as a function of heat treatment temperature and duration.

  18. Origin of ferromagnetism and oxygen-vacancy ordering induced cross-controlled magnetoelectric effects at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. K.; Zou, T.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Q. H.; Sun, Y.; Gu, L.; Hirata, A.; Chen, M. W.; Yao, Y.; Jin, C. Q.; Yu, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    In dilute magnetic oxide hexagonal Ba(Ti0.9Fe0.1)O2.81 bulk ceramic, we report on combined ferromagnetism and improper ferroelectricity as well as cross-controlled magnetoelectric effects at room temperature. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging technique in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) demonstrates an oxygen vacancy ordering in the hexagonal closest-packed Ba1-O1 layers and severe distortion of the octahedra and pyramids. Strong dependencies of the susceptibility on temperature and magnetic field as well as the frequency dependence of magnetization under an ac electric field reveal that the intrinsic ferromagnetism of the highly insulating system dynamically evolves from a paramagnetic ground state, and dynamic exchanges of trapped electrons in the ordered polarons are attributed to the ferromagnetic interaction. Accordingly, aided by the motion of oxygen vacancies, responses of the trapped electrons to the ac magnetic field result in the reversal of magnetically induced voltages between high and low states. Our results not only expand our understanding on the magnetoelectric coupling mechanism, but also provide a grand opportunity toward designing novel multiferroic materials through introducing ordered point defects into a centrosymmetric matrix.

  19. Solidification processing and phase transformations in ordered high temperature alloys. Final report, 30 March 1990-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.J.; Bendersky, L.A.; Kattner, U.R.

    1993-01-20

    Useful high temperature alloys generally have microstructures consisting of more than one phase. Multiphase microstructures are necessary to develop acceptable toughness and creep strength in high temperature intermetallic alloy matrices. The optimum microstructures must be developed by a careful selection of processing path that includes both solidification and solid state heat treatment. Research has been conducted on the rapid solidification of selected intermetallic alloys and on the phase transformation paths that occur during cooling, primarily in the Ti-Al-Nb system. This report describes research performed in the Metallurgy Division at NIST under DARPA order 7469 between 1/1/89 and 12/31/92. Various research tasks were completed and the results have been published or have been submitted for publication.... Intermetallics, Ti-Al-Nb Alloys, Phase Diagrams, Phase Transformations, Ti-Al-Ta Alloys, MoSi2 Alloys.

  20. High-sensitivity temperature sensor using the ultrahigh order mode-enhanced Goos-Hänchen effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianping; Yin, Cheng; Sun, Jingjing; Li, Honggen; Wang, Yang; Ran, Maowu; Cao, Zhuangqi

    2013-06-03

    A high-sensitivity temperature sensor based on the enhanced Goos-Hänchen effect in a symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide is theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Owing to the high sensitivity of the ultrahigh-order modes, any minute variation of the refractive index and thickness in the guiding layer induced by the thermo-optic and thermal expansion effects will easily give rise to a dramatic change in the position of the reflected light. In our experiment, a series of Goos-Hänchen shifts are measured at temperatures varying from 50.0 °C to 51.2 °C with a step of 0.2 °C. The sensor exhibits a good linearity and a high resolution of approximately 5×10(-3) °C. Moreover, there is no need to employ any complicated optical equipment and servo techniques, since our transduction scheme is irrelevant to the light source fluctuation.

  1. Introduction to atomic force microscopy (AFM) in biology.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire S; Scheuring, Simon; Kreplak, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nanoscale to the microscale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described.

  2. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Wen W.; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we propose ``single-image analysis'', as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis.

  3. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced.

  4. Amylose Phase Composition As Analyzed By FTIR In A Temperature Ramp: Influence Of Short Range Order On The Thermodynamic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernazzani, Paul; Delmas, Genevieve

    1998-03-01

    Amylose, a major component of starch, is one of the most important biopolymers, being mainly associated with the pharmacological and food industries. Although widely studied, a complete control and understanding of the physical properties of amylose is still lacking. It is well known that structure and phase transition are important aspects of the functionality of biopolymers since they influence physical attributes such as appearance, digestibility, water holding capacity, etc. In the past, we have studied polyethylene phase composition by DSC in a very slow temperature (T) ramp (1K/h) and have demonstrated the presence and importance of short-range order on the polymer and its characteristics. In this study, we evaluated the phase composition of potato amylose and associated the thermodynamic properties with the presence of short-range order. Two methods were correlated, DSC (in a 1K/h T-ramp) and FTIR as a function of temperature, also in a 1K/h T-ramp. The effects of the various phases on thermodynamic properties such as gelation and enzyme or chemical resistance are discussed.

  5. First-Order SPICE Modeling of Extreme-Temperature 4H-SiC JFET Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    A separate submission to this conference reports that 4H-SiC Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) digital and analog Integrated Circuits (ICs) with two levels of metal interconnect have reproducibly demonstrated electrical operation at 500 C in excess of 1000 hours. While this progress expands the complexity and durability envelope of high temperature ICs, one important area for further technology maturation is the development of reasonably accurate and accessible computer-aided modeling and simulation tools for circuit design of these ICs. Towards this end, we report on development and verification of 25 C to 500 C SPICE simulation models of first order accuracy for this extreme-temperature durable 4H-SiC JFET IC technology. For maximum availability, the JFET IC modeling is implemented using the baseline-version SPICE NMOS LEVEL 1 model that is common to other variations of SPICE software and importantly includes the body-bias effect. The first-order accuracy of these device models is verified by direct comparison with measured experimental device characteristics.

  6. High-order scheme for the source-sink term in a one-dimensional water temperature model.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zheng; Kang, Ling

    2017-01-01

    The source-sink term in water temperature models represents the net heat absorbed or released by a water system. This term is very important because it accounts for solar radiation that can significantly affect water temperature, especially in lakes. However, existing numerical methods for discretizing the source-sink term are very simplistic, causing significant deviations between simulation results and measured data. To address this problem, we present a numerical method specific to the source-sink term. A vertical one-dimensional heat conduction equation was chosen to describe water temperature changes. A two-step operator-splitting method was adopted as the numerical solution. In the first step, using the undetermined coefficient method, a high-order scheme was adopted for discretizing the source-sink term. In the second step, the diffusion term was discretized using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The effectiveness and capability of the numerical method was assessed by performing numerical tests. Then, the proposed numerical method was applied to a simulation of Guozheng Lake (located in central China). The modeling results were in an excellent agreement with measured data.

  7. High-order scheme for the source-sink term in a one-dimensional water temperature model

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Zheng; Kang, Ling

    2017-01-01

    The source-sink term in water temperature models represents the net heat absorbed or released by a water system. This term is very important because it accounts for solar radiation that can significantly affect water temperature, especially in lakes. However, existing numerical methods for discretizing the source-sink term are very simplistic, causing significant deviations between simulation results and measured data. To address this problem, we present a numerical method specific to the source-sink term. A vertical one-dimensional heat conduction equation was chosen to describe water temperature changes. A two-step operator-splitting method was adopted as the numerical solution. In the first step, using the undetermined coefficient method, a high-order scheme was adopted for discretizing the source-sink term. In the second step, the diffusion term was discretized using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. The effectiveness and capability of the numerical method was assessed by performing numerical tests. Then, the proposed numerical method was applied to a simulation of Guozheng Lake (located in central China). The modeling results were in an excellent agreement with measured data. PMID:28264005

  8. Increasing the water temperature of a 2nd order stream reach: Hydraulic aspects of a whole-stream manipulative experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, João L. M. P.; Canhoto, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    What will happen when water temperatures of streams increases, due to climate changes or in connection with rapidly changing human systems? Trying to answer to this question a whole-stream manipulative experiment was undertaken, where an increase in water temperature was artificially induced on a 2nd order stream reach. The main objective of this poster is to describe this experiment focusing on the design of the hydraulic system. The system maintained a steady flow while allowing natural variation in abiotic factors and was successfully used to evaluate the effects of warming on a stream ecosystem at several levels of biological organization. A constant flow of stream water was controlled by a hydraulic setup (~22m long; ~1.5m width) subdivided into two independent channels. One channel of the study reach received heated water (~3°C above the other), while the other received water at stream ambient temperature. The warming system maintained a steady gravity controlled flow making use of weirs and valves.

  9. Rayleigh scatter based order of magnitude increase in distributed temperature and strain sensing by simple UV exposure of optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, Sébastien; Gagné, Mathieu; Lambin-Iezzi, Victor; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-01-01

    We present a technique to improve signal strength, and therefore sensitivity in distributed temperature and strain sensing (DTSS) using Frequency domain Rayleigh scatter. A simple UV exposure of a hydrogen loaded standard SMF-28 fibre core is shown to enhance the Rayleigh back-scattered light dramatically by ten-fold, independent of the presence of a Bragg grating, and is therefore created by the UV exposure alone. This increase in Rayleigh back-scatter allows an order-of-magnitude increase in temperature and strain resolution for DTSS compared to un-exposed SMF-28 fibre used as a sensing element. This enhancement in sensitivity is effective for cm range or more sensor gauge length, below which is the theoretical cross-correlation limit. The detection of a 20 mK temperature rise with a spatial resolution of 2 cm is demonstrated. This gain in sensitivity for SMF-28 is compared with a high Ge doped photosensitive fibre with a characteristically high NA. For the latter, the UV enhancement is also present although of lower amplitude, and enables an even lower noise level for sensing, due to the fibre’s intrinsically higher Rayleigh scatter signal. PMID:26077365

  10. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  11. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming; Samanta, Amit; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Tuckerman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency. PMID:24907992

  12. New insights into the mucoadhesion of pectins by AFM roughness parameters in combination with SPR.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Lars; Klösgen, Beate; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Borch, Jonas; Hagesaether, Ellen

    2011-06-15

    The object of this study was to assess the mucoadhesion of the three main commercially available types of pectin by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Polyacrylic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Image analysis of the AFM scans revealed a significant change of roughness parameters when low-ester pectin was introduced to mica supported bovine submaxillarymucin, indicating a high mucoadhesion for this type of pectin. Only minor changes were observed with high-ester and amidated pectin. The same ranking order of adhesion affinity was confirmed by SPR. In conclusion, a high specific mucin interaction of pectin with a high charge density was demonstrated directly on a molecular scale without interference from the viscoelastic properties or the intra-molecular interactions between the polymer chains themselves, using two independent methods.

  13. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-04

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (<100 nm) oscillations are readily measured with AFM. Resonance oscillation frequencies were measured for drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops.

  14. Power and Thermal Technologies for Air and Space-Scientific Research Program. Delivery Order 0012: High-Temperature Superconductor Performance Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TR-2010-2167 POWER AND THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR AIR AND SPACE‒SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PROGRAM Delivery Order 0012: High -Temperature...AND SUBTITLE POWER AND THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR AIR AND SPACE‒SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PROGRAM Delivery Order 0012: High -Temperature Superconductor...electrically connect them to the substrate. 4) Develop improved measurement techniques and standards of measurement for properties of high temperature

  15. End point of a first-order phase transition in many-flavor lattice QCD at finite temperature and density.

    PubMed

    Ejiri, Shinji; Yamada, Norikazu

    2013-04-26

    Towards the feasibility study of the electroweak baryogenesis in realistic technicolor scenario, we investigate the phase structure of (2+N(f))-flavor QCD, where the mass of two flavors is fixed to a small value and the others are heavy. For the baryogenesis, an appearance of a first-order phase transition at finite temperature is a necessary condition. Using a set of configurations of two-flavor lattice QCD and applying the reweighting method, the effective potential defined by the probability distribution function of the plaquette is calculated in the presence of additional many heavy flavors. Through the shape of the effective potential, we determine the critical mass of heavy flavors separating the first-order and crossover regions and find it to become larger with N(f). We moreover study the critical line at finite density and the first-order region is found to become wider as increasing the chemical potential. Possible applications to real (2+1)-flavor QCD are discussed.

  16. Fast temperature optimization of multi-source hyperthermia applicators with reduced-order modeling of ‘virtual sources’

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kung-Shan; Stakhursky, Vadim; Craciunescu, Oana I; Stauffer, Paul; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to build the foundation for facilitating real-time magnetic resonance image guided patient treatment for heating systems with a large number of physical sources (e.g. antennas). Achieving this goal requires knowledge of how the temperature distribution will be affected by changing each source individually, which requires time expenditure on the order of the square of the number of sources. To reduce computation time, we propose a model reduction approach that combines a smaller number of predefined source configurations (fewer than the number of actual sources) that are most likely to heat tumor. The source configurations consist of magnitude and phase source excitation values for each actual source and may be computed from a CT scan based plan or a simplified generic model of the corresponding patient anatomy. Each pre-calculated source configuration is considered a ‘virtual source’. We assume that the actual best source settings can be represented effectively as weighted combinations of the virtual sources. In the context of optimization, each source configuration is treated equivalently to one physical source. This model reduction approach is tested on a patient upper-leg tumor model (with and without temperature-dependent perfusion), heated using a 140 MHz ten-antenna cylindrical mini-annular phased array. Numerical simulations demonstrate that using only a few pre-defined source configurations can achieve temperature distributions that are comparable to those from full optimizations using all physical sources. The method yields close to optimal temperature distributions when using source configurations determined from a simplified model of the tumor, even when tumor position is erroneously assumed to be ~2.0 cm away from the actual position as often happens in practical clinical application of pre-treatment planning. The method also appears to be robust under conditions of changing, nonlinear, temperature-dependent perfusion. The

  17. Tracer kinetic modeling of [11C]AFM, a new PET imaging agent for the serotonin transporter

    PubMed Central

    Naganawa, Mika; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lin, Shu-Fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Williams, Wendol; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    [11C]AFM, or [11C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenylthio]-5-fluoromethylphenylamine, is a new positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for the serotonin transporter (SERT). The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate kinetic model to quantify [11C]AFM binding in the healthy human brain. Positron emission tomography data and arterial input functions were acquired from 10 subjects. Compartmental modeling and the multilinear analysis-1(MA1) method were tested using the arterial input functions. The one-tissue model showed a lack of fit in low-binding regions, and the two-tissue model failed to estimate parameters reliably. Regional time–activity curves were well described by MA1. The rank order of [11C]AFM binding potential (BPND) matched well with the known regional SERT densities. For routine use of [11C]AFM, several noninvasive methods for quantification of regional binding were evaluated, including simplified reference tissue models (SRTM and SRTM2), and multilinear reference tissue models (MRTM and MRTM2). The best methods for region of interest (ROI) analysis were MA1, MRTM2, and SRTM2, with fixed population kinetic values ( or b′) for the reference methods. The MA1 and MRTM2 methods were best for parametric imaging. These results showed that [11C]AFM is a suitable PET radioligand to image and quantify SERT in humans. PMID:23921898

  18. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for investigating protein crystal growth. Earlier AFM studies were among the first to demonstrate that these crystals grew by dislocation and 2D nucleation growth mechanisms [1]. These investigations were restricted to the micron range where only surface features, such as dislocation hillocks and 2D islands are visible. Most AFM instruments can scan at higher resolutions and have the potential to resolve individual protein molecules at nanometer ranges. Such scans are essential for determining the molecular packing arrangements on crystal faces and for probing the growth process at the molecular level. However, at this resolution the AFM tip influences the image produced, with the resulting image being a convolution of the tip shape and the surface morphology [2]. In most studies this problem is resolved by deconvoluting the image to obtain the true surface morphology. Although deconvolution routines work reasonably well for simple one- dimensional shapes, for complex surfaces this approach does not produce accurate results. In this study we devised a new approach which takes advantage of the precise molecular order of crystal surfaces, combined with the knowledge of individual molecular shapes from the crystallographic data of the protein and the AFM tip shape. This information is used to construct expected theoretical AFM images by convoluting the tip shape with the constructed crystal surface shape for a given surface packing arrangement. By comparing the images from actual AFM scans with the constructed ones for different possible surface packing arrangements, the correct packing arrangement can be conclusively determined. This approach was used in this study to determine the correct one from two possible packing arrangements on (I 10) faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Another novel AFM technique was also devised to measure the dimension of individual growth units of the crystal faces

  19. A phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13 in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Achim; Sasse, Stephanie; Topp, Max S.; Eichenauer, Dennis A.; Hummel, Horst; Reiners, Katrin S.; Dietlein, Markus; Kuhnert, Georg; Kessler, Joerg; Buerkle, Carolin; Ravic, Miroslav; Knackmuss, Stefan; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Borchmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AFM13 is a bispecific, tetravalent chimeric antibody construct (TandAb) designed for the treatment of CD30-expressing malignancies. AFM13 recruits natural killer (NK) cells via binding to CD16A as immune effector cells. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, 28 patients with heavily pretreated relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma received AFM13 at doses of 0.01 to 7 mg/kg body weight. Primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetics, antitumor activity, and pharmacodynamics. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Pharmacokinetics assessment revealed a half-life of up to 19 hours. Three of 26 evaluable patients achieved partial remission (11.5%) and 13 patients achieved stable disease (50%), with an overall disease control rate of 61.5%. AFM13 was also active in brentuximab vedotin–refractory patients. In 13 patients who received doses of ≥1.5 mg/kg AFM13, the overall response rate was 23% and the disease control rate was 77%. AFM13 treatment resulted in a significant NK-cell activation and a decrease of soluble CD30 in peripheral blood. In conclusion, AFM13 represents a well-tolerated, safe, and active targeted immunotherapy of Hodgkin lymphoma. A phase 2 study is currently planned to optimize the dosing schedule in order to further improve the therapeutic efficacy. This phase 1 study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01221571. PMID:25887777

  20. The Emergence of AFM Applications to Cell Biology: How new technologies are facilitating investigation of human cells in health and disease at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Sinha, Animesh A

    2011-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobotics has been used for building nano devices in semiconductors for almost a decade. Leveraging the unparallel precision localization capabilities of this technology, high resolution imaging and mechanical property characterization is now increasingly being performed in biological settings. AFM also offers the prospect for handling and manipulating biological materials at nanometer scale. It has unique advantages over other methods, permitting experiments in the liquid phase where physiological conditions can be maintained. Taking advantage of these properties, our group has visualized membrane and cytoskeletal structures of live cells by controlling the interaction force of the AFM tip with cellular components at the nN or sub-nN range. Cell stiffness changes were observed by statistically analyzing the Young's modulus values of human keratinocytes before and after specific antibody treatment. Furthermore, we used the AFM cantilever as a robotic arm for mechanical pushing, pulling and cutting to perform nanoscale manipulations of cell-associated structures. AFM guided nano-dissection, or nanosurgery was enacted on the cell in order to sever intermediate filaments connecting neighboring keratinocytes via sub 100 nm resolution cuts. Finally, we have used a functionalized AFM tip to probe cell surface receptors to obtain binding force measurements. This technique formed the basis for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS). In addition to enhancing our basic understanding of dynamic signaling events in cell biology, these advancements in AFM based biomedical investigations can be expected to facilitate the search for biomarkers related to disease diagnosis progress and treatment.

  1. Reduction of Ordering Temperature of FePt Al2O3 Thin Films by N2 Addition During Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang-Wei; Katayama, N.; Yang, Zheng; Wei, Fu-Lin; Matsumoto, M.; Morisako, A.; Liu, Xiao-Xi; Takei, S.

    2005-11-01

    We investigate the effect of N2 addition during sputtering on the microstructure and magnetic properties of FePt-Al2O3 thin films. The texture of FePt phase in FePt-Al2O3 thin films changes from (111) to a more random orientation by N2 addition during sputtering. The ordering temperature of FePt phase reduces about 100°C with appropriate N2 partial pressure. A larger coercivity of 6.0×105 A/m is obtained with N2 partial pressure about 15%. Structural analysis reveals that a small quantity of Fe3N phase forms during sputtering and the release of N atoms during the post annealing induces a large number of vacancies in the films, which benefits to the transformation of FePt phase from fcc to fct.

  2. Low-temperature ordered phases of the spin-1/2 XXZ chain system Cs2CoCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, O.; Garst, M.; Rosch, A.; Sela, E.; Buldmann, B.; Becker, P.; Bohatý, L.; Müller, R.; Lorenz, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this study the magnetic order of the spin-1/2 XXZ chain system Cs2CoCl4 in a temperature range from 50 mK to 0.5 K and in applied magnetic fields up to 3.5 T is investigated by high-resolution measurements of the thermal expansion and the specific heat. Applying magnetic fields along a or c suppresses TN completely at about 2.1 T. In addition, we find an adjacent intermediate phase before the magnetization saturates close to 2.5 T. For magnetic fields applied along b , a surprisingly rich phase diagram arises. Two additional transitions are observed at critical fields μ0HS F 1≃0.25 T and μ0HS F 2≃0.7 T , which we propose to arise from a two-stage spin-flop transition.

  3. Linear Chains of Magnetic Ions Stacked with Variable Distance: Ferromagnetic Ordering with a Curie Temperature above 20 K.

    PubMed

    Friedländer, Stefan; Liu, Jinxuan; Addicoat, Matt; Petkov, Petko; Vankova, Nina; Rüger, Robert; Kuc, Agnieszka; Guo, Wei; Zhou, Wencai; Lukose, Binit; Wang, Zhengbang; Weidler, Peter G; Pöppl, Andreas; Ziese, Michael; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2016-10-04

    We have studied the magnetic properties of the SURMOF-2 series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Contrary to bulk MOF-2 crystals, where Cu(2+) ions form paddlewheels and are antiferromagnetically coupled, in this case the Cu(2+) ions are connected via carboxylate groups in a zipper-like fashion. This unusual coupling of the spin 1/2 ions within the resulting one-dimensional chains is found to stabilize a low-temperature, ferromagnetic (FM) phase. In contrast to other ordered 1D systems, no strong magnetic fields are needed to induce the ferromagnetism. The magnetic coupling constants describing the interaction between the individual metal ions have been determined in SQUID experiments. They are fully consistent with the results of ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations. The theoretical results allow the unusual magnetic behavior of this exotic, yet easy-to-fabricate, material to be described in a detailed fashion.

  4. Room temperature p-type conductivity and coexistence of ferroelectric order in ferromagnetic Li doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Awan, Saif Ullah E-mail: ullahphy@gmail.com; Hasanain, S. K.; Anjum, D. H.; Awan, M. S.; Shah, Saqlain A.

    2014-10-28

    Memory and switching devices acquired new materials which exhibit ferroelectric and ferromagnetic order simultaneously. We reported multiferroic behavior in Zn{sub 1−y}Li{sub y}O(0.00≤y≤0.10) nanoparticles. The analysis of transmission electron micrographs confirmed the hexagonal morphology and wurtzite crystalline structure. We investigated p-type conductivity in doped samples and measured hole carriers in range 2.4 × 10{sup 17}/cc to 7.3 × 10{sup 17}/cc for different Li contents. We found that hole carriers are responsible for long range order ferromagnetic coupling in Li doped samples. Room temperature ferroelectric hysteresis loops were observed in 8% and 10% Li doped samples. We demonstrated ferroelectric coercivity (remnant polarization) 2.5 kV/cm (0.11 μC/cm{sup 2}) and 2.8 kV/cm (0.15 μC/cm{sup 2}) for y = 0.08 and y = 0.10 samples. We propose that the mechanism of Li induced ferroelectricity in ZnO is due to indirect dipole interaction via hole carriers. We investigated that if the sample has hole carriers ≥5.3 × 10{sup 17}/cc, they can mediate the ferroelectricity. Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic measurements showed that higher electric polarization and larger magnetic moment is attained when the hole concentration is larger and vice versa. Our results confirmed the hole dependent coexistence of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric behavior at room temperature, which provide potential applications for switchable and memory devices.

  5. Robust deposition of lambda DNA on mica for imaging by AFM in air.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Nancy Anabel Gerling; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio

    2014-01-01

    Long DNA molecules remain difficult to image by atomic force microscopy (AFM) because of their tendency to entanglement and spontaneous formation of networks. We present a comparison of two different DNA deposition methods operating at room temperature and humidity conditions, aimed at reproducible imaging of isolated and relaxed λ DNA conformations by AFM in air. We first demonstrate that a standard deposition procedure, consisting in adsorption of DNA in the presence of divalent cations followed by washing and air-drying steps, yields a coexistence of different types of λ DNA networks with a only a few isolated DNA chains. In contrast, deposition using a spin-coating-based technique results in reproducible coverage of a significant fraction of the substrate area by isolated and relaxed λ DNA molecules, with the added benefit of a reduction in the effect of a residual layer that normally embeds DNA strands and leads to an apparent DNA height closer to the expected value. Furthermore, we show that deposition by spin-coating is also well-suited to visualize DNA-protein complexes. These results indicate that spin-coating is a simple, powerful alternative for reproducible sample preparation for AFM imaging.

  6. Low tip damage AFM technique development for nano structures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biao; Wang, Charles C.; Huang, Po-Fu; Uritsky, Yuri

    2010-06-01

    Ambient dynamic mode (tapping mode or intermittent-contact mode) AFM imaging has been used extensively for the characterization of the topography of nano structures. However, the results are beset with artifacts, because hard tapping of the AFM tip on sample surface usually causes premature tip damage. Through careful study of the cantilever amplitude and phase signals as functions of tip-to-sample distance, principle of non-contact AFM operation was discovered to enable high resolution and low tip damage AFM image acquisition [1, 2]. However, current study discovers that the conventional way of acquiring amplitude and phase versus distance curves gives erroneous non-contact operating range, because the tip gets damaged during the data acquisition process. A new technique is developed to reliably map the operating parameters of an intact tip that ensures the AFM be operated with the correct non-contact settings. Two examples are given to illustrate the successful applications of this new technique. The first example involves the size characterization of polystyrene latex (PSL) nano particles used for light scattering tool calibration. The second example is the development of robust recipes for the measurement of the depth of phase-shift mask trenches.

  7. High-temperature-oxidation-induced ordered structure in Inconel 939 superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jingxi; Wise, Adam; Nuhfer, Thomas; Holcomb, Gordon R; Jablonski, Paul D; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Laughlin, David E

    2013-04-20

    In the integrated oxy-fuel combustion and turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO2 and O2. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation that results in the loss of the strengthening precipitates. In an earlier study of the oxidation of Inconel 939 Ni-based superalloy exposed to oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 hours, a high-temperature-oxidation-induced phase transformation in the sub-surface region was noticed and a two-phase region formed at the expense of strengthening γ' phase. While one of the two phases was identified as the Ni-matrix (γ solid solution, face-center-cubic) phase, the other product phase remained unidentified. In this study, the crystal structure of the unknown phase and its orientation relationship with the parent Ni-matrix phase was investigated through electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that the crystal structure of the unknown phase could be modeled as a ternary derivative of the ordered η-Ni3Ti phase (D024) structure with lattice parameters of a = 0.5092 nm and c = 0.8336 nm, α = 90º, β = 90º and γ = 120º.

  8. The Effect of Pressure and Temperature on the Second-Order Derivatives of the Free Energy Functions for Lower Alkanediols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorębski, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The second-order derivatives of the free energy functions, i.e., isochoric molar heat capacities, isentropic and isothermal molar compressibility, and isobaric and isentropic molar thermal expansion, were calculated in the temperature range from (293.15 to 318.15) K and at pressures up to 100 MPa for 1,2- and 1,3-propanediol; 1,2-, 1,3, and 1,4-butanediol; and 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol. The data for calculations were obtained by means of the acoustic method. The pressure and temperature dependencies for the above mentioned properties are analyzed and discussed together with the literature data on isobaric molar heat capacities. The observed marked difference between isobaric and isentropic thermal expansion is analyzed as well. The differences in behavior of linear 1,2-diols and -diols as well as a diol with a branched carbon chain are emphasized. The isentropic and isothermal molar compressibilities are used to evaluate the dimensionality and relative rigidity of H-associates.

  9. Field dependent ordering temperature in copper pyrazine perchlorate, Cu(pz)2(ClO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landee, Christopher; Xiao, Fan; Turnbull, Mark; Tsyrulin, N.; Kenzelmann, Michel; van Tol, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Copper pyrazine perchlorate is a molecular-based 2D S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet (QHAF) with a moderate exchange constant (J/k = 17.5 K) and a saturation field of 60 T. The zero-field ordering temperature, as recently determined by muon spin relaxation experiments [1], is 4.3 K corresponding to excellent isolation (J'/J 8x10-4) between magnetic layers [2]. Recent studies of Cu(pz)2(ClO4)2 in applied fields (specific heat and ESR) show the ordering transition to increase with field by as much as 30% in a field of nine tesla. This effect will be discussed in terms of a field-induced anisotropy crossover model [3]. 1. T. Lancaster, S. J. Blundell et al, submitted for publication. 2. P. Sengupta, A. W. Sandvik, and R. R. P. Singh, Phys. Rev. B 68, 094423 (2003). 3. A. Cuccoli et al, Phys. Rev. B 68, 060402 (2003).

  10. Effects of higher-order energy bands and temperature on the bosonic Mott insulator in a periodically modulated lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajna, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We show that a certain class of higher-order excitations in ultracold atoms experiments can be described by straightforward extension of the standard strong coupling approach in the coherent state path integral formalism. It is achieved by theoretical analysis of energy absorption spectroscopy in the three-dimensional system of strongly correlated bosons described by the Bose-Hubbard model. In particular, for unit filling, an explicit form of the single-particle Mott insulator Green function at finite temperatures is derived which goes beyond the standard Hubbard bands description. Moreover, for relevant densities, we calculated the energy absorption rate and performed thermometry on rubidium atomic cloud gas by using previously obtained experimental data. Within the local density approximation, we explain that in such systems the nature of absorption spectrum depends significantly on local chemical potential: (a) the crossover region between lobes is characterized by different types of particle-hole excitations from neighboring Mott lobes and (b) origin of higher-order energy excitations changes from hole type to particle type for higher bosonic densities.

  11. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  12. Accurate, explicit formulae for higher harmonic force spectroscopy by frequency modulation-AFM.

    PubMed

    Kuchuk, Kfir; Sivan, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction between an AFM tip and a sample gives rise to oscillations of the cantilever at integral multiples (harmonics) of the fundamental resonance frequency. The higher order harmonics have long been recognized to hold invaluable information on short range interactions but their utilization has thus far been relatively limited due to theoretical and experimental complexities. In particular, existing approximations of the interaction force in terms of higher harmonic amplitudes generally require simultaneous measurements of multiple harmonics to achieve satisfactory accuracy. In the present letter we address the mathematical challenge and derive accurate, explicit formulae for both conservative and dissipative forces in terms of an arbitrary single harmonic. Additionally, we show that in frequency modulation-AFM (FM-AFM) each harmonic carries complete information on the force, obviating the need for multi-harmonic analysis. Finally, we show that higher harmonics may indeed be used to reconstruct short range forces more accurately than the fundamental harmonic when the oscillation amplitude is small compared with the interaction range.

  13. Topographical and electrical study of contact and intermittent contact mode InP AFM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranvouez, E.; Budau, P.; Bremond, G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to fabricate nanoscale oxide patterns on an InP(001) surface, local anodization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) contact and intermittent contact modes has been performed. Contact mode results are similar to those obtained with the local anodization of silicon, and mainly limited by the effect of space charge that occurs during the oxide growth. The existence of this space charge associated with the poor dielectric quality of the obtained oxide has been verified by performing scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) measurements. Results for oxidation using intermittent AFM contact mode associated with a modulated voltage are more specific. For a more than two decade variation of probe velocity (0.01-5 µm s-1), the AFM oxidation introduces no significant changes in the oxide pattern. Experiments on the influence of oxidation time give rise to two regimes. First, for times shorter than 100 ms, a high growth rate is found. Second, for oxidation times longer than 100 ms, we observe an oxide height saturation and a significant decrease of lateral growth rate. These results provide a way to easily control the oxide shape. The space charge neutralization in this mode has also been investigated by SCM. The interesting results for intermittent contact oxidation confirm the capability of this technique to modify a nanoscale InP surface.

  14. Investigation of surface changes of nanoparticles using TM-AFM phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rong; Yu, Liya E

    2003-06-15

    Tapping-mode AFM (TM-AFM) phase imaging was utilized to characterize the surface changes of nanosize particles, in regard to the effects of different amounts of condensed water and organic coatings on particle surfaces. Model nanoparticles were continuously examined under various relative humidity (RH) levels by concurrently obtaining both topographic and phase images. The condensed water appeared to soften particle surfaces and to increase tip-sample attractive interaction over relatively stiff surfaces, which were shown with dark phase contrasts and negative phase shift values in phase images. Under high RH, a massive amount of water gave the particles a droplet-like surface, which reversed the original negative phase shifts to positive values with bright contrasts. Glutaric-acid coatings provided a compliant surface with high viscosity resulting in a dark phase contrast, whereas water droplets containing relatively low viscosity gave a bright phase contrast and positive phase shift. Overall, our results show that it is essential to describe the physical properties of a sample surface as solid, soft, or droplet-like material in order to derive a meaningful understanding of the surface changes of nanosize particles based on TM-AFM phase images. In contrast to other phase imaging studies, this work clearly correlates continuous surface changes with phase images, demonstrating a promising approach to characterize environmental nanoparticles.

  15. A novel dog-bone oscillating AFM probe with thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-10-31

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments.

  16. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  17. Kinetic arrest of field-temperature induced first order phase transition in quasi-one dimensional spin system Ca3Co2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Santanu; Kumar, Kranti; Banerjee, A.; Chaddah, P.

    2016-05-01

    We have found that the geometrically frustrated spin chain compound Ca3Co2O6 belonging to Ising like universality class with uniaxial anisotropy shows kinetic arrest of first order intermediate phase (IP) to ferrimagnetic (FIM) transition. In this system, dc magnetization measurements followed by different protocols suggest the coexistence of high temperature IP with equilibrium FIM phase in low temperature. Formation of metastable state due to hindered first order transition has also been probed through cooling and heating in unequal field (CHUF) protocol. Kinetically arrested high temperature IP appears to persist down to almost the spin freezing temperature in this system.

  18. Fractal properties of macrophage membrane studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Bitler, A; Dover, R; Shai, Y

    2012-12-01

    Complexity of cell membrane poses difficulties to quantify corresponding morphology changes during cell proliferation and damage. We suggest using fractal dimension of the cell membrane to quantify its complexity and track changes produced by various treatments. Glutaraldehyde fixed mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage membranes were chosen as model system and imaged in PeakForce QNM (quantitative nanomechanics) mode of AFM (atomic force microscope). The morphology of the membranes was characterized by fractal dimension. The parameter was calculated for set of AFM images by three different methods. The same calculations were done for the AFM images of macrophages treated with colchicine, an inhibitor of the microtubule polymerization, and microtubule stabilizing agent taxol. We conclude that fractal dimension can be additional and useful parameter to characterize the cell membrane complexity and track the morphology changes produced by different treatments.

  19. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  20. Sub-diffraction nano manipulation using STED AFM.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Canale, Claudio; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, nano manipulation has been recognized as a potential tool of scientific interest especially in nanotechnology and nano-robotics. Contemporary optical microscopy (super resolution) techniques have also reached the nanometer scale resolution to visualize this and hence a combination of super resolution aided nano manipulation ineluctably gives a new perspective to the scenario. Here we demonstrate how specificity and rapid determination of structures provided by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope can aid another microscopic tool with capability of mechanical manoeuvring, like an atomic force microscope (AFM) to get topological information or to target nano scaled materials. We also give proof of principle on how high-resolution real time visualization can improve nano manipulation capability within a dense sample, and how STED-AFM is an optimal combination for this job. With these evidences, this article points to future precise nano dissections and maybe even to a nano-snooker game with an AFM tip and fluorospheres.

  1. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  2. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  3. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  4. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  6. Sharp high-aspect-ratio AFM tips fabricated by a combination of deep reactive ion etching and focused ion beam techniques.

    PubMed

    Caballero, David; Villanueva, Guillermo; Plaza, Jose Antonio; Mills, Christopher A; Samitier, Josep; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2010-01-01

    The shape and dimensions of an atomic force microscope tip are crucial factors to obtain high resolution images at the nanoscale. When measuring samples with narrow trenches, inclined sidewalls near 90 degrees or nanoscaled structures, standard silicon atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips do not provide satisfactory results. We have combined deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and focused ion beam (FIB) lithography techniques in order to produce probes with sharp rocket-shaped silicon AFM tips for high resolution imaging. The cantilevers were shaped and the bulk micromachining was performed using the same DRIE equipment. To improve the tip aspect ratio we used FIB nanolithography technique. The tips were tested on narrow silicon trenches and over biological samples showing a better resolution when compared with standard AFM tips, which enables nanocharacterization and nanometrology of high-aspect-ratio structures and nanoscaled biological elements to be completed, and provides an alternative to commercial high aspect ratio AFM tips.

  7. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  8. Anisotropic magnetic order of the Eu sublattice in single crystals of EuFe2-xCoxAs2 (x=0,0.2) studied by means of magnetization and magnetic torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Bosma, S.; Weyeneth, S.; Shengelaya, A.; Puzniak, R.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Keller, H.

    2011-10-01

    We present a combination of magnetization and magnetic torque experiments to investigate the magnetic orders in undoped EuFe2As2 and Co-doped EuFe1.8Co0.2As2 single crystals. Although at low temperatures typical results for an antiferromagnetic (AFM) state in EuFe2As2 were found, our data strongly indicate the occurrence of a canted antiferromagnetic (C-AFM) order of the Eu2+ moments between 17 and 19 K, observed even in the lowest studied magnetic fields. However, unlike in the parent compound, no low-field and low-temperature AFM state of the Eu2+ moments was observed in the doped EuFe1.8Co0.2As2. Only a C-AFM phase is present at low fields and low temperatures, with a reduced magnetic anisotropy as compared to the undoped system. We discuss for both EuFe2As2 and EuFe1.8Co0.2As2 the experimentally deduced magnetic phase diagrams of the magnetic ordering of the Eu2+ sublattice with respect to the temperature, the applied magnetic field, and its orientation to the crystallographic axes. It is likely that the magnetic coupling of the Eu and the Fe sublattice is strongly dependent on Co doping, having detrimental influence on the magnetic phase diagrams as determined in this work. Their impact on the occurrence of superconductivity with higher Co doping is discussed.

  9. Vibrational CD (VCD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of DNA interaction with Cr3+ ions: VCD and AFM evidence of DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Andrushchenko, V; Leonenko, Z; Cramb, D; van de Sande, H; Wieser, H

    The interaction of natural calf thymus DNA with Cr(3+) ions was studied at room temperature by means of vibrational CD (VCD) and infrared absorption (ir) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cr(3+) ion binding mainly to N(7) (G) and to phosphate groups was demonstrated. Psi-type VCD spectra resembling electronic CD (ECD) spectra, which appear during psi-type DNA condensation, were observed. These spectra are characterized mainly by an anomalous, severalfold increase of VCD intensity. Such anomalous VCD spectra were assigned to DNA condensation with formation of large and dense particles of a size comparable to the wavelength of the probing ir beam and possessing large-scale helicity. Atomic force microscopy confirmed DNA condensation by Cr(3+) ions and the formation of tight DNA particles responsible for the psi-type VCD spectra. Upon increasing the Cr(3+) ion concentration the shape of the condensates changed from loose flower-like structures to highly packed dense spheres. No DNA denaturation was seen even at the highest concentration of Cr(3+) ions studied. The secondary structure of DNA remained in a B-form before and after the condensation. VCD and ir as well as AFM proved to be an effective combination for investigating DNA condensation. In addition to the ability of VCD to determine DNA condensation, VCD and ir can in the same experiment provide unambiguous information about the secondary structure of DNA contained in the condensed particles.

  10. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

  11. Highly ordered sandwich-type (phthalocyaninato)(porphyrinato) europium double-decker nanotubes and room temperature NO2 sensitive properties.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peihua; Wang, Yucheng; Ma, Pan; Song, Feifei; Han, Xinyu; Yao, Shuncheng; Yang, Cheng

    2017-01-31

    A sandwich-type (phthalocyaninato)(porphyrinato) europium double-decker complex Eu(TPyP){Pc-(OC8H17)8} [TPyP = meso-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin; Pc-(OC8H17)8 = 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)phthalocyanine] (2) was designed and prepared. For comparative studies, Eu(TPyP)(Pc) (1) was also prepared. Highly ordered nanotubes of complexes 1 and 2 were successfully fabricated by using an anodized alumina oxide (AAO) template method. The nanotubes were comparatively investigated by electronic absorption spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. Both nanotubes of complexes 1 and 2 showed good conductivities and presented an efficient gas sensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of NO2 at room temperature. In particular, the detection limit and response/recovery times for the proposed sensors based on complex 2 were lower and faster than those of complex 1, indicating the significant effect of a molecular packing mode on tuning the gas sensing performance of organic semiconductors.

  12. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  13. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  15. Probing the Double Layer: Effect of Image Forces on AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Force probes such as AFM tips or laser trap latex beads have a dielectric constant much less than that of the water that they displace. Thus when a probe approaches a charged surface under water it will be repelled simply based upon the image forces, and these can be of nN magnitude. PMID:16714346

  16. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  17. Cantilever's behavior in the AC mode of an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, V.B.; Zanette, S.I.; Caride, A.O.; Prioli, R.; Rivas, A.M.F

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, a model with a small number of parameters is used to simulate the motion of a cantilever in the AC mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results elucidate the transition dependence-from noncontact to tapping operating mode-on the height of the contamination layer and on the stiffness of the sample.

  18. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ho-Baek, Seung

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  19. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  20. Impact of temperature-dependent local and global spin order in RMnO3 compounds for spin-phonon coupling and electromagnon activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, S.; Schiebl, M.; Mukhin, A. A.; Balbashov, A. M.; Pimenov, A.; Geurts, J.

    2017-01-01

    The orthorhombic rare-earth manganite compounds RMnO3 show a global magnetic order for T< {T}N, and several representatives are multiferroic with a cycloidal spin ground state order for T< {T}{{cycl}}< {T}N≈ 40 {{K}}. We deduce from the temperature dependence of spin-phonon coupling in Raman spectroscopy for a series of RMnO3 compounds that their spin order locally persists up to about twice T N . Along the same line, our observation of the persistence of the electromagnon in GdMnO3 up to T≈ 100 {{K}} is attributed to a local cycloidal spin order for T> {T}{{cycl}}, in contrast to the hitherto assumed incommensurate sinusoidal phase in the intermediate temperature range. The development of the magnetization pattern can be described in terms of an order-disorder transition at T cycl within a pseudospin model of localized spin cycloids with opposite chirality.

  1. G -type magnetic order in ferropnictide C uxF e1 -yAs induced by hole doping on As sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, T.; Lee, C. C.; Tian, W.; Cao, H. B.; Zhu, M.; Qian, B.; dela Cruz, C. R.; Ku, W.; Mao, Z. Q.; Ke, X.

    2017-02-01

    Strong antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlation has long been postulated to be closely related to the occurrence of unconventional high-temperature superconductivity observed in the cuprates, heavy fermions, and organic superconductors. The recently discovered Fe-based superconductors add another interesting member to the list. However, insufficient attention has been paid to the versatile nature of the magnetic correlation in these materials: some showing stripe (C -type) order, others double stripe (E -type) or block AFM order instead, implying potentially richer structures of the superconducting order. Here we report the observation of yet another AFM correlation in the family: a G -type AFM order as seen in the high-Tc cuprates, in C uxF e1 -yAs compounds isostructural to the LiFeAs superconductor. This study not only sheds light on the underlying mechanism of the rich magnetic correlations in the Fe-based superconductors, but also suggests the possibility of realizing a distinct pairing symmetry upon chemical doping or applying pressure.

  2. AFM nano-plough planar YBCO micro-bridges: critical currents and magnetic field effects.

    PubMed

    Elkaseh, A A O; Perold, W J; Srinivasu, V V

    2010-10-01

    The critical current (Ic) of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) AFM plough micro-constrictions is measured as a function of temperature, width and the magnetic flux density (B), which was applied perpendicular to the YBCO ab-plane and surface of the bridges. C-axis oriented thin films of YBa2Cu3O7-x were deposited on MgO substrates using an inverted cylindrical magnetron (ICM) sputtering technique. The films were then patterned into 8-10 micron size strips, using standard photolithography and dry etching processes. Micro-bridges with widths between 1.9 microm to 4.1 microm were fabricated by using atomic force microscope (AFM) nanolithography techniques. Critical current versus temperature data shows a straight-line behavior, which is typical of constriction type Josephson junctions. The Ic versus B characteristics exhibited a modulation, and a suppression of the critical current of up to 84%. It was also found that the critical current increases with increasing constriction width.

  3. AFM Manipulation of Viruses: Substrate Interactions and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.; Finch, M.; Taylor, R. M.; Chi, V.; Brooks, F. P.; Ferrari, F.; Samulski, R.

    1996-03-01

    Using an AFM tip as a manipulation tool, we have translated, rotated, and dissected individual Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Adenovirus particles. We have implemented a teleoperation system which allows manual control of the relative tip-sample position while also allowing conventional AFM operation for imaging resulting structure. Using simple tip trajectories to bend the rod-shaped TMV, we observed a variety of resulting structures and mechanical failures. The distributed adhesive interaction between the virus and the sample surface, as well as the local tip-virus interaction affect the distortion in the shape of the virus. Experiments were performed in air as well as in liquid on graphite and Si substrates. The in-liquid experiments allow tuning of the environmental conditions, including osmolarity and pH, which are known to profoundly affect the virus structure. A continuum mechanical model relating mechanical properties to observations provides insight into the constraints for successful nondestructive manipulation.

  4. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Automated assembly of holder chips to AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Gunther; Jacob, Dirk; Fouchier, Marc

    2001-10-01

    At the Belgian institute IMEC techniques for the production of electrically conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are developed. To facilitate handling of the fragile probes, holder chips are required. The assembly of such holder chips, which can be split up into the application of solder paste, the positioning of the holder chip and the soldering of the chip, is a crucial manufacturing step, that, until now, was performed manually for economic reasons. With the help of a modular micro assembly tool, developed by the Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management (iwb) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen, an economical automated assembly of the holder chips was developed. Thanks to our integrated sensor technology, even the automated assembly onto the extremely fragile membranes of moulded AFM probes was possible. In particular, the dispensing process of the solder paste onto the membranes was improved by the integration of a non-contact sensor for the needle clearance.

  6. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; ...

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together withmore » the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  7. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  8. Leading Change: Transitioning the AFMS into a High Reliability Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY LEADING CHANGE: TRANSITIONING THE AFMS INTO A HIGH RELIABILTY ORGANIZATION by Robert K. Bogart...academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the US government, the Department of Defense, or Air ...University. In accordance with Air Force Instruction 51-303, it is not copyrighted, but is the property of the United States government. iii

  9. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  10. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    the development of green rocket propellants . The Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) monopropellant, AF-M315E, has been selected for...art rocket fuels and propellants . A known quantity of liquid propellant is placed in a metal U-tube and held isothermally in a preheated mixture of... Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) program. As the propulsion system developed by Aerojet- Rocketdyne for this propellant advances in maturity, studies

  11. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  12. Biophysical properties of cardiomyocyte surface explored by multiparametric AFM.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, Georges; Cauquil, Marie; Severac, Childerick; Lachaize, Véronique; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline; Dague, Etienne

    2017-03-02

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PeakForce QNM) multiparametric AFM mode was adapted to qualitative and quantitative study of the lateral membrane of cardiomyocytes (CMs), extending this powerful mode to the study of soft cells. On living CM, PeakForce QNM depicted the crests and hollows periodic alternation of cell surface architecture previously described using AFM Force Volume (FV) mode. PeakForce QNM analysis provided better resolution in terms of pixel number compared to FV mode and reduced acquisition time, thus limiting the consequences of spontaneous living adult CM dedifferentiation once isolated from the cardiac tissue. PeakForce QNM mode on fixed CMs clearly visualized subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and their loss following formamide treatment, concomitant with the interfibrillar mitochondria climbing up and forming heaps at the cell surface. Interestingly, formamide-promoted SSM loss allowed visualization of the sarcomeric apparatus ultrastructure below the plasma membrane. High PeakForce QNM resolution led to better contrasted mechanical maps than FV mode and provided correlation between adhesion, dissipation, mechanical and topographical maps. Modified hydrophobic AFM tip enhanced contrast on adhesion and dissipation maps and suggested that CM surface crests and hollows exhibit distinct chemical properties. Finally, two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to objectively quantify AFM maps allowed characterization of periodicity of both sarcomeric Z-line and M-band. Overall, this study validated PeakForce QNM as a valuable and innovative mode for the exploration of living and fixed CMs. In the future, it could be applied to depict cell membrane architectural, mechanical and chemical defects as well as sarcomeric abnormalities associated with cardiac diseases.

  13. Investigation of the influence of UV irradiation on collagen thin films by AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Yova, Dido; Alexandratou, Eleni

    2014-12-01

    Collagen is the major fibrous extracellular matrix protein and due to its unique properties, it has been widely used as biomaterial, scaffold and cell-substrate. The aim of the paper was to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in order to investigate well-characterized collagen thin films after ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The films were also used as in vitro culturing substrates in order to investigate the UV-induced alterations to fibroblasts. A special attention was given in the alteration on collagen D-periodicity. For short irradiation times, spectroscopy (fluorescence/absorption) studies demonstrated that photodegradation took place and AFM imaging showed alterations in surface roughness. Also, it was highlighted that UV-irradiation had different effects when it was applied on collagen solution than on films. Concerning fibroblast culturing, it was shown that fibroblast behavior was affected after UV irradiation of both collagen solution and films. Furthermore, after a long irradiation time, collagen fibrils were deformed revealing that collagen fibrils are consisting of multiple shells and D-periodicity occurred on both outer and inner shells. The clarification of the effects of UV light on collagen and the induced modifications of cell behavior on UV-irradiated collagen-based surfaces will contribute to the better understanding of cell-matrix interactions in the nanoscale and will assist in the appropriate use of UV light for sterilizing and photo-cross-linking applications.

  14. AFM characterization of solid-supported lipid multilayers prepared by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, G; Girasole, M; Cricenti, A; Cattaruzza, F; Flamini, A; Prosperi, T; Generosi, J; Castellano, A Congiu

    2005-06-15

    Lipids are the principal components of biologically relevant structures as cellular membranes. They have been the subject of many studies due to their biological relevance and their potential applications. Different techniques, such as Langmuir-Blodgett and vesicle-fusion deposition, are available to deposit ordered lipid films on etched surfaces. Recently, a new technique of lipid film deposition has been proposed in which stacks of a small and well-controlled number of bilayers are prepared on a suitable substrate using a spin-coater. We studied the morphological properties of multi-layers made of cationic and neutral lipids (DOTAP and DOPC) and mixtures of them using dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). After adapting and optimizing, the spin-coating technique to deposit lipids on a chemically etched Silicon (1,0,0) substrate, a morphological nanometer-scale characterization of the aforementioned samples has been provided. The AFM study showed that an initial layer of ordered vesicles is formed and, afterward, depending on details of the spin-coating preparation protocol and to the dimension of the silicon substrate, vesicle fusion and structural rearrangements of the lipid layers may occur. The present data disclose the possibility to control the lipid's structures by acting on spin-coating parameters with promising perspectives for novel applications of lipid films.

  15. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  16. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  17. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers.

  18. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  19. Absence of Significant Structural Changes Near the Magnetic Ordering Temperature in Small-ion Rare Earth Perovskite RMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T.; Ty, T.; Chen, H.; Abeykoon, A. M. M.; Chen, Y. -S.; Ahn, K. H.

    2014-11-14

    The detailed structural measurements on multiple length scales were conducted on a new perovskite phase of ScMnO3, and on orthorhombic LuMnO3 as a benchmark. Complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out, and predict that ScMnO3 possesses E-phase magnetic order at low temperature with displacements of the Mn sites (relative to the high temperature state) of ~0.07 Å, compared to ~0.04 Å predicted for LuMnO3. However, detailed local, intermediate and long-range structural measurements by x-ray pair distribution function analysis, single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, find no local or long-range distortions on crossing into the low temperature E-phase of the magnetically ordered state. Our measurements place upper limits on any structural changes to be at most one order of magnitude lower than DFT predictions and suggest that this theoretical approach does not properly account for the spin–lattice coupling in these oxides and may possibly predict the incorrect magnetic order at low temperatures. The results suggest that the electronic contribution to the electrical polarization dominates and should be more accurately treated in theoretical models.

  20. AFM observation of monatomic step movements on NaCl(001) with the help of adsorbed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, H.; Ohashi, M.; Baba, K.; Seo, A.

    1996-06-01

    AFM observation of cleaved NaCl(001) surface in air at room temperature revealed spontaneous motion of monatomic steps, depending on relative humidity, to minimize one-dimensional surface free energy. While step motion was recognized only at the parts having large positive curvature at 52% humidity, even straight steps moved at 57%. The motion was accelerated toward higher humidity. It is suggested that adsorbed water having 2-dimensional nature transports ions at the surface. By holding the AFM tip at one place, salt solution was collected beneath the tip by capillary action. Upon removal of the tip, the solution droplet turned into a bell-shaped hillock of salt as high as 78 nm. Although the hillocks gradually flattened spontaneously, the method has potential application in pattern formation.

  1. The Emergence of AFM Applications to Cell Biology: How new technologies are facilitating investigation of human cells in health and disease at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Sinha, Animesh A.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobotics has been used for building nano devices in semiconductors for almost a decade. Leveraging the unparallel precision localization capabilities of this technology, high resolution imaging and mechanical property characterization is now increasingly being performed in biological settings. AFM also offers the prospect for handling and manipulating biological materials at nanometer scale. It has unique advantages over other methods, permitting experiments in the liquid phase where physiological conditions can be maintained. Taking advantage of these properties, our group has visualized membrane and cytoskeletal structures of live cells by controlling the interaction force of the AFM tip with cellular components at the nN or sub-nN range. Cell stiffness changes were observed by statistically analyzing the Young’s modulus values of human keratinocytes before and after specific antibody treatment. Furthermore, we used the AFM cantilever as a robotic arm for mechanical pushing, pulling and cutting to perform nanoscale manipulations of cell-associated structures. AFM guided nano-dissection, or nanosurgery was enacted on the cell in order to sever intermediate filaments connecting neighboring keratinocytes via sub 100 nm resolution cuts. Finally, we have used a functionalized AFM tip to probe cell surface receptors to obtain binding force measurements. This technique formed the basis for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS). In addition to enhancing our basic understanding of dynamic signaling events in cell biology, these advancements in AFM based biomedical investigations can be expected to facilitate the search for biomarkers related to disease diagnosis progress and treatment. PMID:24416719

  2. Low and high cycle fatigue -- A continuum supported by AFM observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.; Harvey, S.E.; Kramer, D.E.; Hoehn, J.W.

    1998-09-01

    It is proposed that fatigue damage evolution is controlled by surface displacements and these can be accurately measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As these displacements can be followed throughout the history of a fatigued component, the fatigue process in general represents a continuum of behavior. In 10 and 200 {micro}m grain size titanium, AFM measurements demonstrate that the fraction of plasticity contributing to surface damage can be expressed as a single function over nearly five decades of cycles. Regarding this function, the effect of grain size appears to be small. In terms of damage accumulation rates, cyclic hardening parameters, and the threshold stress intensity, the proposed model represents a microstructurally-sensitive Manson-Coffin law for fatigue initiation. Coupling this with a more standard fracture mechanics approach for the latter stage of life allows a simple expression for life prediction. Over the range of 10{sup 3}--10{sup 6} cycles, this expression predicts fatigue life of titanium exposed to air and saline environments to first order.

  3. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  4. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; ...

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  5. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  6. Structural changes of polysulfone membrane use for hemodialysis in the consecutive regime: nanometric analysis by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batina, Nikola; Acosta García, Ma. Cristina; Avalos Pérez, Angélica; Alberto Ramírez, Mario; Franco, Martha; Pérez Gravas, Héctor; Cadena Méndez, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the hemodialytic treatment of patients with either acute or chronic renal failure has been improved by promoting biocompatibility in the use of new materials and improve membrane surface characteristics. Low and high flux polysulfone membranes (PM) used in dialysis and ultra filtration have been studied in order to understand the geometry and surface chemistry of the pores at inner (nanometric) and outer (micrometric) membrane parts. The surface changes of polysulfone cartridge membrane (PM) during different number of consecutive reuse trials: after 1st, 10th and 23th times of use. The morphology of the hollow fibers surfaces was studied by means of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and the surface roughness analysis. The roughness of both inner and outer part of PM surface increases with numbers of reuse trails. Thus, small and medium size pores were wiped out when the number of uses changed from zero to 23 on the outer surface. The pore density decreases. The inner part of membrane shows some nanometric size deformation in forms of new openings and raptures. The AFM analysis show differences in the PM morphology at the nanometric level, not previously revealed, which could be important in the evaluation of the PM.

  7. Quantitative description of collagen fibre network on trabecular bone surfaces based on AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Hua, W-D; Chen, P-P; Xu, M-Q; Ao, Z; Liu, Y; Han, D; He, F

    2016-04-01

    The collagen fibre network is an important part of extracellular matrix (ECM) on trabecular bone surface. The geometry features of the network can provide us insights into its physical and physiological properties. However, previous researches have not focused on the geometry and the quantitative description of the collagen fibre network on trabecular bone surface. In this study,we developed a procedure to quantitatively describe the network and verified the validity of the procedure. The experiment proceeds as follow. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to acquire submicron resolution images of the trabecular surface. Then, an image analysing procedure was built to extract important parameters, including, fibre orientation, fibre density, fibre width, fibre crossing numbers, the number of holes formed by fibre s, and the area of holes from AFM images. In order to verify the validity of the parameters extracted by image analysing methods, we adopted two other methods, which are statistical geometry model and computer simulation, to calculate those same parameters and check the consistency of the three methods' results. Statistical tests indicate that there is no significant difference between three groups. We conclude that, (a) the ECM on trabecular surface mainly consists of random collagen fibre network with oriented fibres; (b) our method based on image analysing can be used to characterize quantitative geometry features of the collagen fibre network effectively. This method may provide a basis for quantitative investigating the architecture and function of collagen fibre network.

  8. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 26 September 2016. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing contained blurred figures introduced during the PDF conversion process. Moreover, Equations (5), (6), and (7) were not correctly cited in the text. These errors have been corrected in the updated and republished article.

  9. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  10. High-temperature orbital, charge, and structural phase transitions in the cation-ordered manganites TbBa Mn2 O6 and YBa Mn2 O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Anthony J.; Attfield, J. Paul; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2005-11-01

    The high-temperature structures and phase transitions of the cation-ordered manganite perovskites TbBaMn2O6 and YBaMn2O6 have been studied by powder neutron diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. TbBaMn2O6 undergoes an unprecedented transition from a charge and antiferro-orbitally ordered phase to a charge and ferro-orbitally ordered structure at 94.5°C , and the charge and orbital ordering melts at 200°C . An orthorhombic Cmmm phase with rotational order of MnO6 octahedra is observed above the transition, and at 514°C this transforms to the aristotype tetragonal P4/mmm arrangement. YBaMn2O6 is charge and ferro-orbitally ordered up to 225°C . Above this charge ordering transition, a C2/m phase with two rotational orders is found. This transforms to the Cmmm structure at 437°C . Discontinuities in volume and volume expansion, and a limited phase coexistence region are observed at the charge ordering transitions, whereas the other transitions are continuous.

  11. Cation ordering in orthopyroxenes and cooling rates of meteorites: Low temperature cooling rates of Estherville, Bondoc and Shaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, J.; Yang, H.; Ghose, S.

    1993-01-01

    The cooling rates of meteorites provide important constraints on the size of their parent bodies, and their accretionary and evolutionary histories. However, the cooling rates obtained so far from the commonly used metallographic, radiometric and fission-track methods have been sometimes quite controversial, such as in the case of the mesosiderites and the meteorite Shaw. We have undertaken a systematic study of the cooling rates of meteorites using a different approach, which involves single crystal x-ray determination of Fe(2+)-Mg ordering in orthopyroxenes (OP(x)) in meteorites, subject to bulk compositional constraints, and numerical simulation of the evolution of the ordering state as a function of cooling rate, within the framework of the thermodynamic and kinetic principles governing cation ordering. We report the results obtained for OP(x) crystals from Shaw and two mesosiderites, Estherville and Bondoc.

  12. Second order nonlinear optical properties of zinc oxide films deposited by low temperature dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Larciprete, M.C.; Passeri, D.; Michelotti, F.; Paoloni, S.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Belardini, A.; Sarto, F.; Somma, F.; Lo Mastro, S.

    2005-01-15

    We investigated second order optical nonlinearity of zinc oxide thin films, grown on glass substrates by the dual ion beam sputtering technique under different deposition conditions. Linear optical characterization of the films was carried out by spectrophotometric optical transmittance and reflectance measurements, giving the complex refractive index dispersion. Resistivity of the films was determined using the four-point probe sheet resistance method. Second harmonic generation measurements were performed by means of the Maker fringes technique where the fundamental beam was originated by nanosecond laser at {lambda}=1064 nm. We found a relatively high nonlinear optical response, and evidence of a dependence of the nonlinear coefficient on the deposition parameters for each sample. Moreover, the crystalline properties of the films were investigated by x-ray diffraction measurements and correlation with second order nonlinearity were analyzed. Finally, we investigated the influence of the oxygen flow rate during the deposition process on both the second order nonlinearity and the structural properties of the samples.

  13. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  14. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  15. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  16. High-speed AFM probe with micromachined membrane tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungki; Kwak, Byung Hyung; Jamil, Faize

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a micromachined silicon membrane type AFM tip designed to move nearly 1µm by electrostatic force. Since the tip can be vibrated in small amplitude with AC voltage input and can be displaced up to 1μm by DC voltage input, an additional piezo actuator is not required for scanning of submicron features. The micromachined membrane tips are designed to have 100 kHz ~ 1 MHz resonant frequency. Displacement of the membrane tip is measured by an optical interferometer using a micromachined diffraction grating on a quartz wafer which is positioned behind the membrane tip.

  17. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  18. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  19. The performance of a reduced-order adaptive controller when used in multi-antenna hyperthermia treatments with nonlinear temperature-dependent perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kung-Shan; Yuan, Yu; Li, Zhen; Stauffer, Paul R.; Maccarini, Paolo; Joines, William T.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Das, Shiva K.

    2009-04-01

    In large multi-antenna systems, adaptive controllers can aid in steering the heat focus toward the tumor. However, the large number of sources can greatly increase the steering time. Additionally, controller performance can be degraded due to changes in tissue perfusion which vary non-linearly with temperature, as well as with time and spatial position. The current work investigates whether a reduced-order controller with the assumption of piecewise constant perfusion is robust to temperature-dependent perfusion and achieves steering in a shorter time than required by a full-order controller. The reduced-order controller assumes that the optimal heating setting lies in a subspace spanned by the best heating vectors (virtual sources) of an initial, approximate, patient model. An initial, approximate, reduced-order model is iteratively updated by the controller, using feedback thermal images, until convergence of the heat focus to the tumor. Numerical tests were conducted in a patient model with a right lower leg sarcoma, heated in a 10-antenna cylindrical mini-annual phased array applicator operating at 150 MHz. A half-Gaussian model was used to simulate temperature-dependent perfusion. Simulated magnetic resonance temperature images were used as feedback at each iteration step. Robustness was validated for the controller, starting from four approximate initial models: (1) a 'standard' constant perfusion lower leg model ('standard' implies a model that exactly models the patient with the exception that perfusion is considered constant, i.e., not temperature dependent), (2) a model with electrical and thermal tissue properties varied from 50% higher to 50% lower than the standard model, (3) a simplified constant perfusion pure-muscle lower leg model with ±50% deviated properties and (4) a standard model with the tumor position in the leg shifted by 1.5 cm. Convergence to the desired focus of heating in the tumor was achieved for all four simulated models. The

  20. Study on effects of scan parameters on the image quality and tip wear in AFM tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Yan, Yongda; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2014-01-01

    Due to the tip-sample interaction which is the measurement principle of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), tip wear constantly occurs during scanning. The blunt tip caused by the wear process makes more tip geometry information involved in the image, and correspondingly it increases the measurement error. In the present study, the scan parameters of AFM in tapping mode which affect the wear of single crystal silicon tips, such as the approaching rate, the scan rate, the scan amplitude, and the integral gain are investigated. By proposing a parameter reflecting the imaging quality, the tip state tracing the sample surface is evaluated quantitatively. The influences of scan parameters on this imaging quality parameter are obtained by experiments. Finally, in order to achieve the perfect images with little tip wear influence, tip wear experiments are carried out and then the optimal parameter settings which can lighten the tip wear are obtained.

  1. High temperature magnetic order in Zn1-x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilanski, L.; Górska, M.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Lewińska, S.; Szymczak, R.; Dynowska, E.; Podgórni, A.; Dobrowolski, W.; Ralević, U.; Gajić, R.; Romčević, N.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Marenkin, S. F.

    2016-08-01

    We present studies of structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of Zn1-x Mn x SnSb2+MnSb nanocomposite ferromagnetic semiconductors with the average Mn-content, \\bar{x} , changing from 0.027 up to 0.138. The magnetic force microscope imaging done at room temperature shows the presence of a strong signal coming from MnSb clusters. Magnetic properties show the paramagnet-ferromagnet transition with the Curie temperature, T C, equal to about 522 K and the cluster-glass behavior with the transition temperature, T CG, equal to about 465 K, both related to MnSb clusters. The magnetotransport studies show that all investigated samples are p-type semiconductors with high hole concentration, p, changing from 1021 to 1022 cm-3. A large increase in the resistivity as a function of the magnetic field is observed at T  <  10 K and small magnetic fields, |B|<100 mT, for all the studied samples with a maximum amplitude of the magnetoresistance about 460% at T  =  1.4 K. The large increase in the resistivity is most probably caused by the appearance of the superconducting state in the samples at T  <  4.3 K.

  2. High-temperature environments of human evolution in East Africa based on bond ordering in paleosol carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Levin, Naomi E.; Cerling, Thure E.; Brown, Francis H.; Eiler, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Many important hominid-bearing fossil localities in East Africa are in regions that are extremely hot and dry. Although humans are well adapted to such conditions, it has been inferred that East African environments were cooler or more wooded during the Pliocene and Pleistocene when this region was a central stage of human evolution. Here we show that the Turkana Basin, Kenya—today one of the hottest places on Earth—has been continually hot during the past 4 million years. The distribution of 13C-18O bonds in paleosol carbonates indicates that soil temperatures during periods of carbonate formation were typically above 30 °C and often in excess of 35 °C. Similar soil temperatures are observed today in the Turkana Basin and reflect high air temperatures combined with solar heating of the soil surface. These results are specific to periods of soil carbonate formation, and we suggest that such periods composed a large fraction of integrated time in the Turkana Basin. If correct, this interpretation has implications for human thermophysiology and implies a long-standing human association with marginal environments. PMID:20534500

  3. A High-Temperature Order-Disorder Phase Transition Coupled With Conformational Change in the Hybrid Material [C6 H13 NH]2 ⋅ZnBr4.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tariq; Asghar, Muhammad Adnan; Sun, Zhihua; Zeb, Aurang; Li, Lina; Sijie, Liu; Zhao, Sangen; Ji, Chengmin; Luo, Junhua

    2016-10-20

    A new high-temperature, hybrid, phase-transition material, 1-methylpiperidinium tetrabromozincate (1), that shows a reversible transition at 345 K was synthesized. Differential scanning calorimetry and specific heat capacity measurements confirmed this reversible transformation with a large heat hysteresis of 25 K, which describes a typical first-order phase transition in 1. The dielectric constant exhibited a steplike anomaly and showed high and low dielectric states in the high- and room-temperature phases, respectively, and therefore, this hybrid might be considered as a potential switchable dielectric material. The variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction patterns displayed remarkable shifts between the experimental patterns at the two different phases. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses at various temperatures revealed that the origin of this transformation could be attributed to disordering of the bromine atoms in the anion and the nitrogen atom of the cation. The cation also assumed a conformational change, which was likely induced by the disordered nitrogen atom. The conformational onset of the transformation of the cation from a planar conformer into a relaxed chair also occurred upon decreasing the temperature below transition point; thus, the combined order-disorder and conformational change induced the structural transformation and the change in symmetry.

  4. On-board monitoring of 2-D spatially-resolved temperatures in cylindrical lithium-ion batteries: Part I. Low-order thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert R.; Zhao, Shi; Howey, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the temperature distribution within Li-ion batteries during operation is critical for safety and control purposes. Although existing control-oriented thermal models - such as thermal equivalent circuits (TEC) - are computationally efficient, they only predict average temperatures, and are unable to predict the spatially resolved temperature distribution throughout the cell. We present a low-order 2D thermal model of a cylindrical battery based on a Chebyshev spectral-Galerkin (SG) method, capable of predicting the full temperature distribution with a similar efficiency to a TEC. The model accounts for transient heat generation, anisotropic heat conduction, and non-homogeneous convection boundary conditions. The accuracy of the model is validated through comparison with finite element simulations, which show that the 2-D temperature field (r, z) of a large format (64 mm diameter) cell can be accurately modelled with as few as 4 states. Furthermore, the performance of the model for a range of Biot numbers is investigated via frequency analysis. For larger cells or highly transient thermal dynamics, the model order can be increased for improved accuracy. The incorporation of this model in a state estimation scheme with experimental validation against thermocouple measurements is presented in the companion contribution (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775316308163).

  5. Vortex redistribution below the first-order transition temperature in the beta-pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6.

    PubMed

    Shibauchi, T; Konczykowski, M; van der Beek, C J; Okazaki, R; Matsuda, Y; Yamaura, J; Nagao, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2007-12-21

    A miniature Hall-sensor array was used to detect magnetic induction locally in the vortex states of the beta-pyrochlore superconductor KOs2O6. Below the first-order transition at T{p} approximately 8 K, which is associated with a change in the rattling motion of K ions, the lower critical field and the remanent magnetization both show a distinct decrease, suggesting that the electron-phonon coupling is weakened below the transition. At high magnetic fields, the local induction shows an unexpectedly large jump at T{p} whose sign changes with position inside the sample. Our results demonstrate a novel redistribution of vortices whose energy is reduced abruptly below the first-order transition at T{p}.

  6. Interplay between microstructure and magnetism in NiO nanoparticles: breakdown of the antiferromagnetic order.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi-Montes, N; Gorria, P; Martínez-Blanco, D; Fuertes, A B; Fernández Barquín, L; Rodríguez Fernández, J; de Pedro, I; Fdez-Gubieda, M L; Alonso, J; Olivi, L; Aquilanti, G; Blanco, J A

    2014-01-07

    The possibility of tuning the magnetic behaviour of nanostructured 3d transition metal oxides has opened up the path for extensive research activity in the nanoscale world. In this work we report on how the antiferromagnetism of a bulk material can be broken when reducing its size under a given threshold. We combined X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure and magnetic measurements in order to describe the influence of the microstructure and morphology on the magnetic behaviour of NiO nanoparticles (NPs) with sizes ranging from 2.5 to 9 nm. The present findings reveal that size effects induce surface spin frustration which competes with the expected antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, typical of bulk NiO, giving rise to a threshold size for the AFM phase to nucleate. Ni(2+) magnetic moments in 2.5 nm NPs seem to be in a spin glass (SG) state, whereas larger NPs are formed by an uncompensated AFM core with a net magnetic moment surrounded by a SG shell. The coupling at the core-shell interface leads to an exchange bias effect manifested at low temperature as horizontal shifts of the hysteresis loop (~1 kOe) and a coercivity enhancement (~0.2 kOe).

  7. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  8. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  9. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  10. Near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity associated with magnetic ordering in antiperovskite Mn3+xNi1-xN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sihao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Lei; Wu, Hui; Shi, Kewen; Hu, Pengwei; Huang, Qingzhen; Wang, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity (NZ-TCR) behavior is reported in the antiperovskite compounds Mn3+xNi1-xN (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.333). Our results indicate that the broad temperature range (above 275 K extending to above 220 K) of NZ-TCR is obtained by Mn doping at the Ni site. The short-range magnetic ordering is revealed by both neutron powder diffraction and inverse magnetic susceptibility. Further, we find a strong correlation between the anomalous resistivity change of Mn3+xNi1-xN from the metal-like to the NZ-TCR behavior and the lack of the long-range magnetic ordering. The possible mechanism of NZ-TCR behavior is discussed using the spin-disorder scattering model.

  11. Near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity associated with magnetic ordering in antiperovskite Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Sihao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Lei; Shi, Kewen; Hu, Pengwei; Wang, Cong; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qingzhen

    2016-01-25

    The near-zero temperature coefficient of resistivity (NZ-TCR) behavior is reported in the antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.333). Our results indicate that the broad temperature range (above 275 K extending to above 220 K) of NZ-TCR is obtained by Mn doping at the Ni site. The short-range magnetic ordering is revealed by both neutron powder diffraction and inverse magnetic susceptibility. Further, we find a strong correlation between the anomalous resistivity change of Mn{sub 3+x}Ni{sub 1−x}N from the metal-like to the NZ-TCR behavior and the lack of the long-range magnetic ordering. The possible mechanism of NZ-TCR behavior is discussed using the spin-disorder scattering model.

  12. Investigation of multiferroicity, spin-phonon coupling, and unusual magnetic ordering close to room temperature in LuMn0.5Fe0.5O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Tanushree; Manna, Kaustuv; Elizabeth, Suja; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2017-02-01

    We report the detailed experimental characteristics of LuMn0.5Fe0.5O3 synthesized by the wet chemical method and proclaim it as a new member of the multiferroic family. The compound stabilizes in P63cm crystal symmetry. It exhibits a spin re-orientation transition at TSR and an antiferromagnetic transition at TN. In addition, our magnetization vs. temperature data reveals an extra broad maximum close to room temperature; unseen in earlier studies. By invoking the compatible nature of the magnetic exchange path in P63cm symmetry, we have argued that the origin lies in the intraplane short-range spin ordering. Heat capacity is measured and analysed to elucidate the magnetic entropy. Though long-range antiferromagnetic ordering vanishes at TN ˜ 103 K, we find the experimental magnetic entropy calculated till 200 K is less by a significant amount from the value of theoretical spin randomization magnetic entropy; further supporting the existence of spin ordering beyond TN and even above 200 K. While the specific heat data and phonon modes of Raman spectra show a signature of spin-phonon coupling at TSR and TN both, dielectric anomaly indicating a magnetoelectric effect is seen only at TN. Piezoresponse force microscopy and ferroelectric hysteresis loop measurement confirm the room-temperature weak ferroelectricity with a saturation polarization value 0.007 μC/cm2 and low coercive field. Furthermore high-temperature dielectric characteristics reveal the ferroelectric transition at around 900 K and exhibit Maxwell-Wagner type relaxation. The present work serves as a bridge between h-RMnO3 and rare earth ferrite RFeO3. It assumes significance in the light of recent research developments in hexagonal RFeO3 (mainly h-LuFeO3) in the context of room-temperature multiferroicity and magnetoelectricity.

  13. Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared studies of poly(L-lactic acid) in different states of order: A 2DCOS and PCMW2D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pudun; Unger, Miriam; Pfeifer, Frank; Siesler, Heinz W.

    2016-11-01

    Variable-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra of a predominantly amorphous and a semi-crystalline poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) film were measured between 30 °C and 170 °C in order to investigate their temperature-dependent structural changes as a function of the initial state of order. For an in-depth analysis of the spectral variations in the carbonyl stretching band region (1803-1722 cm-1) two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and perturbation-correlation moving-window two-dimensional (PCMW2D) analyses were applied. Significant spectral changes were observed during heating of the amorphous PLLA sample whereas the semi-crystalline specimen showed only slight band shifts as a function of the external perturbation. The PCMW2D results suggested that for efficient 2DCOS analyses the heating process should be split up in two temperature intervals. These analyses then provided information on the recrystallization of the amorphous regions, the presence of an intermediate state of order and a sequence scenario for the observed spectral changes.

  14. Supramolecular self-assembly of linear oligosilsesquioxanes on mica--AFM surface imaging and hydrophilicity studies.

    PubMed

    Kowalewska, Anna; Nowacka, Maria; Tracz, Adam; Makowski, Tomasz

    2015-06-28

    Linear oligomeric [2-(carboxymethylthio)ethylsilsesquioxanes] (LPSQ-COOH) adsorb spontaneously on muscovite mica and form smooth, well-ordered lamellar structures at the liquid-solid interface. Side carboxylic groups, having donor-acceptor character with regard to hydrogen bonds, are engaged both in multipoint molecule-to-substrate interactions and intermolecular cross-linking. The unique arrangement of silsesquioxane macromolecules, with COOH groups situated at the interface with air, produces highly hydrophilic surfaces of good thermal and solvolytic stability. Supramolecular assemblies of LPSQ-COOH were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy. Comparative height profile analysis combined with ATR-FTIR studies of the spectral regions characteristic of carboxylic groups and C1s core level envelope by XPS confirmed specific interactions between LPSQ-COOH and mica.

  15. UV laser ablation of intraocular lenses: SEM and AFM microscopy examination of the biomaterial surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Asproudis, I.; Tsoutsi, D.; Bacharis, C.; Moutsouris, K.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Several new materials and patterns are studied for the formation and etching of intraocular lenses (IOLs), in order to improve their optical properties, to reduce the diffractive aberrations and to decrease the incidence of posterior capsular opacification. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of UV ( λ = 266 nm) laser pulses to ablate the intraocular lenses materials, and thus to provide an alternative to conventional surface shaping techniques for IOLs fabrication. Ablation experiments were conducted using various polymer substrates of hydrophobic acrylic IOLs and PMMA IOLs. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the morphology of the ablated area by imaging the surface modification with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological appearance of IOL samples reveals the effect of a photochemical and photothermal ablation mechanism.

  16. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-02

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions.

  17. Intrinsically High-Q Dynamic AFM Imaging in Liquid with a Significantly Extended Needle Tip

    PubMed Central

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially-available tapping mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operation frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic materials properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments. PMID:22595833

  18. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification.

    PubMed

    Lassnig, R; Hollerer, M; Striedinger, B; Fian, A; Stadlober, B; Winkler, A

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p(++)-silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3-4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact-channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility.

  19. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification

    PubMed Central

    Lassnig, R.; Hollerer, M.; Striedinger, B.; Fian, A.; Stadlober, B.; Winkler, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p++-silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3–4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact–channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility. PMID:26543442

  20. An AFM study of calcite dissolution in concentrated electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2009-04-01

    Calcite-solution interactions are of a paramount importance in a range of processes such as the removal of heavy metals, carbon dioxide sequestration, landscape modeling, weathering of building stone and biomineralization. Water in contact with minerals often carries significant amounts of solutes; additionally, their concentration may vary due to evaporation and condensation. It is well known that calcite dissolution is affected dramatically by the presence of such solutes. Here we present investigations on the dissolution of calcite in the presence of different electrolytes. Both bulk (batch reactors) experiments and nanoscale (in situ AFM) techniques are used to study the dissolution of calcite in a range of solutions containing alkaly cations balanced by halide anions. Previous works have indicated that the ionic strength has little influence in calcite dissolution rates measured from bulk experiments (Pokrovsky et al. 2005; Glendhill and Morse, 2004). Contrary to these results, our quantitative analyses of AFM observations show an enhancement of the calcite dissolution rate with increasing electrolyte concentration. Such an effect is concentration-dependent and it is most evident in concentrated solutions. AFM experiments have been carried out in a fluid cell using calcite cleavage surfaces in contact with solutions of simple salts of the alkaly metals and halides at different undersaturations with respect to calcite to try to specify the effect of the ionic strength on etch pit spreading rate and calcite dissolution rate. These results show that the presence of soluble salts may critically affect the weathering of carbonate rocks in nature as well as the decay of carbonate stone in built cultural heritage. References: Pokrosky, O.S.; Golubev, S.V.; Schott, J. Dissolution kinetics of calcite, dolomite and magnesite at 25°C and 0 to 50 atm pCO2. Chemical Geology, 2005, 217 (3-4) 239-255. Glendhill, D.K.; Morse, J.W. Dissolution kinetics of calcite in Na

  1. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  2. Fast fabrication of self-ordered anodic porous alumina on oriented aluminum grains by high acid concentration and high temperature anodization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuan; Ngan, Alfonso H W

    2013-05-31

    Anodic porous alumina, which exhibits a characteristic nanohoneycomb structure, has been used in a wide range of nanotechnology applications. The conventional fabrication method of mild anodization (MA) requires a prolonged anodization time which is impractical for batch processing, and self-ordered porous structures can only be formed within narrow processing windows so that the dimensions of the resultant structures are extremely limited. The alternative hard anodization (HA) may easily result in macroscopic defects on the alumina surface. In this work, by systematically varying the anodization conditions including the substrate grain orientation, electrolyte concentration, temperature, voltage, and time, a new oxalic acid based anodization method, called high acid concentration and high temperature anodization (HHA), is found, which can result in far better self-ordering of the porous structures at rates 7-26 times faster than MA, under a continuous voltage range of 30-60 V on (001) oriented Al grains. Unlike HA, no macroscopic defects appear under the optimum self-ordered conditions of HHA at 40 V, even for pore channels grown up to high aspect ratios of more than 3000. Compared to MA and HA, HHA provides more choices of self-ordered nano-porous structures with fast and mechanically stable formation features for practical applications.

  3. Uniaxial pressure effect on the magnetic ordered moment and transition temperatures in BaFe2 -xTxAs2 (T =Co,Ni )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, David W.; Song, Yu; Man, Haoran; Cheung, Sky C.; Yin, Zhiping; Lu, Xingye; Wang, Weiyi; Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Liu, Lian; Gong, Zizhou; Ito, Takashi U.; Cai, Yipeng; Wilson, Murray N.; Guo, Shengli; Koshiishi, Keisuke; Tian, Wei; Hitti, Bassam; Ivanov, Alexandre; Zhao, Yang; Lynn, Jeffrey W.; Luke, Graeme M.; Berlijn, Tom; Maier, Thomas A.; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Dai, Pengcheng

    2017-02-01

    We use neutron diffraction and muon spin relaxation to study the effect of in-plane uniaxial pressure on the antiferromagnetic (AF) orthorhombic phase in BaFe2As2 and its Co- and Ni-substituted members near optimal superconductivity. In the low-temperature AF ordered state, uniaxial pressure necessary to detwin the orthorhombic crystals also increases the magnetic ordered moment, reaching an 11% increase under 40 MPa for BaFe1.9Co0.1As2 , and a 15% increase for BaFe1.915Ni0.085As2 . We also observe an increase of the AF ordering temperature (TN) of about 0.25 K/MPa in all compounds, consistent with density functional theory calculations that reveal better Fermi surface nesting for itinerant electrons under uniaxial pressure. The doping dependence of the magnetic ordered moment is captured by combining dynamical mean field theory with density functional theory, suggesting that the pressure-induced moment increase near optimal superconductivity is closely related to quantum fluctuations and the nearby electronic nematic phase.

  4. A high-order numerical method to study hypersonic boundary-layer instability including high-temperature gas effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2011-08-01

    Prediction of laminar-turbulent transition is a key factor in the design of the heat shield of vehicles (re-)entering a planetary atmosphere. To investigate the transition by means of numerical simulation, accurate and efficient computational methods are necessary. Here, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for a gas where properties such as specific heat, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and specific gas constant depend on one or two thermodynamic variables. Our approach models a mixture of perfect gases in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The gas properties are provided either by means of direct calls to a library based on statistical mechanics and kinetic theory or indirectly in the form of look-up tables. In the first part of the paper, our method of handling a high-temperature gas in thermochemical equilibrium is described and verified. In the second part, the method is applied to the investigation of linear and non-linear boundary-layer instability. We carry out numerical simulations for a laminar flat-plate boundary layer at Mach 10 with a small, convectively amplified perturbation for both Earth and Martian atmospheres. Amplification of the perturbations shows favorable agreement with results obtained from linear theory. The secondary instability of the boundary layer in the presence of a large-amplitude two-dimensional wave is investigated. We observe that the non-linear mechanism of fundamental resonance becomes active and leads to a strong increase in amplification of three-dimensional disturbance waves.

  5. Dispersion and Fixation of Adeno-Associated Virus with Glutaraldehyde for Afm Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Xinyan; Yang, Haijun; Lü, Junhong

    Sample preparation is an important procedure for atomic force microscope (AFM) studies. However, flexible virus particles have a tendency to aggregate together and are easily compressed during sample preparation or by AFM tip that subsequently hamper studying of virus by AFM. Herein, low concentration chemical reagent of glutaraldehyde (2%, v/v) is pre-mixed in virus suspension that facilitates the dispersion and observation of recombinant serotype 2 adeno-associated virus particles deposited on mica surface with little deformation.

  6. Acquisition of a Modular, Multi-laser, Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-28

    vapor deposition on copper foils. The four lasers range from the blue to 785 nm and provides a unique handle to determine excitation dependence of...Acquisition of a Modular, Multi- laser , Raman- AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research A four- laser , confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning... laser , Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research Report Title A four- laser , confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning microscope (Raman-AFM

  7. Predicting the size- and shape-dependent cohesive energy and order-disorder transition temperature of Co-Pt nanoparticles by embedded-atom-method potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenze; Qi, Weihong; Ouyang, Bin; Wang, Xing; Huang, Baiyun

    2013-02-01

    The cohesive energy (CE) of CoPt nanoparticles (NPs) with different sizes and shapes have been calculated by embedded-atom-method (EAM) potential. It is shown that CE of NPs with order or disorder structures decreases with the decrease of particle size, while the shape effects become obvious only at small size. The CE difference per atom between order and disorder structures decreases with the decrease of particle size, indicating that the possibility of order-disorder transition in small size becomes larger compared with these in large size. Significantly, the CE difference varies in proportion to order-disorder transition temperature (T(c)), which suggests that one can predict order-disorder transition of NPs by calculation the cohesive energy. The present calculated T(c) of CoPt NPs is consistent with recent experiments, simulation and theoretical predictions, and the method can also be applied to study the order-disorder transition of FePt, FePd, and so on.

  8. Formation of sensor array on the AFM chip surface by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumov, I. D.; Kanashenko, S. L.; Ziborov, V. S.; Ivanov, Yu D.; Archakov, A. I.; Pleshakova, T. O.

    2017-01-01

    Development of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanotechnological approaches to highly sensitive detection of proteins is a perspective direction in biomedical research. These approaches use AFM chips to concentrate the target proteins from the test solution volume (buffer solution, diluted biological fluid) onto the chip surface for their subsequent registration on the chip surface by AFM. Atomic force microscope is a molecular detector that enables protein detection at ultra-low (subfemtomolar) concentrations in single-molecule counting mode. Due to extremely high sensitivity of AFM, its application for multiplexed protein detection is of great interest for use in proteomics and diagnostic applications. In this study, AFM chips containing an array of sensor areas have been fabricated. Magnetron sputtering of chromium and tungsten nanolayers has been used to form optically visible metallic marks on the AFM chip surface to provide necessary precision of AFM probe positioning against each sensor area for scanning. It has been demonstrated that the marks formed by magnetron sputtering of Cr and W are stable on the surface of the AFM chips during the following activation and intensive washing of this surface. The results obtained in our present study allow application of the developed chips for multiplexed protein analysis by AFM.

  9. Bubble colloidal AFM probes formed from ultrasonically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Lee, Judy; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a simple and effective experimental approach to measuring the interaction forces between two small bubbles (approximately 80-140 microm) in aqueous solution during controlled collisions on the scale of micrometers to nanometers. The colloidal probe technique using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was extended to measure interaction forces between a cantilever-attached bubble and surface-attached bubbles of various sizes. By using an ultrasonic source, we generated numerous small bubbles on a mildly hydrophobic surface of a glass slide. A single bubble picked up with a strongly hydrophobized V-shaped cantilever was used as the colloidal probe. Sample force measurements were used to evaluate the pure water bubble cleanliness and the general consistency of the measurements.

  10. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-05

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits.

  11. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure. PMID:20672104

  12. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuan Yuan; Ding, Gu Qiao; Ding, Jian Ning; Yuan, Ning Yi

    2010-04-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure.

  13. SPR and AFM study of engineered biomolecule immobilisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ian; McLaughlin, James A

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study into two novel and diverse schemes designed to improve immobilization of biomolecules for biosensing purposes is presented. In the first method a silicon rich matrix is created using PECVD. The second method involves creating nano-patterns on the sensor surface to create a large number of surface discontinuities to which the proteins will bind preferentially. The basic theory of SPR is provided to show the importance of the surface sensitive nature of this optical transduction technique. The present work suggests that both may prove both for SPR and other biosensing applications. Of the two schemes proposed, the results for nano-patterning seem to suggest that it is promoting better surface attachment of biomolecules. The results of SPR and AFM studies are presented that have shown that each of these schemes promotes improved binding of various proteins.

  14. Profiles of second- to fourth-order moments of turbulent temperature fluctuations in the convective boundary layer: first measurements with rotational Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.; Hammann, E.; Muppa, S. K.; Pal, S.

    2015-05-01

    The rotational Raman lidar (RRL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) measures atmospheric temperature profiles with high resolution (10 s, 109 m). The data contain low-noise errors even in daytime due to the use of strong UV laser light (355 nm, 10 W, 50 Hz) and a very efficient interference-filter-based polychromator. In this paper, the first profiling of the second- to fourth-order moments of turbulent temperature fluctuations is presented. Furthermore, skewness profiles and kurtosis profiles in the convective planetary boundary layer (CBL) including the interfacial layer (IL) are discussed. The results demonstrate that the UHOH RRL resolves the vertical structure of these moments. The data set which is used for this case study was collected in western Germany (50°53'50.56'' N, 6°27'50.39'' E; 110 m a.s.l.) on 24 April 2013 during the Intensive Observations Period (IOP) 6 of the HD(CP)2 (High-Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). We used the data between 11:00 and 12:00 UTC corresponding to 1 h around local noon (the highest position of the Sun was at 11:33 UTC). First, we investigated profiles of the total noise error of the temperature measurements and compared them with estimates of the temperature measurement uncertainty due to shot noise derived with Poisson statistics. The comparison confirms that the major contribution to the total statistical uncertainty of the temperature measurements originates from shot noise. The total statistical uncertainty of a 20 min temperature measurement is lower than 0.1 K up to 1050 m a.g.l. (above ground level) at noontime; even for single 10 s temperature profiles, it is smaller than 1 K up to 1020 m a.g.l. Autocovariance and spectral analyses of the atmospheric temperature fluctuations confirm that a temporal resolution of 10 s was sufficient to resolve the turbulence down to the inertial subrange. This is also indicated by the integral scale of

  15. In-plane information from tapping mode AFM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Matthew

    2003-03-01

    Phase contrast in intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy is shown to reveal in-plane structural and mechanical properties of poly(diacetylene) monolayer films. This is surprising because measurements of in-plane properties typically require a contact mode of microscopy. Such measurements are possible because the tilt in the oscillating cantilever provides components of motion not just perpendicular to the surface, but also parallel to the sample surface. Lateral tip displacement is virtually universal in AFM, implying that any oscillating tip-AFM technique is sensitive to in-plane material properties. Although the tilt in the cantilever is small ( 10^o) it produces a component of motion that is 20% of the total tip displacement, and this motion accounts for 5-10% of dissipated energy through the tip-sample interaction[1]. The data is used in conjunction with a numerical model to extract in-plane material parameters. The effect of the cantilever tilt on phase measurements is directly verified through measurements on silicon samples tilted at a variety of angles with respect to the cantilever. The lateral tip displacement we make use of allows measurements of in-plane properties of soft samples such as polymer and biological samples. This work was done in collaboration with M. D'Amato, R.W. Carpick, and M.A. Eriksson, and was supported by the NSF CAREER and MRSEC programs and the Research Corporation. 1. M.S. Marcus, R.W. Carpick, D.Y. Sasaki, M.A. Eriksson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 226103 (2002)

  16. An improved measurement of dsDNA elasticity using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Lee, Sang-Myung; Na, Kyounghwan; Yang, Sungwook; Kim, Jinseok; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2010-02-01

    The mechanical properties of a small fragment (30 bp) of an individual double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) in water have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have stretched three systems including ssDNA, double-fixed dsDNA (one strand of the dsDNA molecules was biotinylated at the 3'-end and thiolated at the 5'-end, this was reversed for the other complementary strand) and single-fixed dsDNA (one strand of the dsDNA molecules was biotinylated at the 3'-end and thiolated at the 5'-end, whereas the other complementary strand was biotinylated at only the 5'-end). The achieved thiolation and biotinylation were to bind ds- or ssDNA to the gold surface and streptavidin-coated AFM tip, respectively. Analysis of the force versus displacement (F-D) curves from tip-DNA-substrate systems shows that the pull-off length (Lo) and stretch length (δ) from the double-fixed system were shorter than those observed in the ssDNA and the single-fixed system. The obtained stretch force (Fst) from the single-fixed dsDNA was much greater than that from the ssDNA even though it was about 10 pN greater than the one obtained in the double-fixed system. As a result, the Young's modulus of the double-fixed dsDNA was greater than that of the single-fixed dsDNA and the ssDNA. A more reliable stiffness of the dsDNA was observed via the double-fixed system, since there is no effect of the unpaired molecules during stretching, which always occurred in the single-fixed system. The unpaired molecules were also observed by comparing the stiffness of ssDNA and single-fixed dsDNA in which the end of one strand was left free.

  17. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions.

  18. Exploring connections between statistical mechanics and Green's functions for realistic systems: Temperature dependent electronic entropy and internal energy from a self-consistent second-order Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welden, Alicia Rae; Rusakov, Alexander A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-11-01

    Including finite-temperature effects from the electronic degrees of freedom in electronic structure calculations of semiconductors and metals is desired; however, in practice it remains exceedingly difficult when using zero-temperature methods, since these methods require an explicit evaluation of multiple excited states in order to account for any finite-temperature effects. Using a Matsubara Green's function formalism remains a viable alternative, since in this formalism it is easier to include thermal effects and to connect the dynamic quantities such as the self-energy with static thermodynamic quantities such as the Helmholtz energy, entropy, and internal energy. However, despite the promising properties of this formalism, little is known about the multiple solutions of the non-linear equations present in the self-consistent Matsubara formalism and only a few cases involving a full Coulomb Hamiltonian were investigated in the past. Here, to shed some light onto the iterative nature of the Green's function solutions, we self-consistently evaluate the thermodynamic quantities for a one-dimensional (1D) hydrogen solid at various interatomic separations and temperatures using the self-energy approximated to second-order (GF2). At many points in the phase diagram of this system, multiple phases such as a metal and an insulator exist, and we are able to determine the most stable phase from the analysis of Helmholtz energies. Additionally, we show the evolution of the spectrum of 1D boron nitride to demonstrate that GF2 is capable of qualitatively describing the temperature effects influencing the size of the band gap.

  19. Elastic modulus measurements at variable temperature: Validation of atomic force microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Marco; Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The development of polymer-based nanocomposites to be used in critical thermal environments requires the characterization of their mechanical properties, which are related to their chemical composition, size, morphology and operating temperature. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been proven to be a useful tool to develop techniques for the mechanical characterization of these materials, thanks to its nanometer lateral resolution and to the capability of exerting ultra-low loads, down to the piconewton range. In this work, we demonstrate two techniques, one quasi-static, i.e., AFM-based indentation (I-AFM), and one dynamic, i.e., contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM), for the mechanical characterization of compliant materials at variable temperature. A cross-validation of I-AFM and CR-AFM has been performed by comparing the results obtained on two reference materials, i.e., low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polycarbonate (PC), which demonstrated the accuracy of the techniques.

  20. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  1. A Model for Step Height, Edge Slope and Linewidth Measurements Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Fu, Joseph; Song, John; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2003-09-01

    Nano-scale linewidth measurements are performed in semiconductor manufacturing and in the data storage industry and will become increasingly important in micro-mechanical engineering. With the development of manufacturing technology in recent years, the sizes of linewidths are steadily shrinking and are in the range of hundreds of nanometers. As a result, it is difficult to achieve accurate measurement results for nanometer scale linewidth, primarily because of the interaction volume of electrons in materials for an SEM probe or the tip size of an AFM probe. However, another source of methods divergence is the mathematical model of the line itself. In order to reduce the methods divergences caused by different measurement methods and instruments for an accurate determination of nanometer scale linewidth parameters, a metrological model and algorithm are proposed for linewidth measurements with AFM. The line profile is divided into 5 parts with 19 sections and 20 key derived points. Each section is fitted by a least squares straight line, so that the profile can be represented by a set of straight lines and 6 special points, or by a 20×2 matrix of fitted points and a 6×2 matrix of starter points. According to the algorithm, WT and WTF, WM and WMF, WB and WBF represent the widths at the top, the middle and the bottom of the line profile before and after the least squares fitting, respectively. AL and AR represent the left and right sidewall angles, and H represents the step height of the line profile. Based on this algorithm, software has been developed using MATLAB for the calculation of width and height parameters of the line profile. A NIST nanometer scale linewidth artifact developed at NIST's Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory (EEEL) was measured using a commercial AFM with nanotube tips. The measured linewidth profiles are analyzed using our model, algorithm and software. The model developed in this paper is straightforward to understand, and

  2. Important property of polymer spheres for the preparation of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) metal oxides by the ethylene glycol method: the glass-transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Sadakane, Masahiro; Sasaki, Keisuke; Nakamura, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ninomiya, Wataru; Ueda, Wataru

    2012-12-21

    We demonstrate that the glass-transition temperature (T(g)) of a polymer sphere template is a crucial factor in the production of three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) materials. Metal nitrate dissolved in ethylene glycol-methanol was infiltrated into the void of a face-centered, close-packed colloidal crystal of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based spheres. The metal nitrate reacts with EG to form a metal oxalate (or metal glycoxylate) solid (nitrate oxidation) in the void of the template when the metal nitrate-EG-PMMA composite is heated. Further heating converts metal oxalate to metal oxide and removes PMMA to form 3DOM materials. We investigated the effect of T(g) of PMMA templates and obtained clear evidence that the solidification temperature of the metal precursor solution (i.e., nitration oxidation temperature) should be lower than the T(g) of the polymer spheres to obtain a well-ordered 3DOM structure.

  3. Spontaneous bidirectional ordering of CH3NH3+ in lead iodide perovskites at room temperature: The origins of the tetragonal phase

    PubMed Central

    Deretzis, Ioannis; Di Mauro, Bruno N.; Alberti, Alessandra; Pellegrino, Giovanna; Smecca, Emanuele; La Magna, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    CH3NH3PbI3 is a hybrid organic-inorganic material with a perovskite structure and a temperature-dependent polymorphism whose origins are still unclear. Here we perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the structural properties and atom dynamics of CH3NH3PbI3 at room temperature. Starting from different initial configurations, we find that a single-crystalline system undergoes a spontaneous ordering process which brings the ions to alternately point towards the center of two out of the six faces of the cubic framework, i.e. towards the 〈100〉 and 〈010〉 directions. This bidirectional ordering gives rise to a preferential distortion of the inorganic lattice on the a-b plane, shaping the observed tetragonal symmetry of the system. The process requires tens of picoseconds for CH3NH3PbI3 supercells with just eight ions. PMID:27079383

  4. 3D simulation of AFM non-uniform piezoelectric micro-cantilever with various geometries subjected to the tip-sample forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Alireza Habibnejad; Abdi, Moein

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful instrument for investigation of surface topography at different workspaces. It is important to understand the dynamic behavior of AFM to improve its performance. 3D numerical method is suitable in order to simulate experimental conditions. This paper has investigated modeling and dynamic simulation of rectangular, Dagger and V-shaped geometries of AFM piezoelectric micro-cantilever (MC) with two electrode layers in the air environment. For a better understanding of the system dynamic, multi-layer MC dynamic equation has been derived. Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been used for modeling the AFM cantilever. Hamilton's principle has been used for the MC modeling and the finite element method (FEM) has been applied for its discretization. In 3D, with respect to the tip-sample forces piezoelectric MC has been simulated via the COMSOL software. The frequency and time responses have been also investigated. The topographies have been performed on different surfaces with various roughness's types in the tapping and non-contact mode. The results of these two methods have been compared with experimental results. Moreover, the effects of MC geometrical parameters on surfaces topography and frequency responses have been studied and optimal dimensions of topographies have been obtained for each of the beam geometries. Simulations of various tip geometries have been performed in order to examine the effects of tip dimensions on the frequency and time responses. Furthermore, the effect of tip displacement on the frequency response has been investigated for different MC lengths.

  5. Measurement of a CD and sidewall angle artifact with two-dimensional CD AFM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Sullivan, Neal T.; Schneir, Jason; McWaid, Thomas H.; Tsai, Vincent W.; Prochazka, Jerry; Young, Michael

    1996-05-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of SEM metrology in semiconductor manufacturing, there is no SEM CD standard currently available. Producing such a standard is challenging because SEM CD measurements are not only a function of the linewidth, but also dependent on the line material, sidewall roughness, sidewall angle, line height, substrate material, and the proximity of other objects. As the presence of AFM metrology in semiconductor manufacturing increases, the history of SEM CD metrology raises a number of questions about the prospect of AFM CD artifacts. Is an AFM CD artifact possible? What role would it play in the manufacturing environment? Although AFM has some important advantages over SEM, such as relative insensitivity to material differences, the throughput and reliability of most AFM instruments is not yet at the level necessary to support in-line CD metrology requirements. What, then, is the most useful relationship between AFM and SEM metrology? As a means of addressing some of these questions, we have measured the CD and sidewall angle of 1.2 micrometer oxy-nitride line on Si using three different techniques: optical microscopy (with modeling), AFM, and cross sectional TEM. Systematic errors in the AFM angle measurements were reduced by using a rotational averaging technique that we describe. We found good agreement with uncertainties below 30 nm (2 sigma) for the CD measurement and 1.0 degrees (2 sigma) for the sidewall angles. Based upon these results we suggest a measurement procedure which will yield useful AFM CD artifacts. We consider the possibility that AFMs, especially when used with suitable CD artifacts, can effectively support SEM CD metrology. This synergistic relationship between the AFM and SEM represents an emerging paradigm that has also been suggested by a number of others.

  6. BOREAS AFM-1 NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ Aircraft Flux data Over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Timothy L.; Baldocchi, Dennis; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Gunter, Laureen; Dumas, Ed; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This data set contains measurements from the Airborne Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-1 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration/Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (NOAA/ATDD) Long-EZ Aircraft collected during the 1994 Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) at the southern study area (SSA). These measurements were made from various instruments mounted on the aircraft. The data that were collected include aircraft altitude, wind direction, wind speed, air temperature, potential temperature, water mixing ratio, U and V components of wind velocity, static pressure, surface radiative temperature, downwelling and upwelling total radiation, downwelling and upwelling longwave radiation, net radiation, downwelling and upwelling photosynthectically active radiation (PAR), greenness index, CO2 concentration, O3 concentration, and CH4 concentration. There are also various columns that indicate the standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and trend of some of these data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NOAA/ATDD Long-EZ aircraft flux data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. Adaptation to low body temperature influences pulmonary surfactant composition thereby increasing fluidity while maintaining appropriately ordered membrane structure and surface activity.

    PubMed

    Suri, Lakshmi N M; McCaig, Lynda; Picardi, Maria V; Ospina, Olga L; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Staples, James F; Possmayer, Fred; Yao, Li-Juan; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Orgeig, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    The interfacial surface tension of the lung is regulated by phospholipid-rich pulmonary surfactant films. Small changes in temperature affect surfactant structure and function in vitro. We compared the compositional, thermodynamic and functional properties of surfactant from hibernating and summer-active 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) with porcine surfactant to understand structure-function relationships in surfactant membranes and films. Hibernating squirrels had more surfactant large aggregates with more fluid monounsaturated molecular species than summer-active animals. The latter had more unsaturated species than porcine surfactant. Cold-adapted surfactant membranes displayed gel-to-fluid transitions at lower phase transition temperatures with reduced enthalpy. Both hibernating and summer-active squirrel surfactants exhibited lower enthalpy than porcine surfactant. LAURDAN fluorescence and DPH anisotropy revealed that surfactant bilayers from both groups of squirrels possessed similar ordered phase characteristics at low temperatures. While ground squirrel surfactants functioned well during dynamic cycling at 3, 25, and 37 degrees C, porcine surfactant demonstrated poorer activity at 3 degrees C but was superior at 37 degrees C. Consequently the surfactant composition of ground squirrels confers a greater thermal flexibility relative to homeothermic mammals, while retaining tight lipid packing at low body temperatures. This may represent the most critical feature contributing to sustained stability of the respiratory interface at low lung volumes. Thus, while less effective than porcine surfactant at 37 degrees C, summer-active surfactant functions adequately at both 37 degrees C and 3 degrees C allowing these animals to enter hibernation. Here further compositional alterations occur which improve function at low temperatures by maintaining adequate stability at low lung volumes and when temperature increases during arousal from

  8. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    PubMed

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes.

  9. Temperature-driven disorder-order transitions in 2D copper-intercalated MoO3 revealed using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Bryan W.; Chung, Frank R.; Wang, Mengjing; LaGrange, Thomas; Koski, Kristie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate two different classes of disorder-order phase transitions in two-dimensional layered nanomaterial MoO3 intercalated with ˜9-15 atomic percent zero-valent copper using conventional in situ electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Heating to ˜325 °C on a time scale of minutes produces a superlattice consistent with the formation of a charge density wave stabilized by nanometer-scale ordering of the copper intercalant. Unlike conventional purely electronic charge-density-wave states which form, reform, and disappear on picosecond scales as the temperature is changed, once it forms the observed structure in Cu-MoO3 is stable indefinitely over a very large temperature range (30 °C to the decomposition temperature of 450 °C). Nanosecond-scale heating to ˜380-400 °C produced a completely different structure, replacing the disordered as-fabricated Cu-MoO3 with a much more crystallographically ordered metastable state that, according to a precession electron diffraction reconstruction, resembles the original MoO3 lattice apart from an asymmetric distortion that appears to expand parts of the van der Waals gaps to accommodate the copper intercalant. Control experiments in Cu-free material exhibited neither transformation, thus it appears the copper is a necessary part of the phase dynamics. This work shows how the combination of high-density metal atom intercalation and heat treatment over a wide range of time scales can produce nanomaterials of high crystalline quality in unique structural states that cannot be accessed through other methods.

  10. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  11. Microstructures and room temperature ferromagnetism of ordered porous ZrO2 thin films sputter deposited onto porous anodic alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ru-shuai; Qi, Li-qian; Liu, Li-hu; Xu, Qin; Guo, Ge-Xin; Sun, Hui-yuan

    2017-04-01

    Ordered porous ZrO2 films with pore diameters in the 5-45 nm range have been prepared on porous anodic alumina substrates using DC-reactive magnetron sputtering of pure Zr targets. A saturation magnetization (MS) value as high as 119 emu/cm3 was obtained for the ZrO2 film with pores of 45 nm in diameter when the external field was perpendicular to the film surface. The significant out-of-plane saturation magnetization is associated with the porous structure of the film. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the origin of the room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is closely related to the ordered porous structure and the single charged oxygen vacancies of the films. These findings suggest that porous ZrO2 films are promising to be applied to the spin electronic devices.

  12. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-25

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  13. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  14. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  15. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 5. Nursing Track: Abstracts and Presentations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    will include hematocrit, hemoglobin , mean corpuscle volume, iron , total iron binding capacity, Ferritin , and soluble transferring receptor. The...Iraq/Afghanistan ........ 2  Iron Status of Deployed Military Members...2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 5 Nursing 8 Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 5 Nursing 9 Iron

  16. Atomic long-range order effects on Curie temperature and adiabatic spin-wave dynamics in strained Fe-Co alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönecker, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqing; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2016-08-01

    The strained Fe-Co alloy in body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure has raised considerable interest due to its giant uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy. On the basis of the classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with ab initio interatomic exchange interactions, we perform a theoretical study of fundamental finite temperature magnetic properties of Fe1 -xCox alloy films as a function of three variables: chemical composition 0.3 ≤x ≤0.8 , bct geometry [a ,c (a )] arising from in-plane strain and associated out-of-plane relaxation, and atomic long-range order (ALRO). The Curie temperatures TC(x ,a ) obtained from Monte Carlo simulations display a competition between a pronounced dependence on tetragonality, strong ferromagnetism in the Co-rich alloy, and the beginning instability of ferromagnetic order in the Fe-rich alloy when c /a →√{2 } . Atomic ordering enhances TC and arises mainly due to different distributions of atoms in neighboring coordination shells rather than altering exchange interactions significantly. We investigate the ordering effect on the shape of the adiabatic spin-wave spectrum for selected pairs (x ,a ) . Our results indicate that long-wavelength acoustic spin-wave excitations show dependencies on x , a , and ALRO similar to those of TC. The directional anisotropy of the spin-wave stiffness d (x ,a ) peaks in narrow ranges of composition and tetragonality. ALRO exhibits a strong effect on d for near equiconcentration Fe-Co. We also discuss our findings in the context of employing Fe-Co as perpendicular magnetic recording medium.

  17. High-temperature order-disorder transitions in the skutterudites CoGe{sub 1.5}Q{sub 1.5} (Q=S, Te)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Powell, Anthony V.; Knight, Kevin S.; Vaqueiro, Paz

    2013-02-15

    The temperature dependence of anion ordering in the skutterudites CoGe{sub 1.5}Q{sub 1.5} (Q=S, Te) has been investigated by powder neutron diffraction. Both materials adopt a rhombohedral structure at room temperature (space group R3{sup Macron} ) in which the anions are ordered trans to each other within Ge{sub 2}Q{sub 2} rings. In CoGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5}, anion ordering is preserved up to the melting point of 950 Degree-Sign C. However, rhombohedral CoGe{sub 1.5}Te{sub 1.5} undergoes a phase transition at 610 Degree-Sign C involving a change to cubic symmetry (space group Im3{sup Macron }). In the high-temperature modification, there is a statistical distribution of anions over the available sites within the Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 2} rings. The structural transition involves a reduction in the degree of distortion of the Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 2} rings which progressively transform from a rhombus to a rectangular shape. The effect of this transition on the thermoelectric properties has been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Powder neutron diffraction reveals that the skutterudite CoGe{sub 1.5}Te{sub 1.5} undergoes a phase transition at 610 Degree-Sign C, involving the disordering of the anions within the Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 2} rings. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoGe{sub 1.5}S{sub 1.5} retains an ordered skutterudite structure up to 950 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoGe{sub 1.5}Te{sub 1.5} undergoes an order-disorder phase transition at 610 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Below 610 Degree-Sign C, anions are arranged trans to each other within Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 2} rings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Above 610 Degree-Sign C, anions are statistically distributed within the Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 2} rings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of the phase transition on the thermal conductivity is discussed.

  18. Comparison of the ability of quantitative parameters to differentiate surface texture of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Bethany; Caragianis Broadbridge, Christine; DaPonte, John S.; Gherasimova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of several texture analysis parameters to differentiate textured samples from a smooth control on images obtained with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Surface roughness plays a major role in the realm of material science, especially in integrated electronic devices. As these devices become smaller and smaller, new materials with better electrical properties are needed. New materials with smoother surface morphology have been found to have superior electrical properties than their rougher counterparts. Therefore, in many cases surface texture is indicative of the electrical properties that material will have. Physical vapor deposition techniques such as Jet Vapor Deposition and Molecular Beam Epitaxy are being utilized to synthesize these materials as they have been found to create pure and uniform thin layers. For the current study, growth parameters were varied to produce a spectrum of textured samples. The focus of this study was the image processing techniques associated with quantifying surface texture. As a result of the limited sample size, there was no attempt to draw conclusions about specimen processing methods. The samples were imaged using an AFM in tapping mode. In the process of collecting images, it was discovered that roughness data was much better depicted in the microscope's "height" mode as opposed to "equal area" mode. The AFM quantified the surface texture of each image by returning RMS roughness and the first order histogram statistics of mean roughness, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis. Color images from the AFM were then processed on an off line computer running NIH ImageJ with an image texture plug in. This plug in produced another set of first order statistics computed from each images' histogram as well as second order statistics computed from each images' cooccurrence matrix. The second order statistics, which were originally proposed by Haralick, include contrast, angular

  19. Profiles of second- to third-order moments of turbulent temperature fluctuations in the convective boundary layer: first measurements with Rotational Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.; Hammann, E.; Muppa, S. K.; Pal, S.

    2014-11-01

    The rotational Raman lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) measures atmospheric temperature profiles during daytime with high resolution (10 s, 109 m). The data contain low noise errors even in daytime due to the use of strong UV laser light (355 nm, 10 W, 50 Hz) and a very efficient interference-filter-based polychromator. In this paper, we present the first profiling of the second- to forth-order moments of turbulent temperature fluctuations as well as of skewness and kurtosis in the convective boundary layer (CBL) including the interfacial layer (IL). The results demonstrate that the UHOH RRL resolves the vertical structure of these moments. The data set which is used for this case study was collected in western Germany (50°53'50.56'' N, 6°27'50.39'' E, 110 m a.s.l.) within one hour around local noon on 24 April 2013 during the Intensive Observations Period (IOP) 6 of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), which is embedded in the German project HD(CP)2 (High-Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction). First, we investigated profiles of the noise variance and compared it with estimates of the statistical temperature measurement uncertainty Δ T based on Poisson statistics. The agreement confirms that photon count numbers obtained from extrapolated analog signal intensities provide a lower estimate of the statistical errors. The total statistical uncertainty of a 20 min temperature measurement is lower than 0.1 K up to 1050 m a.g.l. at noontime; even for single 10 s temperature profiles, it is smaller than 1 K up to 1000 m a.g.l.. Then we confirmed by autocovariance and spectral analyses of the atmospheric temperature fluctuations that a temporal resolution of 10 s was sufficient to resolve the turbulence down to the inertial subrange. This is also indicated by the profile of the integral scale of the temperature fluctuations, which was in the range of 40 to 120 s in the CBL. Analyzing then profiles of the second

  20. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  1. Universality class of replica symmetry breaking, scaling behavior, and the low-temperature fixed-point order function of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, R; Schmidt, M J

    2008-12-01

    A scaling theory of replica symmetry breaking (RSB) in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model is presented in the framework of critical phenomena for the scaling regime of large RSB orders kappa , small temperatures T , and small (homogeneous) magnetic fields H . We employ the pseudodynamical picture [R. Oppermann, M. J. Schmidt, and D. Sherrington, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 127201 (2007)], where two critical points CP1 and CP2 are associated with the order function's pseudodynamical limits lim_{a-->infinity}q(a)=1 and lim_{a-->0}q(a)=0 at (T=0 , H=0 , 1kappa=0) . CP1 - and CP2 -dominated contributions to the free energy functional F[q(a)] require an unconventional scaling hypothesis. We determine the scaling contributions in accordance with detailed numerical self-consistent solutions for up to 200 orders of RSB. Power laws, scaling functions, and crossover lines are obtained. CP1 -dominated behavior is found for the nonequilibrium susceptibility, which decays like chi_{1}=kappa;{-53}f_{1}(Tkappa;{-53}) , for the entropy, which obeys S(T=0) approximately chi_{1};{2} , and for the subclass of diverging parameters a_{i}=kappa;{53}f_{a_{i}}(Tkappa;{-53}) [describing Parisi box sizes m_{i}(T) identical witha_{i}(T)T ], with f_{1}(zeta) approximately zeta and f_{a_{i}}(zeta) approximately 1zeta for zeta-->infinity , while f(0) is finite. CP2 -dominated behavior, controlled by the magnetic field H while temperature is irrelevant, is retrieved in the plateau height (or width) of the order function q(a) according to q_{pl}(H)=kappa;{-1}f_{pl}(H;{23}kappa;{-1}) with f_{pl}mid R:(zeta)mid R:_{zeta-->infinity} approximately zeta and f_{pl}(0) finite. Divergent characteristic RSB orders kappa_{CP1}(T) approximately T;{-35} and kappa_{CP2}(H) approximately H;{-23} , respectively, describe the crossover from mean field SK- to RSB-critical behavior with rational-valued exponents extracted with high precision from our RSB data. The order function q(a) is obtained as a fixed

  2. Silica-templated synthesis of ordered mesoporous tungsten carbide/graphitic carbon composites with nanocrystalline walls and high surface areas via a temperature-programmed carburization route.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhangxiong; Yang, Yunxia; Gu, Dong; Li, Qiang; Feng, Dan; Chen, Zhenxia; Tu, Bo; Webley, Paul A; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2009-12-01

    Ordered mesostructured tungsten carbide and graphitic carbon composites (WC/C) with nanocrystalline walls are fabricated for the first time by a temperature-programmed carburization approach with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) as a precursor and mesoporous silica materials as hard templates. The mesostructure, crystal phase, and amount of deposited graphitic carbon can be conveniently tuned by controlling the silica template (SBA-15 or KIT-6), carburizing temperature (700-1000 degrees C), the PTA-loading amount, and the carburizing atmosphere (CH(4) or a CH(4)/H(2) mixture). A high level of deposited carbon is favorable for connecting and stabilizing the WC nanocrystallites to achieve high mesostructural regularity, as well as promoting the carburization reaction. Meanwhile, large pore sizes and high mesoporosity of the silica templates can promote WC-phase formation. These novel, ordered, mesoporous WC/C nanocomposites with high surface areas (74-169 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volumes (0.14-0.17 cm(3) g(-1)), narrow pore-size distributions (centered at about 3 nm), and very good oxidation resistance (up to 750 degrees C) have potential applications in fuel-cell catalysts and nanodevices.

  3. First-order antiferro-ferromagnetic transition in Fe(49)(Rh(0.93)Pd(0.07))(51) under simultaneous application of magnetic field and external pressure.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Pallavi; Bag, Pallab; Rawat, R; Chaddah, P

    2012-03-07

    A magnetic field-pressure-temperature (H-P-T) phase diagram for first-order antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) transitions in Fe(49)(Rh(0.93)Pd(0.07))(51) has been constructed using resistivity measurements under simultaneous application of magnetic field (up to 8 T) and pressure (up to 20 kbar). The temperature dependence of resistivity (ρ-T) shows that the width of the transition and the extent of hysteresis decreases with pressure and increases with magnetic field. By exploiting opposing trends of dT(N)/dP and dT(N)/dH (where T(N) is the first-order transition temperature), the relative effects of temperature, magnetic field and pressure on disorder-broadened first-order transitions has been studied. For this, a set of H and P values are chosen for which T(N)(H(1),P(1)) = T(N)(H(2),P(2)). Measurements for such combinations of H and P show that the temperature dependence of resistivity is similar, i.e. the broadening (in temperature) of transition as well as the extent of hysteresis remains independent of H and P. Isothermal magnetoresistance measurements under various constant pressures show that even though the critical field required for AFM-FM transition depends on applied pressure, the extent of hysteresis as well as transition width (in magnetic field) remains constant with varying pressure.

  4. Mechano-chemical manipulation of Sn chains on Si(1 0 0) by NC-AFM.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, A; Lekkas, I; Moriarty, P

    2017-02-22

    We investigate the atomic structure of Sn dimer chains grown on the Si(1 0 0) surface using non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) at cryogenic temperatures. We find that similar to the native Si(1 0 0) dimer structure, the ground state of the Sn dimer structure is buckled at low temperature. At 5 K we show that the buckling state of the Sn dimers may be controllably, and reversibly, manipulated with atomic precision by close approach of the tip, without modification of the underlying substrate buckling structure. At intermediate cryogenic temperatures we observe changes in the configuration of the dimer chains in the region where the tip-sample interaction is very weak, suggesting that the energy barrier to transit between configurations is sufficiently small to be surmounted at 78 K.

  5. Mechano-chemical manipulation of Sn chains on Si(1 0 0) by NC-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, A.; Lekkas, I.; Moriarty, P.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the atomic structure of Sn dimer chains grown on the Si(1 0 0) surface using non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) at cryogenic temperatures. We find that similar to the native Si(1 0 0) dimer structure, the ground state of the Sn dimer structure is buckled at low temperature. At 5 K we show that the buckling state of the Sn dimers may be controllably, and reversibly, manipulated with atomic precision by close approach of the tip, without modification of the underlying substrate buckling structure. At intermediate cryogenic temperatures we observe changes in the configuration of the dimer chains in the region where the tip-sample interaction is very weak, suggesting that the energy barrier to transit between configurations is sufficiently small to be surmounted at 78 K.

  6. Temperature-dependent and anisotropic optical response of layered Pr0.5Ca1.5MnO4 probed by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, M. A.; Thoeng, E.; Gogoi, P. K.; Wendt, F.; Wang, S. H.; Santoso, I.; Asmara, T. C.; Handayani, I. P.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Nugroho, A. A.; Rübhausen, M.; Rusydi, A.

    2013-06-01

    We study the temperature dependence as well as anisotropy of optical conductivity (σ1) in the pseudocubic single crystal Pr0.5Ca1.5MnO4 using spectrocopic ellipsometry. Three transition temperatures are observed and can be linked to charge-orbital (TCO/OO˜320 K), two-dimensional-antiferromagnetic (2D-AFM) (˜200 K), and three-dimensional AFM (TN˜125 K) orderings. Below TCO/OO, σ1 shows a charge-ordering peak (˜0.8 eV) with a significant blue shift as the temperature decreases. Calculations based on a model that incorporates a static Jahn-Teller distortion and assumes the existence of a local charge imbalance between two different sublattices support this assignment and explain the blue shift. This view is further supported by the partial spectral weight analysis showing the onset of optical anisotropy at TCO/OO in the charge-ordering region (0.5-2.5 eV). Interestingly, in the charge-transfer region (2.5-4 eV), the spectral weight shows anomalies around the T2D-AFM that we attribute to the role of oxygen-p orbitals in stabilizing the CE-type magnetic ordering. Our result shows the importance of spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom in this layered manganite.

  7. Influence of metal ions on the order-disorder transition temperature of the Ba-M-O (M: La, Y, In, or Ga) system

    SciTech Connect

    Mitamura, Takashi; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Hidehiko . Dept. of Applied Chemistry); Mori, Toshiyuki; Yamamura, Hiroshi . Tsukuba Research Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    Preparation of BaLa[sub 2]O[sub 4], Ba[sub 3]Y[sub 4]O[sub 9], Ba[sub 2]In[sub 2]O[sub 5], and Ba[sub 3]Ga[sub 2]O[sub 6] powders and their sintering were investigated in Ar or air. These sintered bodies with perovskite-related structure were synthesized by reaction sintering, using mixed powders in the atomic ratios of Ba/La = 1, Ba/Y = 0.75, Ba/In = 1, and Ba/Ga = 1.5. The order-disorder transition temperatures of the BaLa[sub 2]O[sub 4], Ba[sub 3]Y[sub 4]O[sub 9], Ba[sub 2]In[sub 2]O[sub 5], and Ba[sub 3]Ga[sub 2]O[sub 6], sintered bodies were 270, 350, 880, and 1,230 C, respectively. It was found that the temperatures were influenced by the ionic radius of cations in B sites, and the transition temperatures decreased with increasing ionic radius.

  8. Exploring electro-optic effect and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots: Interplay between hydrostatic pressure, temperature and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-03-01

    We study the profiles of electro-optic effect (EOE) and third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (TONOS) of impurity doped GaAs quantum dots (QDs) under the combined influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) taking into account the presence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. The doped dot has been subjected to a polarized monochromatic electromagnetic field. Effect of application of noise is elegantly reflected through prominent change of peak shift (blue/red) and variation of peak height (increase/ıdecrease) of above nonlinear optical (NLO) properties as temperature and pressure are varied over a range. Interestingly, all such changes subtly depend on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The noteworthy influence of the interplay between noise strength and its mode of application on the said NLO properties has also been critically scrutinized. The findings highlight remarkable role played by noise in tuning above NLO properties of doped QD system under the prominent presence of both hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  9. Highly conductive Cu2-xS nanoparticle films through room-temperature processing and an order of magnitude enhancement of conductivity via electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Otelaja, Obafemi O; Ha, Don-Hyung; Ly, Tiffany; Zhang, Haitao; Robinson, Richard D

    2014-11-12

    A facile room-temperature method for assembling colloidal copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanoparticles into highly electrically conducting films is presented. Ammonium sulfide is utilized for connecting the nanoparticles via ligand removal, which transforms the as-deposited insulating films into highly conducting films. Electronic properties of the treated films are characterized with a combination of Hall effect measurements, field-effect transistor measurements, temperature-dependent conductivity measurements, and capacitance-voltage measurements, revealing their highly doped p-type semiconducting nature. The spin-cast nanoparticle films have carrier concentration of ∼ 10(19) cm(-3), Hall mobilities of ∼ 3 to 4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and electrical conductivities of ∼ 5 to 6 S · cm(-1). Our films have hole mobilities that are 1-4 orders of magnitude higher than hole mobilities previously reported for heat-treated nanoparticle films of HgTe, InSb, PbS, PbTe, and PbSe. We show that electrophoretic deposition (EPD) as a method for nanoparticle film assembly leads to an order of magnitude enhancement in film conductivity (∼ 75 S · cm(-1)) over conventional spin-casting, creating copper sulfide nanoparticle films with conductivities comparable to bulk films formed through physical deposition methods. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the Cu2-xS films, with and without ligand removal, match the Djurleite phase (Cu(1.94)S) of copper sulfide and show that the nanoparticles maintain finite size after the ammonium sulfide processing. The high conductivities reported are attributed to better interparticle coupling through the ammonium sulfide treatment. This approach presents a scalable room-temperature route for fabricating highly conducting nanoparticle assemblies for large-area electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  10. Temperature-induced A-B intersite charge transfer in an A-site-ordered LaCu(3)Fe(4)O(12) perovskite.

    PubMed

    Long, Y W; Hayashi, N; Saito, T; Azuma, M; Muranaka, S; Shimakawa, Y

    2009-03-05

    Changes of valence states in transition-metal oxides often cause significant changes in their structural and physical properties. Chemical doping is the conventional way of modulating these valence states. In ABO(3) perovskite and/or perovskite-like oxides, chemical doping at the A site can introduce holes or electrons at the B site, giving rise to exotic physical properties like high-transition-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. When valence-variable transition metals at two different atomic sites are involved simultaneously, we expect to be able to induce charge transfer-and, hence, valence changes-by using a small external stimulus rather than by introducing a doping element. Materials showing this type of charge transfer are very rare, however, and such externally induced valence changes have been observed only under extreme conditions like high pressure. Here we report unusual temperature-induced valence changes at the A and B sites in the A-site-ordered double perovskite LaCu(3)Fe(4)O(12); the underlying intersite charge transfer is accompanied by considerable changes in the material's structural, magnetic and transport properties. When cooled, the compound shows a first-order, reversible transition at 393 K from LaCu(2+)(3)Fe(3.75+)(4)O(12) with Fe(3.75+) ions at the B site to LaCu(3+)(3)Fe(3+)(4)O(12) with rare Cu(3+) ions at the A site. Intersite charge transfer between the A-site Cu and B-site Fe ions leads to paramagnetism-to-antiferromagnetism and metal-to-insulator isostructural phase transitions. What is more interesting in relation to technological applications is that this above-room-temperature transition is associated with a large negative thermal expansion.

  11. Two orders of magnitude reduction in the temperature dependent resistivity of Ga1-xMnxAs grown on (6 3 1) GaAs insulating substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel-Kuopp, Victor-Tapio; Martinez-Velis, Isaac; Gallardo-Hernandez, Salvador; Lopez-Lopez, Maximo

    2013-12-01

    The temperature dependent van der Pauw (T-Pauw) technique was used to investigate the resistivity of three Ga1-xMnxAs layers grown on (6 3 1) GaAs semi-insulating substrates. The samples had Mn concentration of 3.52×l020 cm-3, 5.05×1020 cm-3 and 1.12×l021 cm-3, corresponding to Mn cell effusion temperature TMn of 700 °C, 715 °C and 745 °C, respectively. They were compared to samples grown under the same conditions but on (0 0 1) GaAs semi-insulating substrates. For the sample grown at TMn=700 °C on a (6 3 1) substrate, a two orders of magnitude decrease in the resistivity is observed, when compared with the sample grown on a (0 0 1) substrate. For the sample grown at TMn=715 °C the decrease is approximately four times, while for the sample grown at TMn=745 °C the decrease is approximately forty times. We plotted the resistivities as a function of temperature in Arrhenius plots, where we extracted two activation energies, the smallest one between 6 and 11 meV, and the largest one between 25 and 183 meV. Both activation energies increased as TMn increased. These results are in agreement with SIMS analysis where we observed that manganese concentration in the (6 3 1) orientation growth is around two order of magnitude larger than in the samples grown in the (0 0 1) orientation substrate.

  12. AFM investigation on surface evolution of amorphous carbon during ion-beam-assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. D.; Ding, F.; Naramoto, H.; Narumi, K.

    2006-11-01

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbons (a-C) have been prepared on mirror-polished Si(1 1 1) wafers through thermally evaporated C 60 with simultaneous bombardments of Ne + ions. The time evolution of film surfaces has been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at two temperatures of 400 and 700 °C, respectively. Based on the topography images and the root-mean-square (rms) roughness analysis, it is found that the a-C surfaces present roughening growth at the initial stage. With increasing growth time, the cooperative nucleation of the islands and pits appears on the surfaces, suggesting three-dimensional growth, and then they continue to evolve to irregular mounds at 400 °C, and elongated mounds at 700 °C. At the steady growth stage, these surfaces further develop to the structures of bamboo joints and ripples corresponding to these two temperatures, respectively. It is believed that besides ion sputtering effect, the chemical bonding configurations in the amorphous carbon films should be taken into considerations for elucidating the surface evolutions.

  13. Experimental evidence of ultrathin polymer film stratification by AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Nicolas; Chebil, Mohamed Souheib; Vignaud, Guillaume; Le Houerou, Vincent; Bardeau, Jean-François; Busselez, Rémi; Gibaud, Alain; Grohens, Yves

    2015-06-01

    By performing Atomic Force Microscopy measurements of pull-off force as a function of the temperature, we were able to probe the dynamic of supported thin polystyrene (PS) films. Thermal transitions induce modifications in the surface energy, roughness and surface modulus that are clearly detected by AFM and related to PS chain relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrated the existence of three transition temperatures that can be associated to the relaxation of polymer chains located at different depth regions within the polymer film. Independently of the film thickness, we have confirmed the presence of a region of high mobility for the polymer chains at the free interface. The thickness of this region is estimated to be above 7nm. The detection of a transition only present for film thicker than the gyration radius Rg is linked to the dynamics of polymer chains in a bulk conformation (i.e. not in contact with the free interface). We claim here that our results demonstrate, in agreement with other techniques, the stratification of thin polymer film depth profile in terms of relaxation behavior.

  14. High-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study of the ordering transition of an amorphous carbon layer into graphene on ruthenium(0001).

    PubMed

    Günther, Sebastian; Dänhardt, Sebastian; Ehrensperger, Martin; Zeller, Patrick; Schmitt, Stefan; Wintterlin, Joost

    2013-01-22

    The ordering transition of an amorphous carbon layer into graphene was investigated by high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. A disordered C layer was prepared on a Ru(0001) surface by chemical vapor deposition of ethylene molecules at ~660 K. The carbon layer grows in the form of dendritic islands that have almost the same density as graphene. Upon annealing of the fully covered surface, residual hydrogen desorbs and a coherent but still disordered carbon layer forms, with almost the same carbon coverage as in graphene. The ordering of this layer into graphene at 920 to 950 K was monitored as a function of time. A unique mechanism was observed that involves small topographic holes in the carbon layer. The holes are mobile, and on the trajectories of the holes the disordered carbon layer is transformed into graphene. The transport of C atoms across the holes or along the hole edges provides a low-energy pathway for the ordering transition. This mechanism is prohibited in a dense graphene layer, which offers an explanation for the difficulty of removing defects from graphene synthesized by chemical methods.

  15. Tuning the Curie temperature of L1{sub 0} ordered FePt thin films through site-specific substitution of Rh

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Dongbin; Sun, Cheng-Jun E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Heald, Steve M.; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, Gan Moog E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Bergman, Anders; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-10-14

    In structurally ordered magnetic thin films, the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of ferromagnetic films depends on the exchange integral of the short range ordered neighboring atoms. The exchange integral may be adjusted by controlling the elemental substitutional concentration at the lattice site of interest. We show how to control the T{sub C} in high anisotropy L1{sub 0} Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} magnetic thin films by substituting Rh into the Pt site. Rh substitution in L1{sub 0} FePt modified the local atomic environment and the corresponding electronic properties, while retaining the ordered L1{sub 0} phase. The analysis of extended x-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra shows that Rh uniformly substitutes for Pt in L1{sub 0} FePt. A model of antiferromagnetic defects caused by controlled Rh substitution of the Pt site, reducing the T{sub C,} is proposed to interpret this phenomenon and its validity is further examined by ab initio density functional calculations.

  16. Inhibition of cold rolled steel corrosion by Tween-20 in sulfuric acid: weight loss, electrochemical and AFM approaches.

    PubMed

    Mu, Guannan; Li, Xianghong

    2005-09-01

    The inhibiting action of a nonionic surfactant of Tween-20 on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 0.5-7.0 M sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) was studied by weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization methods. Atomic force microscope (AFM) provided the surface conditions. The results show that inhibition efficiency increases with the inhibitor concentration, while it decreases with the sulfuric acid concentration. The adsorption of inhibitor on the cold rolled steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. Effect of immersion time was studied and discussed. The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of cold rolled steel was also studied at four temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 degrees C, the thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption heat, adsorption free energy, and adsorption entropy were calculated. The results revealed that the adsorption was physisorption mechanism. A kinetic study of cold rolled steel in uninhibited and inhibited acid was also discussed. The kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, rate constant, and reaction constant were calculated for the reactions of corrosion. The inhibition effect is satisfactorily explained by both thermodynamic and kinetic models. Polarization curves show that Tween-20 is a cathodic-type inhibitor in sulfuric acid. The results obtained from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization are in good agreement, and the Tween-20 inhibition action could also be evidenced by surface AFM images.

  17. Magnetic order driven by orbital ordering in the semiconducting KFe1.5Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing; Yao, Dao-Xin

    2016-04-01

    The two-orbital Hubbard model is studied numerically by using the Hartree-Fock approximation in both real space and momentum space, and the ground-state properties of the alkali metal iron selenide semiconducting KFe1.5Se2 are investigated. A rhombus-type Fe vacancy order with stripetype antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is found, as was observed in neutron scattering experiments [J. Zhao, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 267003 (2012)]. Hopping parameters are obtained by fitting the experimentally observed stripe AFM phase in real space. These hopping parameters are then used to study the ground-state properties of the semiconductor in momentum space. It is found to be a strongly correlated system with a large on-site Coulomb repulsion U, similar to the AFM Mott insulator — the parent compound of copper oxide superconductors. We also find that the electronic occupation numbers and magnetizations in the d xz and d yz orbitals become different simultaneously when U > U c (˜3.4 eV), indicating orbital ordering. These results imply that the rotational symmetry between the two orbitals is broken by orbital ordering and thus drives the strong anisotropy of the magnetic coupling that has been observed by experiments and that the stripe-type AFM order in this compound may be caused by orbital ordering together with the observed large anisotropy.

  18. Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous crystalline WS(2) and MoS(2) via a high-temperature reductive sulfuration route.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yifeng; Wan, Ying; Liu, Ruili; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2007-08-01

    A high-temperature reductive sulfuration method is demonstrated to synthesize highly ordered mesoporous metal sulfide crystallites by using mesoporous silica as hard templates. H2S gas is utilized as a sulfuration agent to in situ convert phosphotungstic acid H3PW12O40.6H2O to hexagonal WS2 crystallites in the silica nanochannels at 600 degrees C. Upon etching silica, mesoporous, layered WS2 nanocrystal arrays are produced with a yield as high as 96 wt %. XRD, nitrogen sorption, SEM, and TEM results reveal that the WS2 products replicated from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 hard template possess highly ordered hexagonal mesostructure (space group, p6mm) and rodlike morphology, analogous to the mother template. The S-W-S trilayers of the WS2 nanocrystals are partially oriented, parallel to the mesochannels of the SBA-15 template. This orientation is related with the reduction of the high-energy layer edges in layered metal dichalcogenides and the confinement in anisotropic nanochannels. The mesostructure can be 3-D cubic bicontinuous if KIT-6 (Iad) is used as a hard template. Mesoporous WS2 replicas have large surface areas (105-120 m2/g), pore volumes ( approximately 0.20 cm3/g), and narrow pore size distributions ( approximately 4.8 nm). By one-step nanocasting with the H3PMo12O40.6H2O (PMA) precursor into the mesochannels of SBA-15 or KIT-6 hard template, highly ordered mesoporous MoS2 layered crystallites with the 2-D hexagonal (p6mm) and 3-D bicontinuous cubic (Iad) structures can also be prepared via this high-temperature reductive sulfuration route. When the loading amount of PMA precursor is low, multiwalled MoS2 nanotubes with 5-7 nm in diameter can be obtained. The high-temperature reductive sulfuration method is a general strategy and can be extended to synthesize mesoporous CdS crystals and other metal sulfides.

  19. Facile preparation of ordered mesoporous MnCo2O4 for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Mingying; Zhan, Sihui; Yu, Hongbing; Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous MnCo2O4 nanomaterials were successfully prepared through the nanocasting route using SBA-15 and KIT-6 as hard templates. These mesoporous nanomaterials were characterized using XRD, BET, TEM, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, NO-TPD, XPS and DRIFT. The low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity of NO with NH3 was investigated, which revealed that 3D-MnCo2O4 using KIT-6 as a template can totally clean all NO over a wide temperature range of 100-250 °C with a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 32 000 h-1, while 2D-MnCo2O4 with SBA-15 as a template had 95% conversion rate at the same condition. 3D-MnCo2O4 showed the best performance to clean NO due to its typical three-dimensional porous structure, large specific surface area, abundant active surface oxygen species and Lewis acid sites. All the results indicate that a novel, cheap catalyst for catalytic removal of NO can be designed by controlling the morphology at the nanoscale.Ordered mesoporous MnCo2O4 nanomaterials were successfully prepared through the nanocasting route using SBA-15 and KIT-6 as hard templates. These mesoporous nanomaterials were characterized using XRD, BET, TEM, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, NO-TPD, XPS and DRIFT. The low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity of NO with NH3 was investigated, which revealed that 3D-MnCo2O4 using KIT-6 as a template can totally clean all NO over a wide temperature range of 100-250 °C with a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 32 000 h-1, while 2D-MnCo2O4 with SBA-15 as a template had 95% conversion rate at the same condition. 3D-MnCo2O4 showed the best performance to clean NO due to its typical three-dimensional porous structure, large specific surface area, abundant active surface oxygen species and Lewis acid sites. All the results indicate that a novel, cheap catalyst for catalytic removal of NO can be designed by controlling the morphology at the nanoscale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Low-angle XRD

  20. Mechanical properties of complex biological systems using AFM-based force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, John Stephen

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was designed and built to study the mechanical properties of small collagen fibrils and the plasma membrane of living cells. Collagen is a major component of bone, skin and connective tissues, and is abundant in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Because of its abundance, an understanding of how disease affects collagen mechanics is crucial in disease prevention efforts. Two levels of type I collagen structure were investigated, subfibrils (on the order of 1 mum in length) and longer fibrils. Comparisons were made between measurements of wild-type (wt) collagen and collagen from the mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Significant differences between OI and wt collagen were observed, primarily that intermolecular bonds in OI collagen fibrils are weaker than in wt, or not ruptured, as in the case of OI subfibrils. As cells interact with collagen in the ECM, the mechanical properties of the plasma membrane are also of great interest. Membrane tethers were extracted from living cells under varied conditions in order to assess the contributions of membrane-associated macromolecules such as the actin cytoskeleton and the glycocalyx, and intracellular signaling. Tether extraction force was found to be sensitive to all of these altered conditions, suggesting that tether extraction may be used to monitor various cellular processes.

  1. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  2. AFM study of the thermotropic behaviour of supported DPPC bilayers with and without the model peptide WALP23.

    PubMed

    Yarrow, F; Kuipers, B W M

    2011-01-01

    Temperature-controlled Atomic Force Microscopy (TC-AFM) in Contact Mode is used here to directly image the mechanisms by which melting and crystallization of supported, hydrated DPPC bilayers proceed in the presence and absence of the model peptide WALP23. Melting from the gel L(β)' to the liquid-crystalline L(α) phase starts at pre-existing line-type packing defects (grain boundaries) in absence of the peptide. The exact transition temperature is shown to be influenced by the magnitude of the force exerted by the AFM probe on the bilayer, but is higher than the main transition temperature of non-supported DPPC vesicles in all cases due to bilayer-substrate interactions. Cooling of the fluid L(α) bilayer shows the formation of the line-type defects at the borders between different gel-phase regions that originate from different nuclei. The number of these defects depends directly on the rate of cooling through the transition, as predicted by classical nucleation theory. The presence of the transmembrane, synthetic model peptide WALP23 is known to give rise to heterogeneity in the bilayer as microdomains with a striped appearance are formed in the DPPC bilayer. This striated phase consists of alternating lines of lipids and peptide. It is shown here that melting starts with the peptide-associated lipids in the domains, whose melting temperature is lowered by 0.8-2.0°C compared to the remaining, peptide-free parts of the bilayer. The stabilization of the fluid phase is ascribed to adaptations of the lipids to the shorter peptide. The lipids not associated with the peptide melt at the same temperature as those in the pure DPPC supported bilayer.

  3. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  4. AF-M315E Propulsion System Advances and Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert K.; Allen, May; Driscoll, Elizabeth; Spores, Ronald A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.; Vasek, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Even as for the GR-1 awaits its first on-orbit demonstration on the planned 2017 launch of NASA's Green Propulsion Infusion Mission (GPIM) program, ongoing efforts continue to advance the technical state-of-the-art through improvements in the performance, life capability, and affordability of both Aerojet Rocketdyne's 1-N-class GR-1 and 20-N-class GR-22 green monopropellant thrusters. Hot-fire testing of a design upgrade of the GR-22 thruster successfully demonstrated resolution of a life-limiting thermo-structural issue encountered during prototype testing on the GPIM program, yielding both an approximately 2x increase in demonstrating life capability, as well as fundamental insights relating to how ionic liquid thrusters operate, thruster scaling, and operational factors affecting catalyst bed life. Further, a number of producibility improvements, related to both materials and processes and promising up to 50% unit cost reduction, have been identified through a comprehensive Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) assessment activity recently completed at Aerojet Rocketdyne. Focused specifically on the GR-1 but applicable to the common-core architecture of both thrusters, ongoing laboratory (heavyweight) thruster testing being conducted under a Space Act Agreement at NASA Glenn Research Center has already validated a number of these proposed manufacturability upgrades, additionally achieving a greater than 40% increase in thruster life. In parallel with technical advancements relevant to conventional large spacecraft, a joint effort between NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne is underway to prepare 1-U CubeSat AF-M315E propulsion module for first flight demonstration in 2018.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation by AFM of cultured human cell-multilayered periosteal sheets.

    PubMed

    Horimizu, Makoto; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Masaki; Burns, Douglas M; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2013-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that thicker periosteal sheets with enhanced cell layering maintain their component cells at relatively immature stages of differentiation but express a high in vivo osteogenic potential. As it has been recently proposed that stiff scaffolds provide a mechanical cue to various cell types that promotes differentiation, we postulated that the maintenance of immature cells in our periosteal sheets is due to the mechanical stiffness of the multilayered-cell architecture. To demonstrate the biomechanical characteristics of our periosteal sheets, we have determined their stiffnesses with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and evaluated the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components specifically by both immunocytochemistry and a complementary DNA microarray technology. Compared to osteoblastic Saos2 cells, the cytoskeletal fibers were developed more in the periosteal cells, but the periosteal cells in monolayer culture developed before either the cells in the peripheral or central regions of the periosteal sheets developed. However, the nanoindentation by AFM distinguished the central region from the peripheral region. The peak stiffness values of cells were ordered as follows: tissue culture polystyrene (1.66GPa)≫dispersed (9.99kPa)>central region (5.20kPa)>peripheral regions (3.67kPa). Similarly, the degree of development of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) filaments within cells was dispersed>central region>peripheral region. In conjunction with the abundantly deposited ECM in the periosteal sheets, these findings suggest that the order of cell stiffness may depend on the integration of the stiffness of individual ECM components and the extent of cytoskeletal fiber formation. Because recently published data have demonstrated that the optimal stiffness for osteogenic differentiation is 25-40kPa, it is plausible that the periosteal cells residing in the less-stiff multilayer regions could be maintained at relatively immature stages under

  6. The Symmetry of the Electronic States and Order Parameter in the High Temperature Superconductor BISMUTH(2) STRONTIUM(2) CALCIUM(1) COPPER(2) OXYGEN(8 + X)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Ronald James

    High resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy was used to study the symmetry properties of the high temperature superconductor rm Bi_2Sr_2Ca _1Cu_2O_{8+x}. Single crystals were grown and then characterized by x-ray diffraction, a.c. susceptibility, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence, and resistivity. The oxygen stoichiometry was varied by post annealing the crystals after growth in oxygen or an inert gas. It was determined that the symmetry of the normal state is orthorhombic, the superconducting gap is anisotropic but not pure d _{x^2-y^2}, the normal state becomes more three dimensional with oxygen doping and the anisotropy of the superconducting state is reduced upon oxygen doping. Taken together, these results indicate the presence of a multiple component order parameter.

  7. Low-temperature synthesis of high-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed {001} nanofacets

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Huang, Zhennan; Zhu, Jihao; Kou, Shengzhong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yang, Hangsheng

    2015-01-01

    High-ordered anatase TiO2 nanotube array films coated with exposed high-reactive {001} nanofacets were fabricated by a modified hydrothermal method using amorphous anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays (ATONAs) as starting materials. It was found that the reaction between gas phase HF and solid ATONAs played a key role in the transformation process from amorphous to anatase TiO2, and the TiO2 tubular structure kept unchanged during the surface modification with an exposed {001} facets up to 76.5%, which could be attributed to the low reaction temperature of 130 °C. Our study provided a novel route for the facile preparation of {001} facets exposed anatase TiO2. PMID:26634815

  8. Note: A method for minimizing oxide formation during elevated temperature nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, I. C.; Hodge, A. M.; Garcia-Sanchez, E.

    2014-09-15

    A standardized method to protect metallic samples and minimize oxide formation during elevated-temperature nanoindentation was adapted to a commercial instrument. Nanoindentation was performed on Al (100), Cu (100), and W (100) single crystals submerged in vacuum oil at 200 °C, while the surface morphology and oxidation was carefully monitored using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared to room temperature and 200 °C nanoindentation tests performed without oil, in order to evaluate the feasibility of using the oil as a protective medium. Extensive surface characterization demonstrated that this methodology is effective for nanoscale testing.

  9. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  10. Wetting properties of AFM probes by means of contact angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhenhua; Bhushan, Bharat

    2006-09-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique was developed to measure the wetting properties of probe tips. By advancing and receding the AFM tip across the water surface, the meniscus force between the tip and the liquid was measured at the tip-water separation. The water contact angle was determined from the meniscus force. The obtained contact angle results were compared with that by the sessile drop method. It was found that the AFM based technique provided higher contact angle values than the sessile drop method. The mechanisms responsible for the difference are discussed.

  11. Enhancement of magnetic ordering temperature and magnetodielectric coupling by hole doping in a multiferroic DyFe0.5Cr0.5O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mohit K.; Basu, Tathamay; Mukherjee, K.; Sampathkumaran, E. V.

    2017-03-01

    We report the results of our investigation of magnetic, thermodynamic and dielectric properties of Ca substituted half-doped orthochromite, Dy0.6Ca0.4Fe0.5Cr0.5O3. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity data bring out that this compound undergoes two antiferromagnetic transitions, one at ~132 and the other at ~22 K. These values are higher than those of DyFe0.5Cr0.5O3. This finding highlights that non-magnetic hole doping in form of Ca+2 in the place of magnetic Dy+3 tends to enhance magnetic transition temperatures in this half-doped orthochromite. We attribute it to possible change in the valence state of Cr/Fe-ion ions due to hole doping. Dielectric anomalies are also seen near the magnetic ordering temperatures indicating magnetodielectric coupling, which is confirmed by magnetic field dependent dielectric studies. The most notable observation is that magnetodielectric coupling strength gets significantly enhanced as compared to DyFe0.5Cr0.5O3. The results reveal that it is possible to tune magnetodielectric coupling by hole doping in this system.

  12. Theoretical evidence of the observed kinetic order dependence on temperature during the N(2)O decomposition over Fe-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Hazar; Berthomieu, Dorothee; Bromley, Bryan; Coq, Bernard; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2010-03-28

    The characterization of Fe/ZSM5 zeolite materials, the nature of Fe-sites active in N(2)O direct decomposition, as well as the rate limiting step are still a matter of debate. The mechanism of N(2)O decomposition on the binuclear oxo-hydroxo bridged extraframework iron core site [Fe(II)(mu-O)(mu-OH)Fe(II)](+) inside the ZSM-5 zeolite has been studied by combining theoretical and experimental approaches. The overall calculated path of N(2)O decomposition involves the oxidation of binuclear Fe(II) core sites by N(2)O (atomic alpha-oxygen formation) and the recombination of two surface alpha-oxygen atoms leading to the formation of molecular oxygen. Rate parameters computed using standard statistical mechanics and transition state theory reveal that elementary catalytic steps involved into N(2)O decomposition are strongly dependent on the temperature. This theoretical result was compared to the experimentally observed steady state kinetics of the N(2)O decomposition and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A switch of the reaction order with respect to N(2)O pressure from zero to one occurs at around 800 K suggesting a change of the rate determining step from the alpha-oxygen recombination to alpha-oxygen formation. The TPD results on the molecular oxygen desorption confirmed the mechanism proposed.

  13. Facile preparation of ordered mesoporous MnCo2O4 for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingying; Zhan, Sihui; Yu, Hongbing; Zhu, Dandan; Wang, Shengqiang

    2015-02-14

    Ordered mesoporous MnCo2O4 nanomaterials were successfully prepared through the nanocasting route using SBA-15 and KIT-6 as hard templates. These mesoporous nanomaterials were characterized using XRD, BET, TEM, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR, NO-TPD, XPS and DRIFT. The low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity of NO with NH3 was investigated, which revealed that 3D-MnCo2O4 using KIT-6 as a template can totally clean all NO over a wide temperature range of 100-250 °C with a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 32,000 h(-1), while 2D-MnCo2O4 with SBA-15 as a template had 95% conversion rate at the same condition. 3D-MnCo2O4 showed the best performance to clean NO due to its typical three-dimensional porous structure, large specific surface area, abundant active surface oxygen species and Lewis acid sites. All the results indicate that a novel, cheap catalyst for catalytic removal of NO can be designed by controlling the morphology at the nanoscale.

  14. Lattice cluster theory of associating telechelic polymers. III. Order parameter and average degree of self-assembly, transition temperature, and specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2012-05-01

    The lattice cluster theory of strongly interacting, structured polymer fluids is applied to determine the thermodynamic properties of solutions of telechelic polymers that may associate through bifunctional end groups. Hence, this model represents a significant albeit natural extension of a diverse array of prior popular equilibrium polymerization models in which structureless "bead" monomers associate into chain-like clusters under equilibrium conditions. In particular, the thermodynamic description of the self-assembly of linear telechelic chains in small molecule solvents (initiated in Paper II) is systematically extended through calculations of the order parameter Φ and average degree ⟨N⟩ of self-assembly, the self-assembly transition temperature Tp, and the specific heat CV of solutions of telechelic molecules. Special focus is placed on examining how molecular and thermodynamic parameters, such as the solution composition ϕ, temperature T, microscopic interaction energies (ɛs and ɛ), and length M of individual telechelic chains, influence the computed thermodynamic quantities that are commonly used to characterize self-assembling systems.

  15. Vigorous thermal excitations in a double-tetrahedral chain of localized Ising spins and mobile electrons mimic a temperature-driven first-order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálisová, Lucia; Strečka, Jozef

    2015-02-01

    A hybrid spin-electron system defined on a one-dimensional double-tetrahedral chain, in which the localized Ising spin regularly alternates with two mobile electrons delocalized over a triangular plaquette, is exactly solved with the help of generalized decoration-iteration transformation. It is shown that a macroscopic degeneracy of ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic ground states arising from chiral degrees of freedom of the mobile electrons cannot be lifted by a magnetic field in contrast to a macroscopic degeneracy of the frustrated ground state, which appears due to a kinetically driven frustration of the localized Ising spins. An anomalous behavior of all basic thermodynamic quantities can be observed on account of massive thermal excitations, which mimic a temperature-driven first-order phase transition from the nondegenerate frustrated state to the highly degenerate ferrimagnetic state at nonzero magnetic fields. A substantial difference in the respective degeneracies is responsible for an immense low-temperature peak of the specific heat and very abrupt (almost discontinuous) thermal variations of the entropy and sublattice magnetizations.

  16. Ultra-large scale AFM of lipid droplet arrays: investigating the ink transfer volume in dip pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Förste, Alexander; Pfirrmann, Marco; Sachs, Johannes; Gröger, Roland; Walheim, Stefan; Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Fuchs, Harald; Schimmel, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    There are only few quantitative studies commenting on the writing process in dip-pen nanolithography with lipids. Lipids are important carrier ink molecules for the delivery of bio-functional patters in bio-nanotechnology. In order to better understand and control the writing process, more information on the transfer of lipid material from the tip to the substrate is needed. The dependence of the transferred ink volume on the dwell time of the tip on the substrate was investigated by topography measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM) that is characterized by an ultra-large scan range of 800 × 800 μm(2). For this purpose arrays of dots of the phospholipid1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were written onto planar glass substrates and the resulting pattern was imaged by large scan area AFM. Two writing regimes were identified, characterized of either a steady decline or a constant ink volume transfer per dot feature. For the steady state ink transfer, a linear relationship between the dwell time and the dot volume was determined, which is characterized by a flow rate of about 16 femtoliters per second. A dependence of the ink transport from the length of pauses before and in between writing the structures was observed and should be taken into account during pattern design when aiming at best writing homogeneity. The ultra-large scan range of the utilized AFM allowed for a simultaneous study of the entire preparation area of almost 1 mm(2), yielding good statistic results.

  17. Reversible wetting of NaCl nanoparticles at relative humidities below deliquescence observed by environmental non-contact AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzewicz, D.A.; Lewis, E.; Ocko, B. M.; McGraw, R. L.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2009-12-14

    The behavior of NaCl nanoparticles as a function of relative humidity (RH) was characterized by depositing particles on a prepared hydrophobic surface and measuring their height via non-contact environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact AFM allows greater sensitivity to changes in the size of particles than does contact AFM or scanning electron microscopy, and greater sensitivity to changes in shape than do mass-based techniques. Crystalline cubic NaCl nanoparticles with sides of 35 to 150 nm were found to reversibly take up water with increasing RH, and to form a liquid-like surface layer of thickness 2 to 4 nm at humidities well below the deliquescence point of 75.0% at 20°C. Measurable uptake begins at 70% RH. The maximum thickness of the layer increases with increasing RH for a given particle size and, for a given RH, increases with increasing particle size over the range studied. The liquid-like behavior of the layer is indicated by a reversible “rounding” at the tops of the particles, where the ratio of particle height to radius of curvature increases from zero (flat top) at 68% RH to 0.7 at 74% RH. These observations suggest that a reorganization of mass occurs on the solid NaCl nanoparticle, and hence that the behavior of NaCl aerosol nanoparticles at RH between 70 and 75% RH is more complex than an abrupt first-order phase transition. Theoretical treatments of the phase transition should therefore account for both the presence of a liquid-like layer prior to deliquescence, and the RH-dependent thickness of the layer.

  18. Electrical characterization of FIB processed metal layers for reliable conductive-AFM on ZnO microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pea, M.; Maiolo, L.; Giovine, E.; Rinaldi, A.; Araneo, R.; Notargiacomo, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study of metallic layers in order to find the most suitable configuration for electrical characterization of individual ZnO micro-pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB). The electrical resistance between the probe tip and both as deposited and FIB processed metal layers (namely, Cr, Ti, Au and Al) has been investigated. Both chromium and titanium evidenced a non homogenous and non ohmic behaviour, non negligible scanning probe induced anodic oxidation associated to electrical measurements, and after FIB milling they exhibited significantly higher tip-sample resistance. Aluminium had generally a more apparent non conductive behaviour. Conversely, gold films showed very good tip-sample conduction properties being less sensitive to FIB processing than the other investigated metals. We found that a reliable C-AFM electrical characterization of ZnO microstructures obtained by FIB machining is feasible by using a combination of metal films as top contact layer. An Au/Ti bilayer on top of ZnO was capable to sustain the FIB fabrication process and to form a suitable ohmic contact to the semiconductor, allowing for reliable C-AFM measurement. To validate the consistency of this approach, we measured the resistance of ZnO micropillars finding a linear dependence on the pillar height, as expected for an ohmic conductor, and evaluated the resistivity of the material. This procedure has the potential to be downscaled to nanometer size structures by a proper choice of metal films type and thickness.

  19. Antiferromagnetic ordering in spin-chain multiferroic Gd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5} studied by electronic spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y. M.; Ruan, M. Y.; Cheng, J. J.; Sun, Y. C.; Ouyang, Z. W. Xia, Z. C.; Rao, G. H.

    2015-06-14

    High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) has been employed to study the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering state (T < T{sub N} = 55 K) of spin-chain multiferroic Gd{sub 2}BaNiO{sub 5}. The spin reorientation at T{sub SR} = 24 K is well characterized by the temperature-dependent ESR spectra. The magnetization data evidence a field-induced spin-flop transition at 2 K. The frequency-field relationship of the ESR data can be explained by conventional AFM resonance theory with uniaxial anisotropy, in good agreement with magnetization data. Related discussion on zero-field spin gap is presented.

  20. Enhancement of Electrical Properties of TiO2- x Oxide Semiconductor by d-Orbital Ordering Using Swift Heavy Ni-Ion Irradiation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S. H.; Jun, B. H.; Chung, K. B.

    2017-02-01

    The electrical properties of radiofrequency (RF)-sputtered TiO2- x films have been investigated as a function of Ni-ion irradiation dose at room temperature. The prepared TiO2- x films were irradiated with 130-MeV swift heavy Ni ions in the range from 5 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. Increasing the Ni-ion irradiation dose dramatically enhanced the mobility in the TiO2- x films from 2.2 cm2/V s to 1.24 × 102 cm2/V s, while the carrier concentration did not vary. To explain this change in the electrical properties of the TiO2- x films, we investigated various physical properties, namely the physical structure, molecular orbital ordering in the conduction band, and shallow/deep trap states in the band-edge area below the conduction band. We suggest that the improvement in mobility originates from the ordering of the Ti 3 d orbital in the conduction band. In addition, increase of the Ni-ion irradiation dose changed two distinct band-edge states below the conduction band.

  1. High magnetic ordering temperature in the perovskites Sr4-xLaxFe3ReO12 (x= 0.0, 1.0, 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Jason P; Retuerto, Maria; Greenblatt, Martha; Li, Man-Rong; Croft, Mark; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V.; Go, Yong Bok; Nowik, Israel; Hadermann, Joke; Herber, R. H.; Ignatov, Alexander Y

    2012-01-01

    A series of perovskites Sr4-xLaxFe3ReO12 (x = 0.0, 1.0, 2.0) has been prepared by wet chemistry methods. The structure analyses by powder x-ray, neutron diffraction and electron microscopy show that these compounds adopt simple perovskite structures without cation ordering over the B sites: tetragonal (I4/mcm) for x = 0.0 and 1.0 and orthorhombic (Pbmn) for x = 2.0. The oxidation state of the cations in the compound with x = 0.0 appear to be Fe3+/4+ and Re7+ and decrease for both with La substitution as evidenced by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. All the compounds are antiferromagnetically ordered above room temperature, as demonstrated by M ssbauer spectroscopy and the magnetic structures, which were determined by powder neutron diffraction. The substitution of Sr by La strongly affects the magnetic properties with an increase of TN up to ~ 750 K.

  2. Combining node-centered parallel radiation transport and higher-order multi-material cell-centered hydrodynamics methods in three-temperature radiation hydrodynamics code TRHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Higher-order cell-centered multi-material hydrodynamics (HD) and parallel node-centered radiation transport (RT) schemes are combined self-consistently in three-temperature (3T) radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) code TRHD (Sijoy and Chaturvedi, 2015) developed for the simulation of intense thermal radiation or high-power laser driven RHD. For RT, a node-centered gray model implemented in a popular RHD code MULTI2D (Ramis et al., 2009) is used. This scheme, in principle, can handle RT in both optically thick and thin materials. The RT module has been parallelized using message passing interface (MPI) for parallel computation. Presently, for multi-material HD, we have used a simple and robust closure model in which common strain rates to all materials in a mixed cell is assumed. The closure model has been further generalized to allow different temperatures for the electrons and ions. In addition to this, electron and radiation temperatures are assumed to be in non-equilibrium. Therefore, the thermal relaxation between the electrons and ions and the coupling between the radiation and matter energies are required to be computed self-consistently. This has been achieved by using a node-centered symmetric-semi-implicit (SSI) integration scheme. The electron thermal conduction is calculated using a cell-centered, monotonic, non-linear finite volume scheme (NLFV) suitable for unstructured meshes. In this paper, we have described the details of the 2D, 3T, non-equilibrium, multi-material RHD code developed with a special attention to the coupling of various cell-centered and node-centered formulations along with a suite of validation test problems to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the algorithms. We also report the parallel performance of RT module. Finally, in order to demonstrate the full capability of the code implementation, we have presented the simulation of laser driven shock propagation in a layered thin foil. The simulation results are found to be in good

  3. Dot arrays of L1{sub 0}-type FePt ordered alloy perpendicular films fabricated using low-temperature sputter film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shimatsu, T.; Aoi, H.; Inaba, Y.; Kataoka, H.; Sayama, J.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.

    2011-04-01

    Using ultrahigh vacuum sputter film deposition, we fabricated L1{sub 0}-type Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} ordered alloy perpendicular films on MgO(001) single-crystal substrates and 2.5 in. glass disks at low substrate temperatures of 200-350 deg. C. Then we examined the magnetic properties of the dot arrays made from these films. The uniaxial magnetic anisotropy K{sub u} for L1{sub 0}-type FePt films (10 nm in thickness) deposited with a Pd underlayer on MgO(001) substrates reached about 2 x 10{sup 7} erg/cm{sup 3} at the substrate temperature T{sub s} of 200 deg. C, and 3 x 10{sup 7} erg/cm{sup 3} at T{sub s} = 250 deg. C. The order parameter S was about 0.46 at T{sub s} = 300 deg. C. Moreover, K{sub u} for L1{sub 0}-FePt films fabricated on glass disks using MgO/Cr underlayers shows 3.4 x 10{sup 7} erg/cm{sup 3} at T{sub s} = 300 deg. C, which was almost equal to that for FePt single-crystal films deposited on Pd/MgO(001). The switching field distribution {sigma}/H{sub c} for dot arrays made from L1{sub 0}-FePt film [5 nm in thickness, on Pd/MgO(001) at T{sub s} = 250 deg. C] was small; {sigma}/H{sub c}= 0.11 for a dot diameter of 15 nm. This value was smaller than that of hcp-Co{sub 75}Pt{sub 25} dot arrays ({sigma}/H{sub c} = 0.18). The difference was mainly attributable to the degree of the easy axis distribution. This result demonstrates the homogeneous formation of a L1{sub 0}-type ordered structure in the FePt layers.

  4. AFM investigations of the morphology features and local mechanical properties of HTS YBCO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Yakov M.; Verdyan, Armen; Lapsker, Igor; Azoulay, Jacob

    2004-08-01

    In the paper presented here the application of the atomic force microscope (AFM) is considered for evaluation of hardness and Young's modulus of high Tc superconducting YBCO thin films of different thickness (from 0.05 to 1 μm) grown on unbuffered SrTiO 3 (film I) and on sapphire with a buffer layer of CeO 2 (film II). The best film features a transition temperature Tc of 90 K, critical current density Jc ( H=0) of 3 × 10 7 A/cm 2 at 4.2 K and 2 × 10 6 A/cm 2 at 77 K. The relationship between mechanical properties and microstructure of these films was investigated. It was found that all the films comprised well-defined Cu-rich precipitates of different size and with different density on their surface. For both type of films the hardness was measured to be in the range of 12-18 GPa. The Young's modulus of the films was about 180-200 GPa. The nanoindentation and nanoscratching measurements showed that the mechanical strength of the films studied was determined mainly by mechanical failure and surface defects (secondary phases).

  5. Observation of Spin-flop Transition in Antiferromagnetic Organic Molecular Conductors using AFM Micro-cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumoto, Madoka; Otsuka, Takeo; Kobayashi, Akiko

    2005-03-01

    A series of (BETS)2Fe1-xGaxCl1-yBry salts is a good candidate for a systematic study of π-d interaction between the conduction electrons and local magnetic moments in organic conductors. Some of them show antiferromagnetic ground state at low temperatures. A torque magnetometry is useful for precise determination of the easy axis as well as the spin-flop field. In this work we will report on the measurements of spin-flop transitions in antiferromagnetic organic molecular conductors including λ-(BETS)2FeCl4[1], using a commercial self-sensing piezo-resistive microcantilever for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) developed by Seiko Instruments Inc. We have succeeded in observation of spin-flop transitions of tiny single crystals including λ-(BETS)2FeCl4 as small as less than 1μg[2]. The results are consistent with the capacitive magnetic torque study[3]. [1] M. Tokumoto et al. Synth. Metals 86, 2161 (1997). [2] M. Tokumoto et al., ICMM2004, Polyhedron in press. [3] T. Sasaki et al., Synth. Metals 120, 759 (2001).

  6. Nanogap based graphene coated AFM tips with high spatial resolution, conductivity and durability.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Mario; Gao, Teng; Yin, Zixuan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan; Tong, Yuzhen; Shen, Ziyong; Duan, Huiling

    2013-11-21

    After one decade of analyzing the intrinsic properties of graphene, interest into the development of graphene-based devices and micro electromechanical systems is increasing. Here, we fabricate graphene-coated atomic force microscope tips by growing the graphene on copper foil and transferring it onto the apex of a commercially available AFM tip. The resulting tip exhibits surprising enhanced resolution in nanoscale electrical measurements. By means of topographic AFM maps and statistical analyses we determine that this superior performance may be related to the presence of a nanogap between the graphene and the tip apex, which reduces the tip radius and tip-sample contact area. In addition, the graphene-coated tips show a low tip-sample interaction, high conductivity and long life times. The novel fabrication-friendly tip could improve the quality and reliability of AFM experiments, while reducing the cost of AFM-based research.

  7. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-27

    dynamic response • Waterhammer effect Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Hydroxyethylhydrazinium Nitrate ...Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HEHN) (HAN) [ ]-NO3 + [ ]HOCH2CH2N2H4 [ ]-+[ ]NH3OH NO3 AF-M315E

  8. Quantitative Measurements of Elastic Properties with Ultrasonic-Based AFM and Conventional Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, D. C.

    A prime motivation for the original development of ultrasonic-based AFM methods was to enable measurements of elastic properties with nanoscale spatial resolution. In this chapter, we discuss the quantitative measurement of elastic modulus with ultrasonic-based AFM methods and compare it to measurement by more conventional or established techniques. First, we present the basic principles of modulus measurement with methods that involve contact resonance spectroscopy, such as atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and ultrasonic AFM (U-AFM). Fundamental concepts of modulus measurement with more established approaches, especially instrumented (nano-) indentation (NI) and surface acoustic wave spectroscopy (SAWS), are then discussed. We consider the relative strengths and limitations of various approaches, for example measurement accuracy, spatial resolution, and applicability to different materials. Example results for specific material systems are given with an emphasis on studies involving direct intercomparison of different techniques. Finally, current research in this area and opportunities for future work are described.

  9. Leveraging Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) Senior Leadership Corps Diversity to Improve Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    commanders and AFMS senior leadership; • Set a single PME standard for AFMS officers; • Shift provider billets to patient care roles and establish...single PME standard, and by realigning human resources to increase clinical currency, medical readiness and resource efficiency. Some structural...organizational entity. Like running a surgical service or a medical service. . . . It’s much bigger than that, because you’re dealing with finance and

  10. Surface Microstructure of Mo(C)N Coatings Investigated by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, T.; Zubar, T.; Chizhik, S.; Gilewicz, A.; Lupicka, O.; Warcholinski, B.

    2016-12-01

    MoCN coatings have been formed by cathodic arc evaporation using the mixture of acetylene and nitrogen and pure molybdenum target. The surface structure, in conjunction with x-ray data, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM results show differently shaped grain forms on the surface of coatings investigated. The increase in carbon in chemical coatings composition results in the reduction in surface grain size and the increase in roughness of the coatings.

  11. Attaching single biomolecules selectively to the apex of AFM tips for measuring specific interactions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianhua; Xiao, Zhongdang; Yam, Chi-Ming; Qin, Guoting; Deluge, Maxence; Boutet, Sabine; Cai, Chengzhi

    2005-11-01

    We present a general approach for preparing well-defined AFM tips for probing single target molecules. We demonstrated that carboxylic acid groups could be generated by electrochemical oxidation selectively at the apex of an AFM tip that is coated with a monolayer of oligo(ethylene glycol) derivatives for resisting nonspecific interactions. These carboxylic acid groups were used as handles to tether only one ligand molecule, such as biotin, to the tip apex for measurement of specific interactions with biomolecules.

  12. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  13. Zeta potential, contact angles, and AFM imaging of protein conformation adsorbed on hybrid nanocomposite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ana C; Piedade, Ana P

    2013-08-28

    The sputtering deposition of gold (Au) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) was used to prepare a nanocomposite hybrid thin film suitable for protein adsorption while maintaining the native conformation of the biological material. The monolithic PTFE and the nanocomposite PTFE/Au thin films, with Au content up to 1 at %, were co-deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering using argon as a discharge gas and deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrates, the most commonly used steel in biomaterials. The deposited thin films, before and after bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, were thoroughly characterized with special emphasis on the surface properties/characteristics by atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential, and static and dynamic contact angle measurements, in order to assess the relationship between structure and conformational changes. The influence of a pre-adsorbed peptide (RGD) was also evaluated. The nanotopographic and chemical changes induced by the presence of gold in the nanocomposite thin films enable RGD bonding, which is critical for the maintenance of the BSA native conformation after adsorption.

  14. Alumina decorated TiO2 nanotubes with ordered mesoporous walls as high sensitivity NO(x) gas sensors at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lü, Renjiang; Zhou, Wei; Shi, Keying; Yang, Ying; Wang, Lei; Pan, Kai; Tian, Chungui; Ren, Zhiyu; Fu, Honggang

    2013-09-21

    Alumina (Al2O3) decorated anatase TiO2 nanotubes with ordered mesoporous pore walls (Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotubes) are successfully synthesized through vacuum pressure induction technology, and then combined with the thermal decomposition of a mesoporous TiO2 sol precursor, inside the cylindrical nanochannels of an anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) template. The decorated Al2O3 was formed by in situ deposition via direct reaction of the strong acid sol precursor and the nanochannel wall of the AAO template. The resultant Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotubes are characterized in detail by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption. The experimental results reveal that the Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotubes have a tubular structure with an average diameter of ∼200 nm and highly ordered mesopores in the tubular walls. The Al2O3 is distributed evenly on the anatase TiO2 nanotubes. Moreover, the Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotubes possess a large specific surface area (136 m(2) g(-1)) and narrow mesopore size distribution (∼10 nm). By using NO(x) as a probe molecule, the Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotube films exhibit better sensing performance than that of mesoporous TiO2 nanotubes, in terms of their high sensitivity, fast response-recovery time, and good stability in air at room temperature. The outstanding performance in the gas sensing ability of Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotubes is a result of their one-dimensional tubular and mesoporous nanostructures, advantageous for the adsorption and diffusion of NO(x) gas. In addition, the sensing response is greatly improved by virtue of the decorated Al2O3 on the surfaces of the TiO2 nanotubes, which acts as an energy barrier to suppress charge recombination. The structural properties of the Al2O3/meso-TiO2 nanotubes makes them a viable novel gas sensor material at room temperature.

  15. Adsorption of modified dextrins to a hydrophobic surface: QCM-D studies, AFM imaging, and dynamic contact angle measurements.

    PubMed

    Sedeva, Iliana G; Fetzer, Renate; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Beattie, David A

    2010-05-15

    The adsorption of three dextrin-based polymers, regular wheat dextrin (Dextrin TY), phenyl succinate dextrin (PS Dextrin), and styrene oxide dextrin (SO Dextrin) on a model hydrophobic surface, consisting of a mixed alkanethiol layer on gold, has been characterized using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The three polymers exhibited varying affinities and capacity for adsorption on the hydrophobic substrate. Atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging of the polymer layers indicates that all three polymers fully cover the surface. The effect of the three polymers on the static contact angle of the surface was studied using captive bubble contact angle measurements. The three polymers were seen to reduce the receding contact angle by similar amounts (approximately 14°) in spite of having varying adsorbed amounts and differences in adsorbed layer water content. Although no differences were observed in the ability of the polymers to reduce the static contact angle, measurements of the dynamic contact angle between a rising air bubble and the polymer covered substrate yielded stark differences between the polymers, with one polymer (SO Dextrin) slowing the dewetting by an order of magnitude more than the other two polymers. The differences in dewetting behavior correlate with the adsorbed layer characteristics determined by QCM-D and AFM. The role of the dynamic and static contact angle in the performance of a polymer as depressant is discussed.

  16. [IR/UV spectroscopic analysis of gangliosides and their microstructures of polymeric aggregates observed by AFM technique].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-long; Sun, Run-guang; Zhang, Jing; Hao, Chang-chun

    2009-04-01

    Gangliosides, a kind of acid glycosphingolipid containing sialic acid, plays a very important physiological role in biomembrane as one of the important components of neurocyte membrane. They were extracted from bovine brain by the Folch method and purified by silica gel and DEAE-Sephadex A-25 column chromatograph. Their molecular functional groups and microstructures of polymeric aggregates were studied by infrared spectrum (IR), ultraviolet spectrum (UV) and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results indicate that: 55.2 mg of Gls from 100 g of wet bovine brain had a certain purity, 62.84%. And their UV absorption spectra appeared at 195 nm, near to the results reported by other peoples. Compared with the IR spectra of sialic acid, the experimental results showed that the structures of the products had the units of sialic acid. In order to investigate the aggregate structures of ganglioside. AFM technique was applied in water, and the results showed that gangliosides can form spherical or ellipsoidal structures in water. It was determined that the size of polymeric aggregates of gangliosides varies between 55 and 380 nm, the average size is (148.9+/-66.7) nm; the height is between 1.0 and 5.0 nm, and the average height is (3.25+/-1.01) nm. The experimental results provide a theoretical and experimental basis for investigating biological activity and the exploitation and utilization of neural drugs.

  17. Drastic changes in electronic properties of Kondo semiconductor CeRu2Al10 induced by Rh doping: Anisotropic transport properties in the antiferromagnetic ordered state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, H.; Nohara, H.; Nakagawa, F.; Yoshida, K.; Sera, M.; Nishioka, T.

    2016-10-01

    Electrical resistivity (ρ ), thermopower, and specific heat measurements have been performed on the novel Kondo semiconductor Ce (Ru1-xRhx) 2Al10 (x =0 , 0.02, 0.03, and 0.05), which has been attracting a great deal of interest due to an unusual antiferromagnetic (AFM) order below T0, in order to clarify the Rh doping effect on the anisotropy of the electronic properties in the ordered state. In CeRu2Al10 , ρ shows an anisotropic increase below T0 independently of the electric current direction. We propose the existence of two different mechanisms to explain the anisotropic increase of ρ . One is an isotropic charge gap which enhances ρ below T0 isotropically, although its origin is not known at present. The other is an anisotropic suppression of ρ which originates from the anisotropic c-f hybridization and is largest along the orthorhombic a axis. By the Rh doping, the anisotropic temperature dependence of ρ below T0 is drastically changed. For I ∥b , the increase is almost completely suppressed and a metallic-like behavior is observed, whereas it is small and isotropic for I ∥a and c . From these results, we propose that as a result of the destruction of the spin-gap excitation by the Rh doping, a metallic-like electronic state is formed along the b axis and the small isotropic charge gap is opened in the a c plane. By taking into account the present results and the still high T0 even in x =0.05 , we conclude that the AFM order in the Rh-doped CeRu2Al10 should be viewed as unusual as the AFM order in CeRu2Al10 although the localized character of the Ce-4 f electron is apparently enhanced by the Rh doping. We have also examined the evolution of the AFM ordered state from x =0 to x =0.05 , where the AFM ordered moment (mAF) is aligned along the c axis in x =0 and a axis in x =0.05 . From the results of those experiments in magnetic field, we have revealed that the spin reorientation from mAF∥c to mAF∥a takes place quite abruptly just at xc˜0

  18. Electronic structure and the origin of the high ordering temperature in SrRu2O6

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J.

    2015-06-16

    SrRu2O6 is a layered honeycomb-lattice material with an extraordinarily high magnetic ordering temperature. We investigated this material using density functional calculations. We find that the energy scales for moment formation and ordering are similar and high. Additionally, we find that the magnetic anisotropy is high and favors moments oriented along the c axis. This provides an explanation for the exceptionally high ordering temperature. Finally, the compound is found to be semiconducting at the bare density functional level, even without magnetic order. Lastly, we discuss experimental consequences of this scenario for the high ordering temperature.

  19. Low temperature corneal laser welding investigated by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Sbrana, Francesca; Tiribilli, Bruno; Pini, Roberto

    2009-02-01

    The structural modifications in the stromal matrix induced by low-temperature corneal laser welding were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This procedure consists of staining the wound with Indocyanine Green (ICG), followed by irradiation with a near-infrared laser operated at low-power densities. This induces a local heating in the 55-65 °C range. In welded tissue, extracellular components undergo heat-induced structural modifications, resulting in a joining effect between the cut edges. However, the exact mechanism generating the welding, to date, is not completely understood. Full-thickness cuts, 3.5 mm in length, were made in fresh porcine cornea samples, and these were then subjected to laser welding operated at 16.7 W/cm2 power density. AFM imaging was performed on resin-embedded semi-thin slices once they had been cleared by chemical etching, in order to expose the stromal bulk of the tissue within the section. We then carried out a morphological analysis of characteristic fibrillar features in the laser-treated and control samples. AFM images of control stromal regions highlighted well-organized collagen fibrils (36.2 +/- 8.7 nm in size) running parallel to each other as in a typical lamellar domain. The fibrils exhibited a beaded pattern with a 22-39 nm axial periodicity. Laser-treated corneal regions were characterized by a significant disorganization of the intralamellar architecture. At the weld site, groups of interwoven fibrils joined the cut edges, showing structural properties that were fully comparable with those of control regions. This suggested that fibrillar collagen is not denatured by low-temperature laser welding, confirming previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, and thus it is probably not involved in the closure mechanism of corneal cuts. The loss of fibrillar organization may be related to some structural modifications in some interfibrillar substance as proteoglycans or collagen VI. Furthermore, AFM

  20. Doping effects on the hybridization gap and antiferromagnetic order in the Kondo semiconductor CeO s2A l10 studied by break-junction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, J.; Ekino, T.; Yamada, Y.; Okada, Y.; Sugimoto, A.; Muro, Y.; Takabatake, T.

    2017-01-01

    The Kondo semiconductors Ce T2A l10 (T =Ru and Os) exhibit antiferromagnetic (AFM) orders at unexpectedly high temperatures TN=27.0 and 28.5 K, respectively, whose mechanism remains in debate. We report the break-junction experiments on 4 f /5 d -hole and 5 d -electron doped CeO s2A l10 as well as nondoped CeR u2A l10 . The differential conductance spectra d I /d V for T =Os and Ru show three gap structures; two hybridization gaps V1, V2 and an AFM gap VAF, whose magnitudes for T =Os are 15 -50 % larger than for T =Ru . Doping of 4 f /5 d holes and 5 d electrons in CeO s2A l10 changes the d I /d V spectrum in very different ways. Nevertheless, in all cases, the suppression of V1 is well correlated with those of VAF and TN. Furthermore, the zero-bias conductance decreases on cooling below T* (>TN ) only in the doping region where V1 and VAF coexist. This fact indicates that the unusual AFM order is preceded by the decrease in the density of states in the presence of V1.

  1. Magnetic structures of the low temperature phase of Mn3(VO4)2 - towards understanding magnetic ordering between adjacent Kagomé layers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Oliver; Rohrer, Jochen; Nénert, Gwilherm

    2016-01-07

    In this article we report on a detailed analysis of the magnetic structures of the magnetic phases of the low temperature (lt-) phase of Mn3(VO4)2 (=Mn3V2O8) with a Kagomé staircase structure determined by means of powder neutron diffraction. Two magnetic transitions were found at ∼25 K (HT1 phase, Cmc'a') and ∼17 K (LT1 phase, Pmc'a'), in excellent agreement with previous reports. The LT1 phase is characterized by commensurate magnetic ordering of the magnetic moments on two magnetic sites of the Mn1a/b (2a + 2d) and Mn2 (8i) ions of the nuclear structure (where for the latter site two different overall orientations of magnetic moments within the ab-plane (Mn2a and Mn2b) can be distinguished. This results in mainly antiferromagnetic interactions between edge-sharing Mn-octahedra within the Kagomé planes. The HT1 phase is characterised by strong spin frustration resulting from the loss of ordering of the magnetic moments of Mn2a/b ions along the b-axis. Both magnetic structures are in agreement with the previously reported ferrimagnetic properties of lt-Mn3(VO4)2 and shed light on the magnetic phase diagram of the compound reported previously. The magnetic structures are discussed with respect to superexchange interaction pathways within the Kagomé layers, which appear to be predominantly antiferromagnetic. The magnetic structures of Mn3(VO4)2 are different compared to those reported for Ni3(VO4)2 and Co3(VO4)2 and represent an unique commensurate way out of spin frustration for compounds with strong antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions within the Kagomé layers. Additionally, we derive a superexchange model, which will be called redox-mediated M-M(')(d(0))-M superexchange and which can help to understand the exclusively ferromagnetic ordering of adjacent Kagomé layers found only for lt-Mn3(VO4)2.

  2. The origin of the double-triangle hysteresis loops in ErFeO3 near the low temperature erbium ordering transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, L. T.; Bazaliy, Ya. B.; Kakazei, G. N.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic properties of an orthoferrite ErFeO3 are determined by the iron and the rare-earth magnetic ions. Interactions between magnetic sub-systems of ErFeO3 lead to a sequence of orientation phase transitions observed in this material. In this work hysteresis loops in single crystal ErFeO3 samples were studied below the spin-rotation transition region, T < 80 K. Above and around the compensation point Tcomp= 46 K the hysteresis loops are rectangular, with the coercive force diverging at Tcomp. As the temperature is lowered towards the erbium ordering transition TN2= 4.1 K, the shape of the loops experiences a dramatic change. At 20 K the loops develop triangular ``tails.'' At 10 K the triangles become prominent while the central rectangular part near H = 0 collapses. A double-loop hysteresis pattern with two triangular loops emerges. We explain this behavior by a domain wall motion reversal mechanism with negligible pinning of the walls in the sample. The transition from the rectangular to the double-triangle loops is due to the competition between the energy barrier of wall nucleation and the demagnetization energy gain achieved by placing the wall inside the sample. Our model explains well the correlation of the loop's shapes and sizes with the total magnetization of ErFeO3.

  3. Interfacial superconductivity in a bi-collinear antiferromagnetically ordered FeTe monolayer on a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Manna, S; Kamlapure, A; Cornils, L; Hänke, T; Hedegaard, E M J; Bremholm, M; Iversen, B B; Hofmann, Ph; Wiebe, J; Wiesendanger, R

    2017-01-17

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in Fe-based compounds triggered numerous investigations on the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and on the enhancement of transition temperatures through interface effects. It is widely believed that the emergence of optimal superconductivity is intimately linked to the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, although the exact microscopic picture remains elusive because of the lack of atomically resolved data. Here we present spin-polarized scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of ultrathin FeTe1-xSex (x=0, 0.5) films on bulk topological insulators. Surprisingly, we find an energy gap at the Fermi level, indicating superconducting correlations up to Tc∼6 K for one unit cell FeTe grown on Bi2Te3, in contrast to the non-superconducting bulk FeTe. The gap spatially coexists with bi-collinear AFM order. This finding opens perspectives for theoretical studies of competing orders in Fe-based superconductors and for experimental investigations of exotic phases in superconducting layers on topological insulators.

  4. Interfacial superconductivity in a bi-collinear antiferromagnetically ordered FeTe monolayer on a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, S.; Kamlapure, A.; Cornils, L.; Hänke, T.; Hedegaard, E. M. J.; Bremholm, M.; Iversen, B. B.; Hofmann, Ph.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in Fe-based compounds triggered numerous investigations on the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and on the enhancement of transition temperatures through interface effects. It is widely believed that the emergence of optimal superconductivity is intimately linked to the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, although the exact microscopic picture remains elusive because of the lack of atomically resolved data. Here we present spin-polarized scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of ultrathin FeTe1-xSex (x=0, 0.5) films on bulk topological insulators. Surprisingly, we find an energy gap at the Fermi level, indicating superconducting correlations up to Tc~6 K for one unit cell FeTe grown on Bi2Te3, in contrast to the non-superconducting bulk FeTe. The gap spatially coexists with bi-collinear AFM order. This finding opens perspectives for theoretical studies of competing orders in Fe-based superconductors and for experimental investigations of exotic phases in superconducting layers on topological insulators.

  5. Interfacial superconductivity in a bi-collinear antiferromagnetically ordered FeTe monolayer on a topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Manna, S.; Kamlapure, A.; Cornils, L.; Hänke, T.; Hedegaard, E. M. J.; Bremholm, M.; Iversen, B. B.; Hofmann, Ph.; Wiebe, J.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in Fe-based compounds triggered numerous investigations on the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism, and on the enhancement of transition temperatures through interface effects. It is widely believed that the emergence of optimal superconductivity is intimately linked to the suppression of long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order, although the exact microscopic picture remains elusive because of the lack of atomically resolved data. Here we present spin-polarized scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of ultrathin FeTe1−xSex (x=0, 0.5) films on bulk topological insulators. Surprisingly, we find an energy gap at the Fermi level, indicating superconducting correlations up to Tc∼6 K for one unit cell FeTe grown on Bi2Te3, in contrast to the non-superconducting bulk FeTe. The gap spatially coexists with bi-collinear AFM order. This finding opens perspectives for theoretical studies of competing orders in Fe-based superconductors and for experimental investigations of exotic phases in superconducting layers on topological insulators. PMID:28094258

  6. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  7. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  8. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  9. Hybrid Metrology and 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.

    2011-11-10

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R and D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials...). Therefore, time for R and D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam.In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R and D and production. The final goal for 'chip makers' is to improve yield and save R and D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2{sup nd} part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  10. Hybrid Metrology & 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.; Irmer, B.; Penzkofer, C.

    2011-11-01

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R&D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials…). Therefore, time for R&D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam. In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R&D and production. The final goal for "chip makers" is to improve yield and save R&D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2nd part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  11. Second order phase transition temperature of single crystals of Gd5Si1.3Ge2.7 and Gd5Si1.4Ge2.6

    DOE PAGES

    Hadimani, R. L.; Melikhov, Y.; Schlagel, D. L.; ...

    2015-01-30

    Gd5(SixGe1–x)4 has mixed phases in the composition range 0.32 < x < 0.41, which have not been widely studied. In this paper, we have synthesized and indexed single crystal samples of Gd5Si1.3Ge2.7 and Gd5Si1.4Ge2.6. In this study, we have investigated the first order and second order phase transition temperatures of these samples using magnetic moment vs. temperature and magnetic moment vs. magnetic field at different temperatures. We have used a modified Arrott plot technique that was developed and reported by us previously to determine the “hidden” second order phase transition temperature of the orthorhombic II phase.

  12. AFM Quantitative Morphological Analysis Of The Step Bunching Instability Formed On GaAs(110) During H-assisted MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespillo, M. L.; Tejedor, P.

    2007-04-01

    Power Spectral Density (PSD) analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images has been applied to study the effect of H-assisted surface oxide cleaning on the step bunching and Bales-Zangwill instabilities that develop during homoepitaxial growth from molecular beams of Ga and As4 on vicinal GaAs(110) substrates at high temperatures and high As:Ga flux ratios, leading to the formation of a characteristic ripple pattern along the [001] tilt direction. As growth proceeds in the presence of chemisorbed H, step bunching gradually vanishes and the ripple pattern breaks up into an array of self-organized nanowires running along the [11¯0] step edge direction.

  13. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  14. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)−1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  15. Mutant AFM 2 of Alcaligenes faecalis for phenol biodegradation using He-Ne laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Wen, Jianping; Caiyin, Qinggele; Lin, Liangcai; Hu, Zongding

    2006-11-01

    He-Ne laser technology was utilized in this study to investigate the response of Alcaligenes faecalis to laser stimulation. The irradiation experiments were conducted by the adjustment of the output power from 5 to 25 mW and the exposure time from 5 to 25 min. The results showed that the survival rate changed regularly with the variety of irradiation dose, and high positive mutation frequency was determined by both the energy density and the output power. The mutant strain AFM 2 was obtained. Phenol biodegradation assay demonstrated that AFM 2 possessed a more prominent phenol-degrading potential than its parent strain, which presumably attributed to the improvements of phenol hydroxylase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activities. The phenol of 2000 mgl(-1) was completely degraded by AFM 2 within 85.5h at 30 degrees C. In addition, the cell growth and phenol degradation kinetics of the mutant strain AFM 2 and its parent strain in batch cultures were also investigated at the wide initial phenol concentration ranging from 0 to 2000 mgl(-1) by Haldane model. The results of these experiments further demonstrated that the mutant strain AFM 2 possessed a higher capacity to resist phenol.

  16. Accelerated design and quality control of impact modifiers for plastics through atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Gunter

    2011-03-01

    Standard polymer resins are often too brittle or do not meet other mechanical property requirements for typical polymer applications. To achieve desired properties it is common to disperse so called ``impact modifiers'', which are spherical latex particles with diameters of much less than one micrometer, into the pure resin. Understanding and control of the entire process from latex particle formation to subsequent dispersion into polymer resins are necessary to accelerate the development of new materials that meet specific application requirements. In this work AFM imaging and nanoindentation techniques in combination with AFM-based spectroscopic techniques were applied to assess latex formation and dispersion. The size and size distribution of the latex particles can be measured based on AFM amplitude modulation images. AFM phase images provide information about the chemical homogeneity of individual particles. Nanoindentation may be used to estimate their elastic and viscoelastic properties. Proprietary creep and nanoscale Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) tests that we have developed were used to measure these mechanical properties. The small size of dispersed latex inclusions requires local mechanical and spectroscopic analysis techniques with high lateral and spatial resolution. We applied the CRAVE AFM method, developed at NIST, to perform mechanical analysis of individual latex inclusions and compared results with those obtained using nanoscale DMA. NanoIR, developed by Anasys Inc., and principal component confocal Raman were used for spectroscopic analysis and results from both techniques compared.

  17. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  18. Quantitating membrane bleb stiffness using AFM force spectroscopy and an optical sideview setup.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Carina; Huang, Chaolie; Becker, Sarah F; Stamov, Dimitar R; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-03-01

    AFM-based force spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cell mechanics and adhesion on the single cell level. However, standard setups featuring an AFM mounted on an inverted light microscope only provide a bottom view of cell and AFM cantilever but cannot visualize vertical cell shape changes, for instance occurring during motile membrane blebbing. Here, we have integrated a mirror-based sideview system to monitor cell shape changes resulting from motile bleb behavior of Xenopus cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during AFM elasticity and adhesion measurements. Using the sideview setup, we quantitatively investigate mechanical changes associated with bleb formation and compared cell elasticity values recorded during membrane bleb and non-bleb events. Bleb protrusions displayed significantly lower stiffness compared to the non-blebbing membrane in the same cell. Bleb stiffness values were comparable to values obtained from blebbistatin-treated cells, consistent with the absence of a functional actomyosin network in bleb protrusions. Furthermore, we show that membrane blebs forming within the cell-cell contact zone have a detrimental effect on cell-cell adhesion forces, suggesting that mechanical changes associated with bleb protrusions promote cell-cell detachment or prevent adhesion reinforcement. Incorporating a sideview setup into an AFM platform therefore provides a new tool to correlate changes in cell morphology with results from force spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density D Δ f(f m) is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL) detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure D Δ f(f m) for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops. PMID:28144538

  20. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  1. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  2. X-AFm stabilization as a mechanism of bypassing conversion phenomena in calcium aluminate cements

    SciTech Connect

    Falzone, Gabriel; Balonis, Magdalena; Sant, Gaurav

    2015-06-15

    Phase conversion phenomena are often observed in calcium aluminate cements (CACs), when the water-rich hydrates (e.g., CAH{sub 10}, C{sub 2}AH{sub 8}) formed at early ages, at temperatures ≤ 30 °C, expel water in time to form more compact, less water-rich structures (C{sub 3}AH{sub 6}). The phase conversions follow a path regulated by the thermodynamic stabilities (solubilities) of phases. Based on this premise, it is proposed that conversion phenomena in CACs can be bypassed by provoking the precipitation of phases more preferred than those typically encountered along the conversion pathway. Therefore, X-AFm formation (where in this case, X = NO{sub 3}{sup −}) triggered by the sequential addition of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} = CN) additives is identified as a new means of bypassing conversion. A multi-method approach comprising X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analytics, and evaluations of the compressive strength is applied to correlate phase balances and properties of CAC systems cured at 25 °C and 45 °C. The results highlight the absence of the C{sub 3}AH{sub 6} phase across all systems and the curing conditions considered, with enhanced strengths being noted, when sufficient quantities of CN are added. The experimental outcomes are supported by insights gained from thermodynamic calculations which highlight thermodynamic selectivity as a means of regulating and controlling the evolutions of solid phase balances using inorganic salts in CACs, and more generally in cementing material systems.

  3. Nanofractography of Composition B Fracture Surfaces With AFM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    structures (Miller and Garroway , 2001). Also, the monoclinic form(s), mostly assumed to be the ones present at low temperature, are known to exhibit...parameters of ~ 0.6, ~ 1.5, and ~ 2.0 - 2.1 nm lengths. No identification of potential cleavage planes are given in Miller and Garroway (Miller...and Garroway , 2001). TNT is known to be relatively ductile compared to the other listed energetic materials and shear deformation before fracture is

  4. DNA-duplex linker for AFM-SELEX of DNA aptamer against human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Musashi; Okumura, Yuzo; Amino, Tomokazu; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-02-15

    DNA-duplex interactions in thymines and adenins are used as a linker for the novel methodology of Atomic Force Microscope-Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXpotential enrichment (AFM-SELEX). This study used the hydrogen bonds in 10 mer of both thymines (T10) and adenines (A10). Initially, the interactive force in T10-A10 was measured by AFM, which returned an average interactive force of approximately 350pN. Based on this result, DNA aptamers against human serum albumin could be selected in the 4th round, and 15 different clones could be sequenced. The lowest dissociation constant of the selected aptamer was identified via surface plasmon resonance, and it proved to be identical to that of the commercial aptamer. Therefore, specific hydrogen bonds in DNA can be useful linkers for AFM-SELEX.

  5. In situ nanomanipulators as a tool to separate individual tobermorite crystals for AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianhe; Holzer, Lorenz; Kägi, Ralf; Winnefeld, Frank; Keller, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of cementitious materials are limited, mainly due to the lack of appropriate sample preparation techniques. In porous autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC), calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is produced in its crystalline form, tobermorite. The crystals are lath-like with a length of several micrometers. In this work, we demonstrate the application of nanomanipulators to separate an individual tobermorite crystal from the bulk AAC for subsequent AFM investigations. The nanomanipulators are operated directly in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). We studied the interaction between moisture and the tobermorite surface under controlled relative humidity (RH). The results of topography and adhesion force measurements with AFM suggest that the surface of tobermorite is hydrophobic, which contrasts the macroscopic material properties (e.g. moisture transport in capillary pores).

  6. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  7. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  8. AFM study of forces between silica, silicon nitride and polyurethane pads.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Igor; Ong, Quy K; Shodiev, Hasan; Chechik, Nina; James, David; Oliver, Mike

    2006-08-15

    Interaction of silica and silicon nitride with polyurethane surfaces is rather poorly studied despite being of great interest for modern semiconductor industry, e.g., for chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) processes. Here we show the results from the application of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to study the forces between silica or silicon nitride (AFM tips) and polyurethane surfaces in aqueous solutions of different acidity. The polyurethane surface potentials are derived from the measured AFM data. The obtained potentials are in rather good agreement with measurements of zeta-potentials using the streaming-potentials method. Another important parameter, adhesion, is also measured. While the surface potentials of silica are well known, there are ambiguous results on the potentials of silicon nitride that is naturally oxidized. Deriving the surface potential of the naturally oxidized silicon nitride from our measurements, we show that it is not oxidized to silica despite some earlier published expectations.

  9. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young's modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins.

  10. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  11. SEM and AFM imaging of solar cells defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škarvada, Pavel; Macků, Robert; Dallaeva, Dinara S.; Sedlák, Petr; Grmela, Lubomír.; Tománek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the successive localization and imaging of solar cell defects, going from macroscale to microscale. For the purpose of localization, the light emission from reversed bias samples is used. After rough macroscopic localization, microscopic localization by scanning probe microscopy combined with a photomultiplier (shadow mapping) is performed. The type of microscopic defects are discernable from their current-voltage plot or from noise measurements. Two specific defects, both of the avalanche type, with different voltage threshold, are presented in this paper. Current voltage plots and radiant flux versus voltage characteristics for two temperatures, topography, shadow map and corresponding SEM micrographs are shown for both samples.

  12. An Evaluation of the Impacts of AF-M315E Propulsion Systems for Varied Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fittje, James; Colozza, Anthony; Packard, Tom; Gyekenyesi, John; McLean, Christopher H.; Spores, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the AF-M315E COMPASS study is to identify near-term (3-5 years) and long term (5 years +) opportunities for infusion, specifically the thruster and associated component technologies being developed as part of the GPIM project. Develop design reference missions which show the advantages of the AF-M315E green propulsion system. Utilize a combination of past COMPASS designs and selected new designs to demonstrate AF-M315E advantages. Use the COMPASS process to show the puts and takes of using AF-M315E at the integrated system level.

  13. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-03

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets.

  14. [Study of in-situ measurement system for porous alumina film based on AFM and reflectometric interference spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Dong-Xian; Zhang, Hai-Jun

    2008-07-01

    An in-situ measurement system for porous alumina (PA) film based on atomic force microscope (AFM) in liquid and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIFS) was developed. The present article briefly discusses the principle and structure of the system, and introduces its unique characteristic. The system consists of probe unit, XY scanner, Z-piezo feedback system, computer and software, fiber optic spectrometer, anodization control circuitry etc. When a white light beam illuminates the surface of the film, the reflective light beams at the front and back side of the layer are coherent, and lead to periodical amplifications and extinction in the reflective spectrum with the information of the optical thickness of the film. A fiber optic spectrometer was applied in the system which input the refractive spectrum into the computer by which the optical thickness of the film was calculated. Meanwhile according to the surface topography of PA films by AFM in liquid, the effective refractive index was calculated based on Maxwell-Garnett theory and coherent potential approximation (CPA). So the thickness of PA films could be gained at last. To checkout the feasibility and stability of the system, the real-time scanning and thickness measurement experiments were done during anodization of Al sheets in oxalic acid aqueous solution. In the experiment, the authors used 25 mm diameter aluminum (Al) sheets with 99.999% purity and 0.4 mm thickness as the anode, and graphite rod as the cathode. The pretreatment-cleaned Al sheets were anodized in an aqueous solution of 0.5 mol x L(-1) oxalic acid at the constant temperature (20 +/- 0.2) degrees C with 20 mA x cm(-2) anodization electronic current density. Real-time AFM images of PA film were successfully obtained during anodization. The pore-ratios of Al sheet were 7.81% and 13.83% at oxidizing time 150 min and 180 min respectively. Correspondingly, the effective indexes were calculated to be 1.62 and 1.60, respectively

  15. Order-disorder phenomena in myelinated nerve sheaths: V. Effects of temperature on rat sciatic and optic nerves, and structural differences between the two types of nerve.

    PubMed

    Mateu, L; Luzzati, V; Vonasek, E; Mateu, E; Villegas, G M; Vargas, R

    1995-01-13

    We describe in this work X-ray scattering and electron microscope studies of rat sciatic and optic nerves as a function of temperature. The scattering experiments were analyzed as described in the previous papers of this series: a variety of parameters were determined, some of which characterize the lattice disorder, others the structure of the motif. The main results are the following. All the parameters determined by the X-ray scattering study vary with temperature and the temperature-dependence is specific for the type of nerve (sciatic or optic). Most of the disorder-related parameters display a minimum or a maximum in the vicinity of physiological temperature (38 degrees C in rat); this observation, strongly supported by the electron microscope study, shows that the degree of organization of myelin is highest near physiological temperature. The structure of the motif, as revealed by the electron density profile, is fairly different in the two types of nerves (in contrast with the assumption made by previous workers); the structure also varies with temperature and the temperature-induced alterations are nerve-type specific. In the two types of nerve the thickness of the lipid bilayer varies with temperature as expected for a lipid-containing system with hydrocarbon chains in the disordered conformation. In sciatic nerve the thickness of the (thinner) cytoplasmic polar layer, which is also the layer most affected by lattice disorder in this type of nerve, decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In optic nerve, in which lattice disorder predominantly affects the extracellular layer, the thickness of both the cytoplasmic and the extracellular layer is barely affected by temperature.

  16. Finite-temperature second-order many-body perturbation and Hartree-Fock theories for one-dimensional solids: an application to Peierls and charge-density-wave transitions in conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Ryu, Shinsei; Hirata, So

    2014-01-14

    Finite-temperature extensions of ab initio Gaussian-basis-set spin-restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories are implemented for infinitely extended, periodic, one-dimensional solids and applied to the Peierls and charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene. The HF theory predicts insulating CDW ground states for both systems in their equidistant structures at low temperatures. In the same structures, they turn metallic at high temperatures. Starting from the "dimerized" low-temperature equilibrium structures, the systems need even higher temperatures to undergo a Peierls transition, which is accompanied by geometric as well as electronic distortions from dimerized to non-dimerized forms. The conventional finite-temperature MP2 theory shows a sign of divergence in any phase at any nonzero temperature and is useless. The renormalized finite-temperature MP2 (MP2R) theory is divergent only near metallic electronic structures, but is well behaved elsewhere. MP2R also predicts CDW and Peierls transitions occurring at two different temperatures. The effect of electron correlation is primarily to lower the Peierls transition temperature.

  17. Finite-temperature second-order many-body perturbation and Hartree–Fock theories for one-dimensional solids: An application to Peierls and charge-density-wave transitions in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiao; Ryu, Shinsei; Hirata, So

    2014-01-14

    Finite-temperature extensions of ab initio Gaussian-basis-set spin-restricted Hartree–Fock (HF) and second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) theories are implemented for infinitely extended, periodic, one-dimensional solids and applied to the Peierls and charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions in polyyne and all-trans polyacetylene. The HF theory predicts insulating CDW ground states for both systems in their equidistant structures at low temperatures. In the same structures, they turn metallic at high temperatures. Starting from the “dimerized” low-temperature equilibrium structures, the systems need even higher temperatures to undergo a Peierls transition, which is accompanied by geometric as well as electronic distortions from dimerized to non-dimerized forms. The conventional finite-temperature MP2 theory shows a sign of divergence in any phase at any nonzero temperature and is useless. The renormalized finite-temperature MP2 (MP2R) theory is divergent only near metallic electronic structures, but is well behaved elsewhere. MP2R also predicts CDW and Peierls transitions occurring at two different temperatures. The effect of electron correlation is primarily to lower the Peierls transition temperature.

  18. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Neutron Scattering Study of Magnetic and Fe Vacancy Orders in (Tl,Rb)2 Fe4 Se5 Superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Feng; Bao, Wei; Chi, Song-Xue; ...

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic and iron vacancy orders in superconducting (Tl,Rb)2Fe4Se5 single-crystals by using a high-pressure neutron diffraction technique. Similar to the temperature effect, the block antiferromagnetic order gradually decreases upon increasing pressure while the Fe vacancy superstructural order remains intact before its precipitous disappearance at the critical pressure Pc = 8.3 GPa. Combined with previously determined Pc for superconductivity, our phase diagram under pressure reveals the concurrence of the block AFM order, the √5 × √5 iron vacancy order and superconductivity for the 245 superconductor. Lastly, a synthesis of current experimental data in a coherent physical picture is attempted.

  19. Fermion pseudogap from fluctuations of an order parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernyshyov, Oleg Vladimirovich

    Pseudogap behavior, observed in cuprate superconductors and Peierls chains, is studied using various phenomenological approaches. (1) A work of M. V. Sadovskii on Peierls chains with Gaussian fluctuations of the order parameter is revisited. A more transparent diagrammatic method is given and a serious error is pointed out. The method is applied to a recent work of J. Schmalian, B. Stojkovic and D. Pines on "hot spots". It is shown that, while their model is not affected by Sadovskii's mistake, it predicts no pseudogap in the local density of states. (2) A simple analytical treatment based on the self-consistent t-matrix approach is suggested to describe Cooper pair fluctuations deeply in the pseudogap regime. It is argued that a pronounced depletion of the fermion density of states by the pseudogap suppresses the decay of pairing fluctuations, giving them a propagating, rather than diffusing, nature. In view of an approximate particle-hole symmetry at the Fermi surface, both electron pairs and hole pairs should exist in the pseudogap regime, in addition to gapped fermions. Near 2 dimensions, the condensation temperature of these pairs is linearly proportional to the fermion density (the Uemura scaling). (3) A work of J. R. Schrieffer and A. R. Kampf on the crossover between an antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulator and a Fermi liquid is complemented by an exactly solvable toy model with all essential features intact. Based on that solution, the three bands of Schrieffer and Kampf are reinterpreted as just two AFM bands with a gap slowly varying in time or across the sample.

  20. Investigation of Molecular Interactions between AFM-Tip and Thiol Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhami, Ahmed; Moore, Justin; Lee, T. Randall

    Among various self-assembly processes, the formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is one of the most elegant ways for making an organic film with specific surface properties. Recently, much effort has been devoted in using AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to understanding the formation of alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces. Investigating the factors that affect the AFM tip-SAMs interactions is necessary to clarify the controversial results of these studies. Here, we investigated the interactions between bare AFM-tips and several SAMs thiols-gold surfaces under controlled humidity conditions. Our results demonstrate that the Tip-SAM interactions can be used to precisely determine the length of the thiol chains, the adhesion force between thiols head groups and the AFM tip, and the strength of the thiol-gold contact. Our findings on the dynamics and the structure of the SAMs of alkanethiols on gold are useful for detail understanding of the thermodynamics, kinetics and mechanisms of SAM technology assembly. NSF.

  1. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods.

  2. Combined AFM nano-machining and reactive ion etching to fabricate high aspect ratio structures.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ping; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Tang, Zirong

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, a new combined method of sub-micron high aspect ratio structure fabrication is developed which can be used for production of nano imprint template. The process includes atomic force microscope (AFM) scratch nano-machining and reactive ion etching (RIE) fabrication. First, 40 nm aluminum film was deposited on the silicon substrate by magnetron sputtering, and then sub-micron grooves were fabricated on the aluminum film by nano scratch using AFM diamond tip. As aluminum film is a good mask for etching silicon, high aspect ratio structures were finally fabricated by RIE process. The fabricated structures were studied by SEM, which shows that the grooves are about 400 nm in width and 5 microm in depth. To obtain sub-micron scale groove structures on the aluminum film, experiments of nanomachining on aluminum films under various machining conditions were conducted. The depths of the grooves fabricated using different scratch loads were also studied by the AFM. The result shows that the material properties of the film/substrate are elastic-plastic following nearly a bilinear law with isotropic strain hardening. Combined AFM nanomachining and RIE process provides a relative lower cost nano fabrication technique than traditional e-beam lithography, and it has a good prospect in nano imprint template fabrication.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  4. [AFM-based technologies as the way towards the reverse Avogadro number].

    PubMed

    Pleshakova, T O; Shumov, I D; Ivanov, Yu D; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Achievement of the concentration detection limit for proteins at the level of the reverse Avogadro number determines the modern development of proteomics. In this review, the possibility of approximating the reverse Avogadro number by using nanotechnological methods (AFM-based fishing with mechanical and electrical stimulation, nanowire detectors, and other methods) are discussed. The ability of AFM to detect, count, visualize and characterize physico-chemical properties of proteins at concentrations up to 10(-17)-10(-18) M is demonstrated. The combination of AFM-fishing with mass-spectrometry allows the identification of proteins not only in pure solutions, but also in multi-component biological fluids (serum). The possibilities to improve the biospecific fishing efficiency by use of SOMAmers in both AFM and nanowire systems are discussed. The paper also provides criteria for evaluation of the sensitivity of fishing-based detection systems. The fishing efficiency depending on the detection system parameters is estimated. The practical implementation of protein fishing depending on the ratio of the sample solution volume and the surface of the detection system is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of today's promising nanotechnological protein detection methods implemented on the basis of these schemes.

  5. First-principles AFM image simulation with frozen density embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    We present efficient first-principles method of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Ordinary nc-AFM simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) require exhaustive computational cost because it involves thousands of total energy calculations. Regarding the sample as a fixed external potential can reduce the computational cost, and we adopt frozen density embedding theory (FDET) for this purpose. Simulated nc-AFM images with FDET using a carbon monoxide tip well reproduces the full DFT images of benzene, pentacene, and graphene, although optimized tip-sample distances and interaction energies in FDET are underestimated and overestimated, respectively. The FDET-based simulation method is promising for AFM image simulation of surfaces and two-dimensional materials. This work was supported by U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46286 and Award No. DE-SC0008877, and by Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources are provided by NERSC and TACC.

  6. High-speed AFM for 1x node metrology and inspection: Does it damage the features?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian, Hamed; van den Dool, Teun C.; Uziel, Yoram; Bar Or, Ron

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at unraveling the mystery of damage in high speed AFMs for 1X node and below. With the device dimensions moving towards the 1X node and below, the semiconductor industry is rapidly approaching the point where existing metrology, inspection and review tools face huge challenges in terms of resolution, the ability to resolve 3D, and throughput. In this paper, we critically asses the important issue of damage in high speed AFM for metrology and inspection of semiconductor wafers. The issues of damage in four major scanning modes (contact mode, tapping mode, non-contact mode, and peak force tapping mode) are described to show which modes are suitable for which applications and which conditions are damaging. The effects of all important scanning parameters on resulting damage are taken into account for materials such as silicon, photoresists and low K materials. Finally, we recommend appropriate scanning parameters and conditions for several use cases (FinFET, patterned photoresist, HAR structures) that avoid exceeding a critical contact stress such that sample damage is minimized. In conclusion, we show using our theoretical analysis that selecting parameters that exceed the target contact stress, indeed leads to significant damage. This method provides AFM users for metrology with a better understanding of contact stresses and enables selection of AFM cantilevers and experimental parameters that prevent sample damage.

  7. Data fusion for CD metrology: heterogeneous hybridization of scatterometry, CDSEM, and AFM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazart, J.; Chesneau, N.; Evin, G.; Largent, A.; Derville, A.; Thérèse, R.; Bos, S.; Bouyssou, R.; Dezauzier, C.; Foucher, J.

    2014-04-01

    The manufacturing of next generation semiconductor devices forces metrology tool providers for an exceptional effort in order to meet the requirements for precision, accuracy and throughput stated in the ITRS. In the past years hybrid metrology (based on data fusion theories) has been investigated as a new methodology for advanced metrology [1][2][3]. This paper provides a new point of view of data fusion for metrology through some experiments and simulations. The techniques are presented concretely in terms of equations to be solved. The first point of view is High Level Fusion which is the use of simple numbers with their associated uncertainty postprocessed by tools. In this paper, it is divided into two stages: one for calibration to reach accuracy, the second to reach precision thanks to Bayesian Fusion. From our perspective, the first stage is mandatory before applying the second stage which is commonly presented [1]. However a reference metrology system is necessary for this fusion. So, precision can be improved if and only if the tools to be fused are perfectly matched at least for some parameters. We provide a methodology similar to a multidimensional TMU able to perform this matching exercise. It is demonstrated on a 28 nm node backend lithography case. The second point of view is Deep Level Fusion which works on the contrary with raw data and their combination. In the approach presented here, the analysis of each raw data is based on a parametric model and connections between the parameters of each tool. In order to allow OCD/SEM Deep Level Fusion, a SEM Compact Model derived from [4] has been developed and compared to AFM. As far as we know, this is the first time such techniques have been coupled at Deep Level. A numerical study on the case of a simple stack for lithography is performed. We show strict equivalence of Deep Level Fusion and High Level Fusion when tools are sensitive and models are perfect. When one of the tools can be considered as a

  8. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-04

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  9. Low temperature and magnetic field behaviour of the (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B. S. Sheppard, C. J.; Prinsloo, A. R. E.; Lodya, L.

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of the temperature (T) dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (χ) and electrical resistance (R) on an antiferromagnetic (AFM) (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy are reported in order to probe the existence of quantum critical behaviour (QCB) utilizing static magnetic fields (H) as a tuning parameter. The results indicate that an increase in H suppresses T{sub N} in such a way that it varies exponentially with increasing H. R(T) measurements show evidence of possible superconducting (SC) behaviour below 1 K at H = 0 T. These results therefore indicate the coexistence of the AFM and SC phases in the (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy.

  10. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Naik, Vikrant V; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E; Spencer, Nicholas D; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-21

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.

  11. AFM studies of the crystallization and habit modification of an excipient material, adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Keel, T R; Thompson, C; Davies, M C; Tendler, S J B; Roberts, C J

    2004-08-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the (1 0 0) face of crystalline adipic acid, both in air and liquid environments. In air, surface reorganization occurred during scanning of the AFM probe, which has been investigated using single point force-distance analysis under a controlled relative humidity (RH) environment. We suggest such reorganization can be attributed to the influence of a network of water molecules bound to the hydrophilic (1 0 0) surface permitting local AFM tip-enhanced dissolution and reorganization of the solute. In situ imaging was also carried out on the crystals, revealing etch-pit formation during dissolution, and rapid growth at higher levels of supersaturation (sigma), both of which are direct consequences of the hydrophilic nature of the (1 0 0) face. Also presented here are nanoscale observations of the effect of octanoic acid, a structurally-related habit modifier, on crystalline adipic acid. Using AFM, we have been able to show that the presence of octanoic acid at low concentration has little observable affect on the development of the (1 0 0) face; however, as this concentration is increased, there are clear changes in step morphology and growth mode on the (1 0 0) face of the crystal. At a concentration of 1.26 mmol dm(-3) (a concentration corresponding to a molar ratio of approximately 1:175 octanoic acid:adipic acid), growth on the (1 0 0) face is inhibited, with in situ AFM imaging indicating this is a direct consequence of octanoic acid binding to the surface, and pinning the monomolecular growth steps.

  12. Cubic-tetragonal transition in KMnF3: IR hard-mode spectroscopy and the temperature evolution of the (precursor) order parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Huali

    2009-08-01

    Precursor effects were observed in KMnF3 using infrared hard-mode spectroscopy. The intensity of the infrared-active mode near 265 cm-1 follows the thermodynamic order parameter, Q, in the tetragonal phase (I4/mcm). An additional weak signal is found in the cubic phase (Pm\\bar {3}m ). The order parameter step at To = 185.95 K (L = 0.129 J g-1) is smeared with excess intensity due to the tetragonal short range order extending to T>215 K. The intensity follows the predictions of Landau theory with a defect field Gdefect = -hQ, h = 6 J mol-1. The observed excess intensities are compared with the appearance of precursor elastic softening. It is concluded that the precursor softening and the local tetragonal short range order are likely to be related to an extended defect structure, such as a tweed pattern, which may be stabilized by extrinsic defects.

  13. Long-range Antiferromagnetic Order in [MnTe/ZnTe] Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhyne, J.; Lin, J.; Furdyna, J.; Giebultowicz, T.

    1997-03-01

    Long range antiferromagnetic order has been found in epitaxially-grown superlattices of [(MnTe)_x/(ZnTe)_y] with thin ZnTe interlayers (e.g, y=3D4-6 monolayers) and MnTe layer thicknesses x =3D 10 and 20. Previous studies(T.M. Giebultowicz, P. Klosowski, N. Samarth, H. Luo, J. K. Furdyna, and J.J. Rhyne, Phys. Rev. B 48), 12817 (1993). of [MnTe/ZnTe] superlattices with thicker ZnTe interlayers (e.g., y=3D18) revealed antiferromagnetic order confined to single MnTe layers consistent with strong nearest-neighbor (NN) exchange and relatively weak higher-neighbor exchange. The thin ZnTe layer superlattices show an inphase antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling coherent across several bilayers with spin directions on adjacent MnTe layers determined by assuming "phantom" spins on the ZnTe layers with the same AFM order as the MnTe layers. As the temperature is raised, this ordering slowly transforms into an antiphase coupling with spin directions in alternate MnTe layers reversed from their low temperature structure. The magnetic scattered intensity from both co-existing phases vanishes at a common Neel temperature near 75 K.

  14. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes.

  15. High-temperature orbital, charge, and structural phase transitions in the cation-ordered manganites TbBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} and YBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Anthony J.; Attfield, J. Paul; Redfern, Simon A.T.

    2005-11-01

    The high-temperature structures and phase transitions of the cation-ordered manganite perovskites TbBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} and YBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} have been studied by powder neutron diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. TbBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} undergoes an unprecedented transition from a charge and antiferro-orbitally ordered phase to a charge and ferro-orbitally ordered structure at 94.5 deg. C, and the charge and orbital ordering melts at 200 deg. C. An orthorhombic Cmmm phase with rotational order of MnO{sub 6} octahedra is observed above the transition, and at 514 deg. C this transforms to the aristotype tetragonal P4/mmm arrangement. YBaMn{sub 2}O{sub 6} is charge and ferro-orbitally ordered up to 225 deg. C. Above this charge ordering transition, a C2/m phase with two rotational orders is found. This transforms to the Cmmm structure at 437 deg. C. Discontinuities in volume and volume expansion, and a limited phase coexistence region are observed at the charge ordering transitions, whereas the other transitions are continuous.

  16. Static and dynamic properties of low-temperature order in the one-dimensional semiconductor (NbSe4)3I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominko, D.; Vdović, S.; Skenderović, H.; Starešinić, D.; Biljaković, K.; Ristić, D.; Ivanda, D.; Lorenzo, J. E.; Demsar, J.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated static and dynamic lattice properties in a quasi-one-dimensional charge-ordered semiconductor (NbSe4)3I by using Raman, femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. In addition to a well-documented pseudo-Jahn-Teller ferrodistortive structural transition at TC=274 K, where the displacements of Nb ions lead to ferroelectric (FE) in-chain polarization with opposite direction in adjacent chains, all methods suggest an additional lowering of symmetry at T*≈160 K. Although antiferroelectric (AFE) phase is partially formed at TC, our results consistently point to an enhancement of the interchain order at T*, thus leading to AFE order-disorder transition, as supported by the earlier dielectric and structural studies.

  17. Cubic-tetragonal transition in KMnF(3): IR hard-mode spectroscopy and the temperature evolution of the (precursor) order parameter.

    PubMed

    Salje, Ekhard K H; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Huali

    2009-08-19

    Precursor effects were observed in KMnF(3) using infrared hard-mode spectroscopy. The intensity of the infrared-active mode near 265 cm(-1) follows the thermodynamic order parameter, Q, in the tetragonal phase (I4/mcm). An additional weak signal is found in the cubic phase ([Formula: see text]). The order parameter step at T(o) = 185.95 K (L = 0.129 J g(-1)) is smeared with excess intensity due to the tetragonal short range order extending to T>215 K. The intensity follows the predictions of Landau theory with a defect field G(defect) = -hQ, h = 6 J mol(-1). The observed excess intensities are compared with the appearance of precursor elastic softening. It is concluded that the precursor softening and the local tetragonal short range order are likely to be related to an extended defect structure, such as a tweed pattern, which may be stabilized by extrinsic defects.

  18. Using a CBL Unit, a Temperature Sensor, and a Graphing Calculator to Model the Kinetics of Consecutive First-Order Reactions as Safe In-Class Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore-Russo, Deborah A.; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.; Schuman, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of Calculator-Based Laboratory (CBL) technology, the graphing calculator, and the cooling and heating of water to model the behavior of consecutive first-order reactions is presented, where B is the reactant, I is the intermediate, and P is the product for an in-class demonstration. The activity demonstrates the spontaneous and consecutive…

  19. Higher order nonlinear equations for the dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma with two temperature-ions and nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-04-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma whose constituents are negatively charged dust, Maxwellian ions with two distinct temperatures, and electrons following q-nonextensive distribution, is investigated by deriving a number of nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de-Vries (K-dV), the modified Korteweg-de-Vries (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic characteristics of the hump (positive potential) and dip (negative potential) shaped dust-acoustic (DA) Gardner solitons are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit. The effects of two temperature ions and electron nonextensivity on the basic features of DA K-dV, mK-dV, and Gardner solitons are also examined. It has been observed that the DA Gardner solitons exhibit negative (positive) solitons for qq{sub c}) (where q{sub c} is the critical value of the nonextensive parameter q). The implications of our results in understanding the localized nonlinear electrostatic perturbations existing in stellar polytropes, quark-gluon plasma, protoneutron stars, etc. (where ions with different temperatures and nonextensive electrons exist) are also briefly addressed.

  20. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  1. Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Various Dairy Products: Evidence for Biologically Reduced Amount of AFM1 in Yoghurt

    PubMed Central

    RAHIMIRAD, Amir; MAALEKINEJAD, Hassan; OSTADI, Araz; YEGANEH, Samal; FAHIMI, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a carcinogenic substance is found in milk and dairy products. The effect of season and type of dairy products on AFMi level in northern Iran was investigated in this study. Methods Three hundred samples (each season 75 samples) including raw and pasteurized milk, yoghurt, cheese, and cream samples were collected from three distinct milk producing farms. The samples were subjected to chemical and solid phase extractions and were analyzed by using HPLC technique. Recovery percentages, limit of detection and limit of quantification values were determined. Results Seventy percent and 98% were the minimum and maximum recoveries for cheese and raw milk, respectively and 0.021 and 0.063 ppb were the limit of detection and limit of quantification values for AFM1. We found that in autumn and winter the highest level (0.121 ppb) of AFM1 in cheese and cream samples and failed to detect any AFM1 in spring samples. Interestingly, our data showed that the yoghurt samples had the lowest level of AFM1 in all seasons. Conclusion There are significant differences between the AFM1 levels in dairy products in various seasons and also various types of products, suggesting spring and summer yoghurt samples as the safest products from AFM1 level point of view. PMID:25927044

  2. Confocal Raman spectroscopy and AFM for evaluation of sidewalls in type II superlattice FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, T. J.; Busani, T.; Rathi, P.; Jaeckel, F.; Reyes, P. A.; Malloy, K. J.; Ukhanov, A. A.; Plis, E.; Krishna, S.; Jaime-Vasquez, M.; Baril, N. F.; Benson, J. D.; Tenne, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    We propose to utilize confocal Raman spectroscopy combined with high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) for nondestructive characterisation of the sidewalls of etched and passivated small pixel (24 μm×24 μm) focal plane arrays (FPA) fabricated using LW/LWIR InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattice (T2SL) detector material. Special high aspect ratio Si and GaAs AFM probes, with tip length of 13 μm and tip aperture less than 7°, allow characterisation of the sidewall morphology. Confocal microscopy enables imaging of the sidewall profile through optical sectioning. Raman spectra measured on etched T2SL FPA single pixels enable us to quantify the non-uniformity of the mesa delineation process.

  3. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ferat; Yablon, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization. PMID:26665072

  4. Nano-Electrochemistry and Nano-Electrografting with an Original Combined AFM-SECM

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbal, Achraf; Grisotto, Federico; Charlier, Julienne; Palacin, Serge; Goyer, Cédric; Demaille, Christophe; Ben Brahim, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the advantages of the combination between atomic force microscopy and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The combined technique can perform nano-electrochemical measurements onto agarose surface and nano-electrografting of non-conducting polymers onto conducting surfaces. This work was achieved by manufacturing an original Atomic Force Microscopy-Scanning ElectroChemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) electrode. The capabilities of the AFM-SECM-electrode were tested with the nano-electrografting of vinylic monomers initiated by aryl diazonium salts. Nano-electrochemical and technical processes were thoroughly described, so as to allow experiments reproducing. A plausible explanation of chemical and electrochemical mechanisms, leading to the nano-grafting process, was reported. This combined technique represents the first step towards improved nano-processes for the nano-electrografting.

  5. Exploring electron transport through organic monolayers using conductive tip AFM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaini, Denis; Castronovo, Matteo; Dell'Angela, Martina; Hudej, Robert; Casalis, Loredana; Scoles, Giacinto

    2006-03-01

    We follow an alternative approach to the study of Metal-molecule-Metal junctions that uses a combination of two atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. We use Nanografting to build a nanopatch of the molecules of interest and a second made of a reference molecule into a hosting self assembled monolayer (SAM) typically made of alkanethiols. After the tip is changed to a conductive one CT-AFM is used to characterized the whole system recording, at the same time, the system topography. Some of the advantages of this approach are the possibility to build and study a wide range of different M-m-M junctions and the in-situ control of the quality of the monolayers and patches. Results will be presented on saturated and unsaturated thiols self-assembled and nanografted on Au(111) surfaces. The results will be compared with those obtained by Liang and Scoles at Princeton using similar techniques.

  6. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  7. Characterization of the polycaprolactone melt crystallization: complementary optical microscopy, DSC, and AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Speranza, V; Sorrentino, A; De Santis, F; Pantani, R

    2014-01-01

    The first stages of the crystallization of polycaprolactone (PCL) were studied using several techniques. The crystallization exotherms measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were analyzed and compared with results obtained by polarized optical microscopy (POM), rheology, and atomic force microscope (AFM). The experimental results suggest a strong influence of the observation scale. In particular, the AFM, even if limited on time scale, appears to be the most sensitive technique to detect the first stages of crystallization. On the contrary, at least in the case analysed in this work, rheology appears to be the least sensitive technique. DSC and POM provide closer results. This suggests that the definition of induction time in the polymer crystallization is a vague concept that, in any case, requires the definition of the technique used for its characterization.

  8. Accurate and precise calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Pratt, Jon R

    2012-09-21

    Accurate cantilever spring constants are important in atomic force microscopy both in control of sensitive imaging and to provide correct nanomechanical property measurements. Conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) spring constant calibration techniques are usually performed in an AFM. They rely on significant handling and often require touching the cantilever probe tip to a surface to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of the configuration. This can damage the tip. The thermal calibration technique developed for laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) can be used to calibrate cantilevers without handling or touching the tip to a surface. Both flexural and torsional spring constants can be measured. Using both Euler-Bernoulli modeling and an SI traceable electrostatic force balance technique as a comparison we demonstrate that the LDV thermal technique is capable of providing rapid calibrations with a combination of ease, accuracy and precision beyond anything previously available.

  9. AFM fishing nanotechnology is the way to reverse the Avogadro number in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Archakov, Alexander Ivanovich; Ivanov, Yurii Dmitrievich; Lisitsa, Andrey Valerevich; Zgoda, Victor Gavrilovich

    2007-01-01

    Future development of proteomics may be hindered by limitations in the concentration sensitivity of widespread technological approaches. The concentration sensitivity limit (CSL) of currently used approaches, like 2-DE/LC separation coupled with MS detection, etc., varies from 10(-9) to 10(-12) M. Therefore, proteomic technologies enable detection of up to 20% of the protein species present in the plasma. New technologies, like atomic force microscopy (AFM molecular detector), enable the counting of single molecules, whereas biospecific fishing can be used to capture these molecules from the biomaterial. At the same time, fishing also has thermodynamic limitations due to the reversibility of the binding. In cases where the fishing becomes irreversible, its combination with an AFM detector enables the registration of single protein molecules, and that opens up a way to lower the CSL down to the reverse Avogadro number.

  10. Influence of Fluid Cell Design on the Frequency Response of AFM Microcantilevers in Liquid Media

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Ramin; Wood-Adams, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the frequency response of AFM microcantilevers in liquid media contained in a commercial fluid cell is presented. Such systems exhibit complicated dynamics which are often not well described by available theories. Their dynamic behavior has a direct effect on the use of the AFM in dynamic mode while imaging in liquid or while extracting the rheological properties of the fluid. We explore the issues related to the design of the cantilever holder/fluid cell and propose an approach for evaluating, minimizing and recognizing the ultimate limitations of commercial cantilever holders. A technique for estimating the frequency response spectrum of the fluid cell itself from experimental data is presented. This spectrum can then be used to evaluate whether or not the fluid cell is suited for the desired purpose. PMID:27873849

  11. Mechanism of high-resolution STM, AFM and IETS-STM imaging with functionalized tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirov, R.; Hapala, P.; Tautz, F. S.; Jelinek, P.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution AFM and STM with functionalized tips is well established, but a detailed understanding of the image mechanism is still missing. Moreover, recently this family of imaging techniques has been complemented by a method based on inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy. Here we present a comprehensive mechanical and transport simulation model that explains essentially all image features in functionalized tip STM, AFM and IETS-STM. Important aspects of the mechanism are: (i) Images are dominantly determined by Pauli repulsion, (ii) in STM and IETS STM this force signal is transduced into an elastic or inelastic conductance signal, (iii) probe particle relaxation leads to image sharpening, (iv) the apparent imaging of hydrogen bonds can be explained by a relaxation effect, and (v) electrostatic forces may also influence the image contrast.

  12. Searching events in AFM force-extension curves: A wavelet approach.

    PubMed

    Benítez, R; Bolós, V J

    2017-01-01

    An algorithm, based on the wavelet scalogram energy, for automatically detecting events in force-extension AFM force spectroscopy experiments is introduced. The events to be detected are characterized by a discontinuity in the signal. It is shown how the wavelet scalogram energy has different decay rates at different points depending on the degree of regularity of the signal, showing faster decay rates at regular points and slower rates at singular points (jumps). It is shown that these differences produce peaks in the scalogram energy plot at the event points. Finally, the algorithm is illustrated in a tether analysis experiment by using it for the detection of events in the AFM force-extension curves susceptible to being considered tethers. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:153-159, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Temperature-induced reversible first-order single crystal to single crystal phase transition in Boc-γ(4)(R)Val-Val-OH: interplay of enthalpy and entropy.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rumpa; Reddy, M B Madhusudana; Dinesh, Bhimareddy; Balaram, Padmanabhan; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2014-10-09

    Crystals of Boc-γ(4)(R)Val-Val-OH undergo a reversible first-order single crystal to single crystal phase transition at Tc ≈ 205 K from the orthorhombic space group P22121 (Z' = 1) to the monoclinic space group P21 (Z' = 2) with a hysteresis of ∼2.1 K. The low-temperature monoclinic form is best described as a nonmerohedral twin with ∼50% contributions from its two components. The thermal behavior of the dipeptide crystals was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Visual changes in birefringence of the sample during heating and cooling cycles on a hot-stage microscope with polarized light supported the phase transition. Variable-temperature unit cell check measurements from 300 to 100 K showed discontinuity in the volume and cell parameters near the transition temperature, supporting the first-order behavior. A detailed comparison of the room-temperature orthorhombic form with the low-temperature (100 K) monoclinic form revealed that the strong hydrogen-bonding motif is retained in both crystal systems, whereas the non-covalent interactions involving side chains of the dipeptide differ significantly, leading to a small change in molecular conformation in the monoclinic form as well as a small reorientation of the molecules along the ac plane. A rigid-body thermal motion analysis (translation, libration, screw; correlation of translation and libration) was performed to study the crystal entropy. The reversible nature of the phase transition is probably the result of an interplay between enthalpy and entropy: the low-temperature monoclinic form is enthalpically favored, whereas the room-temperature orthorhombic form is entropically favored.

  14. U.S. Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity (ATTACC) for Munitions (AFM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    days. The RUSLE dataset delivered with the AFM model is defined below and in Appendix E. The Adapted RUSLE is defined as A=R*K* LS *C*P where: A...hr [hundreds of ft-tons]-1 in.-1) LS = slope length and steepness factor (dimensionless) C = cover and management factor (dimensionless) P...erosion index unit under standardized conditions. Higher K factor values indicate more easily erodible soils. • LS Factor. The rate of soil

  15. Study of mechanical behavior of AFM silicon tips under mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopycinska-Mueller, M.; Gluch, J.; Köhler, B.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we address critical issues concerning calibration of AFM based methods used for nanoscale mechanical characterization of materials. It has been shown that calibration approaches based on macroscopic models for contact mechanics may yield excellent results in terms of the indentation modulus of the sample, but fail to provide a comprehensive and actual information concerning the tip-sample contact radius or the mechanical properties of the tip. Explanations for the severely reduced indentation modulus of the tip included the inadequacies of the models used for calculations of the tip-sample contact stiffness, discrepancies in the actual and ideal shape of the tip, presence of the amorphous silicon phase within the silicon tip, as well as negligence of the actual size of the stress field created in the tip during elastic interactions. To clarify these issues, we investigated the influence of the mechanical load applied to four AFM silicon tips on their crystalline state by exposing them to systematically increasing loads, evaluating the character of the tip-sample interactions via the load-unload stiffness curves, and assessing the state of the tips from HR-TEM images. The results presented in this paper were obtained in a series of relatively simple and basic atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) experiments. The novel combination of TEM imaging of the AFM tips with the analysis of the load-unload stiffness curves gave us a detailed insight into their mechanical behavior under load conditions. We were able to identify the limits for the elastic interactions, as well as the hallmarks for phase transformation and dislocation formation and movement. The comparison of the physical dimensions of the AFM tips, geometry parameters determined from the values of the contact stiffness, and the information on the crystalline state of the tips allowed us a better understanding of the nanoscale contact.

  16. Size-depressed critical temperatures for the order-disorder transition of FePt, CoPt, FePb, Cu2S, and ZnS nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, R.; Zhou, Z. F.; Yang, X. X.; Guo, N. G.; Qi, W. H.; Sun, C. Q.

    2013-01-01

    The size dependency of the critical temperature (TC) for the order-disorder phase transitions of both the bimetallic and the chalcogenide nanoclusters is shown to follow the rule of bond order-length-strength correlation. The loss of the cohesive energy of the undercoordinated atoms in the surface skin dictates the structural stability. Theoretical reproduction of the size TC trends of FePt, CoPt, FePb, Cu2S, and ZnS nanostructures not only confirms our expectations without involving the concepts of surface energy or entropy used for continuum bulk materials but also provides guideline for engineering nanostructured alloys or compounds.

  17. Ultrasonic Study on Charge Ordering in Nd0:5Ca0:5Mn1-xAlxO3 (x=0,0.03)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Kong, Hui; Su, Jin-rui; Zh, Chang-fei

    2006-12-01

    The ultrasonic, magnetic and transport properties of Nd0:5Ca0:5Mn1-xAlxO3 (x=0,0.03) were studied from 15 to 300 K. The temperature dependencies of resistivity and magnetization show that Nd0:5Ca0:5MnO3 undergoes a charge ordering transition at TCO ~ 257 K. An obvious softening of the longitudinal sound velocity above TCO and a dramatic stiffening below TCO accompanied by an attenuation peak were observed. These features imply a strong electron-phonon interaction via the Jahn-Teller effect in the sample. Another broad attenuation peak was observed at around Tp ~ 80 K. This anomaly is attributed to the phase separation between the antiferromagnetic (AFM) and paramagnetic (PM) phases and gives a direct evidence for spin-phonon coupling in the compound. For the x=0.03 sample, both the minimum of sound velocity and attenuation peaks shift to a lower temperature. The results indicate that the charge ordering and CE-type AFM state in Nd0:5Ca0:5MnO3 are both partially suppressed by replacing Mn with Al.

  18. Short-range Incommensurate Magnetic Order Near the Superconducting Phase Boundary in Fe1+δTe1−xSex

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J.; Xu, G.; Xu, Z.; Lin, Z.W.; Li, Q.; Ratcliff, W.; Gu, G.; Tranquada, J.M.

    2009-09-10

    We performed elastic neutron-scattering and magnetization measurements on Fe{sub 1.07}Te{sub 0.75}Se{sub 0.25} and FeTe{sub 0.7}Se{sub 0.3}. Short-range incommensurate magnetic order is observed in both samples. In the former sample with higher Fe content, a broad magnetic peak appears around (0.46,0,0.5) at low temperature, while in FeTe{sub 0.7}Se{sub 0.3}, the broad magnetic peak is found to be closer to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) wave vector (0.5,0,0.5). The incommensurate peaks are only observed on one side of the AFM wave vector for both samples, which can be modeled in terms of an imbalance of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic correlations between nearest-neighbor spins. We also find that with higher Se (and lower Fe) concentration, the magnetic order becomes weaker while the superconducting temperature and volume increase.

  19. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A; Warr, Gregory G; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-07-21

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.

  20. Enzymatic nanolithography of FRET peptide layer using V8 protease-immobilized AFM probe.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Chie; Obataya, Ikuo; Takeda, Seiji; Yabuta, Masayuki; Miyake, Jun

    2007-04-15

    In our study, a method based on Enzymatic nanolithography was successfully performed in a buffered solution using Staphylococcal serine V8 protease and AFM. To estimate the lithographing activity of the protease immobilized on the AFM tip to peptides immobilized on a substrate, we designed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides as reporter peptides that showed enzymatic action specific to the V8 protease. When the protease digested the reporter peptide a quencher residue was released from the peptide and resulted in the appearance of fluorescence. In the designed 9-mer peptides, TAMRA functioned as a good quencher for FAM. When the fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides immobilized on a glass substrate were hydrolyzed by V8 protease at the C-terminal of glutamic acid, fluorescence of a reporter dye was observed because of the release of a quencher from the substrate. After contacting and lateral scanning of the protease-immobilized AFM tip to the reporter peptide layer, a fluorescent area was observed by imaging using total internal refection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The increment of fluorescence intensity of the digested peptide indicates the performance of lithography. Lithographing rates increased in inverse relation to scanning rates of the probe. The maximum limit of the scanning rate, i.e., that was too fast to permit cutting of the peptide on the substrate, and the lithographing performance are discussed in this study.

  1. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G. Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the ‘footprint’ of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7.

  2. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the 'footprint' of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7.

  3. Single-cycle-PLL detection for real-time FM-AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Benedikt; Dukic, Maja; Erickson, Blake; Ortmanns, Maurits; Fantner, Georg; Anders, Jens

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present a novel architecture for phase-locked loop (PLL) based high-speed demodulation of frequency-modulated (FM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) signals. In our approach, we use single-sideband (SSB) frequency upconversion to translate the AFM signal from the position sensitive detector to a fixed intermediate frequency (IF) of 10 MHz. In this way, we fully benefit from the excellent noise performance of PLL-based FM demodulators still avoiding the intrinsic bandwidth limitation of such systems. In addition, the upconversion to a fixed IF renders the PLL demodulator independent of the cantilever's resonance frequency, allowing the system to work with a large range of cantilever frequencies. To investigate if the additional noise introduced by the SSB upconverter degrades the system noise figure we present a model of the AM-to-FM noise conversion in PLLs incorporating a phase-frequency detector. Using this model, we can predict an upper corner frequency for the demodulation bandwidth above which the converted noise from the single-sideband upconverter becomes the dominant noise source and therefore begins to deteriorate the overall system performance. The approach is validated by both electrical and AFM measurements obtained with a PCB-based prototype implementing the proposed demodulator architecture.

  4. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  5. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  6. AFM-based quantification of conformational changes in DNA caused by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Berg, Florian; Wilken, Janine; Helm, Christiane A; Block, Stephan

    2015-01-08

    Radical induced modification of DNA plays an important role in many pathological pathways like cancer development, aging, etc. In this work, we quantify radical-induced DNA damage that causes transitions from double to single stranded DNA using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasmid pBR322 is attacked by free hydroxyl radicals that are produced by Fenton's reaction; the strength of the radical attack is controlled via the ratio of hydroxyl radical molecules to DNA base pairs. The extent of DNA modification is assessed by AFM tapping mode (TM) imaging of the plasmids (after adsorption onto PAH-functionalized mica) in air. As single stranded DNA chains (height ∼2 Å) are much smaller than intact DNA strands (∼5 Å), their fraction can be quantified based on the height distribution, which allows a simplified data analysis in comparison to similar AFM-based approaches. It is found that the amount of damaged DNA strands increases with increasing strength of radical attack, and decreases if ROS scavengers like sodium acetate are added. Competition curves are calculated for the interaction of hydroxyl radicals with DNA and sodium acetate, which finally allows calculation of relative rate constants for the respective reactions.

  7. Fabrication of nanochannels with ladder nanostructure at the bottom using AFM nanoscratching method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This letter presents a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanomanufacturing method combining the tip scanning with the high-precision stage movement to fabricate nanochannels with ladder nanostructure at the bottom by continuous scanning with a fixed scan size. Different structures can be obtained according to the matching relation of the tip feeding velocity and the precision stage moving velocity. This relationship was first studied in detail to achieve nanochannels with different ladder nanostructures at the bottom. Machining experiments were then performed to fabricate nanochannels on an aluminum alloy surface to demonstrate the capability of this AFM-based fabrication method presented in this study. Results show that the feed value and the tip orientation in the removing action play important roles in this method which has a significant effect on the machined surfaces. Finally, the capacity of this method to fabricate a large-scale nanochannel was also demonstrated. This method has the potential to advance the existing AFM tip-based nanomanufacturing technique of the formation these complex structures by increasing the removal speed, simplifying the processing procedure and achieving the large-scale nanofabrication. PMID:24940171

  8. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  9. On the determination of elastic moduli of cells by AFM based indentation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Xu, Guang-Kui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells through indentations. In most of existing studies, the cell is supposed to be linear elastic within the small strain regime when analyzing the AFM indentation data. However, in experimental situations, the roles of large deformation and surface tension of cells should be taken into consideration. Here, we use the neo-Hookean model to describe the hyperelastic behavior of cells and investigate the influence of surface tension through finite element simulations. At large deformation, a correction factor, depending on the geometric ratio of indenter radius to cell radius, is introduced to modify the force-indent depth relation of classical Hertzian model. Moreover, when the indent depth is comparable with an intrinsic length defined as the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus, the surface tension evidently affects the indentation response, indicating an overestimation of elastic modulus by the Hertzian model. The dimensionless-analysis-based theoretical predictions, which include both large deformation and surface tension, are in good agreement with our finite element simulation data. This study provides a novel method to more accurately measure the mechanical properties of biological cells and soft materials in AFM indentation experiments. PMID:28368053

  10. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  11. A study of water droplet between an AFM tip and a substrate using dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Souvik; Lan, Chuanjin; Li, Zhen; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Ma, Yanbao

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a water droplet between a sharp AFM tip and a substrate due to capillary condensation affects the tip-substrate interaction. As a consequence, AFM measurements lose precision and often produce incorrect sample topology. Understanding the physics of liquid bridges is also important in the field of Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). Significant research is being carried out to understand the mechanics of the formation of the liquid bridge and its dependence of surface properties, ambient conditions etc. The in-between length scale, i.e., mesoscale (~100 nm) associated with this phenomenon presents a steep challenge for experimental measurements. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) can be computationally prohibitive to model the entire system, especially over microseconds to seconds. Theoretical analysis using Young Laplace equation has so far provided some qualitative insights only. We study this system using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) which is a simulation technique suitable for describing mesoscopic hydrodynamic behavior of fluids. In this work, we carry out simulations to improve understanding of the process of formation of the meniscus, the mechanics of manipulation and control of its shape, and better estimation of capillary forces. The knowledge gained through our study will help in correcting the AFM measurements affected by capillary condensation. Moreover, it will improve understanding of more accurate droplet manipulation in DPN.

  12. Graphene Nanopore Support System for Simultaneous High-Resolution AFM Imaging and Conductance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurately defining the nanoporous structure and sensing the ionic flow across nanoscale pores in thin films and membranes has a wide range of applications, including characterization of biological ion channels and receptors, DNA sequencing, molecule separation by nanoparticle films, sensing by block co-polymers films, and catalysis through metal–organic frameworks. Ionic conductance through nanopores is often regulated by their 3D structures, a relationship that can be accurately determined only by their simultaneous measurements. However, defining their structure–function relationships directly by any existing techniques is still not possible. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can image the structures of these pores at high resolution in an aqueous environment, and electrophysiological techniques can measure ion flow through individual nanoscale pores. Combining these techniques is limited by the lack of nanoscale interfaces. We have designed a graphene-based single-nanopore support (∼5 nm thick with ∼20 nm pore diameter) and have integrated AFM imaging and ionic conductance recording using our newly designed double-chamber recording system to study an overlaid thin film. The functionality of this integrated system is demonstrated by electrical recording (<10 pS conductance) of suspended lipid bilayers spanning a nanopore and simultaneous AFM imaging of the bilayer. PMID:24581087

  13. Fracture Growth Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Martinez, Jonathan; McLean, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant in orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent flaws will not cause failure during the design life. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environmentally-assisted cracking (K (sub EAC)) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched specimens SE(B) representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to the monopropellant at 50 degrees Centigrade for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant was found to be at least 22.0 kilopounds per square inch. The stress intensity factor of the weld material was at least 31.3 kilopounds per square inch.

  14. Advantages and limitations of OM, SEM, TEM and AFM in the study of ancient decorated pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas-Alatorre, J.; Silva-Velazquez, Y.; Alva Medina, A.; Rivera, M.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents results from the study of two fragments of pre-Hispanic pottery, decorated with red pigment, using Optical Microscopy (OM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM). Capabilities and limitations of these techniques in the analysis of archaeological material are highlighted with special emphasis on TEM, AFM and MFM due to their contribution in the study of the pigment layer at micro and nano scale. The analyzed samples come from the archaeological sites of El Tajin and Xochicalco, both in Mexico. Results of conventional TEM and HRTEM analysis of the red pigment showed nanometric Fe2O3 particles in both samples but different particle shape and size distributions: specimen from El Tajin presented irregular particles between 50-100 nm while that from Xochicalco exhibited semispherical shapes in the 3-25 nm range. AFM images showed the topography of the pigments, which are related to the texture of their surface and thus to the production process. Finally, MFM showed different contrast regions suggesting the presence of ferromagnetic elements forming clusters and domain orientations on the color layer.

  15. Multilayer silicon rich oxy-nitride films characterization by SIMS, VASE and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barozzi, M.; Vanzetti, L.; Iacob, E.; Bersani, M.; Anderle, M.; Pucker, G.; Kompocholis, C.; Ghulinyan, M.; Bellutti, P.

    2008-03-01

    In this work secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), variable angle spectroscopy ellipsometry (VASE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to investigate the structure, composition and morphology of multilayer SRON films. Three/four SRON sequential layers were deposited on silicon wafers by PECVD and silicon, nitrogen and oxygen content was varied by changing the N2O/SiH4 ratio. The total thickness of the resulting SRON stack is about 50nm. SIMS analyses of NCs+, OCs+, SiCs+, in MCs+ methodology are performed by a Cameca SC-ultra instrument. Depth profiles are obtained at 500eV of primary beam impact energy with sample rotation. An approximate method to obtain silicon concentration is used. Total layer thickness are obtained from both SIMS and VASE measurements. In addition, we compare the thickness of the single layers obtained from VASE with the SIMS depth profiles. A detailed analysis of films morphology is obtained by AFM. The SRON stack is sputtered by SIMS until a certain layer is exposed, which is then analyzed by AFM. The sputtered layers are then etched in HF solution to better resolve the exposed nano-crystals.

  16. On the determination of elastic moduli of cells by AFM based indentation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Xu, Guang-Kui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2017-04-03

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to measure the mechanical properties of biological cells through indentations. In most of existing studies, the cell is supposed to be linear elastic within the small strain regime when analyzing the AFM indentation data. However, in experimental situations, the roles of large deformation and surface tension of cells should be taken into consideration. Here, we use the neo-Hookean model to describe the hyperelastic behavior of cells and investigate the influence of surface tension through finite element simulations. At large deformation, a correction factor, depending on the geometric ratio of indenter radius to cell radius, is introduced to modify the force-indent depth relation of classical Hertzian model. Moreover, when the indent depth is comparable with an intrinsic length defined as the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus, the surface tension evidently affects the indentation response, indicating an overestimation of elastic modulus by the Hertzian model. The dimensionless-analysis-based theoretical predictions, which include both large deformation and surface tension, are in good agreement with our finite element simulation data. This study provides a novel method to more accurately measure the mechanical properties of biological cells and soft materials in AFM indentation experiments.

  17. Brain tumor classification using AFM in combination with data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Huml, Marlene; Silye, René; Zauner, Gerald; Hutterer, Stephan; Schilcher, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Although classification of astrocytic tumors is standardized by the WHO grading system, which is mainly based on microscopy-derived, histomorphological features, there is great interobserver variability. The main causes are thought to be the complexity of morphological details varying from tumor to tumor and from patient to patient, variations in the technical histopathological procedures like staining protocols, and finally the individual experience of the diagnosing pathologist. Thus, to raise astrocytoma grading to a more objective standard, this paper proposes a methodology based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) derived images made from histopathological samples in combination with data mining techniques. By comparing AFM images with corresponding light microscopy images of the same area, the progressive formation of cavities due to cell necrosis was identified as a typical morphological marker for a computer-assisted analysis. Using genetic programming as a tool for feature analysis, a best model was created that achieved 94.74% classification accuracy in distinguishing grade II tumors from grade IV ones. While utilizing modern image analysis techniques, AFM may become an important tool in astrocytic tumor diagnosis. By this way patients suffering from grade II tumors are identified unambiguously, having a less risk for malignant transformation. They would benefit from early adjuvant therapies.

  18. Bulk first-order phase transition in three-flavor lattice QCD with O(a)-improved Wilson fermion action at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Tsutsui, N.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kanaya, K.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Yamada, N.

    2005-09-01

    Three-flavor QCD simulation with the O(a)-improved Wilson fermion action is made employing an exact fermion algorithm developed for an odd number of quark flavors. For the plaquette gauge action, an unexpected first-order phase transition is found in the strong coupling regime ({beta} < or approx. 5.0) at relatively heavy quark masses (m{sub PS}/m{sub V}{approx}0.74-0.87). Strong metastability persists on a large lattice of size 12{sup 3}x32, which indicates that the transition has a bulk nature. The phase gap becomes smaller toward weaker couplings and vanishes at {beta}{approx_equal}5.0, which corresponds to a lattice spacing a{approx_equal}0.1 fm. These results imply that realistic simulations of QCD with three flavors of dynamical Wilson-type fermions at lattice spacings in the range a=0.1-0.2 fm are not possible with the plaquette gauge action. Extending the study to improved gauge actions, we do not observe evidence for first-order phase transition, at least within the ({beta},{kappa}) range we explored. This suggests the possibility that the phase transition either moves away or weakens with improved gauge actions. Possible origins of the phase transition are discussed.

  19. Room temperature magnetic ordering, enhanced magnetization and exchange bias of GdMnO3 nanoparticles in (GdMnO3)0.70(CoFe2O4)0.30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, A.; Mahapatra, A. S.; Mallick, A.; Chakrabarti, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles of GdMnO3 (GMO) are prepared by sol-gel method. To enhance the magnetic property and also to obtain the magnetic ordering at room temperature (RT), nanoparticles of GMO are incorporated in the matrix of CoFe2O4 (CFO). Desired crystallographic phases of CFO, GMO and GMO-CFO are confirmed by analyzing X-ray diffractrograms (XRD) using Rietveld method. The average size of nanoparticles and their distribution, crystallographic phase, nanocrystallinity etc. are studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Magnetic hysteresis loops (M-H) of GMO-CFO under zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) conditions are observed at different temperatures down to 5 K. Magnetization vs. temperature (M-T) under ZFC and FC conditions are also recorded. Interestingly, exchange bias (EB) is found at low temperature which suggests the encapsulation of the ferromagnetic (FM) nanoparticles of GMO by the ferrimagnetic nanoparticles of CFO below 100 K. Enhanced magnetization, EB effect and RT magnetic ordering of GMO-CFO would be interesting for both theoretical and experimental investigations.

  20. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Neutron Scattering Study of Magnetic and Fe Vacancy Orders in (Tl,Rb)2 Fe4 Se5 Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Feng; Bao, Wei; Chi, Song-Xue; Santos, Antonio M. dos; Molaison, Jamie J.; Fang, Ming-Hu; Wang, Hang-Dong; Mao, Qian-Hui; Wang, Jin-Chen; Liu, Juan-Juan; Sheng, Jie-Ming

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic and iron vacancy orders in superconducting (Tl,Rb)2Fe4Se5 single-crystals by using a high-pressure neutron diffraction technique. Similar to the temperature effect, the block antiferromagnetic order gradually decreases upon increasing pressure while the Fe vacancy superstructural order remains intact before its precipitous disappearance at the critical pressure Pc = 8.3 GPa. Combined with previously determined Pc for superconductivity, our phase diagram under pressure reveals the concurrence of the block AFM order, the √5 × √5 iron vacancy order and superconductivity for the 245 superconductor. Lastly, a synthesis of current experimental data in a coherent physical picture is attempted.