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Sample records for afm phase image

  1. Phase-Imaging with a Sharpened Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube AFM Tip: Investigation of Low-k Dielectric Polymer Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, M.; Volksen, Willi; Miller, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    Phase shift tapping mode scanning force microscopy (TMSFM) has evolved into a very powerful technique for the nanoscale surface characterization of compositional variations in heterogeneous samples. Phase shift signal measures the difference between the phase angle of the excitation signal and the phase angle of the cantilever response. The signal correlates to the tip-sample inelastic interactions, identifying the different chemical and/or physical property of surfaces. In general, the resolution and quality of scanning probe microscopic images are highly dependent on the size of the scanning probe tip. In improving AFM tip technology, we recently developed a technique for sharpening the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip, reducing the radius of curvature of the CNT tip to less than 5 nm while still maintaining the inherent stability of multi-walled CNT tips. Herein we report the use of sharpened (CNT) AFM tips for phase-imaging of polymer hybrids, a precursor for generating nanoporous low-k dielectrics for on-chip interconnect applications. Using sharpened CNT tips, we obtained phase-contrast images having domains less than 10 nm. In contrast, conventional Si tips and unsharpened CNT tips (radius greater than 15 nm) were not able to resolve the nanoscale domains in the polymer hybrid films. C1early, the size of the CNT tip contributes significantly to the resolution of phase-contrast imaging. In addition, a study on the nonlinear tapping dynamics of the multi-walled CNT tip indicates that the multi-walled CNT tip is immune to conventional imaging instabilities related to the coexistence of attractive and repulsive tapping regimes. This factor may also contribute to the phase-contrast image quality of multi-walled CNT AFM tips. This presentation will also offer data in support of the stability of the CNT tip for phase shift TMSFM.

  2. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  3. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  4. Nanoscale crystallization of phase change Ge2Sb2Te5 film with AFM lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, JunHo

    2010-01-01

    We have made nanoindents on Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5)(GST) films using electric field-assisted atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. GST shows increase of material density and electric conductivity as it changes from amorphous to crystalline phases. By applying electric field between AFM probe-tip and GST surface, nanoscale crystallization could be induced on tip contact area. As the crystallized GST exhibits increase of material density, that is to say depression of volume, nanoindented surface with crystallization is created on host amorphous GST (a-GST) film. For the AFM lithography, a highly conductive tip, which showed voltage-switching characteristics in current-voltage spectroscopy of GST film, was found to be very suitable for recording and sensing crystallized nanoindents on the GST film. By varying sample bias voltages, we performed nanoscale crystallization, and measured the nanostructured film in AFM conductance-image (C-image) mode and topography-image (T-image) mode, simultaneously. Two types of crystallized wires were fabricated on (a-GST) film. Type-I was sensed in only C-image, whereas Type-II was sensed in both C-image and T-image. These nanowires are discussed in terms of crystallization of GST and sensitivity of current (or topography) sensing. By repeated lithography, larger size of nanoindented wires were also produced, which indicates line-dimension controllability of AFM lithography. PMID:20853405

  5. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  6. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  7. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Liashkovich, I.; Neves, V.; Danzberger, J.; Heister, E.; Rangl, M.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Flahaut, E.; Gruber, H. J.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Kienberger, F.; Ebner, A.

    2009-10-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  8. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  9. Fast image scanning method in liquid-AFM without image distortion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inhee; Kim, Younghun; Kim, Jong Ho; Yang, Young In; Lee, Jeongjin; Lee, Suseung; Hong, Surin; Yi, Jongheop

    2008-11-01

    High speed imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows one to directly observe the dynamic behavior of a sample surface immersed in liquid media; thus, it has been considered to be an indispensable tool for nanobiotechnology and is used in many research fields, including molecular biology and surface science. For real-time observation of a certain behavior, the high speed imaging technique should be accompanied with a high resolution imaging technique to identify target materials. To improve the image quality at a high scanning rate, we developed a variable-controlled fast scanning method, which originated from the modified squeeze-drag superposition model in liquid media. A collection of non-distorted images was accomplished after proper modification of the operating conditions in a viscous fluid, via the simple handling of loading force and cantilever length. Consequently, a speeded-up AFM imaging process was achieved in the liquid environment at up to 200 µm s(-1), without attachment of additional devices. The reliability of the proposed method was verified by the characterization of a grating sample immersed in three types of liquid media. In addition, the results were visualized for elastic biomolecules submerged in a liquid with high kinematic viscosity. PMID:21832743

  10. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  11. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  12. Sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube-polymer composites using dynamic AFM methods.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Maria J; Misiego, Rocio; Smith, Kyle C; Avila, Alba; Pipes, Byron; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks within polymer nanocomposites is demonstrated through electrical characterization techniques based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). We compare three techniques implemented in the single-pass configuration: DC-biased amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in terms of the physics of sub-surface image formation and experimental robustness. The methods were applied to study the dispersion of sub-surface networks of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in a polyimide (PI) matrix. We conclude that among these methods, the KPFM channel, which measures the capacitance gradient (∂C/∂d) at the second harmonic of electrical excitation, is the best channel to obtain high-contrast images of the CNT network embedded in the polymer matrix, without the influence of surface conditions. Additionally, we propose an analysis of the ∂C/∂d images as a tool to characterize the dispersion and connectivity of the CNTs. Through the analysis we demonstrate that these AFM-based sub-surface methods probe sufficiently deep within the SWNT composites, to resolve clustered networks that likely play a role in conductivity percolation. This opens up the possibility of dynamic AFM-based characterization of sub-surface dispersion and connectivity in nanostructured composites, two critical parameters for nanocomposite applications in sensors and energy storage devices. PMID:23478510

  13. Multiparametric imaging of biological systems by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Martínez-Martín, David; Medalsy, Izhar; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how biological systems change their structural, biophysical and chemical properties to adjust functionality. Addressing this issue has been severely hampered by the lack of methods capable of imaging biosystems at high resolution while simultaneously mapping their multiple properties. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) now enable researchers to combine (sub)molecular imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological interactions. Here we discuss the principles and applications of advanced FD-based AFM tools for the quantitative multiparametric characterization of complex cellular and biomolecular systems under physiological conditions. PMID:23985731

  14. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  15. MEMS piezoresistive ring resonator for AFM imaging with pico-Newton force resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z.; Walter, B.; Mairiaux, E.; Faucher, M.; Buchaillot, L.; Legrand, B.

    2013-03-01

    A new concept of atomic force microscope (AFM) oscillating probes using electrostatic excitation and piezoresistive detection is presented. The probe is characterized by electrical methods in vacuum and by mechanical methods in air. A frequency-mixing measurement technique is developed to reduce the parasitic signal floor. The probe resonance frequencies are in the 1 MHz range and the quality factor is measured about 53 000 in vacuum and 3000 in air. The ring probe is mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up and topographic images of patterned sample surfaces are obtained. The force resolution deduced from the measurements is about 10 pN Hz-0.5.

  16. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  17. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  18. Determination of the architecture of ionotropic receptors using AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Nelson P; Henderson, Robert M; Edwardson, J Michael

    2008-04-01

    Fast neurotransmission in the nervous system is mediated by ionotropic receptors, all of which contain several subunits surrounding an integral ion channel. There are three major families of ionotropic receptors: the 'Cys-loop' receptors (including the nicotinic receptor for acetylcholine, the 5-HT(3) receptor, the GABA(A) receptor and the glycine receptor), the glutamate receptors (including the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid, kainate and N-methyl-D: -aspartic acid receptors) and the P2X receptors for adenosine triphosphate. These receptors are often built from multiple types of subunit, raising the question of the stoichiometry and subunit arrangement within the receptors. This question is of therapeutic significance because in some cases drug-binding sites are located at subunit-subunit interfaces. In this paper, we describe a general method, based on atomic force microscopy imaging, to solve the architecture of multi-subunit proteins, such as the ionotropic receptors. Specific epitope tags are engineered onto each receptor subunit. The subunits are then expressed exogenously in cultured cells, and the receptors are isolated from detergent extracts of membrane fractions by affinity chromatography. The receptors are imaged both alone and in complex with anti-epitope antibodies. The size of the imaged particles provides an estimate of the subunit stoichiometry, whereas the geometry of the receptor-antibody complexes produces more detailed information about the receptor architecture. We use an automated, unbiased system to identify receptors and receptor-antibody complexes and to determine the geometry of the complexes. We are also able to determine the orientation of the receptors on the mica substrate, which will allow us to solve the subunit arrangement within receptors, such as the GABA(A) receptor, which contain three types of subunits. PMID:18026748

  19. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  20. First-principles AFM image simulation with frozen density embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    We present efficient first-principles method of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Ordinary nc-AFM simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) require exhaustive computational cost because it involves thousands of total energy calculations. Regarding the sample as a fixed external potential can reduce the computational cost, and we adopt frozen density embedding theory (FDET) for this purpose. Simulated nc-AFM images with FDET using a carbon monoxide tip well reproduces the full DFT images of benzene, pentacene, and graphene, although optimized tip-sample distances and interaction energies in FDET are underestimated and overestimated, respectively. The FDET-based simulation method is promising for AFM image simulation of surfaces and two-dimensional materials. This work was supported by U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46286 and Award No. DE-SC0008877, and by Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources are provided by NERSC and TACC.

  1. Temperature Dependence Study of Noncontact Afm Images Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Meghdari, Ali

    The effect of temperature on the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) surface imaging is investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) analysis based on the Sutton-Chen (SC) interatomic potential. Particular attention is devoted to the tip and sample flexibility at different temperatures. When a gold coated probe is brought close to the Au (001) surface at high temperatures, the tip and surface atoms are pulled together and their distance becomes smaller. The tip and sample atoms displacement varies in the different environment temperatures and this leads to the different interaction forces. Along this line, to study the effect of temperature on the resulting images, we have employed the well-known NC-AFM model and carried out realistic non-equilibrium MD 3D simulations of atomic scale imaging at different close approach positions to the surface.

  2. AFM Imaging of Mercaptobenzoic Acid on Au(110): Submolecular Contrast with Metal Tips.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Robles, Roberto; Abufager, Paula; Lorente, Nicolas; Berndt, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A self-assembled monolayer of mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) on Au(110) is investigated with scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy (STM and AFM) and density functional calculations. High-resolution AFM images obtained with metallic tips show clear contrasts between oxygen atoms and phenyl moieties. The contrast above the oxygen atoms is due to attractive covalent interactions, which is different than previously reported high-resolution images, where Pauli repulsion dominated the image contrast. We show that the bonding of MBA to the substrate occurs mainly through dispersion interactions, whereas the thiol-Au bond contributes only a quarter of the adsorption energy. No indication of Au adatoms mediating the thiol-Au interaction was found in contrast to other thiol-bonded systems. However, MBA lifts the Au(110)-(2 × 1) reconstruction. PMID:27183144

  3. Reconstruction of an AFM image based on estimation of the tip shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Luan, Fangjun; Song, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Jifei

    2013-10-01

    From the viewpoint of mathematical morphology, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) image contains the distortion effect of the tip convolution on a real sample surface. If tip shape can be characterized accurately, mathematical deconvolution can be applied to reduce the distortion to obtain more precise AFM images. AFM image reconstruction has practical significance in nanoscale observation and manipulation technology. Among recent tip modeling algorithms, the blind tip evaluation algorithm based on mathematical morphology is widely used. However, it takes considerable computing time, and the noise threshold is hard to optimize. To tackle these problems, a new blind modeling method is proposed in this paper to accelerate the computation of the algorithm and realize the optimum threshold estimation to build a precise tip model. The simulation verifies the efficiency of the new algorithm by comparing the computing time with the original one. The calculated tip shape is also validated by comparison with the SEM image of the tip. Finally, the reconstruction of a carbon nanotube image based on the precise tip model illustrates the feasibility and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  4. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. PMID:26517548

  5. Graphene Nanopore Support System for Simultaneous High-Resolution AFM Imaging and Conductance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurately defining the nanoporous structure and sensing the ionic flow across nanoscale pores in thin films and membranes has a wide range of applications, including characterization of biological ion channels and receptors, DNA sequencing, molecule separation by nanoparticle films, sensing by block co-polymers films, and catalysis through metal–organic frameworks. Ionic conductance through nanopores is often regulated by their 3D structures, a relationship that can be accurately determined only by their simultaneous measurements. However, defining their structure–function relationships directly by any existing techniques is still not possible. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can image the structures of these pores at high resolution in an aqueous environment, and electrophysiological techniques can measure ion flow through individual nanoscale pores. Combining these techniques is limited by the lack of nanoscale interfaces. We have designed a graphene-based single-nanopore support (∼5 nm thick with ∼20 nm pore diameter) and have integrated AFM imaging and ionic conductance recording using our newly designed double-chamber recording system to study an overlaid thin film. The functionality of this integrated system is demonstrated by electrical recording (<10 pS conductance) of suspended lipid bilayers spanning a nanopore and simultaneous AFM imaging of the bilayer. PMID:24581087

  6. Novel tip shape reconstruction method for restoration of AFM topography images using nano-structures with given shapes.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of more accurate imaging of surface microstructures is needed. The most significant distortion in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is induced by the probe tip shape, whenever the sample surface contains features whose dimensions are comparable to the probe tip size. The acquired AFM image is the dilation between the tip shape and the sample topography. To restore the original topographical profile, a numerical erosion procedure using a precise probe shape function is required. Here, a new technique for reconstruction of probe shape function using a well-defined nanostructure is proposed. First, AFM topography images of the given-shape nanostructure dispersed on flat substrates are taken. Then, a probe shape function is determined by a numerical calculation procedure. By using the experimentally determined probe shape function, the most probable surface morphologies from the observed AFM topography images of unknown samples can be extracted. PMID:21321438

  7. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  8. Phase imaging of moving DNA molecules and DNA molecules replicated in the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Argaman, M; Golan, R; Thomson, N H; Hansma, H G

    1997-01-01

    Phase imaging with a tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM) has many advantages for imaging moving DNA and DNA-enzyme complexes in aqueous buffers at molecular resolution. In phase images molecules can be resolved at higher scan rates and lower forces than in height images from the AFM. Higher scan rates make it possible to image faster processes. At lower forces the molecules are imaged more gently. Moving DNA molecules are also resolved more clearly in phase images than in height images. Phase images in tapping mode AFM show the phase difference between oscillation of the piezoelectric crystal that drives the cantilever and oscillation of the cantilever as it interacts with the sample surface. Phase images presented here show moving DNA molecules that have been replicated with Sequenase in the AFM and DNA molecules tethered in complexes with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. PMID:9336471

  9. Immunological Identification of Fibrinogen in Dual-Component Protein Films by AFM Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Rice, Zachary; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The success of long-term blood-contacting implanted devices is largely dependent upon the interaction of the blood components with the device biomaterial surface. The ability to study these interactions has been hindered by a lack of methods to measure single-molecule interactions in complex multi-protein environments similar to the environment found in-vivo. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with gold nanolabels to detect the protein fibrinogen under aqueous conditions without the topographical clues usually necessary for high resolution visualization. BSA was patterned onto both muscovite mica and plasma-treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and these test substrates were subsequently backfilled with fibrinogen to yield a featureless protein layer. The fibrinogen in this dual protein layer was detected using high resolution AFM imaging following infusion of anti-fibrinogen conjugated with nanogold particles. This AFM immuno-detection technique will potentially be applicable to complex multi-component protein films adsorbed on clinically-relevant polymers used in medical devices. PMID:18294855

  10. Crystal structures of Boro-AFm and sBoro-AFt phases

    SciTech Connect

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Cau Dit Coumes, Celine; Leroux, Fabrice; Mercier, Cyrille; Revel, Bertrand; Damidot, Denis

    2012-10-15

    Crystal structures of boron-containing AFm (B-AFm) and AFt (B-AFt) phases have been solved ab-initio and refined from X-ray powder diffraction. {sup 11}B NMR and Raman spectroscopies confirm the boron local environment in both compounds: three-fold coordinated in B-AFm corresponding to HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} species, and four-fold coordinated in B-AFt corresponding to B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} species. B-AFm crystallizes in the rhombohedral R3{sup Macron }c space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaHBO{sub 3}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O (4CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}1/2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}12.5H{sub 2}O, C{sub 4}AB{sub 1/2}H{sub 12.5}) general formulae with planar trigonal HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anions weakly bonded at the centre of the interlayer region. One HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anion is statistically distributed with two weakly bonded water molecules on the same crystallographic site. B-AFt crystallizes in the trigonal P3cl space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}2Ca(B (OH){sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O (6CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}33H{sub 2}O, C{sub 6}AB{sub 2}H{sub 33}) general formulae with tetrahedral B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} anions located in the channel region of the structure. All tetrahedral anions are oriented in a unique direction, leading to a hexagonal c lattice parameter about half that of ettringite.

  11. Imaging and manipulation of nanoscale materials with coaxial and triaxial AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Westervelt, R. M.

    2011-03-01

    We present coaxial and triaxial Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probes and demonstrate their applications to imaging and manipulating nanoscale materials. A coaxial probe with concentric electrodes at its tip creates a highly confined electric field that decays as a dipole field, making the coaxial probe useful for near field imaging of electrical properties. We show nearly an order of magnitude improvement in the step resolution of Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes. We further demonstrate that coaxial probes can image dielectric materials with the dielectrophoretic force. In addition to imaging, the capacitive structure that makes up the cantilever of a coaxial probe is used to locally mechanically drive the probe, making them self-driving probes. Finally, coaxial probes can create strong forces with dielectrophoresis (DEP) which we combine with the nanometer precision of the AFM to create a nanometer scale pick-and-place tool. We demonstrate 3D assembly of micrometer scale objects with coaxial probes using positive DEP and discuss the assembly of nanometer scale objects with triaxial probes using negative DEP.

  12. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  13. High-Speed AFM Images of Thermal Motion Provide Stiffness Map of Interfacial Membrane Protein Moieties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels (AqpZ, GlpF) revealed the spatial and temporal organization of loop-stabilizing intraproteinaceous H-bonds and salt bridges. PMID:25516527

  14. Lattice-resolution imaging of the sapphire (0 0 0 1) surface in air by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yang; Wanless, Erica J.; Franks, George V.

    2007-02-01

    Lattice-resolution images of single-crystal α-alumina (sapphire) (0 0 0 1) surfaces have been obtained using contact-mode AFM under ambient conditions. It was found that the hexagonal surface lattice has a periodicity of 0.47 ± 0.11 nm, which is identical to that reported previously when the same surface was imaged in water. Large lattice corrugations (as high as 1 nm) were observed, but were concluded to be imaging artifacts because of the strong friction which causes additional deflection of the cantilever. The additional deflection of the cantilever is registered by the detector of the optical beam-deflection AFM resulting in an overestimation of the height at each lattice point. Abrupt changes were also resolved in the topography including honeycomb patterns and a transition from 2D lattices to 1D parallel stripes, with scanning direction. These phenomena can be explained by the commensurate sliding between the tip and sapphire surface due to the strong contact force.

  15. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  16. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D; Fantner, Georg E

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  17. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  18. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  19. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution. PMID:26561004

  20. BOREAS AFM-6 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35-GHz cloud-sensing radar in the Northern Study Area (NSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 16 Jul 1994 to 08 Aug 1994. This data set contains a time series of GIF images that show the structure of the lower atmosphere. The NOAA/ETL 35-GHz cloud/turbulence radar GIF images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. Phase calibration target for quantitative phase imaging with ptychography.

    PubMed

    Godden, T M; Muñiz-Piniella, A; Claverley, J D; Yacoot, A; Humphry, M J

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) utilizes refractive index and thickness variations that lead to optical phase shifts. This gives contrast to images of transparent objects. In quantitative biology, phase images are used to accurately segment cells and calculate properties such as dry mass, volume and proliferation rate. The fidelity of the measured phase shifts is of critical importance in this field. However to date, there has been no standardized method for characterizing the performance of phase imaging systems. Consequently, there is an increasing need for protocols to test the performance of phase imaging systems using well-defined phase calibration and resolution targets. In this work, we present a candidate for a standardized phase resolution target, and measurement protocol for the determination of the transfer of spatial frequencies, and sensitivity of a phase imaging system. The target has been carefully designed to contain well-defined depth variations over a broadband range of spatial frequencies. In order to demonstrate the utility of the target, we measure quantitative phase images on a ptychographic microscope, and compare the measured optical phase shifts with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) topography maps and surface profile measurements from coherence scanning interferometry. The results show that ptychography has fully quantitative nanometer sensitivity in optical path differences over a broadband range of spatial frequencies for feature sizes ranging from micrometers to hundreds of micrometers. PMID:27137054

  2. Graphite, graphene on SiC, and graphene nanoribbons: Calculated images with a numerical FM-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Castanié, Fabien; Nony, Laurent; Gauthier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Characterization at the atomic scale is becoming an achievable task for FM-AFM users equipped, for example, with a qPlus sensor. Nevertheless, calculations are necessary to fully interpret experimental images in some specific cases. In this context, we developed a numerical AFM (n-AFM) able to be used in different modes and under different usage conditions. Results: Here, we tackled FM-AFM image calculations of three types of graphitic structures, namely a graphite surface, a graphene sheet on a silicon carbide substrate with a Si-terminated surface, and finally, a graphene nanoribbon. We compared static structures, meaning that all the tip and sample atoms are kept frozen in their equilibrium position, with dynamic systems, obtained with a molecular dynamics module allowing all the atoms to move freely during the probe oscillations. Conclusion: We found a very good agreement with experimental graphite and graphene images. The imaging process for the deposited nanoribbon demonstrates the stability of our n-AFM to image a non-perfectly planar substrate exhibiting a geometrical step as well as a material step. PMID:22497004

  3. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer. PMID:21491854

  4. Combined quantitative ultrasonic and time-resolved interaction force AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Z.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-01-15

    The authors describe a method where quantitative ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) is achieved during time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) imaging in intermittent contact mode. The method uses a calibration procedure for quantitative UAFM. It improves elasticity measurements of stiff regions of surfaces while retaining the capabilities of the TRIF mode for topography, adhesion, dissipation, and elasticity measurements on soft regions of sample surfaces. This combination is especially advantageous when measuring and imaging samples with broad stiffness range in a nondestructive manner. The experiments utilize an active AFM probe with high bandwidth and the UAFM calibration is performed by measuring the magnitude of the time-resolved UAFM signal at a judiciously chosen frequency for different contact stiffness values during individual taps. Improved sensitivity to stiff surface elasticity is demonstrated on a special sample. The results show that combining UAFM with TRIF provides 2.5 GPa (5%) standard deviation on the silicon surface reduced Young's modulus, representing 5x improvement over using only TRIF mode imaging.

  5. Tracer kinetic modeling of [(11)C]AFM, a new PET imaging agent for the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Mika; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Lin, Shu-Fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Williams, Wendol; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    [(11)C]AFM, or [(11)C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethyl)phenylthio]-5-fluoromethylphenylamine, is a new positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for the serotonin transporter (SERT). The purpose of this study was to determine the most appropriate kinetic model to quantify [(11)C]AFM binding in the healthy human brain. Positron emission tomography data and arterial input functions were acquired from 10 subjects. Compartmental modeling and the multilinear analysis-1(MA1) method were tested using the arterial input functions. The one-tissue model showed a lack of fit in low-binding regions, and the two-tissue model failed to estimate parameters reliably. Regional time-activity curves were well described by MA1. The rank order of [(11)C]AFM binding potential (BPND) matched well with the known regional SERT densities. For routine use of [(11)C]AFM, several noninvasive methods for quantification of regional binding were evaluated, including simplified reference tissue models (SRTM and SRTM2), and multilinear reference tissue models (MRTM and MRTM2). The best methods for region of interest (ROI) analysis were MA1, MRTM2, and SRTM2, with fixed population kinetic values ( or b') for the reference methods. The MA1 and MRTM2 methods were best for parametric imaging. These results showed that [(11)C]AFM is a suitable PET radioligand to image and quantify SERT in humans. PMID:23921898

  6. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  7. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  8. Non-reciprocal directional dichroism in the AFM phase of BiFeO3 at THz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Urmas; Rõõm, T.; Farkas, D.; Szaller, D.; Bordács, S.; Kézsmárki, I.; Engelkamp, H.; Ozaki, Y.; Tomiaki, Y.; Ito, T.; Fishman, Randy S.

    We did THz absorption spectroscopy of BiFeO3 single crystals in the AFM phase, where the spin cycloid is destroyed in magnetic fields between 18 T and 32 T in Voigt geometry at 1.6 K. If B0 ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , we see strong directional dichroism (DD) of absorption of the magnon mode with light propagating along the direction of the ferroelectric polarization k ∥ P ∥ [ 111 ] and eω ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , bω ∥ [ 1 1 2 ] . The sign of DD can be reversed (i) by reversing the direction of B0 or (ii) by flipping the sample, thus reversing the propagation direction of light. The observed effect is caused by the strong magneto-electric coupling in the collinear AFM phase. Research sponsored by the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research (IUT23-3).

  9. A phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13 in patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Achim; Sasse, Stephanie; Topp, Max S.; Eichenauer, Dennis A.; Hummel, Horst; Reiners, Katrin S.; Dietlein, Markus; Kuhnert, Georg; Kessler, Joerg; Buerkle, Carolin; Ravic, Miroslav; Knackmuss, Stefan; Marschner, Jens-Peter; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Borchmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AFM13 is a bispecific, tetravalent chimeric antibody construct (TandAb) designed for the treatment of CD30-expressing malignancies. AFM13 recruits natural killer (NK) cells via binding to CD16A as immune effector cells. In this phase 1 dose-escalation study, 28 patients with heavily pretreated relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma received AFM13 at doses of 0.01 to 7 mg/kg body weight. Primary objectives were safety and tolerability. Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetics, antitumor activity, and pharmacodynamics. Adverse events were generally mild to moderate. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Pharmacokinetics assessment revealed a half-life of up to 19 hours. Three of 26 evaluable patients achieved partial remission (11.5%) and 13 patients achieved stable disease (50%), with an overall disease control rate of 61.5%. AFM13 was also active in brentuximab vedotin–refractory patients. In 13 patients who received doses of ≥1.5 mg/kg AFM13, the overall response rate was 23% and the disease control rate was 77%. AFM13 treatment resulted in a significant NK-cell activation and a decrease of soluble CD30 in peripheral blood. In conclusion, AFM13 represents a well-tolerated, safe, and active targeted immunotherapy of Hodgkin lymphoma. A phase 2 study is currently planned to optimize the dosing schedule in order to further improve the therapeutic efficacy. This phase 1 study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01221571. PMID:25887777

  10. Spatial Phase Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Frequently, scientists grow crystals by dissolving a protein in a specific liquid solution, and then allowing that solution to evaporate. The methods used next have been, variously, invasive (adding a dye that is absorbed by the protein), destructive (crushing protein/salt-crystal mixtures and observing differences between the crushing of salt and protein), or costly and time-consuming (X-ray crystallography). In contrast to these methods, a new technology for monitoring protein growth, developed in part through NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Marshall Space Flight Center, is noninvasive, nondestructive, rapid, and more cost effective than X-ray analysis. The partner for this SBIR, Photon-X, Inc., of Huntsville, Alabama, developed spatial phase imaging technology that can monitor crystal growth in real time and in an automated mode. Spatial phase imaging scans for flaws quickly and produces a 3-D structured image of a crystal, showing volumetric growth analysis for future automated growth.

  11. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  12. Mapping real-time images of high-speed AFM using multitouch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carberry, D. M.; Picco, L.; Dunton, P. G.; Miles, M. J.

    2009-10-01

    Conventional AFM is highly restricted by its scan rate, a problem that has been overcome by the development of high-speed AFM systems. As the technology to produce higher scan rates has developed it has pushed forward the design of control software. However, the user interface has not evolved at the same rate, limiting the user to sequential control steps. In this paper we demonstrate the integration of HSAFM with a multitouch interface to produce a highly intuitive and responsive control environment. This enables nanometre resolution to be maintained whilst scanning the sample over tens of microns, and arbitrary paths to be traversed. We illustrate this by scanning around two chromosomes in water, before scanning on top of the chromosome, showing the surface structure.

  13. Bi-stability of amplitude modulation AFM in air: deterministic and stochastic outcomes for imaging biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Thomson, Neil H

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of the oscillating microcantilever for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM AFM) operating in air is well understood theoretically but the experimental outcomes are still emerging. We use double-stranded DNA on mica as a model biomolecular system for investigating the connection between theory and experiment. A demonstration that the switching between the two cantilever oscillation states is stochastic in nature is achieved, and it can be induced by means of topographical anomalies on the surface. Whether one or the other attractor basin is accessed depends on the tip-sample separation history used to achieve the imaging conditions, and we show that the behaviour is reproducible when the tip is stable and well characterized. Emergence of background noise occurs in certain regions of parameter space regardless of whether two cantilever oscillation states coexist. The low state has been explored in detail and we note that at low to intermediate values of the free amplitude, noise-free imaging is achieved. The outcomes shown here are general and demonstrate that a thorough and systematic experimental approach in conjunction with standard modelling gives insight into the mechanisms behind image contrast formation in AM AFM in air. PMID:20453275

  14. Particle deformation induced by AFM tapping under different setpoint voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John A.; He, Bo-Ching; Fu, Wei-En

    2014-09-01

    The measured height of polystyrene nanoparticles varies with setpoint voltage during atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping-mode imaging. Nanoparticle height was strongly influenced by the magnitude of the deformation caused by the AFM tapping forces, which was determined by the setpoint voltage. This influence quantity was studied by controlling the operational AFM setpoint voltage. A test sample consisting of well-dispersed 60-nm polystyrene and gold nanoparticles co-adsorbed on poly-l-lysine-coated mica was studied in this research. Gold nanoparticles have not only better mechanical property than polystyrene nanoparticles, but also obvious facets in AFM phase image. By using this sample of mixed nanoparticles, it allows us to confirm that the deformation resulted from the effect of setpoint voltage, not noise. In tapping mode, the deformation of polystyrene nanoparticles increased with decreasing setpoint voltage. Similar behavior was observed with both open loop and closed loop AFM instruments.

  15. Nanodimentional Aggregates In Organic Monolayers Studied With Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) And Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, George R.; Burov, Julian

    2007-04-01

    Organic monolayers from a fluorescently labeled phospholipid (DPPE-NBD) were deposited on solid supports under special conditions that form stable nanometer wide bilayers cylinders that protrude from the monolayer. This molecule was frequently used in sensor applications due to its sensitivity to environment changes. The proposed configuration should provide both fast response times (ultra thin film) and increased sensitivity (greatly increased surface area). AFM can clearly distinguish between the different phases. The height difference between the solid-expanded and the liquid-expanded phase was measured to be 1.4 nm while the bilayer thickness was 5.6 nm. The solid domains show a 20 % decrease in fluorescence lifetime in comparison to the monolayer as measured by FLIM. This difference in lifetimes is explained in the model of fluorescence self quenching in the solid phase due to the molecules being closer to each other.

  16. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  17. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  18. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  19. Phase microscope imaging in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Mehta, Shalin B.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging in a bright field or phase contrast microscope is partially coherent. We have found that the image can be conveniently considered and modeled in terms of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) of the object transmission. The WDF of the object has a simple physical interpretation for the case of a slowly varying object. Basically, the image intensity is the spatial marginal of the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the phase space imager kernel (PSIkernel), a rotated version of the transmission cross-coefficient. The PSI-kernel can be regarded as a partially-coherent generalization of the point spread function. This approach can be extended to consider the partial coherence of the image itself. In particular, we can consider the mutual intensity, WDF or ambiguity function of the image. It is important to note that the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the PSI-kernel is not a WDF, and not the WDF of the image. The phase space representations of the image have relevance to phase reconstruction methods such as phase space tomography, or the transport of intensity equation approach, and to the three-dimensional image properties.

  20. Gallotannin-Capped Gold Nanoparticles: Green Synthesis and Enhanced Morphology of AFM Images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyung; Yhim, Won Been; Park, Jong-Won; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Tae Yoon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jang, Hong-Lae; Cho, Miyeon; Park, Youmie; Cho, Seonho

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by a green method using a plant secondary metabolite, gallotannin. Gallotannin was used as a reducing and capping agent to convert gold ions into AuNPs for the generation of gallotannin-capped AuNPs (GT-AuNPs). This synthetic route is ecofriendly and eliminates the use of toxic chemical reducing agents. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance of the GT-AuNPs was observed at 536 nm in the UV-visible spectra. The face-centered cubic structure of GT-AuNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction analysis. The majority of the GT-AuNPs had a spherical shape with an average diameter of 15.93 ± 8.60 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested that the hydroxyl functional groups of gallotannin were involved in the synthesis of GT-AuNPs. The size and shape of nanoparticles can have a crucial impact on their biological, mechanical, and structural properties. Herein, we developed a modified anisotropic diffusion equation to selectively remove nanoscale experimental noise while preserving nanoscale intrinsic geometry information. To demonstrate the performance of the developed method, the ridge and valley lines were plotted by utilizing the principle curvatures. Compared to the original anisotropic diffusion and raw atomic force microscopy (AFM) experimental data, the developed modified anisotropic diffusion shows excellent performance in nanoscale noise removal while preserving the intrinsic aeometry of the nanoparticles. PMID:27427661

  1. Size and orientation of the lipid II headgroup as revealed by AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Ganchev, D N; Hasper, H E; Breukink, E; de Kruijff, B

    2006-05-16

    In this study, we investigated the size and orientation of the bacterial Lipid II (L II) headgroup when the L II molecule is present in liquid-crystalline domains of DOPC in a supported DPPC bilayer. Using atomic force microscopy, we detected that L II causes the appearance of a 1.9 nm thick layer, situated over the DOPC headgroup region. With an increased scanning force, this layer can be penetrated by the AFM tip down to the level of the DOPC bilayer. Using different L II precursor molecules, we demonstrated that the detected layer consists of the headgroups of L II and that the MurNAc-pentapeptide unit of the headgroup is responsible for the measured 1.9 nm height of that layer. Monolayer experiments provided information about the in-plane dimensions of the L II headgroup. On the basis of these results and considerations of the molecular dimensions of L II headgroup constituents, we propose a model for the orientation of the L II headgroup in the membrane. In this model, the pentapeptide of the L II headgroup is rather extended and points away from the bilayer surface, which could be important for biological processes, in which L II is involved. PMID:16681392

  2. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid

  3. Probing the probe: AFM tip-profiling via nanotemplates to determine Hamaker constants from phase-distance curves.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Raul D; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Jupille, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    A method to determine the van der Waals forces from phase-distance curves recorded by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in tapping mode is presented. The relationship between the phase shift and the tip-sample distance is expressed as a function of the product of the Hamaker constant by tip radius. Silica-covered silicon tips are used to probe silica-covered silicon substrate in dry conditions to avoid capillary effects. Tips being assumed spherical, radii are determined in situ by averaging profiles recorded in different directions on hematite nanocrystals acting as nanotemplates, thus accounting for tip anisotropy. Through a series of reproducible measurements performed with tips of various radii (including the in-situ characterization of a damaged tip), a value of (6.3±0.4)×10(-20) J is found for the Hamaker constant of interacting silica surfaces in air, in good agreement with tabulated data. The results demonstrate that the onset of the tip-surface interaction is dominated by the van der Waals forces and that the total force can be modeled in the framework of the harmonic approximation. Based on the tip radius and the Hamaker constant associated to the tip-substrate system, the model is quite flexible. Once the Hamaker constant is known, a direct estimate of the tip size can be achieved whereas when the tip size is known, a quantitative evaluation of the van der Waals force becomes possible on different substrates with a spatial resolution at the nanoscale. PMID:22922181

  4. Identifying tips for intramolecular NC-AFM imaging via in situ fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Hongqian; Jarvis, Samuel P.; Zhou, Zhichao; Sharp, Peter; Moriarty, Philip; Wang, Jianbo; Wang, Yu; Kantorovich, Lev

    2014-10-01

    A practical experimental strategy is proposed that could potentially enable greater control of the tip apex in non-contact atomic force microscopy experiments. It is based on a preparation of a structure of interest alongside a reference surface reconstruction on the same sample. Our proposed strategy is as follows. Spectroscopy measurements are first performed on the reference surface to identify the tip apex structure using a previously collected database of responses of different tips to this surface. Next, immediately following the tip identification protocol, the surface of interest is studied (imaging, manipulation and/or spectroscopy). The prototype system we choose is the mixed Si(111)-7×7 and surface which can be prepared on the same sample with a controlled ratio of reactive and passivated regions. Using an ``in silico'' approach based on ab initio density functional calculations and a set of tips with varying chemical reactivities, we show how one can perform tip fingerprinting using the Si(111)-7×7 reference surface. Then it is found by examining the imaging of a naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide (NTCDI) molecule adsorbed on surface that negatively charged tips produce the best intramolecular contrast attributed to the enhancement of repulsive interactions.

  5. Phase Contrast Imaging in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Kai; Ernst, Thomas; Buchthal, Steve; Speck, Oliver; Anderson, Lynn; Chang, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase images can yield superior gray and white matter contrast compared to conventional magnitude images. However, the underlying contrast mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Previous studies have been limited to high field acquisitions in adult volunteers and patients. In this study, phase imaging in the neonatal brain is demonstrated for the first time. Compared to adults, phase differences between gray and white matter are significantly reduced but not inverted in neonates with little myelination and iron deposits in their brains. The remaining phase difference between the neonatal and adult brains may be due to different macromolecule concentration in the unmyelinated brain of the neonates and thus different frequency due to water macromolecule exchange. Additionally, the susceptibility contrast from brain myelination can be separately studied in neonates during brain development. Therefore, magnetic resonance phase imaging is suggested as a novel tool to study neonatal brain development and pathologies in neonates. PMID:21232619

  6. Ultra-small oscillation amplitude nc-AFM/STM imaging, force and dissipation spectroscopy of Si(100)(2×1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgür Özer, H.; Atabak, Mehrdad; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-12-01

    Si(100)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new nc-AFM (non-contact atomic force microscopy)/STM with sub-Ångstrom oscillation amplitudes using stiff hand-made tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance and dissipation-distance curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long-range force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM. We also observed an increase in the dissipation as the tip is approached closer to the surface, followed by an unexpected decrease as we pass the inflection point in the energy-distance curve.

  7. Simultaneous non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM imaging and force spectroscopy of Si(1 0 0)(2×1) with small oscillation amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özer, H. Özgür; Atabak, Mehrdad; Ellialtıoğlu, Recai M.; Oral, Ahmet

    2002-03-01

    Si(1 0 0)(2×1) surface is imaged using a new non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)/STM with sub-Ångström oscillation amplitudes using stiff tungsten levers. Simultaneous force gradient and STM images of individual dimers and atomic scale defects are obtained. We measured force-distance ( f- d) curves with different tips. Some of the tips show long force interactions, whereas some others resolve short-range interatomic force interactions. We observed that the tips showing short-range force interaction give atomic resolution in force gradient scans. This result suggests that short-range force interactions are responsible for atomic resolution in nc-AFM.

  8. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  9. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  10. Interactions of newly designed dicationic carbazole derivatives with double-stranded DNA: syntheses, binding studies and AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tao; Xiang, Jin; Wang, Jing; Guo, Peng; Yu, Junping

    2013-09-01

    The design of small molecular ligands able to bind with DNA is pivotal for the development of diagnostic agents and therapeutic drugs targeting DNA. Carbazole-derivatives are potential agents against tumors and opportunistic infections of AIDS. Here, two carbazole-derived dicationic compounds, DPDI and DPPDI, were designed, synthesized and characterized using NMR, IR and MS. The DNA binding properties of DPDI and DPPDI were sensitive to ionic strength. At low ionic strength, planar and aromatic DPDI had a strongly intercalative interaction with DNA, which was confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) and gel electrophoresis. In DPPDI, a phenyl group substituting H atom at the –NH group of DPDI destroyed molecular planarity, which resulted in no intercalative interactions between DPPDI and DNA, proved by CD. The positive enhancement of CD at 260–270 nm and Hoechst 33258 competitive binding tests indicated the strong groove interactions of both DPPDI and DPDI to DNA. The similarity and difference in the structures between DPDI and DPPDI explained different interaction preferences with DNA. In groove interactions, dications of pyridinium on either DPDI or DPPDI could interact with DNA base pairs, and –NH on DPDI or –N–Ph on DPPDI pointed out of the groove, as the classical model of DNA groove binding agents. Furthermore, AFM imaging revealed that both carbazole-derivatives drove the DNA conformation more compact. All the experimental data proved that the two dicationic carbazole-derivatives interacted with DNA strongly and might act as a novel type of DNA-binding candidate. PMID:23863992

  11. Condensed-phase thermal decomposition of TATB investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Foltz, M.F.; Behrens, R. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A combination of techniques has been used to investigate the condensed-phase thermal decomposition of TATB. STMBMS has been used to identify the thermal decomposition products and their temporal correlation`s. These experiments have shown that the condensed-phase decomposition proceeds through several autocatalytic pathways. Both low and high molecular weight decomposition products have been identified. Mono-, di- and tri-furazans products have been identified and, their temporal behaviors are consistent with a stepwise loss of water. AFM has been used to correlate the decomposition chemistry with morphological changes occurring as a function of heating. Patches of small 25-140 nm round holes were observed throughout the lattice of TATB crystals that were heated briefly to 300C. It is likely that these holes show where decomposition reactions have started. Evidence of decomposition products have been seen in TATB that has been held at 250C for one hour.

  12. Combination of ToF-SIMS imaging and AFM to study the early stages of corrosion in Al-Cu thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Seyeux, A.; Missert, Nancy; Frankel, Gerald; Unocic, Kinga A; Klein, L. H.; Galtayries, A.; Marcus, P

    2011-01-01

    The pitting corrosion of Al-Cu thin film alloys was investigated using samples that were heat treated in air to form through-thickness Al2Cu particles within an Al-0.5%Cu matrix. Time-of-Flight SIMS (ToF-SIMS) analysis revealed Cu-rich regions 250 - 800 nm in lateral extent near the metal/oxide interface. Following exposure that generated pitting corrosion, secondary electron, secondary ion, and AFM images showed pits with size and density similar to those of the Cu-rich regions. The role of the Cu-rich regions is addressed.

  13. Higher-dimensional phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntley, Jonathan M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditional full-field interferometric techniques (speckle, moiré, holography etc) provide 2-D phase images, which encode the surface deformation state of the object under test. Over the past 15 years, the use of additional spatial or temporal dimensions has been investigated by a number of research groups. Early examples include the measurement of 3-D surface profiles by temporally-varying projected fringe patterns, and dynamic speckle interferometry. More recently (the past 5 years) a family of related techniques (Wavelength Scanning Interferometry, Phase Contrast Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and Tilt Scanning Interferometry) has emerged that provides the volume deformation state of the object. The techniques can be thought of as a marriage between the phase sensing capabilities of Phase Shifting Interferometry and the depth-sensing capabilities of OCT. Finally, in the past 12 months a technique called Hyperspectral Interferometry has been proposed in which absolute optical path distributions are obtained in a single shot through the spectral decomposition of a white light interferogram, and for which the additional dimension therefore corresponds to the illumination wavenumber. An overview of these developments, and the related issue of robust phase unwrapping of noisy 3-D wrapped phase volumes, is presented in this paper.

  14. GPC and quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is a light efficient method for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions using binary-only or analog phase levels. It has been used in applications such as optical trapping and manipulation, active microscopy, structured illumination, optical security, parallel laser marking and labelling and recently in contemporary biophotonics applications such as for adaptive and parallel two-photon optogenetics and neurophotonics. We will present our most recent GPC developments geared towards these applications. We first show a very compact static light shaper followed by the potential of GPC for biomedical and multispectral applications where we experimentally demonstrate the active light shaping of a supercontinuum laser over most of the visible wavelength range. Finally, we discuss how GPC can be advantageously applied for Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI).

  15. Imaging phased telescope array study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The problems encountered in obtaining a wide field-of-view with large, space-based direct imaging phased telescope arrays were considered. After defining some of the critical systems issues, previous relevant work in the literature was reviewed and summarized. An extensive list was made of potential error sources and the error sources were categorized in the form of an error budget tree including optical design errors, optical fabrication errors, assembly and alignment errors, and environmental errors. After choosing a top level image quality requirment as a goal, a preliminary tops-down error budget allocation was performed; then, based upon engineering experience, detailed analysis, or data from the literature, a bottoms-up error budget reallocation was performed in an attempt to achieve an equitable distribution of difficulty in satisfying the various allocations. This exercise provided a realistic allocation for residual off-axis optical design errors in the presence of state-of-the-art optical fabrication and alignment errors. Three different computational techniques were developed for computing the image degradation of phased telescope arrays due to aberrations of the individual telescopes. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses were then performed for a variety of subaperture configurations and telescope design parameters in an attempt to determine how the off-axis performance of a phased telescope array varies as the telescopes are scaled up in size. The Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL) multipurpose telescope testbed (MMTT) configuration was analyzed in detail with regard to image degradation due to field curvature and distortion of the individual telescopes as they are scaled up in size.

  16. In Situ AFM Imaging of Solid Electrolyte Interfaces on HOPG with Ethylene Carbonate and Fluoroethylene Carbonate-Based Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cai; Wang, Shuwei; Jin, Yan; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-11-18

    Chemical and morphological structure of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) plays a vital role in lithium-ion battery (LIB), especially for its cyclability and safety. To date, research on SEI is quite limited because of the complexity of SEI and lack of effective in situ characterization techniques. Here, we present real-time views of SEI morphological evolution using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM). Complemented by an ex situ XPS analysis, fundamental differences of SEI formation from ethylene carbonate (EC) and fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-based electrolytes during first lithiation/delithiation cycle on HOPG electrode surface were revealed. PMID:26502161

  17. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  18. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging.

    PubMed

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring the surface pressure and surface area decrease versus time. In the second approach we applied AFM imaging of the supported BSA monolayers adsorbed on mica solid supports and extracted information for the enzyme action by analyzing the obtained images of the surface topography in the course of enzyme action. In both cases we obtained an estimate for the turnover number (TON) of the enzyme reaction. PMID:21868205

  19. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  20. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Curmi, Patrick A; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  1. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  2. Sub-pixel spatial resolution wavefront phase imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Mooney, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A phase imaging method for an optical wavefront acquires a plurality of phase images of the optical wavefront using a phase imager. Each phase image is unique and is shifted with respect to another of the phase images by a known/controlled amount that is less than the size of the phase imager's pixels. The phase images are then combined to generate a single high-spatial resolution phase image of the optical wavefront.

  3. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  4. Simulated structure and imaging of NTCDI on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 : a combined STM, NC-AFM and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, S P; Sweetman, A M; Lekkas, I; Champness, N R; Kantorovich, L; Moriarty, P

    2015-02-11

    The adsorption of naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide (NTCDI) on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 is investigated through a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We show that NTCDI adopts multiple planar adsorption geometries on the Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 surface which can be imaged with intramolecular bond resolution using NC-AFM. DFT calculations reveal adsorption is dominated by covalent bond formation between the molecular oxygen atoms and the surface silicon adatoms. The chemisorption of the molecule is found to induce subtle distortions to the molecular structure, which are observed in NC-AFM images. PMID:25414147

  5. Light-field-based phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingdan; Xu, Tingfa; Yue, Weirui; Situ, Guohai

    2014-10-01

    Phase contains important information about the diffraction or scattering property of an object, and therefore the imaging of phase is vital to many applications including biomedicine and metrology, just name a few. However, due to the limited bandwidth of image sensors, it is not possible to directly detect the phase of an optical field. Many methods including the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) have been well demonstrated for quantitative and non-interferometric imaging of phase. The TIE offers an experimentally simple technique for computing phase quantitatively from two or more defocused images. Usually, the defocused images were experimentally obtained by shifting the camera along the optical axis with slight intervals. Note that light field imaging has the capability to take an image stack focused at different depths by digital refocusing the captured light field of a scene. In this paper, we propose to combine Light Field Microscopy and the TIE method for phase imaging, taking the digital-refocusing advantage of Light Field Microscopy. We demonstrate the propose technique by simulation results. Compare with the traditional camera-shifting technique, light-field imaging allows the capturing the defocused images without any mechanical instability and therefore demonstrate advantage in practical applications.

  6. White-light quantitative phase imaging unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, YoonSeok; Lee, KyeoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the white light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool.

  7. White-light quantitative phase imaging unit.

    PubMed

    Baek, YoonSeok; Lee, KyeoReh; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the white-light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool. PMID:27137546

  8. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  9. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  10. Development of a new generation of active AFM tools for applications in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollier, A.-S.; Jenkins, D.; Dogheche, E.; Legrand, B.; Faucher, M.; Buchaillot, L.

    2010-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful imaging tool with high-resolution imaging capability. AFM probes consist of a very sharp tip at the end of a silicon cantilever that can respond to surface artefacts to produce an image of the topography or surface features. They are intrinsically passive devices. For imaging soft biological samples, and also for samples in liquid, it is essential to control the AFM tip position, both statically and dynamically, and this is not possible using external actuators mounted on the AFM chip. AFM cantilevers have been fabricated using silicon micromachining to incorporate a piezoelectric thin film actuator for precise control. The piezoelectric thin films have been fully characterized to determine their actuation performance and to characterize the operation of the integrated device. Examples of the spatial and vertical response are presented to illustrate their imaging capability. For operation in a liquid environment, the dynamic behaviour has been modelled and verified experimentally. The optimal drive conditions for the cantilever, along with their dynamic response, including frequency and phase in air and water, are presented.

  11. Quantitative phase imaging using grating-based quadrature phase interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Yaqoob, Zahid; Heng, Xin; Cui, Xiquan; Yang, Changhuei

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report the use of holographic gratings, which act as the free-space equivalent of the 3x3 fiber-optic coupler, to perform full field phase imaging. By recording two harmonically-related gratings in the same holographic plate, we are able to obtain nontrivial phase shift between different output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The phase difference can be adjusted by changing the relative phase of the recording beams when recording the hologram. We have built a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using harmonically-related holographic gratings with 600 and 1200 lines/mm spacing. Two CCD cameras at the output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer are used to record the full-field quadrature interferograms, which are subsequently processed to reconstruct the phase image. The imaging system has ~12X magnification with ~420μmx315μm field-of-view. To demonstrate the capability of our system, we have successfully performed phase imaging of a pure phase object and a paramecium caudatum.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of sulfite-containing AFm phases in the system CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Motzet, H.; Poellmann, H.

    1999-07-01

    The use of sulfite-containing waste materials mainly from flue gas desulfurization causes the formation of new lamellar phases (AFm) in the field of calcium aluminum hydrates. The incorporation of sulfite anions in the structure of lamellar calcium aluminate hydroxy salts and solid solutions with tetracalcium aluminate hydrate will be shown. Using special synthesis conditions a sulfite containing ettringite (AFt) was synthesized. Besides the pure synthesis of phases, the thermal stability, the hydration stages, and other properties of sulfite-containing phases were investigated. Solid solutions of lamellar calcium aluminate hydroxy salts are discussed.

  13. Fabrication of homogeneously cross-linked, functional alginate microcapsules validated by NMR-, CLSM- and AFM-imaging.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Hillgärtner, M; Manz, B; Feilen, P; Brunnenmeier, F; Leinfelder, U; Weber, M; Cramer, H; Schneider, S; Hendrich, C; Volke, F; Zimmermann, U

    2003-05-01

    Cross-linked alginate microcapsules of sufficient mechanical strength can immunoisolate cells for the long-term treatment of hormone and other deficiency diseases in human beings. However, gelation of alginate by external Ba(2+) (or other divalent cations) produces non-homogeneous cross-linking of the polymeric mannuronic (M) and guluronic (G) acid chains. The stability of such microcapsules is rather limited. Here, we show that homogeneous cross-linking can be achieved by injecting BaCl(2) crystals into alginate droplets before they come into contact with external BaCl(2). The high effectiveness of this crystal gun method is demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and by advanced nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Both techniques gave clear-cut evidence that homogeneous cross-linkage throughout the microcapsule is only obtained with simultaneous internal and external gelation. Atomic force microscopy showed a very smooth surface topography for microcapsules made by the crystal gun method, provided that excess Ba(2+) ions were removed immediately after gelation. In vitro experiments showed greatly suppressed swelling for crystal gun microcapsules. Even alginate extracted from Lessonia nigrescens (highly biocompatible) yielded microcapsules with long-term mechanical stability not hitherto possible. Encapsulation of rat islets, human monoclonal antibodies secreting hybridoma cells and murine mesenchymal stem cells transfected with cDNA encoding for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-4) revealed that injection of BaCl(2) crystals has no adverse side effects on cell viability and function. However, the release of low-molecular weight factors (such as insulin) may be delayed when using alginate concentrations in the usual range. PMID:12628829

  14. Multifocus image fusion using phase congruency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Kun; Li, Qiaoqiao; Teng, Jicai; Wang, Mingying; Shi, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    We address the problem of fusing multifocus images based on the phase congruency (PC). PC provides a sharpness feature of a natural image. The focus measure (FM) is identified as strong PC near a distinctive image feature evaluated by the complex Gabor wavelet. The PC is more robust against noise than other FMs. The fusion image is obtained by a new fusion rule (FR), and the focused region is selected by the FR from one of the input images. Experimental results show that the proposed fusion scheme achieves the fusion performance of the state-of-the-art methods in terms of visual quality and quantitative evaluations.

  15. Phase imaging in brain using SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Corum, Curtis Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The majority of MRI phase imaging is based on gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences. This work studies phase contrast behavior due to small off-resonance frequency offsets in brain using SWIFT, a FID-based sequence with nearly zero acquisition delay. 1D simulations and a phantom study were conducted to describe the behavior of phase accumulation in SWIFT. Imaging experiments of known brain phase contrast properties were conducted in a perfused rat brain comparing GRE and SWIFT. Additionally, a human brain sample was imaged. It is demonstrated how SWIFT phase is orientation dependent and correlates well with GRE, linking SWIFT phase to similar off-resonance sources as GRE. The acquisition time is shown to be analogous to TE for phase accumulation time. Using experiments with and without a magnetization transfer preparation, the likely effect of myelin water pool contribution is seen as a phase increase for all acquisition times. Due to the phase accumulation during acquisition, SWIFT phase contrast can be sensitized to small frequency differences between white and gray matter using low acquisition bandwidths.

  16. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-10-03

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis.

  17. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  18. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  19. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  20. Multiple image encryption by phase retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Hong; Kang, Yanmei; Liu, Yueqin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple image encryption (MIE) was proposed to increase the efficiency of encrypting images by processing several images simultaneously. Because of the advantage of optical technology in processing twodimensional images at high throughput, MIE has been significantly improved by use of methods originating from optics. Phase retrieval was the process of algorithmically finding solutions to the phase loss problem due to light detectors only capturing the intensity. It was to retrieve phase information for the determination of a structure from diffraction data. Error-reduction algorithm is a typical phase retrieval method. Here, we employ it to illustrate that methods in phase retrieval are able to encrypt multiple images and compress them into encrypted data simultaneously. Moreover, the decryption is also designed to handle multiple images at the same time. The whole process including both the encryption and decryption is proposed to improve MIE with respect to the compression and efficiency. The feasibility and encryption of the MIE scheme is demonstrated with encryption experiments under Gaussian white noise and unauthorized access.

  1. Synchronous Phase-Resolving Flash Range Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus, now undergoing development, for range imaging based on measurement of the round-trip phase delay of a pulsed laser beam is described. The apparatus would operate in a staring mode. A pulsed laser would illuminate a target. Laser light reflected from the target would be imaged on a verylarge- scale integrated (VLSI)-circuit image detector, each pixel of which would contain a photodetector and a phase-measuring circuit. The round-trip travel time for the reflected laser light incident on each pixel, and thus the distance to the portion of the target imaged in that pixel, would be measured in terms of the phase difference between (1) the photodetector output pulse and (2) a local-oscillator signal that would have a frequency between 10 and 20 MHz and that would be synchronized with the laser-pulse-triggering signal.

  2. In situ AFM imaging of Li-O2 electrochemical reaction on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with ether-based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Hong, Misun; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2013-07-24

    Understanding the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) electrochemical reaction is of importance to improve reaction kinetics, efficiency, and mitigate parasitic reactions, which links to the strategy of enhanced Li-O2 battery performance. Many in situ and ex situ analyses have been reported to address chemical species of reduction intermediate and products, whereas details of the dynamic Li-O2 reaction have not as yet been fully unraveled. For this purpose, visual imaging can provide straightforward evidence, formation and decomposition of products, during the Li-O2 electrochemical reaction. Here, we present real-time and in situ views of the Li-O2 reaction using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM). Details of the reaction process can be observed at nano-/micrometer scale on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode with lithium ion-containing tetraglyme, representative of the carbon cathode and ether-based electrolyte extensively employed in the Li-O2 battery. Upon oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), rapid growth of nanoplates, having axial diameter of hundreds of nanometers, length of micrometers, and ~5 nm thickness, at a step edge of HOPG can be observed, which eventually forms a lithium peroxide (Li2O2) film. This Li2O2 film is decomposed during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), for which the decomposition potential is related to a thickness. There is no evidence of byproduct analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after first reduction and oxidation reaction. However, further cycles provide unintended products such as lithium carbonate (Li2CO3), lithium acetate, and fluorine-related species with irregular morphology due to the degradation of HOPG electrode, tetraglyme, and lithium salt. These observations provide the first visualization of Li-O2 reaction process and morphological information of Li2O2, which can allow one to build strategies to prepare the optimum conditions for the Li-O2 battery. PMID:23808397

  3. Plane wave imaging using phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno

    2014-02-01

    Phased arrays are often used for rapid inspections. Phased arrays can be used to synthesize different wave fronts. For imaging, focused wave fronts are frequently used. In order to build an image, the phased array has to be fired multiple times at the same location. Alternatively, different data acquisition configurations can be designed in combination with an imaging algorithm. The objective of this paper is to use the minimal amount of data required to construct an image. If a plane wave is synthesized, the region of interest is illuminated completely. For plane wave synthesis, all elements in the phase array are fired. This ensures a good signal to noise ratio. Imaging can be performed efficiently with a mapping algorithm in the wavenumber domain. The algorithm involves only two Fourier transforms and can therefore be extremely fast. The obtained resolution is comparable to conventional imaging algorithms. This work investigates the potential and limitations of this mapping algorithm on simulated data. With this approach, frame rates of more than 1 kHz can be achieved.

  4. Phase congruency assesses hyperspectral image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-10-01

    Blind image quality assessment (QA) is a tough task especially for hyperspectral imagery which is degraded by noise, distortion, defocus, and other complex factors. Subjective hyperspectral imagery QA methods are basically measured the degradation of image from human perceptual visual quality. As the most important image quality measurement features, noise and blur, determined the image quality greatly, are employed to predict the objective hyperspectral imagery quality of each band. We demonstrate a novel no-reference hyperspectral imagery QA model based on phase congruency (PC), which is a dimensionless quantity and provides an absolute measure of the significance of feature point. First, Log Gabor wavelet is used to calculate the phase congruency of frequencies of each band image. The relationship between noise and PC can be derived from above transformation under the assumption that noise is additive. Second, PC focus measure evaluation model is proposed to evaluate blur caused by different amounts of defocus. The ratio and mean factors of edge blur level and noise is defined to assess the quality of each band image. This image QA method obtains excellent correlation with subjective image quality score without any reference. Finally, the PC information is utilized to improve the quality of some bands images.

  5. Imaging IR spectrometer, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, Jonathan; Lewis, Ralph; Lundeen, Thomas; Wang, Shu-I

    1990-01-01

    The development is examined of a prototype multi-channel infrared imaging spectrometer. The design, construction and preliminary performance is described. This instrument is intended for use with JPL Table Mountain telescope as well as the 88 inch UH telescope on Mauna Kea. The instrument is capable of sampling simultaneously the spectral region of 0.9 to 2.6 um at an average spectral resolution of 1 percent using a cooled (77 K) optical bench, a concave holographic grating and a special order sorting filter to allow the acquisition of the full spectral range on a 128 x 128 HgCdTe infrared detector array. The field of view of the spectrometer is 0.5 arcsec/pixel in mapping mode and designed to be 5 arcsec/pixel in spot mode. The innovative optical design has resulted in a small, transportable spectrometer, capable of remote operation. Commercial applications of this spectrometer design include remote sensing from both space and aircraft platforms as well as groundbased astronomical observations.

  6. Image fusion algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Koehler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary signals:1, 2 the attenuation, the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, strongly influenced by the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angles. In medical applications, it is of the utmost importance to present to the radiologist all clinically relevant information in as compact a way as possible. Hence, the need arises for a method to combine two or more of the above mentioned signals into one image containing all information relevant for diagnosis. We present an image composition algorithm that fuses the attenuation image and the differential phase contrast image into a composite, final image based on the assumption that the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the sample can be related by a constant scaling factor. The merging is performed in such a way that the composite image is characterized by minimal noise-power at each frequency component.

  7. Phase Imaging using Focusing Polycapillary Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Sajid

    The interaction of X rays in diagnostic energy range with soft tissues can be described by Compton scattering and by the complex refractive index, which together characterize the attenuation properties of the tissue and the phase imparted to X rays passing through it. Many soft tissues exhibit extremely similar attenuation, so that their discrimination using conventional radiography, which generates contrast in an image through differential attenuation, is challenging. However, these tissues will impart phase differences significantly greater than attenuation differences to the X rays passing through them, so that phase-contrast imaging techniques can enable their discrimination. A major limitation to the widespread adoption of phase-contrast techniques is that phase contrast requires significant spatial coherence of the X-ray beam, which in turn requires specialized sources. For tabletop sources, this often requires a small (usually in the range of 10-50 micron) X-ray source. In this work, polycapillary optics were employed to create a small secondary source from a large spot rotating anode. Polycapillary optics consist of arrays of small hollow glass tubes through which X rays can be guided by total internal reflection from the tube walls. By tapering the tubes to guide the X rays to a point, they can be focused to a small spot which can be used as a secondary source. The polycapillary optic was first aligned with the X-ray source. The spot size was measured using a computed radiography image plate. Images were taken at a variety of optic-to-object and object-to-detector distances and phase-contrast edge enhancement was observed. Conventional absorption images were also acquired at a small object-to detector distances for comparison. Background division was performed to remove strong non-uniformity due to the optics. Differential phase contrast reconstruction demonstrates promising preliminary results. This manuscript is divided into six chapters. The second

  8. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  9. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  10. Phase-Scrambler Plate Spreads Point Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Oliver J.; Arild, Tor

    1992-01-01

    Array of small prisms retrofit to imaging lens. Phase-scrambler plate essentially planar array of small prisms partitioning aperture of lens into many subapertures, and prism at each subaperture designed to divert relatively large diffraction spot formed by that subaperture to different, specific point on focal plane.

  11. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  12. Quantitative phase imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollárová, Vera; Colláková, Jana; Dostál, Zbynek; Slabý, Tomas; Veselý, Pavel; Chmelík, Radim

    2015-03-01

    Coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) is an off-axis holographic system. It enables observation of a sample and its quantitative phase imaging with coherent as well as with incoherent illumination. The spatial and temporal coherence can be modified and thus also the quality and type of the image information. The coherent illumination provides numerical refocusing in wide depth range similarly to a classic coherent-light digital holographic microscopy (HM). Incoherent-light HM is characterized by a high quality, coherence-noise-free imaging with up to twice higher resolution compared to coherent illumination. Owing to an independent, free of sample reference arm of the CCHM the low spatial light coherence induces coherence-gating effect. This makes possible to observe specimen also through scattering media. We have described theoretically and simulated numerically imaging of a two dimensional object through a scattering layer by CCHM using the linear systems theory. We have investigated both strongly and weakly scattering media characterized by different amount of ballistic and diffuse light. The influence of a scattering layer on the quality of a phase signal is discussed for both types of the scattering media. A strong dependence of the imaging process on the light coherence is demonstrated. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are supported by experimental data gained with model samples, as well as real biologic objects particularly then by time-lapse observations of live cells reactions to substances producing optically turbid emulsion.

  13. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  14. Synthesized Bistatic Echo Imaging Using Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad

    1990-01-01

    An object illuminated by a source produces a scattered signal; this signal depends upon both the source and the physical properties of the object. The problem of deducing coordinates, shape and/or certain physical properties of the object from the measurements of the returned signal is an inverse problem called echo imaging. The problem of echo imaging arises in medical imaging, remote sensing (radar; sonar; geophysical exploration), and non-destructive testing. In this paper, we address the problem of imaging an object form its returned signals using a phased array. Our approach is to exploit the array's various radiation patterns and the recordable portion of the returned signal's spectrum to generate the data base for this echo imaging system. Rapid steering of a phased array's radiation patterns can be achieved electronically. These steered waves can be utilized to synthesize waves with varying angles of propagation. In this case, the recorded returned signal for each direction of propagation can be viewed as data obtained by a bistatic array configuration. We first formulate the imaging problem for a plane wave source in a bistatic configuration. We utilize the two-way propagation time and amplitude of the returned signal to relate the object's properties, reflectivity function and coordinates, to the measured data (system modeling). This relationship is the basis for deducing the object's reflectivity function from the recorded data (inverse problem). We then extend these results for an arbitrary radiation pattern and synthesized radiation patterns generated by an array capable of beam steering in cross-range. We show that the recorded returned signals can be related to the spatial frequency contents of the reflectivity function. We also show that these array processing principles can be utilized to formulate a system model and inversion for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging that incorporates wavefront curvature.

  15. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  16. Quantitative phase imaging with programmable illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Edwards, Chris; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Even with the recent rapid advances in the field of microscopy, non-laser light sources used for light microscopy have not been developing significantly. Most current optical microscopy systems use halogen bulbs as their light sources to provide a white-light illumination. Due to the confined shapes and finite filament size of the bulbs, little room is available for modification in the light source, which prevents further advances in microscopy. By contrast, commercial projectors provide a high power output that is comparable to the halogen lamps while allowing for great flexibility in patterning the illumination. In addition to their high brightness, the illumination can be patterned to have arbitrary spatial and spectral distributions. Therefore, commercial projectors can be adopted as a flexible light source to an optical microscope by careful alignment to the existing optical path. In this study, we employed a commercial projector source to a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), which is an outside module for an existing phase contrast (PC) microscope. By replacing the ring illumination of PC with a ring-shaped pattern projected onto the condenser plane, we were able to recover the same result as the original SLIM. Furthermore, the ring illumination is replaced with multiple dots aligned along the same ring to minimize the overlap between the scattered and unscattered fields. This new method minimizes the halo artifact of the imaging system, which allows for a halo-free high-resolution quantitative phase microscopy system.

  17. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  18. Phase averaging of image ensembles by using cepstral gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, H.W.

    1983-11-01

    The direct Fourier phase averaging of an ensemble of randomly blurred images has long been thought to be too difficult a problem to undertake realistically owing to the necessity of proper phase unwrapping. It is shown that it is nevertheless possible to average the Fourier phase information in an image ensemble without calculating phases by using the technique of cepstral gradients.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of mask phase defects from through-focus EUV aerial images

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-02-21

    Mask defects inspection and imaging is one of the most important issues for any pattern transfer lithography technology. This is especially true for EUV lithography where the wavelength-specific properties of masks and defects necessitate actinic inspection for a faithful prediction of defect printability and repair performance. In this paper we will present a technique to obtain a quantitative characterization of mask phase defects from EUV aerial images. We apply this technique to measure the aerial image phase of native defects on a blank mask, measured with the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) an EUV zoneplate microscope that operates at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured phase is compared with predictions made from AFM top-surface measurements of those defects. While amplitude defects are usually easy to recognize and quantify with standard inspection techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), defects or structures that have a phase component can be much more challenging to inspect. A phase defect can originate from the substrate or from any level of the multilayer. In both cases its effect on the reflected field is not directly related to the local topography of the mask surface, but depends on the deformation of the multilayer structure. Using the AIT, we have previously showed that EUV inspection provides a faithful and reliable way to predict the appearance of mask defect on the printed wafer; but to obtain a complete characterization of the defect we need to evaluate quantitatively its phase component. While aerial imaging doesn't provide a direct measurement of the phase of the object, this information is encoded in the through focus evolution of the image intensity distribution. Recently we developed a technique that allows us to extract the complex amplitude of EUV mask defects using two aerial images from different focal planes. The method for the phase reconstruction is derived from the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS

  20. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  1. Heralded phase-contrast imaging using an orbital angular momentum phase-filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspden, Reuben S.; Morris, Peter A.; He, Ruiqing; Chen, Qian; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-05-01

    We utilise the position and orbital angular momentum (OAM) correlations between the signal and idler photons generated in the down-conversion process to obtain ghost images of a phase object. By using an OAM phase filter, which is non-local with respect to the object, the images exhibit isotropic edge-enhancement. This imaging technique is the first demonstration of a full-field, phase-contrast imaging system with non-local edge enhancement, and enables imaging of phase objects using significantly fewer photons than standard phase-contrast imaging techniques.

  2. Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Kazuki; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2013-11-11

    Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of a calcite crystal growth process in water at one frame per second. The significant improvement in the imaging speed should enable various studies on unexplored atomic-scale interfacial processes.

  3. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W

    2003-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C{sub 6}A{sub 2}S-bar{sub 2}H{sub 34} or {l_brace}Ca{sub 6}[Al(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O{r_brace}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2}. If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125.

  4. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  5. Dynamics of the nanoneedle probe in trolling mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ahmad; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Keramati, Ramtin; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-05-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as an indispensable tool for nanoscale characterization, presents major drawbacks for operation in a liquid environment arising from the large hydrodynamic drag on the vibrating cantilever. The newly introduced 'Trolling mode' (TR-mode) AFM resolves this complication by using a specialized nanoneedle cantilever that keeps the cantilever outside of the liquid. Herein, a mechanical model with a lumped mass was developed to capture the dynamics of such a cantilever with a nanoneedle tip. This new developed model was applied to investigate the effects of the needle-liquid interface on the performance of the AFM, including the imaging capability in liquid. PMID:25915451

  6. Influence of electron irradiation on the electronic transport mechanisms during the conductive AFM imaging of InAs/GaAs quantum dots capped with a thin GaAs layer.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M; Smaali, K

    2008-06-25

    We have used conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) to study the electronic transport mechanisms through InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on an n-type GaAs(001) substrate and covered with a 5 nm thick GaAs cap layer. The study is performed with a conductive atomic force microscope working inside a scanning electron microscope. Electric images can be obtained only if the sample is preliminarily irradiated with an electron probe current sufficiently high to generate strong electron beam induced current. In these conditions holes are trapped in QDs and surface states, so allowing the release of the Fermi level pinning and thus conduction through the sample. The electronic transport mechanism depends on the type of AFM probe used; it is explained for a metal (Co/Cr) coated probe and p-doped diamond coated probe with the aid of energy band diagrams. The writing (charge trapping) and erasing (untrapping) phenomena is conditioned by the magnitude of the electron probe current. A strong memory effect is evidenced for the sample studied. PMID:21828669

  7. Ghost imaging of phase objects with classical incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Tomohiro; Setaelae, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-10-15

    We describe an optical setup for performing spatial Fourier filtering in ghost imaging with classical incoherent light. This is achieved by a modification of the conventional geometry for lensless ghost imaging. It is shown on the basis of classical coherence theory that with this technique one can realize what we call phase-contrast ghost imaging to visualize pure phase objects.

  8. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  9. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Larkin, Kieran G

    2016-08-21

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required. PMID:27436750

  10. Structured illumination quantitative phase microscopy for enhanced resolution amplitude and phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established microscopy technique typically used to image samples at resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. Until now, however, achieving sub-diffraction resolution has predominantly been limited to intensity-based imaging modalities. Here, we introduce an analogue to conventional SIM that allows sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase-contrast imaging of optically transparent objects. We demonstrate sub-diffraction resolution amplitude and quantitative-phase imaging of phantom targets and enhanced resolution quantitative-phase imaging of cells. We report a phase accuracy to within 5% and phase noise of 0.06 rad. PMID:24156044

  11. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  12. PRECL: A new method for interferometry imaging from closure phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Akiyama, Kazunori; Hada, Kazuhiro; Honma, Mareki

    2016-06-01

    For short-wavelength VLBI observations, it is difficult to measure the phase of the visibility function accurately. The closure phases are reliable measurements under this situation, though it is not sufficient to retrieve all of the phase information. We propose a new method, phase retrieval from closure phase (PRECL). PRECL estimates all the visibility phases only from the closure phases. Combining PRECL with a sparse modeling method we have already proposed, the imaging process of VLBI does not rely on a dirty image or self-calibration. The proposed method is tested numerically and the results are promising.

  13. Imaging by Zernike phase plates in the TEM.

    PubMed

    Edgcombe, C J

    2016-08-01

    The images produced from simple phase objects, lenses and Zernike phase plates when all have rotational symmetry can be calculated by 1D Fourier-Bessel transforms. For a simple disc object producing a uniform phase shift over its diameter, the resulting image can be defined for any size of object phase change. The monotonic range of intensity variation with object phase is found to depend strongly on the phase change introduced by the phase plate; this property of the system is not well predicted by the weak phase approximation. The effect of spreading the phase transition at the plate over a range of radius is beneficial if the plate phase change is sufficiently small. Weak-phase calculations for a phase distribution more typical of a spherical object are also shown. PMID:27183505

  14. Quantitative phase imaging of Breast cancer cell based on SLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Wu, Shulian

    2016-02-01

    We illustrated a novel optical microscopy technique to observe cell dynamics via spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). SLIM combines Zemike's phase contrast microscopy and Gabor's holography. When the light passes through the transparent specimens, it could render high contrast intensity and record the phase information from the object. We reconstructed the Breast cancer cell phase image by SLIM and the reconstruction algorithm. Our investigation showed that SLIM has the ability to achieve the quantitative phase imaging (QPI).

  15. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-01-01

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions. PMID:26868719

  16. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-01-01

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions. PMID:26868719

  17. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  18. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  19. Phase contrast without phase plates and phase rings--optical solutions for improved imaging of phase structures.

    PubMed

    Piper, Timm; Piper, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Using the optical methods described, phase specimens can be observed with a modified light microscope in enhanced clarity, purified from typical artifacts which are apparent in standard phase contrast illumination. In particular, haloing and shade-off are absent, lateral and vertical resolution are maximized and the image quality remains constant even in problematic preparations which cannot be well examined in normal phase contrast, such as specimens beyond a critical thickness or covered by obliquely situated cover slips. The background brightness and thus the range of contrast can be continuously modulated and specimens can be illuminated in concentric-peripheral, axial or paraxial light. Additional contrast effects can be achieved by spectral color separation. Normal glass or mirror lenses can be used; they do not need to be fitted with a phase plate or a phase ring. The methods described should be of general interest for all disciplines using phase microscopy. PMID:23913620

  20. High-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging with spectral domain phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangzhi; Ding, Zhihua; Shen, Yi; Chen, Zhiyan; Zhao, Chen; Ni, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy for high-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging is presented. The phase retrieval is realized in the depth domain to maintain a high sensitivity, while the phase information obtained in the spectral domain is exploited to extend the dynamic range of optical path difference. Sensitivity advantage of phase retrieved in the depth domain over that in the spectral domain is thoroughly investigated. The performance of the proposed depth domain phase based approach is illustrated by phase imaging of a resolution target and an onion skin. PMID:24216799

  1. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  2. Broadband Phase Retrieval for Image-Based Wavefront Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A focus-diverse phase-retrieval algorithm has been shown to perform adequately for the purpose of image-based wavefront sensing when (1) broadband light (typically spanning the visible spectrum) is used in forming the images by use of an optical system under test and (2) the assumption of monochromaticity is applied to the broadband image data. Heretofore, it had been assumed that in order to obtain adequate performance, it is necessary to use narrowband or monochromatic light. Some background information, including definitions of terms and a brief description of pertinent aspects of image-based phase retrieval, is prerequisite to a meaningful summary of the present development. Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to denote estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations of an optical system under test. The term image-based wavefront sensing refers to a general class of algorithms that recover optical phase information, and phase-retrieval algorithms constitute a subset of this class. In phase retrieval, one utilizes the measured response of the optical system under test to produce a phase estimate. The optical response of the system is defined as the image of a point-source object, which could be a star or a laboratory point source. The phase-retrieval problem is characterized as image-based in the sense that a charge-coupled-device camera, preferably of scientific imaging quality, is used to collect image data where the optical system would normally form an image. In a variant of phase retrieval, denoted phase-diverse phase retrieval [which can include focus-diverse phase retrieval (in which various defocus planes are used)], an additional known aberration (or an equivalent diversity function) is superimposed as an aid in estimating unknown aberrations by use of an image-based wavefront-sensing algorithm. Image-based phase-retrieval differs from such other wavefront-sensing methods, such as interferometry, shearing interferometry, curvature

  3. Simple phase extraction in x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Liu; Jin-Chuan, Guo; Yao-Hu, Lei; Ji, Li; Han-Ben, Niu

    2016-02-01

    A fast and simple method to extract phase-contrast images from interferograms is proposed, and its effectiveness is demonstrated through simulation and experiment. For x-ray differential phase contrast imaging, a strong attenuation signal acts as an overwhelming background intensity that obscures the weak phase signal so that no obvious phase-gradient information is detectable in the raw image. By subtracting one interferogram from another, chosen at particular intervals, the phase signal can be isolated and magnified. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61101175, 61571305, and 61227802).

  4. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for – breast – simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive contrast imaging. PMID:24865208

  5. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  6. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  7. Modeling the Interaction between AFM Tips and Pinned Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenjiang; Liu, Yawei; Xiao, Qianxiang; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Xianren

    2016-01-26

    Although the morphology of surface nanobubbles has been studied widely with different AFM modes, AFM images may not reflect the real shapes of the nanobubbles due to AFM tip-nanobubble interactions. In addition, the interplay between surface nanobubble deformation and induced capillary force has not been well understood in this context. In our work we used constraint lattice density functional theory to investigate the interaction between AFM tips and pinned surface nanobubbles systematically, especially concentrating on the effects of tip hydrophilicity and shape. For a hydrophilic tip contacting a nanobubble, its hydrophilic nature facilitates its departure from the bubble surface, displaying a weak and intermediate-range attraction. However, when the tip squeezes the nanobubble during the approach process, the nanobubble shows an elastic effect that prevents the tip from penetrating the bubble, leading to a strong nanobubble deformation and repulsive interactions. On the contrary, a hydrophobic tip can easily pierce the vapor-liquid interface of the nanobubble during the approach process, leading to the disappearance of the repulsive force. In the retraction process, however, the adhesion between the tip and the nanobubble leads to a much stronger lengthening effect on nanobubble deformation and a strong long-range attractive force. The trends of force evolution from our simulations agree qualitatively well with recent experimental AFM observations. This favorable agreement demonstrates that our model catches the main intergradient of tip-nanobubble interactions for pinned surface nanobubbles and may therefore provide important insight into how to design minimally invasive AFM experiments. PMID:26751634

  8. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  9. High-sensitivity noncontact atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (nc AFM/STM) operating at subangstrom oscillation amplitudes for atomic resolution imaging and force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oral, A.; Grimble, R. A.; Özer, H. Ö.; Pethica, J. B.

    2003-08-01

    We describe a new, highly sensitive noncontact atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) with subangstrom oscillation amplitudes for atomic resolution imaging and force-distance spectroscopy. A novel fiber interferometer with ˜4×10-4 Å/√Hz noise level is employed to detect cantilever displacements. Subangstrom oscillation amplitude is applied to the lever at a frequency well below the resonance and changes in the oscillation amplitude due to tip-sample force interactions are measured with a lock-in amplifier. Quantitative force gradient images can be obtained simultaneously with the STM topography. Employment of subangstrom oscillation amplitudes lets us perform force-distance measurements, which reveal very short-range force interactions, consistent with the theory. Performance of the microscope is demonstrated with quantitative atomic resolution images of Si(111)(7×7) and force-distance curves showing short interaction range, all obtained with <0.25 Å lever oscillation amplitude. Our technique is not limited to UHV only and operation under liquids and air is feasible.

  10. Phase-retrieval ghost imaging of complex-valued objects

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Wenlin; Han Shensheng

    2010-08-15

    An imaging approach, based on ghost imaging, is reported to recover a pure-phase object or a complex-valued object. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that both the complex-valued object and its amplitude-dependent part can be separately and nonlocally reconstructed using this approach. Both effects influencing the quality of reconstructed images and methods to further improve the imaging quality are also discussed.

  11. Phase space representation of spatially partially coherent imaging.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Roman

    2008-08-01

    The phase space representation of imaging with optical fields in any state of spatial coherence is developed by using spatial coherence wavelets. It leads to new functions for describing the optical transfer and response of imaging systems when the field is represented by Wigner distribution functions. Specific imaging cases are analyzed in this context, and special attention is devoted to the imaging of two point sources. PMID:18670542

  12. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  13. Non-interferometric quantitative phase imaging of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen K.; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Real-time imaging of live cells is quite difficult without the addition of external contrast agents. Various methods for quantitative phase imaging of living cells have been proposed like digital holographic microscopy and diffraction phase microscopy. In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental results of quantitative phase imaging of live yeast cells with nanometric precision using transport of intensity equations (TIE). We demonstrate nanometric depth sensitivity in imaging live yeast cells using this technique. This technique being noninterferometric, does not need any coherent light sources and images can be captured through a regular bright-field microscope. This real-time imaging technique would deliver the depth or 3-D volume information of cells and is highly promising in real-time digital pathology applications, screening of pathogens and staging of diseases like malaria as it does not need any preprocessing of samples.

  14. Kernel Phase and Kernel Amplitude in Fizeau Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin J. S.

    2016-09-01

    Kernel phase interferometry is an approach to high angular resolution imaging which enhances the performance of speckle imaging with adaptive optics. Kernel phases are self-calibrating observables that generalize the idea of closure phases from non-redundant arrays to telescopes with arbitrarily shaped pupils, by considering a matrix-based approximation to the diffraction problem. In this paper I discuss the recent fhistory of kernel phase, in particular in the matrix-based study of sparse arrays, and propose an analogous generalization of the closure amplitude to kernel amplitudes. This new approach can self-calibrate throughput and scintillation errors in optical imaging, which extends the power of kernel phase-like methods to symmetric targets where amplitude and not phase calibration can be a significant limitation, and will enable further developments in high angular resolution astronomy.

  15. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  16. Experimental verification of phase retrieval of microbeads in high-speed phase imaging using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoba, Osamu; Xia, Peng; Quan, Xiangyu; Nagahama, Naoya; Tanimoto, Shunsuke; Nitta, Kouichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    One of fast measurement systems of μm-size phase objects based on digital holographic microscope with transmission geometry is presented. For building a 3D inspection system of the phase objects, the improvement of recovered phase image is discussed. Under the CW laser illumination, the movement afterimage of phase object was observed. The phase object is recovered by deconvolution filter. Experimental and numerical evaluation are presented.

  17. Atomic force microscopy on phase-control pulsed force mode in water: Imaging and force analysis on a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    We developed phase-control pulsed force mode (p-PFM) as the operation mode for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The p-PFM allowed us to observe soft or weakly adsorbed materials in a liquid environment using a conventional AFM apparatus, and allowed for force curve mapping (FCM) after offline data processing. We applied the p-PFM to a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin (RhOEP) layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is applicable to anode catalysts of fuel cells. The RhOEP/HOPG system was stably observed in water by this mode. In the p-PFM image, we found both large and small protrusions, which were not observed in the dynamic force mode, in air. The detailed force analysis suggested that these protrusions are nanobubbles located on the HOPG substrate exposed in holes or pits of the RhOEP layer.

  18. Phase contrast imaging of buccal mucosa tissues-Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, A.; Tripathi, S.; Shripathi, T.; Kulkarni, V. K.; Banda, N. R.; Agrawal, A. K.; Sarkar, P. S.; Kashyap, Y.; Sinha, A.

    2015-06-01

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) technique has been used to interpret physical parameters obtained from the image taken on the normal buccal mucosa tissue extracted from cheek of a patient. The advantages of this method over the conventional imaging techniques are discussed. PCI technique uses the X-ray phase shift at the edges differentiated by very minute density differences and the edge enhanced high contrast images reveal details of soft tissues. The contrast in the images produced is related to changes in the X-ray refractive index of the tissues resulting in higher clarity compared with conventional absorption based X-ray imaging. The results show that this type of imaging has better ability to visualize microstructures of biological soft tissues with good contrast, which can lead to the diagnosis of lesions at an early stage of the diseases.

  19. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  20. Examination of Humidity Effects on Measured Thickness and Interfacial Phenomena of Exfoliated Graphene on SiO2 via AC-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinkins, Katherine; Camacho, Jorge; Farina, Lee; Wu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Tapping (AC) mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of graphene samples. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as adsorbed water, in turn dependent on relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AC-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO2) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. Loss tangent is an AFM imaging technique that interprets the phase information as a relationship between the stored and dissipated energy in the tip-sample interaction. This study demonstrates the loss tangent of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO2. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO2 substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AC-AFM.

  1. Surface investigations of ZnBeMnSe mixed crystals by means of the piezoelectric spectroscopy and the AFM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzałkowski, K.; Kulesza, S.; Zakrzewski, J.; Maliński, M.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric photoacoustic spectroscopy with a piezoelectric detection has been used for measurements of the amplitude and phase spectra of Zn1-x-yBexMnySe mixed semiconductors. The investigated crystals were grown from the melt by the modified high pressure Bridgman method under the argon overpressure. The preliminary study of the sample's surface of the investigated crystals was carried out using the AFM technique. The influence of a different surface treatment on the amplitude and phase piezoelectric spectra as well as on AFM images is presented and analyzed. The correlations between these two techniques have been found and are discussed. Piezoelectric (PZE) spectra were analyzed using an extended and modified Jackson-Amer theory.

  2. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  3. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  4. Automated detection of cardiac phase from intracoronary ultrasound image sequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Dong, Yi; Li, Mengchan

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary ultrasound (ICUS) is a widely used interventional imaging modality in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Due to cyclic cardiac motion and pulsatile blood flow within the lumen, there exist changes of coronary arterial dimensions and relative motion between the imaging catheter and the lumen during continuous pullback of the catheter. The action subsequently causes cyclic changes to the image intensity of the acquired image sequence. Information on cardiac phases is implied in a non-gated ICUS image sequence. A 1-D phase signal reflecting cardiac cycles was extracted according to cyclical changes in local gray-levels in ICUS images. The local extrema of the signal were then detected to retrieve cardiac phases and to retrospectively gate the image sequence. Results of clinically acquired in vivo image data showed that the average inter-frame dissimilarity of lower than 0.1 was achievable with our technique. In terms of computational efficiency and complexity, the proposed method was shown to be competitive when compared with the current methods. The average frame processing time was lower than 30 ms. We effectively reduced the effect of image noises, useless textures, and non-vessel region on the phase signal detection by discarding signal components caused by non-cardiac factors. PMID:26406038

  5. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  6. Imaging of Phase Objects using Partially Coherent Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Ravizza, F. L.

    2013-01-01

    Screening high-power laser optics for light intensifying phase objects that cause laserinduced damage on downstream optics is critical to sustaining laser operation. Identifying such flaws on large-apertures is quite challenging since they are relatively small and invisible to conventional inspection methods. A Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI) system was developed to rapidly identify these flaws on large-aperture optics within a single full-aperture dark-field image. We describe a two-step production phase object screening process consisting of LPDI mapping and image analysis, followed by high-resolution interferometry and propagation based evaluation of the downstream damage potential of identified flaws. An image simulation code capable of modeling the LPDI partially coherent illumination was used to optimize its phase object sensitivity.

  7. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  8. To enhance imaging performance of hybrid imaging systems by using two asymmetrical phase masks.

    PubMed

    Le, Van Nhu; Chen, Shouqian; Fan, Zhigang; Pham, Nghia Minh

    2016-02-10

    We propose the use of two asymmetrical phase masks combined with the subtracted imaging method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio in wavefront coding systems. This subtracted imaging technique is similar to the variable pinhole diameter in confocal microscopy. Two different phase modulations of same phase masks are employed to promote the magnitude of the optical transfer function (OTF). The ratio factor is used to control the phase variation between two phase masks. The noise of decoded images is suppressed owing to the higher magnitude of the OTF than the wavefront coding systems with a phase mask. A tangent phase mask as an example is used to demonstrate our concept. Simulated results show that the performance promotion controls noise amplification of decoded images while maintaining a depth-of-field extension. PMID:26906377

  9. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Imaging: Towards its Interdisciplinary Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottler, C.; Revol, V.; Kaufmann, R.; Urban, C.; Knop, K.; Sennhauser, U.; Jerjen, I.; Lüthi, T.; Cardot, F.; Niedermann, P.; Morel, J.-P.; Maake, C.; Walt, H.; Knop, E.; Blanc, N.

    2010-04-01

    X-ray phase imaging including phase tomography has been attracting increasing attention during the past few decades. The advantage of X-ray phase imaging is that an extremely high sensitivity is achieved for weakly absorbing materials, such as biological soft tissues, which generate a poor contrast by conventional schemes. Especially for such living samples, where the reduction of the applied dose is of paramount interest, phase sensitive measurements schemes have an inherent potential for a significant dose reduction combined with an image quality enhancement. Several methods have been invented for x-ray phase contrast imaging that either use an approach based on interferometry, diffraction or wave-field propagation. Some of these techniques have a potential for commercial applications, such as in medicine, non-destructive testing, security and inspection. The scope of this manuscript thus deals with one particular such technique that measures the diffraction caused by the specimen by means of a grating interferometer. Examples of measurements are shown that depict the potential of phase contrast imaging for future commercial applications, such as in medical imaging, non-destructive testing and inspection for quality control. The current state of the technology is briefly reviewed as well as its shortcomings to be overcome with regard to the applications.

  10. Phase estimation for magnetic resonance imaging near metal prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bones, Philip J.; King, Laura J.; Millane, Rick P.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to be the best technique for assessing complications in patients with metal orthopedic implants. The presence of fat can obscure definition of the other soft tissues in MRI images, so fat suppression is often required. However, the performance of existing fat suppression techniques is inadequate near implants, due to very significant magnetic field perturbations induced by the metal. The three-point Dixon technique is potentially a method of choice as it is able to suppress fat in the presence of inhomogeneities, but the success of this technique depends on being able to accurately calculate the phase shift. This is generally done using phase unwrapping and/or iterative reconstruction algorithms. Most current phase unwrapping techniques assume that the phase function is slowly varying and phase differences between adjacent points are limited to less than π radians in magnitude. Much greater phase differences can be present near metal implants. We present our experience with two phase unwrapping techniques which have been adapted to use prior knowledge of the implant. The first method identifies phase discontinuities before recovering the phase along paths through the image. The second method employs a transform to find the least squares solution to the unwrapped phase. Simulation results indicate that the methods show promise.

  11. Image-inpainting and quality-guided phase unwrapping algorithm.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lei; Fang, Suping; Yang, Pengcheng; Wang, Leijie; Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh

    2012-05-01

    For the wrapped phase map with regional abnormal fringes, a new phase unwrapping algorithm that combines the image-inpainting theory and the quality-guided phase unwrapping algorithm is proposed. First, by applying a threshold to the modulation map, the valid region (i.e., the interference region) is divided into the doubtful region (called the target region during the inpainting period) and the reasonable one (the source region). The wrapped phase of the doubtful region is thought to be unreliable, and the data are abandoned temporarily. Using the region-filling image-inpainting method, the blank target region is filled with new data, while nothing is changed in the source region. A new wrapped phase map is generated, and then it is unwrapped with the quality-guided phase unwrapping algorithm. Finally, a postprocessing operation is proposed for the final result. Experimental results have shown that the performance of the proposed algorithm is effective. PMID:22614426

  12. STM and AFM; Which is Better for Surface Structural Analysis? Non- contact AFM Studies on Ge/Si(105) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been utilized to determine surface atomic structure with its highly resolved images. Probing surface electronic states near the Fermi energy (EF), STM images, however, do not necessarily represent the atomic structure of surfaces. It has been believed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides us surface topographic images without being disturbed by the electronic states. In order to prove the surpassing performance, we performed noncontact (nc) AFM on the Ge/Si(105) surface [1], which is a facet plane of the ?hut? clusters formed on Ge-deposited Si(001) surface. It is found that STM images taken on the surface, either filled- or empty-state images, do not show all surface atoms because of the electronic effect; some surface atoms have dangling bond states below EF and other surface atoms have states above EF. [2]. In a nc-AFM image, on the other hand, all surface atoms having a dangling bond are observed [3], directly representing an atomic structure of the surface. Electronic information can also be obtained in AFM by using a Kelvin-probe method. From atomically resolved potential profile we obtained, charge transfer among the dangling bond states is directly demonstrated. These results clearly demonstrate that highly-resolved nc-AFM with a Kelvin-probe method is an ideal tool for analysis of atomic structures and electronic properties of surfaces. This work was done in collaboration with T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama, T. An, and M. Ono, ISSP, Univ. Tokyo and JST, Y. Fujikawa and T. Sakurai, IMR. Tohoku Univ. T. Hashimoto, AIST, Y. Morikawa, ISIR, Osaka Univ. K. Terakura, Hokkaido Univ., and M.G. Lagally, University of Wisconsin-Madison. [1] T. Eguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 266102 (2004). [2] Y. Fujikawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176101 (2002). [3] T. Eguchi and Y. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 256105 (2002)

  13. Phase 2 N01 Program - Cancer Imaging Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Phase 2 N01 Program is a CTEP-CIP collaboration includes 7 contractors, most of whom consist of multi-institutional consortia, and includes a total of 22 NCI-designated Cancer Centers. These sites carry out early clinical trials with CTEP and CIP-held IND agents, with an emphasis on phase 2 trials, but including phase 1 trials as well. These trials include the evaluation of novel imaging agents and methods to enhance the evaluation of novel therapeutics.

  14. Near-infrared quantitative phase imaging of cellular manipulation under different physio-chemical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bipin

    Quantitative phase imaging using Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) is emerging as a label-free and wide-field method of characterizing cells with high spatio-temporal resolution. In parallel, silicon based micromechanical and electronic devices are allowing both manipulation (e.g. electrical stimulation, mechanical actuation) as well as characterization (electrical and mechanical) of micro and nano-scopic samples. This has revolutionized development of lab-on-a-chip devices for high throughput analysis of cells and molecules for diagnosis of disease and screening of drug-effects. However, very little progress has been made in optical (e.g. fluorescence, Raman etc) characterization of samples on these silicon-based devices. Especially, wide-field high-resolution optical imaging and characterization of samples under silicon environment has not been possible owing to the opacity of silicon to visible light. This thesis reports high resolution near-infrared quantitative phase imaging of cells through silicon, in isotonic as well as hypotonic environment using DHM. Further, several microscopic (AFM, laser manipulation) methods are being developed for characterization of mechanical properties (e.g. elasticity) of cells so as to determine changes during physiological stress. In particular, optical tweezers are used for transverse-stretching cells by actuating anchored-beads as handles and imaging using phase-contrast microscopy. While this method is constantly gaining more attention due to non-contact nature of actuation, it is very time consuming and has low working distance. The thesis describes development of a weakly-focused laser beam for axial-stretching of cell by scattering force, which can be easily extended for wide-area stretching. Application of DHM allowed cell imaging with nm-resolution when stretched axially. Development of an empirical formula for force exerted by defocused light beam on cell surface led to measurement of elastic property of cell. In

  15. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. )

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  16. Terahertz holography for imaging amplitude and phase objects.

    PubMed

    Hack, Erwin; Zolliker, Peter

    2014-06-30

    A non-monochromatic THz Quantum Cascade Laser and an uncooled micro-bolometer array detector with VGA resolution are used in a beam-splitter free holographic set-up to measure amplitude and phase objects in transmission. Phase maps of the diffraction pattern are retrieved using the Fourier transform carrier fringe method; while a Fresnel-Kirchhoff back propagation algorithm is used to reconstruct the complex object image. A lateral resolution of 280 µm and a relative phase sensitivity of about 0.5 rad are estimated from reconstructed images of a metallic Siemens star and a polypropylene test structure, respectively. Simulations corroborate the experimental results. PMID:24977861

  17. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Eppler, W G; Poland, D N

    2005-02-18

    A 3D solid model-aided object cueing method that matches phase angles of directional derivative vectors at image pixels to phase angles of vectors normal to projected model edges is described. It is intended for finding specific types of objects at arbitrary position and orientation in overhead images, independent of spatial resolution, obliqueness, acquisition conditions, and type of imaging sensor. It is shown that the phase similarity measure can be efficiently evaluated over all combinations of model position and orientation using the FFT. The highest degree of similarity over all model orientations is captured in a match surface of similarity values vs. model position. Unambiguous peaks in this surface are sorted in descending order of similarity value, and the small image thumbnails that contain them are presented to human analysts for inspection in sorted order.

  18. Improvement in metrology on new 3D-AFM platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Ingo; Osborn, Marc; Hand, Sean; Chen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    According to the 2007 edition of the ITRS roadmap, the requirement for CD uniformity of isolated lines on a binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 2.1nm (3σ) in 2008 and requires improvement to1.3 nm (3σ) in 2010. In order to meet the increasing demand for CD uniformity on photo masks, improved CD metrology is required. A next generation AFM, InSightTM 3DAFM, has been developed to meet these increased requirements for advanced photo mask metrology. The new system achieves 2X improvement in CD and depth precision on advanced photo masks features over the previous generation 3D-AFM. This paper provides measurement data including depth, CD, and sidewall angle metrology. In addition the unique capabilities of damage-free defect inspection and Nanoimprint characterization by 3D AFM are presented.

  19. Surface Morphological Studies on Nerve Cells by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-03-01

    Surface morphological properties of fixed and living nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis have been studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Identified, individual neurons were removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis and plated into poly-L-lysine coated glass cover-slips. The growth of the nerve cells was stopped and fixed with 0.1% Glutaraldehyde and 4% Formaldehyde solution after extension of growth cones at the tip of the axons. Topography and softness of growth cone filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) were probed by AFM. Information obtained from AFM's amplitude and phase channels have been used for determination of softness of the region probed. The results of structural studies on the cells are linked to their mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution.

  20. Automatic evaluation of nickel alloy secondary phases from SEM images.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; Menezes, Thiago Ivo de S; Farias, Jesualdo Pereira; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative metallography is a technique to determine and correlate the microstructures of materials with their properties and behavior. Generic commercial image processing and analysis software packages have been used to quantify material phases from metallographic images. However, these all-purpose solutions also have some drawbacks, particularly when applied to segmentation of material phases. To overcome such limitations, this work presents a new solution to automatically segment and quantify material phases from SEM metallographic images. The solution is based on a neuronal network and in this work was used to identify the secondary phase precipitated in the gamma matrix of a Nickel base alloy. The results obtained by the new solution were validated by visual inspection and compared with the ones obtained by a commonly used commercial software. The conclusion is that the new solution is precise, reliable and more accurate and faster than the commercial software. PMID:21181708

  1. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  3. Imaging quality automated measurement of image intensifier based on orthometric phase-shifting gratings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Song; Cao, Yiping

    2016-06-01

    A method for automatically measuring the imaging quality parameters of an image intensifier based on orthometric phase-shifting gratings (OPSG) is proposed. Two sets of phase-shifting gratings, one with a fringe direction at 45° and the other at 135°, are successively projected onto the input port of the image intensifier, and the corresponding deformed patterns modulated by the measured image intensifier on its output port are captured with a CCD camera. Two phases are retrieved from these two sets of deformed patterns by a phase-measuring algorithm. By building the relationship between these retrieved phases, the referential fringe period can be determined accurately. Meanwhile, the distorted phase distribution introduced by the image intensifier can also be efficiently separated wherein the subtle imaging quality information can be further decomposed. Subsequently, the magnification of the image intensifier is successfully measured by fringe period self-calibration. The experimental results have shown the feasibility of the proposed method, which can automatically measure the multiple imaging quality parameters of an image intensifier without human intervention. PMID:27411191

  4. Phase-Based Road Detection in Multi-Source Images

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S K; Lopez, A S; Brase, J M; Paglieroni, D W

    2004-06-16

    The problem of robust automatic road detection in remotely sensed images is complicated by the fact that the sensor, spatial resolution, acquisition conditions, road width, road orientation and road material composition can all vary. A novel technique for detecting road pixels in multi-source remotely sensed images based on the phase (i.e., orientation or directional) information in edge pixels is described. A very dense map of edges extracted from the image is separated into channels, each containing edge pixels whose phases lie within a different range of orientations. The edge map associated with each channel is de-cluttered. A map of road pixels is formed by re-combining the de-cluttered channels into a composite edge image which is itself then separately de-cluttered. Road detection results are provided for DigitalGlobe and TerraServerUSA images. Road representations suitable for various applications are then discussed.

  5. Optical image encryption in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Xu, Xiaobin; Situ, Guohai; Wu, Quanying

    2014-11-01

    In the field of optical information security, the research of double random phase encoding is becoming deeper with each passing day, however the encryption system is linear, and the dependencies between plaintext and ciphertext is not complicated, with leaving a great hidden danger to the security of the encryption system. In this paper, we encrypted the higher dimensional Wigner distribution function of low dimensional plaintext by using the bilinear property of Wigner distribution function. Computer simulation results show that this method can not only enlarge the key space, but also break through the linear characteristic of the traditional optical encryption technology. So it can significantly improve the safety of the encryption system.

  6. Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these

  7. Perceived Blur in Naturally Contoured Images Depends on Phase

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stephanie; Bex, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Perceived blur is an important measure of image quality and clinical visual function. The magnitude of image blur varies across space and time under natural viewing conditions owing to changes in pupil size and accommodation. Blur is frequently studied in the laboratory with a variety of digital filters, without comparing how the choice of filter affects blur perception. We examine the perception of image blur in synthetic images composed of contours whose orientation and curvature spatial properties matched those of natural images but whose blur could be directly controlled. The images were blurred by manipulating the slope of the amplitude spectrum, Gaussian low-pass filtering or filtering with a Sinc function, which, unlike slope or Gaussian filtering, introduces periodic phase reversals similar to those in optically blurred images. For slope-filtered images, blur discrimination thresholds for over-sharpened images were extremely high and perceived blur could not be matched with either Gaussian or Sinc filtered images, suggesting that directly manipulating image slope does not simulate the perception of blur. For Gaussian- and Sinc-blurred images, blur discrimination thresholds were dipper-shaped and were well-fit with a simple variance discrimination model and with a contrast detection threshold model, but the latter required different contrast sensitivity functions for different types of blur. Blur matches between Gaussian- and Sinc-blurred images were used to test several models of blur perception and were in good agreement with models based on luminance slope, but not with spatial frequency based models. Collectively, these results show that the relative phases of image components, in addition to their relative amplitudes, determines perceived blur. PMID:21833246

  8. Real-time quantitative phase imaging for cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hoa Vinh

    Most biological cells are not clearly visible with a bright field microscope. Several methods have been developed to improve contrast in cell imaging, including use of exogenous contrast agents such as fluorescence microscopy, as well as utilizing properties of light-specimen interaction for optics design, to reveal the endogenous contrast, such as phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Although PCM and DIC methods significantly improve the image contrast without the need for staining agents, they only provide qualitative information about the phase change induced by the cells as light passes through them. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has recently emerged as an effective imaging tool which provides not only better image contrast but also cell-induced phase shifts in the optical pathlength, thus allowing nanometer-scale measurements of structures and dynamics of the cells. Other important aspects of an imaging system are its imaging speed and throughput. High-throughput, high-speed, real-time quantitative phase imaging with high spatial and temporal sensitivity is highly desirable in many applications including applied physics and biomedicine. In this dissertation, to address this need, I discuss the development of such an imaging system that includes the white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a new optical imaging method, and image reconstruction/analysis algorithms using graphics processing units (GPUs). wDPM can measure optical pathlength changes at nanometer scale both spatially and temporally with single-shot image acquisition, enabling very fast imaging. I also exploit the broadband spectrum of white light used as the light source in wDPM to develop a system called spectroscopic diffraction phase microscopy (sDPM). This sDPM system allows QPI measurements at several wavelengths, which solves the problem of thickness and refractive index coupling in the phase shifts induced by the cell, and which

  9. Variational Phase Imaging Using the Transport-of-Intensity Equation.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Emrah; Froustey, Emmanuel; Nilchian, Masih; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a variational phase retrieval algorithm for the imaging of transparent objects. Our formalism is based on the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE), which relates the phase of an optical field to the variation of its intensity along the direction of propagation. TIE practically requires one to record a set of defocus images to measure the variation of intensity. We first investigate the effect of the defocus distance on the retrieved phase map. Based on our analysis, we propose a weighted phase reconstruction algorithm yielding a phase map that minimizes a convex functional. The method is nonlinear and combines different ranges of spatial frequencies - depending on the defocus value of the measurements - in a regularized fashion. The minimization task is solved iteratively via the alternating-direction method of multipliers. Our simulations outperform commonly used linear and nonlinear TIE solvers. We also illustrate and validate our method on real microscopy data of HeLa cells. PMID:26685242

  10. Calculation of confocal microscope images of cholesteric blue phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Okumura, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-01

    Real-space images of bulk cholesteric blue phases (BPs) have been successfully obtained by confocal microscopy observations using structural color without doping fluorescent dye. However, theoretical interpretation of these images (for example, the understanding of the relation between intensity distribution and the ordering of BPs) remains challenging because typical lattice spacing of BPs is of the order of the wavelength of visible light, and therefore geometrical optics is entirely useless. In this work, we present a numerical approach to calculate the confocal images of BPs by solving the Maxwell equations. Calculated confocal images are consistent with experimental observations in terms of in-plane symmetry.

  11. The Emergence of AFM Applications to Cell Biology: How new technologies are facilitating investigation of human cells in health and disease at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Sinha, Animesh A.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based nanorobotics has been used for building nano devices in semiconductors for almost a decade. Leveraging the unparallel precision localization capabilities of this technology, high resolution imaging and mechanical property characterization is now increasingly being performed in biological settings. AFM also offers the prospect for handling and manipulating biological materials at nanometer scale. It has unique advantages over other methods, permitting experiments in the liquid phase where physiological conditions can be maintained. Taking advantage of these properties, our group has visualized membrane and cytoskeletal structures of live cells by controlling the interaction force of the AFM tip with cellular components at the nN or sub-nN range. Cell stiffness changes were observed by statistically analyzing the Young’s modulus values of human keratinocytes before and after specific antibody treatment. Furthermore, we used the AFM cantilever as a robotic arm for mechanical pushing, pulling and cutting to perform nanoscale manipulations of cell-associated structures. AFM guided nano-dissection, or nanosurgery was enacted on the cell in order to sever intermediate filaments connecting neighboring keratinocytes via sub 100 nm resolution cuts. Finally, we have used a functionalized AFM tip to probe cell surface receptors to obtain binding force measurements. This technique formed the basis for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS). In addition to enhancing our basic understanding of dynamic signaling events in cell biology, these advancements in AFM based biomedical investigations can be expected to facilitate the search for biomarkers related to disease diagnosis progress and treatment. PMID:24416719

  12. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  13. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    PubMed

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  14. AFM imaging of natural optical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallaeva, Dinara; Tománek, Pavel; Prokopyeva, Elena; Kaspar, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír.; Škarvada, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The colors of some living organisms assosiated with the surface structure. Irridesence butterfly wings is an example of such coloration. Optical effects such as interference, diffraction, polarization are responsible for physical colors appearance. Alongside with amazing beauty this structure represent interest for design of optical devices. Here we report the results of morphology investigation by atomic force microscopy. The difference in surface structure of black and blue wings areas is clearly observed. It explains the angle dependence of the wing blue color, since these micrometer and sub-micrometer quasiperiodical structures could control the light propagation, absorption and reflection.

  15. Self-imaging phase mask used in digital holography with phase-shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajst, Agnieszka; Sypek, Maciej; Makowski, Michal; Suszek, Jaroslaw; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2008-12-01

    The digital reconstruction of an optically recorded hologram has become a fast developing method and has found a vast practical application in many branches of science and industry. An especially invented diffractive optical element with self imaging properties is placed in the reference beam. In the recording process this element forms its self-image in the hologram plane. Self-imaging properties of the diffractive optical element provide the possibility of recording a digital hologram by means of the phase-shifting without any additional imaging components. The innovation of the proposed method lies in using a self-imaging diffractive optical element which enables a significant simplification of a spatial phase shifting optical setup used to record the digital hologram with only a small decrease of the quality of the reconstructed image.

  16. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. PMID:22015370

  17. Phase transfer function based method to alleviate image artifacts in wavefront coding imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xutao; Wang, Jinjiang

    2013-09-01

    Wavefront coding technique can extend the depth of filed (DOF) of the incoherent imaging system. Several rectangular separable phase masks (such as cubic type, exponential type, logarithmic type, sinusoidal type, rational type, et al) have been proposed and discussed, because they can extend the DOF up to ten times of the DOF of ordinary imaging system. But according to the research on them, researchers have pointed out that the images are damaged by the artifacts, which usually come from the non-linear phase transfer function (PTF) differences between the PTF used in the image restoration filter and the PTF related to real imaging condition. In order to alleviate the image artifacts in imaging systems with wavefront coding, an optimization model based on the PTF was proposed to make the PTF invariance with the defocus. Thereafter, an image restoration filter based on the average PTF in the designed depth of field was introduced along with the PTF-based optimization. The combination of the optimization and the image restoration proposed can alleviate the artifacts, which was confirmed by the imaging simulation of spoke target. The cubic phase mask (CPM) and exponential phase mask (EPM) were discussed as example.

  18. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  19. Orbital lesions: proton spectroscopic phase-dependent contrast MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Atlas, S W; Grossman, R I; Axel, L; Hackney, D B; Bilaniuk, L T; Goldberg, H I; Zimmerman, R A

    1987-08-01

    Thirteen orbital lesions in 12 patients were evaluated with both conventional spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and phase-dependent proton spectroscopic imaging. This technique, which makes use of small differences in the resonant frequencies of water and fat protons, provides excellent high-resolution images with simultaneous chemical shift information. In this method, there is 180 degrees opposition of phase between fat protons and water protons at the time of the gradient echo, resulting in signal cancellation in voxels containing equal signals from fat and water. In this preliminary series, advantages of spectroscopic images in orbital lesions included better lesion delineation, with superior anatomic definition of orbital apex involvement; more specific characterization of high-intensity hemorrhage with a single pulse sequence; elimination of potential confusion from chemical shift misregistration artifact; further clarification of possible intravascular flow abnormalities; and improved apparent intralesional contrast. PMID:3602394

  20. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  1. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging Signatures for Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-02-01

    Abstract: Differential phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is a promising new radiographic technique providing three distinct contrast mechanisms - absorption, phase, and scatter (or dark field) - using a conventional x-ray tube source. We investigate the signatures available in these three contrast mechanisms with attention towards potential security applications. We find that the scatter mode in particular is sensitive to textured materials, enabling lowered detection limits than absorption for materials such as powders. We investigate the length scales to which our imaging system is sensitive.

  2. Accelerated nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging through phase multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, B. A.; Eichler, A. Takahashi, H.; Navaretti, P.; Degen, C. L.; Tao, Y.

    2015-05-25

    We report a method for accelerated nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance imaging by detecting several signals in parallel. Our technique relies on phase multiplexing, where the signals from different nuclear spin ensembles are encoded in the phase of an ultrasensitive magnetic detector. We demonstrate this technique by simultaneously acquiring statistically polarized spin signals from two different nuclear species ({sup 1}H, {sup 19}F) and from up to six spatial locations in a nanowire test sample using a magnetic resonance force microscope. We obtain one-dimensional imaging resolution better than 5 nm, and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  3. Accelerated nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging through phase multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, B. A.; Eichler, A.; Tao, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Navaretti, P.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    We report a method for accelerated nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance imaging by detecting several signals in parallel. Our technique relies on phase multiplexing, where the signals from different nuclear spin ensembles are encoded in the phase of an ultrasensitive magnetic detector. We demonstrate this technique by simultaneously acquiring statistically polarized spin signals from two different nuclear species (1H, 19F) and from up to six spatial locations in a nanowire test sample using a magnetic resonance force microscope. We obtain one-dimensional imaging resolution better than 5 nm, and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  4. Imaging capabilities of weak-phase interferometric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannes, Andre

    1998-07-01

    The first imaging devices of optical interferometry are likely to be of weak phase, typically: a set of three- element arrays, coherent and stable, independently observing the same object. The study of their imaging capabilities essentially addresses the self-calibration problem and its stability. Like in VLBI, the principle of our self- calibration methods consists in preforming a series of alternate phase calibration operations and Fourier synthesis processes. Algebraic graph theory and algebraic number theory prove to be the key topics involved in the phase calibration operation. The latter can often be written in closed form. As expected, the relative expressions explicitly refer to a set of independent closure phases. To illustrate this essential point, we consider the special case of three-element arrays. The corresponding phase calibration formula, which is then particularly simple, provides all the elements for coping with the possible global instabilities. The Fourier synthesis process, which is also involved in the self-calibration cycles, is performed via WIPE, a methodology recently introduced in radio imaging and optical interferometry. The robustness of the image reconstruction process can then be well controlled.

  5. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  6. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  7. Phase dispersion X-ray imaging of murine soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, V. N.; Ingal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of phase-contrast (PC) images in the phase-dispersion introscopy (PDI) technique is the subject of this paper. Conditions for extreme sensitivity to murine soft-tissue anatomy are discussed. The unique information content and good contrast of the minutest details of anatomy, together with the high brilliance of X-ray optics, give the authors confidence that the PDI method can be successfully applied for medical diagnostics.

  8. Multinuclear NMR Imaging of Fluid Phases in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S. N.; Dechter, J. J.; Komoroski, R. A.

    Multinuclear NMR of 7Li, 19F, and 1H has been investigated as a method for discriminating multiple fluid phases in porous rock. Good 7Li NMR images from LiCl brine in saturated Berea sandstone were obtained within a few hours at 1 × 1 × 5 mm 3 resolution using a low-TE, 3D volume imaging sequence. At 4.7 T, the 7Li T1 was 750 ms, and T2 was 10 ms. High-quality 19F and 1H images of a model fluorinated injectant (trifluorotoluene) in Berea were obtained at 0.4 × 0.4 × 3 mm 3 resolution in a few hours. Fluorine-19 imaging was found to be easier than 1H imaging due to the narrower 19F resonance and comparable T1 and T2 in Berea sandstone. Lithium-7 and 19F imaging offer alternatives for discriminating aqueous and organic phases unambiguously in flooded oil cores, especially where 1H signals for the two phases are unresolved.

  9. Phase contrast imaging with micro focus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shovkun, V. Y.; Kumakhov, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    Now the phase-contrast (PC) radiography with monochromatic synchmtron radiation sources is very promising for use in non-destructive industrial control, medical and biological X-ray imaging. Unfortunately synchrotron sources are rather expensive for laboratory practice. We are developing a phase-contrast imaging with a micro focus X-ray tube. We performed numerical calculations with Fresnel-Kirchhgoff formalism to obtain values of PC-signals taking into account polychromatic nature of X-ray radiation, a finite size of a source, and a finite resolution of a detector including spectral sensitivity of the detector. We conducted experiments with a micro focus X-ray tube to find absolute values of PC signals for some models of biological tissue and technical materials in presence of scattering X-rays that emerge from the object. By means of simple set of the experimental arrangement it is possible to obtain the phase-contrast image map of the boundaries between regions with the density difference of order ~1 g/cm3. Under experimental conditions the minimal detected PC-signal is found for the plastic fiber 45 tm in diameter. Examples ofthe X-ray PC-images of fishes, images of air bubbles and ribs, slag inclusions in joint weld of Al-Li alloy materials, and images of sapphire microspheres for cellular metallic structures are presented.

  10. Colorful holographic imaging reconstruction based on one thin phase plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Song, Qiang; Wang, Jian; Yue, Weirui; Zhang, Fang; Huang, Huijie

    2014-11-01

    One method of realizing color holographic imaging using one thin diffractive optical element (DOE) is proposed. This method can reconstruct a two-dimensional color image with one phase plate at user defined distance from DOE. For improving the resolution ratio of reproduced color images, the DOE is optimized by combining Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and compensation algorithm. To accelerate the computational process, the Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) is used. In the end, the simulation result was analyzed to verify the validity of this method.

  11. Correction of phase-error for phase-resolved k-clocked optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianhua; Li, Jianan; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-01-01

    Phase-resolved optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) has emerged as a promising technique for blood flow measurement in human tissues. Phase stability is essential for this technique to achieve high accuracy in flow velocity measurement. In OFDI systems that use k-clocking for the data acquisition, phase-error occurs due to jitter in the data acquisition electronics. We presented a statistical analysis of jitter represented as point shifts of the k-clocked spectrum. We demonstrated a real-time phase-error correction algorithm for phase-resolved OFDI. A 50 KHz wavelength-swept laser (Axsun Technologies) based balanced-detection OFDI system was developed centered at 1310 nm. To evaluate the performance of this algorithm, a stationary gold mirror was employed as sample for phase analysis. Furthermore, we implemented this algorithm for imaging of human skin. Good-quality skin structure and Doppler image can be observed in real-time after phase-error correction. The results show that the algorithm can effectively correct the jitter-induced phase error in OFDI system.

  12. Structured illumination diffraction phase microscopy for broadband, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established technique that allows sub-diffraction resolution imaging by heterodyning high sample frequencies into the system’s passband via structured illumination. However, until now, SIM has been typically used to achieve sub-diffraction resolution for intensity-based imaging. Here, we present a novel optical setup that uses structured illumination with a broadband-light source to obtain noise-reduced, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative-phase (QPM) imaging of cells. We compare this with a previous work for sub-diffraction QPM imaging via SIM that used a laser source, and was thus still corrupted by coherent noise. PMID:24562266

  13. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  14. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  15. Extracting flat-field images from scene-based image sequences using phase correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, James N.; Montes, Marcos J.; Obermark, Jerome L.

    2016-06-01

    Flat-field image processing is an essential step in producing high-quality and radiometrically calibrated images. Flat-fielding corrects for variations in the gain of focal plane array electronics and unequal illumination from the system optics. Typically, a flat-field image is captured by imaging a radiometrically uniform surface. The flat-field image is normalized and removed from the images. There are circumstances, such as with remote sensing, where a flat-field image cannot be acquired in this manner. For these cases, we developed a phase-correlation method that allows the extraction of an effective flat-field image from a sequence of scene-based displaced images. The method uses sub-pixel phase correlation image registration to align the sequence to estimate the static scene. The scene is removed from sequence producing a sequence of misaligned flat-field images. An average flat-field image is derived from the realigned flat-field sequence.

  16. High-resolution phase imaging of phase singularities in the focal region of a lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walford, J. N.; Nugent, K. A.; Roberts, A.; Scholten, R. E.

    2002-03-01

    Subwavelength-resolution phase images of phase dislocations at the focal region of a 20×, 0.4-N.A. lens have been obtained by use of an optical fiber interferometer with a tapered probe in one arm. A phase-stepping algorithm is used to determine a quantitative value of the phase at each point in the scan, clearly showing the presence of edge dislocations between the Airy rings of the diffraction pattern near the lens focus, as well as four isolated screw-type singularties caused by astigmatism in the lens.

  17. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  18. Phase retrieval and differential phase-contrast imaging with low-brilliance X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian

    2006-04-01

    X-ray radiographic absorption imaging is an invaluable tool in medical diagnostics and materials science. For biological tissue samples, polymers or fibre composites, however, the use of conventional X-ray radiography is limited due to their weak absorption. This is resolved at highly brilliant X-ray synchrotron or micro-focus sources by using phase-sensitive imaging methods to improve the contrast. However, the requirements of the illuminating radiation mean that hard-X-ray phase-sensitive imaging has until now been impractical with more readily available X-ray sources, such as X-ray tubes. In this letter, we report how a setup consisting of three transmission gratings can efficiently yield quantitative differential phase-contrast images with conventional X-ray tubes. In contrast with existing techniques, the method requires no spatial or temporal coherence, is mechanically robust, and can be scaled up to large fields of view. Our method provides all the benefits of contrast-enhanced phase-sensitive imaging, but is also fully compatible with conventional absorption radiography. It is applicable to X-ray medical imaging, industrial non-destructive testing, and to other low-brilliance radiation, such as neutrons or atoms.

  19. Ferromagnetic resonance phase imaging in spin Hall multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Bartell, Jason M.; Fuchs, Gregory D.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally image the magnetic precession phase of patterned spin Hall multilayer samples to study the rf driving field vector using time-resolved anomalous Nernst effect microscopy. Our ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements quantify the phase and amplitude for both the magnetic precession and the electric current, which allows us to establish the total driving field orientation and the strength of the spin Hall effect. In a channel of uniform width, we observe a large spatial variation of the FMR phase laterally across the channel. We interpret our findings in the context of electrical measurement using the spin transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance technique and show that observed phase variation introduces a systematic correction into the spin Hall efficiency if spatial phase and amplitude variations are not taken into account.

  20. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-08-15

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  1. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  2. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inexpensive imaging Instrument to quickly locate leaks of methane and other greenhouse and VOC gases would reduce the cost and effort expended by industry to comply with EPA regulations. In Phase I, of this WBIR program, a new gas leak visualization camera was demonstrated...

  3. Grid-Independent Compressive Imaging and Fourier Phase Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Wenjing

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of two parts. In the first part techniques of band exclusion(BE) and local optimization(LO) are proposed to solve linear continuum inverse problems independently of the grid spacing. The second part is devoted to the Fourier phase retrieval problem. Many situations in optics, medical imaging and signal processing call…

  4. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  5. Directionlets using in-phase lifting for image representation.

    PubMed

    Jayachandra, Dakala; Makur, Anamitra

    2014-01-01

    Directionlets allow a construction of perfect reconstruction and critically sampled multidirectional anisotropic basis, yet retaining the separable filtering of standard wavelet transform. However, due to the spatially varying filtering and downsampling direction, it is forced to apply spatial segmentation and process each segment independently. Because of this independent processing of the image segments, directionlets suffer from the following two major limitations when applied to, say, image coding. First, failure to exploit the correlation across block boundaries degrades the coding performance and also induces blocking artifacts, thus making it mandatory to use deblocking filter at low bit rates. Second, spatial scalability, i.e., minimum segment size or the number of levels of the transform, is limited due to independent processing of segments. We show that, with simple modifications in the block boundaries, we can overcome these limitations by, what we call, in-phase lifting implementation of directionlets. In the context of directionlets using in-phase lifting, we identify different possible groups of downsampling matrices that would allow the construction of a multilevel transform without forcing independent processing of segments both with and without any modifications in the segment boundary. Experimental results in image coding show objective and subjective improvements when compared with the directionlets applied independently on each image segment. As an application, using both the in-phase lifting implementation of directionlets and the adaptive directional lifting, we have constructed an adaptive directional wavelet transform, which has shown improved image coding performance over these adaptive directional wavelet transforms. PMID:24235304

  6. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Lewis, Rob A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-01

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 μm), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  7. Ultrasensitive Phase-Resolved Imaging of Cellular Morphology and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choma, Michael A.; Ellerbee, Audrey; Izatt, Joseph A.

    Microscopy is an important imaging tool in modern clinical medicine and basic biomedical research. The retrieval of phase information from microscopic samples has a long history initiated by the development of the phase contrast microscope. This technique exploits the fact that optically thin samples such as cells diffract light secondary to local variations in optical index. Phase contrast microscopy has had an immeasurable impact by allowing the user to qualitatively visualize small, subcellular variations in optical index. Quantitative phase microscopy seeks to build upon the principles of phase contrast microscopy to extract quantitative measures relating to optical index, birefringence, motion, and flow. In addition to highlighting subcellular detail in unstained cells, quantitative phase techniques can measure picometer-scale cell motions, small changes in cell index, and even cytoplasmic flow. Because of its sensitivity to phase and its ability to reliably quantify and track changes in coherent wavefronts, interferometry has recently gained momentum as a technique for the implementation of quantitative phase microscopy. This chapter reviews interferometric phase contrast microscopy techniques, with an emphasis on broadband interferometric techniques which exploit the principles of OCT. Both the underlying theory as well biological applications are discussed. Although this chapter gives particular focus to biologically relevant applications, the methods are readily extendable for other, nonbiological applications.

  8. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  9. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  10. Partially coherent phase imaging with simultaneous source recovery.

    PubMed

    Jingshan, Zhong; Tian, Lei; Dauwels, Justin; Waller, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for phase retrieval that uses partially coherent illumination created by any arbitrary source shape in Köhler geometry. Using a stack of defocused intensity images, we recover not only the phase and amplitude of the sample, but also an estimate of the unknown source shape, which describes the spatial coherence of the illumination. Our algorithm uses a Kalman filtering approach which is fast, accurate and robust to noise. The method is experimentally simple and flexible, so should find use in optical, electron, X-ray and other phase imaging systems which employ partially coherent light. We provide an experimental demonstration in an optical microscope with various condenser apertures. PMID:25657890

  11. Partially coherent phase imaging with simultaneous source recovery

    PubMed Central

    Jingshan, Zhong; Tian, Lei; Dauwels, Justin; Waller, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method for phase retrieval that uses partially coherent illumination created by any arbitrary source shape in Köhler geometry. Using a stack of defocused intensity images, we recover not only the phase and amplitude of the sample, but also an estimate of the unknown source shape, which describes the spatial coherence of the illumination. Our algorithm uses a Kalman filtering approach which is fast, accurate and robust to noise. The method is experimentally simple and flexible, so should find use in optical, electron, X-ray and other phase imaging systems which employ partially coherent light. We provide an experimental demonstration in an optical microscope with various condenser apertures. PMID:25657890

  12. Atomic force microscopy images of lyotropic lamellar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, C.; Thieghi, L. T.; Castillo, R.

    2007-02-01

    For the very first time, atomic force microscope images of lamellar phases were observed combined with a freeze fracture technique that does not involve the use of replicas. Samples are rapidly frozen, fractured, and scanned directly with atomic force microscopy, at liquid nitrogen temperature and in high vacuum. This procedure can be used to investigate micro-structured liquids. The lamellar phases in Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water and in C12E5/water systems were used to asses this new technique. Our observations were compared with x-ray diffraction measurements and with other freeze fracture methods reported in the literature. Our results show that this technique is useful to image lyotropic lamellar phases and the estimated repeat distances for lamellar periodicity are consistent with those obtained by x-ray diffraction.

  13. Atomic force microscopy images of lyotropic lamellar phases.

    PubMed

    Garza, C; Thieghi, L T; Castillo, R

    2007-02-01

    For the very first time, atomic force microscope images of lamellar phases were observed combined with a freeze fracture technique that does not involve the use of replicas. Samples are rapidly frozen, fractured, and scanned directly with atomic force microscopy, at liquid nitrogen temperature and in high vacuum. This procedure can be used to investigate micro-structured liquids. The lamellar phases in Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water and in C12E5/water systems were used to asses this new technique. Our observations were compared with x-ray diffraction measurements and with other freeze fracture methods reported in the literature. Our results show that this technique is useful to image lyotropic lamellar phases and the estimated repeat distances for lamellar periodicity are consistent with those obtained by x-ray diffraction. PMID:17302467

  14. Conductive supports for combined AFM SECM on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Chami, Mohamed; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Blackstock, Jason J.; Dooleweerdt, Karin; de Rooij, Nico F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Four different conductive supports are analysed regarding their suitability for combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) on biological membranes. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), MoS2, template stripped gold, and template stripped platinum are compared as supports for high resolution imaging of reconstituted membrane proteins or native membranes, and as electrodes for transferring electrons from or to a redox molecule. We demonstrate that high resolution topographs of the bacterial outer membrane protein F can be recorded by contact mode AFM on all four supports. Electrochemical feedback experiments with conductive cantilevers that feature nanometre-scale electrodes showed fast re-oxidation of the redox couple Ru(NH3)63+/2+ with the two metal supports after prolonged immersion in electrolyte. In contrast, the re-oxidation rates decayed quickly to unpractical levels with HOPG or MoS2 under physiological conditions. On HOPG we observed heterogeneity in the re-oxidation rate of the redox molecules with higher feedback currents at step edges. The latter results demonstrate the capability of conductive cantilevers with small electrodes to measure minor variations in an SECM signal and to relate them to nanometre-scale features in a simultaneously recorded AFM topography. Rapid decay of re-oxidation rate and surface heterogeneity make HOPG or MoS2 less attractive for combined AFM-SECM experiments on biological membranes than template stripped gold or platinum supports.

  15. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  16. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography.

    PubMed

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J G; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization. PMID:26459771

  17. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  18. AFM/CLSM data visualization and comparison using an open-source toolkit.

    PubMed

    Rajwa, Bartek; McNally, Helen A; Varadharajan, Padma; Sturgis, Jennifer; Robinson, J Paul

    2004-06-01

    There is a vast difference in the traditional presentation of AFM data and confocal data. AFM data are presented as surface contours while confocal data are usually visualized using either surface- or volume-rendering techniques. Finding a common meaningful visualization platform is not an easy task. AFM and CLSM technologies are complementary and are more frequently being used to image common biological systems. In order to provide a presentation method that would assist us in evaluating cellular morphology, we propose a simple visualization strategy that is comparative, intuitive, and operates within an open-source environment of ImageJ, SurfaceJ, and VolumeJ applications. In order to find some common ground for AFM-CLSM image comparison, we have developed a plug-in for ImageJ, which allows us to import proprietary image data sets into this application. We propose to represent both AFM and CLSM image data sets as shaded elevation maps with color-coded height. This simple technique utilizes the open source VolumeJ and SurfaceJ plug-ins. To provide an example of this visualization technique, we evaluated the three-dimensional architecture of living chick dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia measured independently with AFM and CLSM. PMID:15352089

  19. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  20. Fourier transform image processing techniques for grid-based phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad; Bashir, Sajid; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-09-01

    A recently developed technique for phase imaging using table top sources is to use multiple fine-pitch gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerences and precise alignment required have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we employ a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al.1 that ultilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Phase is extracted using Fourier processing on a single raw image taken using a focused mammography grid. The effects on the final image of varying grid, object, and detector distances, window widths, and of a variety of windowing functions, used to separate the harmonics, were investigated.

  1. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  2. Motionless electromagnetic phase stepping versus mechanical phase stepping in x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a compact source.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-04-21

    X-ray phase contrast imaging based on grating interferometers detects the refractive index distribution of an object without relying on radiation attenuation, thereby having the potential for reduced radiation absorption. These techniques belong to the broader category of optical wavefront measurement, which requires stepping the phase of the interference pattern to obtain a pixel-wise map of the phase distortion of the wavefront. While phase stepping traditionally involves mechanical scanning of a grating or mirror, we developed electromagnetic phase stepping (EPS) for imaging with compact sources to obviate the need for mechanical movement. In EPS a solenoid coil is placed outside the x-ray tube to shift its focal spot with a magnetic field, causing a relative movement between the projection of the sample and the interference pattern in the image. Here we present two embodiments of this method. We verified experimentally that electromagnetic and mechanical phase stepping give the same results and attain the same signal-to-noise ratios under the same radiation dose. We found that the relative changes of interference fringe visibility were within 3.0% when the x-ray focal spot was shifted by up to 1.0 mm in either direction. We conclude that when using x-ray tube sources, EPS is an effective means of phase stepping without the need for mechanical movement. PMID:25803511

  3. Diagnosis of breast cancer biopsies using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The standard practice in the histopathology of breast cancers is to examine a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue biopsy under a microscope. The pathologist looks at certain morphological features, visible under the stain, to diagnose whether a tumor is benign or malignant. This determination is made based on qualitative inspection making it subject to investigator bias. Furthermore, since this method requires a microscopic examination by the pathologist it suffers from low throughput. A quantitative, label-free and high throughput method for detection of these morphological features from images of tissue biopsies is, hence, highly desirable as it would assist the pathologist in making a quicker and more accurate diagnosis of cancers. We present here preliminary results showing the potential of using quantitative phase imaging for breast cancer screening and help with differential diagnosis. We generated optical path length maps of unstained breast tissue biopsies using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM). As a first step towards diagnosis based on quantitative phase imaging, we carried out a qualitative evaluation of the imaging resolution and contrast of our label-free phase images. These images were shown to two pathologists who marked the tumors present in tissue as either benign or malignant. This diagnosis was then compared against the diagnosis of the two pathologists on H&E stained tissue images and the number of agreements were counted. In our experiment, the agreement between SLIM and H&E based diagnosis was measured to be 88%. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential and promise of SLIM for a push in the future towards quantitative, label-free and high throughput diagnosis.

  4. Bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM) for accurate phase imaging using conventional microscopy hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Micah; Gaylord, Thomas K.

    2015-03-01

    Most quantitative phase microscopy methods require the use of custom-built or modified microscopic configurations which are not typically available to most bio/pathologists. There are, however, phase retrieval algorithms which utilize defocused bright-field images as input data and are therefore implementable in existing laboratory environments. Among these, deterministic methods such as those based on inverting the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) or a phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) are particularly attractive due to their compatibility with Köhler illuminated systems and numerical simplicity. Recently, a new method has been proposed, called multi-filter phase imaging with partially coherent light (MFPI-PC), which alleviates the inherent noise/resolution trade-off in solving the TIE by utilizing a large number of defocused bright-field images spaced equally about the focal plane. Despite greatly improving the state-ofthe- art, the method has many shortcomings including the impracticality of high-speed acquisition, inefficient sampling, and attenuated response at high frequencies due to aperture effects. In this report, we present a new method, called bright-field quantitative phase microscopy (BFQPM), which efficiently utilizes a small number of defocused bright-field images and recovers frequencies out to the partially coherent diffraction limit. The method is based on a noiseminimized inversion of a PCTF derived for each finite defocus distance. We present simulation results which indicate nanoscale optical path length sensitivity and improved performance over MFPI-PC. We also provide experimental results imaging live bovine mesenchymal stem cells at sub-second temporal resolution. In all, BFQPM enables fast and accurate phase imaging with unprecedented spatial resolution using widely available bright-field microscopy hardware.

  5. High speed AFM studies of 193 nm immersion photoresists during TMAH development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngunjiri, Johnpeter; Meyers, Greg; Cameron, Jim; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Jeon, Hyun; Lee, Dave; Choi, Kwang Mo; Kim, Jung Woo; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Lim, Hae-Jin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report on our studies of the dynamic process of resist development in real time. Using High Speed - Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM) in dilute developer solution, changes in morphology and nanomechanical properties of patterned resist were monitored. The Bruker Dimension FastScan AFMTM was applied to analyze 193 nm acrylic-based immersion resists in developer. HS-AFM operated in Peak Force mapping mode allowed for concurrent measurements of image topography resist stiffness, adhesion to AFM probe and deformation during development. In our studies we focused on HS-AFM topography data as it readily revealed detailed information about initial resist morphology, followed by a resist swelling process and eventual dissolution of the exposed resist areas. HS-AFM showed potential for tracking and understanding development of patterned resist films and can be useful in evaluating the dissolution properties of different resist designs.

  6. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time. PMID:25361350

  7. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  8. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  9. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D V G L N

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  10. Phase Effects on Mesoscale Object X-ray Absorption Images

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Jr., H E; Aufderheide, M B; Barty, A; Lehman, S K; Kozioziemski, B J; Schneberk, D J

    2004-09-24

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory particular emphasis is being placed on the nondestructive characterization (NDC) of 'mesoscale' objects.[Martz and Albrecht 2003] We define mesoscale objects as objects that have mm extent with {micro}m features. Here we confine our discussions to x-ray imaging methods applicable to mesoscale object characterization. The goal is object recovery algorithms including phase to enable emerging high-spatial resolution x-ray imaging methods to ''see'' inside or image mesoscale-size materials and objects. To be successful our imaging characterization effort must be able to recover the object function to one micrometer or better spatial resolution over a few millimeters field-of-view with very high contrast.

  11. IMAGING RED BLOOD CELL DYNAMICS BY QUANTITATIVE PHASE MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease. PMID:18387320

  12. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  13. Wavelength-multiplexing phase-sensitive surface plasmon imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yonghong; Li, Yan; Gu, Dayong; Zhang, Kai; Qu, Junle; He, Jianan; Li, Xuejin; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Ho, Ho-Pui; Somekh, Michael G; Niu, Hanben

    2013-05-01

    A wavelength-multiplexing phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor offering wide dynamic detection range and microarray capability is reported. Phase detection is accomplished by performing self-interference between the s- and p- polarizations within the signal beam. A liquid crystal tunable filter is used to sequentially select the SPR excitation wavelength from a white light source. This wavelength-multiplexing approach enables fast detection of the sensor's SPR phase response over a wide range of wavelengths, thereby covering literally any regions of interest within the SPR dip and thus maintaining the highest sensitivity point at all times. The phase-sensitive approach is particularly important for imaging SPR sensing applications because of its less stringent requirements for intensity signal-to-noise ratio, which also means the possibility of using uncooled modest resolution analog-to-digital conversion imaging devices. Experimental results demonstrate a resolution of 2.7×10(-7) RIU with a dynamic range of 0.0138 RIU. PMID:23632487

  14. Phase-image-based content-addressable holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Renu; Joseph, Joby; Singh, Kehar

    2004-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of phase images for content-addressable holographic data storage. Use of binary phase-based data pages with 0 and π phase changes, produces uniform spectral distribution at the Fourier plane. The absence of strong DC component at the Fourier plane and more intensity of higher order spatial frequencies facilitate better recording of higher spatial frequencies, and improves the discrimination capability of the content-addressable memory. This improves the results of the associative recall in a holographic memory system, and can give low number of false hits even for small search arguments. The phase-modulated pixels also provide an opportunity of subtraction among data pixels leading to better discrimination between similar data pages.

  15. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  16. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  17. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  18. Neutron Imaging of a Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction remains a crucial parameter in understanding and characterizing two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in both heat transfer and pressure drop correlations of two-phase flows, from the macro to micro- channel scale. Void fraction estimation dictates the sizing of both evaporating and condensing phase change heat exchangers, for example. In order to measure void fraction some invasive approach is necessary. Typically, visualization is achieved either downstream of the test section or on top by machining to expose the channel. Both approaches can lead to inaccuracies. The former assumes the flow will not be affected moving from the heat exchanger surface to the transparent section. The latter distorts the heat flow path. Neutron Imaging can provide a non-invasive measurement because metals such as Aluminum are essentially transparent to neutrons. Hence, if a refrigerant is selected that provides suitable neutron attenuation; steady-state void fraction measurements in two-phase flow are attainable in-situ without disturbing the fluid flow or heat flow path. Neutron Imaging has been used in the past to qualitatively describe the flow in heat exchangers in terms of maldistributions without providing void fraction data. This work is distinguished from previous efforts because the heat exchanger has been designed and the refrigerant selected to avail of neutron imaging. This work describes the experimental flow loop that enables a boiling two-phase flow; the heat exchanger test section and downstream transparent section are described. The flow loop controls the degree of subcooling and the refrigerant flowrate. Heating cartridges embedded in the test section are employed to control the heat input. Neutron-imaged steady-state void fraction measurements are captured and compared to representative high-speed videography captured at the visualization section. This allows a qualitative comparison between neutron imaged and traditional techniques. The

  19. Parallel phase-sensitive three-dimensional imaging camera

    DOEpatents

    Smithpeter, Colin L.; Hoover, Eddie R.; Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce R.; Nellums, Robert O.

    2007-09-25

    An apparatus is disclosed for generating a three-dimensional (3-D) image of a scene illuminated by a pulsed light source (e.g. a laser or light-emitting diode). The apparatus, referred to as a phase-sensitive 3-D imaging camera utilizes a two-dimensional (2-D) array of photodetectors to receive light that is reflected or scattered from the scene and processes an electrical output signal from each photodetector in the 2-D array in parallel using multiple modulators, each having inputs of the photodetector output signal and a reference signal, with the reference signal provided to each modulator having a different phase delay. The output from each modulator is provided to a computational unit which can be used to generate intensity and range information for use in generating a 3-D image of the scene. The 3-D camera is capable of generating a 3-D image using a single pulse of light, or alternately can be used to generate subsequent 3-D images with each additional pulse of light.

  20. The influence of noise on image quality in phase-diverse coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittler, H. P. A.; van Riessen, G. A.; Jones, M. W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Phase-diverse coherent diffraction imaging provides a route to high sensitivity and resolution with low radiation dose. To take full advantage of this, the characteristics and tolerable limits of measurement noise for high quality images must be understood. In this work we show the artefacts that manifest in images recovered from simulated data with noise of various characteristics in the illumination and diffraction pattern. We explore the limits at which images of acceptable quality can be obtained and suggest qualitative guidelines that would allow for faster data acquisition and minimize radiation dose.

  1. Accelerating dual cardiac phase images using undersampled radial phase encoding trajectories.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Karis; Urbina, Jesus; Andía, Marcelo; Tejos, Cristián; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Prieto, Claudia; Uribe, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional dual-cardiac-phase (3D-DCP) scan has been proposed to acquire two data sets of the whole heart and great vessels during the end-diastolic and end-systolic cardiac phases in a single free-breathing scan. This method has shown accurate assessment of cardiac anatomy and function but is limited by long acquisition times. This work proposes to accelerate the acquisition and reconstruction of 3D-DCP scans by exploiting redundant information of the outer k-space regions of both cardiac phases. This is achieved using a modified radial-phase-encoding trajectory and gridding reconstruction with uniform coil combination. The end-diastolic acquisition trajectory was angularly shifted with respect to the end-systolic phase. Initially, a fully-sampled 3D-DCP scan was acquired to determine the optimal percentage of the outer k-space data that can be combined between cardiac phases. Thereafter, prospectively undersampled data were reconstructed based on this percentage. As gold standard images, the undersampled data were also reconstructed using iterative SENSE. To validate the method, image quality assessments and a cardiac volume analysis were performed. The proposed method was tested in thirteen healthy volunteers (mean age, 30years). Prospectively undersampled data (R=4) reconstructed with 50% combination led high quality images. There were no significant differences in the image quality and in the cardiac volume analysis between our method and iterative SENSE. In addition, the proposed approach reduced the reconstruction time from 40min to 1min. In conclusion, the proposed method obtains 3D-DCP scans with an image quality comparable to those reconstructed with iterative SENSE, and within a clinically acceptable reconstruction time. PMID:27067473

  2. Acoustic radiation pressure: A 'phase contrast' agent for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Hamilton, Theron J.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2004-11-08

    We show that the radiation pressure exerted by a beam of ultrasound can be used for contrast enhancement in high-resolution x-ray imaging of tissue and soft materials. Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. The potential of the method is demonstrated by imaging microscopic tumor phantoms embedded into tissue with a thickness typically presented in mammography. The detection limit of micrometer size masses exceeds the resolution of currently available mammography imaging systems. The directionality of the acoustic radiation force and its localization in space permits the imaging of ultrasound-selected tissue volumes. The results presented here suggest that the method may permit the detection of tumors in soft tissue in their early stage of development.

  3. Boundary value problem for phase retrieval from unidirectional X-ray differential phase images.

    PubMed

    Gasilov, Sergei; Mittone, Alberto; Horng, Annie; Bravin, Alberto; Baumbach, Tilo; Geith, Tobias; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola

    2015-05-18

    The phase retrieval problem can be reduced to the second order partial differential equation. In order to retrieve the absolute values of the X-ray phase and to minimize the reconstruction artifacts we defined the mixed inhomogeneous boundary condition using available a priori information about the sample. Finite element technique was used to solve the boundary value problem. The approach is validated on numerical and experimental phantoms. In order to demonstrate a possible application of the method, we have processed an entire tomographic set of differential phase images and estimated the magnitude of the refractive index decrement for some tissues inside complex biomedical samples. PMID:26074580

  4. Manipulating stored images with phase imprinting at low light levels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L; Yang, Guojian; Duan, Wenhui

    2012-07-15

    Coherent manipulation of stored images is performed at low light levels based on enhanced cross-Kerr nonlinearity in a four-level N-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system. Using intensity masks in the signal pulse, quadratic phase shifts with low nonlinear absorption can be efficiently imprinted on the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns already stored in the EIT system. Fast-Fourier-transform-based numerical simulations clearly demonstrate that the far-field images of the retrieved probe light can be flexibly modulated by applying different signal fields. Our studies could help advance the goals of nonlinear all-optical processing for spatial information coherently stored in EIT systems. PMID:22825156

  5. Optimization of grating-based phase-contrast imaging setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo; Shafer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) technology has emerged over the last decade as a novel imaging technique capable of probing phase characteristics of an object as complimentary information to conventional absorption properties. In this work, we identified and provided a rationale for optimization of key parameters that determine the performance of a Talbot-Lau PCI system. The study used the Fresnel wave propagation theory and system geometry to predict optimal grating alignment conditions necessary for producing maximum-phase contrast. The moiré fringe pattern frequency and angular orientation produced in the X-ray detector plane were studied as functions of the gratings' axial rotation. The effect of axial displacement between source-to-phase (L) and phase-to-absorption (d) gratings, on system contrast, was discussed in detail. The L-d regions of highest contrast were identified, and the dependence of contrast on the energy of the X-ray spectrum was also studied. The predictions made in this study were tested experimentally and showed excellent agreement. The results indicated that the PCI system performance is highly sensitive to alignment. The rationale and recommendations made should serve as guidance in design, development, and optimization of Talbot-Lau PCI systems.

  6. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  7. Automatic detection of ridges in lunar images using phase symmetry and phase congruency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheal, Anto A.; Vani, K.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Lunar surface exploration is increasing rapidly. These exploring satellites provide a large number of high resolution images containing topographical information. The topographical information in lunar surface are craters, ridges, mountains and grabens. Extracting this topographical information manually is time-consuming. Hence, an automatic feature extraction is favored. This paper presents a novel approach using image processing techniques to automatically detect ridges in lunar images. The approaches adopted for this development includes phase symmetry, phase congruency and morphological operations to automatically detect significant ridges. The phase symmetry extracts symmetry features with discontinuities, phase congruency extracts features lying in low contrast regions and morphological operations such as thinning and pruning are used to obtain significant ridges. The proposed novel approach experiments on a test set of different regions. These different region images are obtained from different sensors (LROC, Selene and Clementine) having different spatial resolution and illumination variation. The results obtained are compared with the plan curvature method; and they are evaluated based on true and false detection of ridge pixels. Irrespective of illumination variation and spatial resolution, the proposed approach provides better results than the plan curvature method and its detection rate is approximately 92%.

  8. Biomechanical cell analysis using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wax, Adam; Park, Han Sang; Eldridge, William J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging provides nanometer scale sensitivity and has been previously used to study spectral and temporal characteristics of individual cells in vitro, especially red blood cells. Here we extend this work to study the mechanical responses of individual cells due to the influence of external stimuli. Cell stiffness may be characterized by analyzing the inherent thermal fluctuations of cells but by applying external stimuli, additional information can be obtained. The time dependent response of cells due to external shear stress is examined with high speed quantitative phase imaging and found to exhibit characteristics that relate to their stiffness. However, analysis beyond the cellular scale also reveals internal organization of the cell and its modulation due to pathologic processes such as carcinogenesis. Further studies with microfluidic platforms point the way for using this approach in high throughput assays.

  9. Infrared imaging of a solid phase surfactant monolayer.

    PubMed

    Conover, T A; Saylor, J R

    2006-08-01

    A new method for visualizing solid phase surfactant monolayers is presented. This method utilizes infrared (IR) imaging of the surface of a warm subphase covered by the monolayer. When the subphase is deep, natural convection occurs, resulting in a complex surface temperature field that is easily visualized using an IR camera. The presence of a surfactant monolayer changes the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the interface, dramatically altering the surface temperature field, and permitting the differentiation of surfactant-covered and surfactant-free regions. In this work, solid phase monolayers are imaged using this IR method. Fractures in the monolayer are dramatically visualized because of the sudden elimination of surfactant in the region opened up by the crack. The method is demonstrated in a wind/water tunnel, where a stearic acid monolayer is deposited and a crack is created through shear on the surfactant surface, created by suddenly increasing the velocity of the air over the water. PMID:16863234

  10. Quantitative phase imaging technologies to assess neuronal activity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Active neurons tends to have a different dynamical behavior compared to resting ones. Non-exhaustively, vesicular transport towards the synapses is increased, since axonal growth becomes slower. Previous studies also reported small phase variations occurring simultaneously with the action potential. Such changes exhibit times scales ranging from milliseconds to several seconds on spatial scales smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, QPI systems are of particular interest to measure neuronal activity without labels. Here, we report the development of two new QPI systems that should enable the detection of such activity. Both systems can acquire full field phase images with a sub nanometer sensitivity at a few hundreds of frames per second. The first setup is a synchronous combination of Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) and Fluorescence wide field imaging. The latter modality enables the measurement of neurons electrical activity using calcium indicators. In cultures, FF-OCT exhibits similar features to Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), except from complex computational reconstruction. However, FF-OCT is of particular interest in order to measure phase variations in tissues. The second setup is based on a Quantitative Differential Interference Contrast setup mounted in an epi-illumination configuration with a spectrally incoherent illumination. Such a common path interferometer exhibits a very good mechanical stability, and thus enables the measurement of phase images during hours. Additionally, such setup can not only measure a height change, but also an optical index change for both polarization. Hence, one can measure simultaneously a phase change and a birefringence change.

  11. Improved Phased Array Imaging of a Model Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced phased array system, OptiNav Array 48, and a new deconvolution algorithm, TIDY, have been used to make octave band images of supersonic and subsonic jet noise produced by the NASA Glenn Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR). The results are much more detailed than previous jet noise images. Shock cell structures and the production of screech in an underexpanded supersonic jet are observed directly. Some trends are similar to observations using spherical and elliptic mirrors that partially informed the two-source model of jet noise, but the radial distribution of high frequency noise near the nozzle appears to differ from expectations of this model. The beamforming approach has been validated by agreement between the integrated image results and the conventional microphone data.

  12. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures. PMID:26907891

  13. Pupil phase apodization for achromatic imaging of extra- solar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong

    2004-09-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets in the visible and infrared region has generated great interest among scientists and the general public as well. However, this is a challenging problem. Difficulties of detecting a planet (faint source) are caused, mostly, by two factors: sidelobes caused by starlight diffraction from the edge of the pupil and the randomly scattered starlight caused by the phase errors from the imperfections in the optical system. While the latter difficulty can be corrected by high density active deformable mirrors with advanced phase sensing and control technology, the optimized strategy for suppressing the diffraction sidelobes is still an open question. In this thesis, I present a new approach to the sidelobe reduction problem: pupil phase apodization. It is based on a discovery that an anti-symmetric spatial phase modulation pattern imposed over a pupil or a relay plane causes diffracted starlight suppression sufficient for imaging of extra-solar planets. Numerical simulations with specific square pupil (side D) phase functions, such as f(x,y)=a[ln ((1+3)+ 2x/D)/((1+3)-2x/D) . ((1+3)+2y/D)/((1+3)-2y/D)] demonstrate annulling in at least one quadrant of the diffraction plane to the contrast level of better than 10-12 with an inner working angle down to 3.5λ/D (with a = 3 and 3 = 10-3). Furthermore, our computer experiments show that phase apodization remains effective throughout a broad spectrum (60% of the central wavelength) covering the entire visible light range. In addition to the specific phase functions that can yield deep sidelobe reduction on one quadrant; we also found that a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm can help to find small sized (101 x 101 element) discrete phase functions if regional sidelobe reduction is desired. Our simulation shows that a 101 x 101 segmented but gapless active mirror can also generate a dark region with Inner Working Distance about 2.8λ/D in one quadrant. Phase-only modulation has the additional

  14. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Abdelnour, A F; Nehmeh, S A; Pan, T; Humm, J L; Vernon, P; Schöder, H; Rosenzweig, K E; Mageras, G S; Yorke, E; Larson, S M; Erdi, Y E

    2007-06-21

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2pi rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error mue+/-sigmae in PB ranged from 18%+/-20% to 30%+/-35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11%+/-14% to 20%+/-24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis. PMID:17664557

  15. A sensitive x-ray phase contrast technique for rapid imaging using a single phase grid analyzer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kaye S; Modregger, Peter; Irvine, Sarah C; Rutishauser, Simon; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Stampanoni, Marco; David, Christian

    2013-11-15

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) is a promising imaging modality, capable of sensitively differentiating soft tissue structures at high spatial resolution. However, high sensitivity often comes at the cost of a long exposure time or multiple exposures per image, limiting the imaging speed and possibly increasing the radiation dose. Here, we demonstrate a PCXI method that uses a single short exposure to sensitively capture sample phase information, permitting high speed x-ray movies and live animal imaging. The method illuminates a checkerboard phase grid to produce a fine grid-like intensity reference pattern at the detector, then spatially maps sample-induced distortions of this pattern to recover differential phase images of the sample. The use of a phase grid is an improvement on our previous absorption grid work in two ways. There is minimal loss in x-ray flux, permitting faster imaging, and, a very fine pattern is produced for homogenous high spatial resolution. We describe how this pattern permits retrieval of five images from a single exposure; the sample phase gradient images in the horizontal and vertical directions, a projected phase depth image, an edge-enhanced image, and a type of scattering image. Finally, we describe how the reconstruction technique can achieve subpixel distortion retrieval and study the behavior of the technique in regard to analysis technique, Talbot distance, and exposure time. PMID:24322085

  16. Phase-shifter edge effects on attenuated phase-shifting mask image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alfred K. K.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1994-05-01

    Edge effects of space, line, and linespace patterns in attenuated phase-shifting masks are studied using experimentally measured aerial images from the IBM AIMS tool, the scalar and thin mask approximations in SPLAT, and the rigorous electromagnetic simulator TEMPEST. The inadequacy of the thin mask approximation cannot be anticipated from comparisons of in- focus images of isolated line features as the experimentally measured image and the predictions from SPLAT and TEMPEST agree well. However, the scalar and thin mask approximations are not suitable for out of focus image prediction for all pattern types because the presence of the glass edges causes a focus shift of about 0.1 micrometers . Printing small isolated spaces and dense linespace patterns is more robust than isolated lines in the attenuated PSM technology.

  17. Dynamic phase differences based on quantitative phase imaging for the objective evaluation of cell behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizova, Aneta; Collakova, Jana; Dostal, Zbynek; Kvasnica, Lukas; Uhlirova, Hana; Zikmund, Tomas; Vesely, Pavel; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) brought innovation to noninvasive observation of live cell dynamics seen as cell behavior. Unlike the Zernike phase contrast or differential interference contrast, QPI provides quantitative information about cell dry mass distribution. We used such data for objective evaluation of live cell behavioral dynamics by the advanced method of dynamic phase differences (DPDs). The DPDs method is considered a rational instrument offered by QPI. By subtracting the antecedent from the subsequent image in a time-lapse series, only the changes in mass distribution in the cell are detected. The result is either visualized as a two-dimensional color-coded projection of these two states of the cell or as a time dependence of changes quantified in picograms. Then in a series of time-lapse recordings, the chain of cell mass distribution changes that would otherwise escape attention is revealed. Consequently, new salient features of live cell behavior should emerge. Construction of the DPDs method and results exhibiting the approach are presented. Advantage of the DPDs application is demonstrated on cells exposed to an osmotic challenge. For time-lapse acquisition of quantitative phase images, the recently developed coherence-controlled holographic microscope was employed.

  18. Restoration of singularities in reconstructed phase of crystal image in electron holography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2014-12-01

    Off-axis electron holography can be used to measure the inner potential of a specimen from its reconstructed phase image and is thus a powerful technique for materials scientists. However, abrupt reversals of contrast from white to black may sometimes occur in a digitally reconstructed phase image, which results in inaccurate information. Such phase distortion is mainly due to the digital reconstruction process and weak electron wave amplitude in some areas of the specimen. Therefore, digital image processing can be applied to the reconstruction and restoration of phase images. In this paper, fringe reconnection processing is applied to phase image restoration of a crystal structure image. The disconnection and wrong connection of interference fringes in the hologram that directly cause a 2π phase jump imperfection are correctly reconnected. Experimental results show that the phase distortion is significantly reduced after the processing. The quality of the reconstructed phase image was improved by the removal of imperfections in the final phase. PMID:25272997

  19. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  20. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  1. Differential phase photoacoustic imaging for enhanced lateral and axial resolution imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskander-Rizk, Sophinese; Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    The bandwidth limitation and aperture size of the transducer limits the resolution of a photoacoustic computed tomography system. If the separation between two sources is smaller than the point spread function width of the imaging system, they will appear as a single object at different wavelengths. It was shown previously in ultrasound motion imaging that phase difference between two consecutive frames can be used to detect lateral or axial motion with submicron resolution. We tested this method in the context of static PA imaging of two unresolved PA sources. We set up an experiment where we imaged a green and a yellow wire of 40 μm width with known relative absorption coefficients, separated by 355μm. Imaging was performed at 650nm and 460nm. The PA signal is recorded by a single element flat 1MHz transducer (Panametrics 0.5'' V303) in the plane of the wires, so the targets are axially spaced seen from the transducer. We reconstructed the signals originating from both unresolved sources and measured the separation between them to be 350 µm. Similar performance was obtained using an array transducer, viewing the wires from the top so they were laterally separated in the imaging plane. The signal at two different wavelengths was recorded using a commercial imaging system. The two-wavelength phase difference at every pair of channels provides an estimate of the distance between the two absorbers, determined to be 350 µm by the median of the two-channel estimates.

  2. SAR image construction from periodically gapped phase-history data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jianwei J.

    2002-08-01

    It is known that high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging can be cast as a spectral analysis problem, and consequently a number of sophisticated spectral estimation methods have been applied to SAR imaging. These method include the classical Capon method and the closely related Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) algorithm. In this paper, we show how Capon and APES can be extended to deal with spectral analysis of periodically gapped (PG) data, i.e. data where samples are missing in a periodic fashion. This problem is highly relevant for SAR imaging with angular diversity since in that case the measured phase-history data matrix contains missing columns. Our extension of Capon and APES is based on a transform that maps a one-dimensional (1D) periodically gapped time-series into a uniformly sampled two-dimensional (2D) data set. We show that the stationarity properties of the 1D signal are left unchanged by the transformation, and as a result the conventional 2D Capon and APES methods can be applied to the transformed data. An associated inverse transform is used to extract the 1D spectral estimate from the 2D one. The new method is computationally and conceptually non-intricate and it does not involve any interpolation of the missing data. Despite its striking simplicity, numerical results indicate that the new method can be a promising tool for SAR imaging with angular diversity as well as for time-series analysis. In SAR applications, the new method may be particularly suitable for accurate imaging of a small region of interest.

  3. Unlimited field-of-view optofluidic quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Marchesano, V.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    Here we show a novel imaging modality, named Space-Time Scanning Interferometry (STSI), which synthesizes interferograms mapped in a hybrid space-time domain. A single linear sensor array is sufficient to create hybrid interferograms with unlimited Field of View (FoV) along the scanning direction, and allowing quantitative phase retrieval by Phase Shifting (PS) interferometry algorithms. We applied the STSI method to microfluidic imaging of biological samples, where the required phase shift between interferograms is intrinsically offered due to the sample movement. Besides, out-of-focus recordings are performed using a single line detector, in order to synthesize an unlimited FoV Space-Time Digital Hologram (STDH) yielding full-field, 3D information. Experimental proofs have been carried out to demonstrate the useful capability of STDH to overcome the trade-off existing between FoV and sample magnification, thus providing a high-throughput, label/free, quantitative, diagnostic tool to study biological elements onboard LoC platforms.

  4. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  5. Phase-unwrapping algorithm for images with high noise content based on a local histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present a robust algorithm of phase unwrapping that was designed for use on phase images with high noise content. We proceed with the algorithm by first identifying regions with continuous phase values placed between fringe boundaries in an image and then phase shifting the regions with respect to one another by multiples of 2pi to unwrap the phase. Image pixels are segmented between interfringe and fringe boundary areas by use of a local histogram of a wrapped phase. The algorithm has been used successfully to unwrap phase images generated in a three-dimensional shape measurement for noninvasive quantification of human skin structure in dermatology, cosmetology, and plastic surgery.

  6. Three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging via tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Micah H; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    The field of three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging (3D QPI) is expanding rapidly with applications in biological, medical, and industrial research, development, diagnostics, and metrology. Much of this research has centered on developing optical diffraction tomography (ODT) for biomedical applications. In addition to technical difficulties associated with coherent noise, ODT is not congruous with optical microscopy utilizing partially coherent light, which is used in most biomedical laboratories. Thus, ODT solutions have, for the most part, been limited to customized optomechanical systems which would be relatively expensive to implement on a wide scale. In the present work, a new phase reconstruction method, called tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy (TDPM), is described which makes use of commercial microscopy hardware in realizing 3D QPI. TDPM is analogous to methods used in deconvolution microscopy which improve spatial resolution and 3D-localization accuracy of fluorescence micrographs by combining multiple through-focal scans which are deconvolved by the system point spread function. TDPM is based on the 3D weak object transfer function theory which is shown here to be capable of imaging "nonweak" phase objects with large phase excursions. TDPM requires no phase unwrapping and recovers the entire object spectrum via object rotation, mitigating the need to fill in the "missing cone" of spatial frequencies algorithmically as in limited-angle ODT. In the present work, TDPM is demonstrated using optical fibers, including single-mode, polarization-maintaining, and photonic-crystal fibers as well as an azimuthally varying CO2-laser-induced long-period fiber grating period as test phase objects. PMID:26560576

  7. Symmetric Phase-Only Filtering in Particle-Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wemet, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Symmetrical phase-only filtering (SPOF) can be exploited to obtain substantial improvements in the results of data processing in particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In comparison with traditional PIV data processing, SPOF PIV data processing yields narrower and larger amplitude correlation peaks, thereby providing more-accurate velocity estimates. The higher signal-to-noise ratios associated with the higher amplitude correlation peaks afford greater robustness and reliability of processing. SPOF also affords superior performance in the presence of surface flare light and/or background light. SPOF algorithms can readily be incorporated into pre-existing algorithms used to process digitized image data in PIV, without significantly increasing processing times. A summary of PIV and traditional PIV data processing is prerequisite to a meaningful description of SPOF PIV processing. In PIV, a pulsed laser is used to illuminate a substantially planar region of a flowing fluid in which particles are entrained. An electronic camera records digital images of the particles at two instants of time. The components of velocity of the fluid in the illuminated plane can be obtained by determining the displacements of particles between the two illumination pulses. The objective in PIV data processing is to compute the particle displacements from the digital image data. In traditional PIV data processing, to which the present innovation applies, the two images are divided into a grid of subregions and the displacements determined from cross-correlations between the corresponding sub-regions in the first and second images. The cross-correlation process begins with the calculation of the Fourier transforms (or fast Fourier transforms) of the subregion portions of the images. The Fourier transforms from the corresponding subregions are multiplied, and this product is inverse Fourier transformed, yielding the cross-correlation intensity distribution. The average displacement of the

  8. Three-phase radionuclide bone imaging in sports medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rupani, H.D.; Holder, L.E.; Espinola, D.A.; Engin, S.I.

    1985-07-01

    Three-phase radionuclide bone (TPB) imaging was performed on 238 patients with sports-related injuries. A wide variety of lesions was encountered, but the most frequent lesions seen were stress fractures of the lower part of the leg at the junction of the middle and distal thirds of the posterior tibial cortex (42 of 79 lesions). There were no differences in the type, location, or distribution of lesions between males and females or between competitive and noncompetitive athletes. In 110 cases, bone stress lesions were often diagnosed when radiographs were normal, whereas subacute or chronic soft-tissue abnormalities had few specific scintigraphic features. TPB imaging provides significant early diagnostic information about bone stress lesions. Normal examination results (53 cases) exclude underlying osseous pathologic conditions.

  9. Performance validation of phase diversity image reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-05-01

    We present a performance study of a phase diversity (PD) image reconstruction algorithm based on artificial solar images obtained from MHD simulations and on seeing-free data obtained with the SuFI instrument on the Sunrise balloon borne observatory. The artificial data were altered by applying different levels of degradation with synthesised wavefront errors and noise. The PD algorithm was modified by changing the number of fitted polynomials, the shape of the pupil and the applied noise filter. The obtained reconstructions are evaluated by means of the resulting rms intensity contrast and by the conspicuousness of appearing artifacts. The results show that PD is a robust method which consistently recovers the initial unaffected image contents. The efficiency of the reconstruction is, however, strongly dependent on the number of used fitting polynomials and the noise level of the images. If the maximum number of fitted polynomials is higher than 21, artifacts have to be accepted and for noise levels higher than 10-3 the commonly used noise filtering techniques are not able to avoid amplification of spurious structures.

  10. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  11. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-15

    A ''synthetic diagnostic'' has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  12. SAR image quality effects of damped phase and amplitude errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenka, Jerry S.; Falk, Thomas

    The effects of damped multiplicative, amplitude, or phase errors on the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar systems are considered. These types of errors can result from aircraft maneuvers or the mechanical steering of an antenna. The proper treatment of damped multiplicative errors can lead to related design specifications and possibly an enhanced collection capability. Only small, high-frequency errors are considered. Expressions for the average intensity and energy associated with a damped multiplicative error are presented and used to derive graphic results. A typical example is used to show how to apply the results of this effort.

  13. Tomographic imaging of three-phase flow experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Wellington, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The medical x-ray computerized tomography (CT) scanner has proved to be a useful tool for studies of fluid flow in porous media, with particular applications in reservoir engineering and enhanced oil recovery. This paper explains how CT is used to measure the volume fraction of pore space occupied by up to three discrete phases, such as oil, water, and gas. The image processing system, x-ray transparent high-pressure flow equipment, choice of fluid dopants, and x-ray energies are described for scanning of core flood experiments. Examples are given of tertiary miscible carbon dioxide displacements in Berea sandstone.

  14. Development of a synthetic phase contrast imaging diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.

    2010-06-01

    A "synthetic diagnostic" has been developed to calculate the expected experimental response of phase contrast imaging (PCI), a scattering diagnostic used to measure density fluctuations in laboratory plasmas, to a tokamak discharge modeled with the GYRO nonlinear gyrokinetic code [J. Candy and R. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The synthetic PCI includes the spatial response of the experimental diagnostic, primarily implemented as a line integral of plasma density along the beam path, and the minimum and maximum wavenumber response resulting from the detection scheme. The synthetic PCI can be used for comparisons between GYRO and experiment as well as studies of the PCI response.

  15. Improved phase imaging from intensity measurements in multiple planes

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Marcos; Acosta, Eva

    2007-11-20

    Problems stemming from quantitative phase imaging from intensity measurements play a key role in many fields of physics. Techniques based on the transport of intensity equation require an estimate of the axial derivative of the intensity to invert the problem. Derivation formulas in two adjacent planes are commonly used to experimentally compute the derivative of the irradiance. Here we propose a formula that improves the estimate of the derivative by using a higher number of planes and taking the noisy nature of the measurements into account. We also establish an upper and lower limit for the estimate error and provide the distance between planes that optimizes the estimate of the derivative.

  16. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes. PMID:21858377

  17. Computational methods for microfluidic microscopy and phase-space imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegard, Nicolas Christian Richard

    Modern optical devices are made by assembling separate components such as lenses, objectives, and cameras. Traditionally, each part is optimized separately, even though the trade-offs typically limit the performance of the system overall. This component-based approach is particularly unfit to solve the new challenges brought by modern biology: 3D imaging, in vivo environments, and high sample throughput. In the first part of this thesis, we introduce a general method to design integrated optical systems. The laws of wave propagation, the performance of available technology, as well as other design parameters are combined as constraints into a single optimization problem. The solution provides qualitative design rules to improve optical systems as well as quantitative task-specific methods to minimize loss of information. Our results have applications in optical data storage, holography, and microscopy. The second part of this dissertation presents a direct application. We propose a more efficient design for wide-field microscopy with coherent light, based on double transmission through the sample. Historically, speckle noise and aberrations caused by undesired interferences have made coherent illumination unpopular for imaging. We were able to dramatically reduce speckle noise and unwanted interferences using optimized holographic wavefront reconstruction. The resulting microscope not only yields clear coherent images with low aberration---even in thick samples---but also increases contrast and enables optical filtering and in-depth sectioning. In the third part, we develop new imaging techniques that better respond to the needs of modern biology research through implementing optical design optimization. Using a 4D phase-space distribution, we first represent the state and propagation of incoherent light. We then introduce an additional degree of freedom by putting samples in motion in a microfluidic channel, increasing image diversity. From there, we develop a

  18. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  19. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  20. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  1. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  2. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  3. Troubleshooting Arterial-Phase MR Images of Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jimi; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Kyoung Won; Wu, En-Haw; Wang, Z. Jane; Zhao, Li-qin; Chang, Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Gadoxetate disodium is a widely used magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent for liver MR imaging, and it provides both dynamic and hepatobiliary phase images. However, acquiring optimal arterial phase images at liver MR using gadoxetate disodium is more challenging than using conventional extracellular MR contrast agent because of the small volume administered, the gadolinium content of the agent, and the common occurrence of transient severe motion. In this article, we identify the challenges in obtaining high-quality arterial-phase images of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MR imaging and present strategies for optimizing arterial-phase imaging based on the thorough review of recent research in this field. PMID:26576109

  4. Imaging deformation of adherent cells due to shear stress using quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Will J; Sheinfeld, Adi; Rinehart, Matthew T; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-15

    We present a platform for detecting cellular deformations from mechanical stimuli, such as fluid shear stress, using rapid quantitative phase imaging. Rapid quantitative phase imaging was used to analyze changes in the optical path length of adherent skin cancer cells during mechanical displacement. Both the whole-cell phase displacement and the resultant shift of the cellular center of mass were calculated over the duration of the stimulus. Whole-cell phase displacement images were found to match expectation. Furthermore, center-of-mass shifts of adherent cells were found to resemble that of a one-dimensional Kelvin-Voigt (KV) viscoelastic solid. Cellular steady-state displacements from step fluid shear stimuli were found to be linearly related to the shear stress. Shear stiffness constants for cells exposed to a cytoskeletal disrupting toxin were found to be significantly lower than unexposed cells. This novel technique allows for elastographic analysis of whole-cell effective shear stiffness without the use of an exogenous force applicator, a specialized culture substrate, or tracking net perimeter movement of the cell. PMID:26766712

  5. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH. PMID:26942293

  6. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  7. Performance analysis of the attenuation-partition based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for in-line phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The phase retrieval is an important task in x-ray phase contrast imaging. The robustness of phase retrieval is especially important for potential medical imaging applications such as phase contrast mammography. Recently the authors developed an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the attenuation-partition based algorithm, for the phase retrieval in inline phase-contrast imaging [1]. Applied to experimental images, the algorithm was proven to be fast and robust. However, a quantitative analysis of the performance of this new algorithm is desirable. In this work, we systematically compared the performance of this algorithm with other two widely used phase retrieval algorithms, namely the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm and the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) algorithm. The systematical comparison is conducted by analyzing phase retrieval performances with a digital breast specimen model. We show that the proposed algorithm converges faster than the GS algorithm in the Fresnel diffraction regime, and is more robust against image noise than the TIE algorithm. These results suggest the significance of the proposed algorithm for future medical applications with the x-ray phase contrast imaging technique. PMID:20720992

  8. A phase-image watermarking scheme in gyrator domain using devil's vortex Fresnel lens as a phase mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, A. K.; Vashisth, Sunanda; Singh, Hukum; Singh, Kehar

    2015-06-01

    We propose a watermarking scheme for phase images, based on the use of devil's vortex Fresnel lens (DVFL) as a phase mask. The DVFL provides much-desired parameter-rich phase masks which contribute to the enhanced security of the scheme in addition to overcoming the problem of axis alignment in the optical setup. The scheme uses gyrator transform (GT) in the input and the frequency domains to encrypt the input phase image before combining it with a host image. The scheme is validated for its efficacy, and analyzed for its sensitivity to various encryption parameters. Finally, it is examined for its robustness against occlusion and noise attacks.

  9. Nanosecond switching in GeSe phase change memory films by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, James L.; Huey, Bryan D.; Grishin, Ilya; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Gyu Choi, Yong; Cheong, Byung-ki; Lee, Suyoun

    2014-02-03

    Nanosecond scale threshold switching is investigated with conducting atomic force microscopy (AFM) for an amorphous GeSe film. Switched bits exhibit 2–3 orders of magnitude variations in conductivity, as demonstrated in phase change based memory devices. Through the nm-scale AFM probe, this crystallization was achieved with pulse durations of as low as 15 ns, the fastest reported with scanning probe based methods. Conductance AFM imaging of the switched bits further reveals correlations between the switched volume, pulse amplitude, and pulse duration. The influence of film heterogeneities on switching is also directly detected, which is of tremendous importance for optimal device performance.

  10. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail (CD) phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 μm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 μm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and SNR/FOM comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disk sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest disks. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disk sizes except the smallest disks. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique. PMID:24732108

  11. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan Wong, Molly; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 µm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 µm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)/figure of merit comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disc sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest discs. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disc sizes except the smallest discs. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique.

  12. A study on carrier phase distortion in phase measuring deflectometry with non-telecentric imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Lei; Yue, Huimin; Kim, Hanshin; Wu, Yuxiang; Liu, Yong; Liu, Yongzhi

    2012-10-22

    In phase measuring deflectometry (PMD), the fringe pattern deformed according to slope deviation of a specular surface is digitized employing a phase-shift technique. Without height-angle ambiguity, carrier-removal process is adopted to evaluate the variation of surface slope from phase distribution when a quasi-plane is measured. However, the difficulty lies in the fact that the nonlinearity is generally contained in the carrier frequency due to the restrictions of system geometries. This paper investigates nonlinear carrier components introduced by the generalized imaging process in PMD. Furthermore, the analytical expression of carrier components in PMD is presented for the first time. The presented analytical form of carrier components can be extended to analyze and describe various effects of system parameters on carrier distortion. Assuming a pinhole perspective model, carrier phase distribution of arbitrary geometric arrangement is modeled as a function of spatial variables by exploring ray tracing method. As shown by simulation and experimental results, the carrier distortion is greatly affected by non-telecentric camera operation. Experimental results on the basis of reference subtraction technique further demonstrate that restrictions on reflection system geometry can be eliminated when the carrier phase is removed elaborately. PMID:23187214

  13. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  14. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  15. Real time blood testing using quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoa V; Bhaduri, Basanta; Tangella, Krishnarao; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a real-time blood testing system that can provide remote diagnosis with minimal human intervention in economically challenged areas. Our instrument combines novel advances in label-free optical imaging with parallel computing. Specifically, we use quantitative phase imaging for extracting red blood cell morphology with nanoscale sensitivity and NVIDIA's CUDA programming language to perform real time cellular-level analysis. While the blood smear is translated through focus, our system is able to segment and analyze all the cells in the one megapixel field of view, at a rate of 40 frames/s. The variety of diagnostic parameters measured from each cell (e.g., surface area, sphericity, and minimum cylindrical diameter) are currently not available with current state of the art clinical instruments. In addition, we show that our instrument correctly recovers the red blood cell volume distribution, as evidenced by the excellent agreement with the cell counter results obtained on normal patients and those with microcytic and macrocytic anemia. The final data outputted by our instrument represent arrays of numbers associated with these morphological parameters and not images. Thus, the memory necessary to store these data is of the order of kilobytes, which allows for their remote transmission via, for example, the cellular network. We envision that such a system will dramatically increase access for blood testing and furthermore, may pave the way to digital hematology. PMID:23405194

  16. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  17. Phase-aware projection model for steganalysis of JPEG images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Vojtěch; Fridrich, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    State-of-the-art JPEG steganographic algorithms, such as J-UNIWARD, are currently better detected in the spatial domain rather than the JPEG domain. Rich models built from pixel residuals seem to better capture the impact of embedding than features constructed as co-occurrences of quantized JPEG coefficients. However, when steganalyzing JPEG steganographic algorithms in the spatial domain, the pixels' statistical properties vary because of the underlying 8 × 8 pixel grid imposed by the compression. In order to detect JPEG steganography more accurately, we split the statistics of noise residuals based on their phase w.r.t. the 8 × 8 grid. Because of the heterogeneity of pixels in a decompressed image, it also makes sense to keep the kernel size of pixel predictors small as larger kernels mix up qualitatively different statistics more, losing thus on the detection power. Based on these observations, we propose a novel feature set called PHase Aware pRojection Model (PHARM) in which residuals obtained using a small number of small-support kernels are represented using first-order statistics of their random projections as in the projection spatial rich model PSRM. The benefit of making the features "phase-aware" is shown experimentally on selected modern JPEG steganographic algorithms with the biggest improvement seen for J-UNIWARD. Additionally, the PHARM feature vector can be computed at a fraction of computational costs of existing projection rich models.

  18. Lensless ghost imaging of a phase object with pseudo-thermal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Jian; Tang, Qiang; Wu, Teng-Fei; Qiu, Hao-Chuan; Xu, De-Qin; Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Hai-Bo; Xiong, Jun; Wang, Kaige

    2014-03-01

    We report an experimental realization of lensless ghost imaging for a phase-only object with pseudo-thermal light, which was proposed by W. Gong and S. Han [Phys. Rev. A 82, 023828 (2010)]. In contrast with conventional ghost imaging, the scheme involves the interference of two correlated fields and the phase information of the object can be retrieved. This imaging technique completes the nonlocally lensless spatial reconstruction of both amplitude and phase distributions in ghost imaging with thermal light.

  19. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  20. Comparison of dynamic lever STM and noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Bammerlin, M.; Lüthi, R.; Loppacher, C.; Battiston, F.; Lü, J.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    We investigate interaction effects which occur in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by performing local force spectroscopy with an oscillating tip while imaging Si(111)7×7 terraces in the dynamic lever STM mode (constant time-averaged current). It is found that true atomic resolution is achieved close to the minimum of the resonance frequency vs. distance curve and even closer to the sample. On the other hand true atomic resolution in noncontact AFM (constant frequency shift) is expected several nm away from this minimum, in the range where the frequency shift becomes more negative with decreasing distance.

  1. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot–Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot–Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot–Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot–Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot–Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis

  2. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  3. Determination of nanostructures and mechanical properties on the surface of molybdenum dithiocarbamate and zinc dialkyl-dithiophosphate tribochemical reacted films using atomic force microscope phase imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiping; Kano, Makoto; Yasuda, Yoshiteru

    2003-05-01

    Nanostructures and mechanical properties on the surface of two kinds of tribofilm formed from zinc dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP) and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) additives, which exhibited obviously different friction coefficients in a pin-on-disc test, were determined by using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase imaging technique. The level of interactive force between the tip and sample was modulated for distinguishing well-defined structures and mechanical properties of individual components not only on the uppermost surface but also in the underlying area near the surface in the AFM tapping mode. It was found that the MoDTC/ZDDP tribofilm possessed a lower surface modulus than the ZDDP film in the elastic deformation range. Most importantly, nanostrips oriented in the sliding direction were found in the MoDTC/ZDDP tribofilm at a depth of around 10 nm from the surface. These nanostrips possessed lower shearing stress than the surface matrix and formed the inner skin layer, which exhibited lower friction behavior than that of the ZDDP tribofilm. These results agreed with our recent nanoindentation and nanoscratch measurements for estimating the mechanical and frictional properties of MoDTC/ZDDP and ZDDP tribofilms. These findings and previous surface analytical results suggest that the nanostrips act as a type of solid lubricant, such as MoS2 single sheets, to lower the boundary friction coefficient.

  4. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  5. Ultrasound phase contrast thermal imaging with reflex transmission imaging methods in tissue phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Farny, Caleb H.; Clement, Gregory T.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal imaging measurements using ultrasound phase contrast have been performed in tissue phantoms heated with a focused ultrasound source. Back projection and reflex transmission imaging principles were employed to detect sound speed-induced changes in the phase caused by an increase in the temperature. The temperature was determined from an empirical relationship for the temperature dependence on sound speed. The phase contrast was determined from changes in the sound field measured with a hydrophone scan conducted before and during applied heating. The lengthy scanning routine used to mimic a large two-dimensional array required a steady-state temperature distribution within the phantom. The temperature distribution in the phantom was validated with magnetic resonance (MR) thermal imaging measurements. The peak temperature was found to agree within 1°C with MR and good agreement was found between the temperature profiles. The spatial resolution was 0.3 × 0.3 × 0.3 mm, comparing favorably with the 0.625 × 0.625 × 1.5 mm MR spatial resolution. PMID:19683380

  6. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-15

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as micro-calcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  7. Numerical simulation of phase images and depth reconstruction in pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Valle, Saul; Peters, Kara

    2015-11-01

    In this work we apply the finite element (FE) method to simulate the results of pulsed phase thermography experiments on laminated composite plates. Specifically, the goal is to simulate the phase component of reflected thermal waves and therefore verify the calculation of defect depth through the identification of the defect blind frequency. The calculation of phase components requires a higher spatial and temporal resolution than that of the calculation of the reflected temperature. An FE modeling strategy is presented, including the estimation of the defect thermal properties, which in this case is represented as a foam insert impregnated with epoxy resin. A comparison of meshing strategies using tetrahedral and hexahedral elements reveals that temperature errors in the tetrahedral results are amplified in the calculation of phase images and blind frequencies. Finally, we investigate the linearity of the measured diffusion length (based on the blind frequency) as a function of defect depth. The simulations demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between the defect depth and diffusion length, calculated from the blind frequency, consistent with previous experimental observations.

  8. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  9. Quasiparticle scattering image in hidden order phases and chiral superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, Peter; Akbari, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    The technique of Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference (QPI) has been successfully used to investigate the symmetry of unconventional superconducting gaps, also in heavy fermion compounds. It was demonstrated that QPI can distinguish between the d-wave singlet candidates in CeCoIn5. In URu2Si2 presumably a chiral d-wave singlet superconducting (SC) state exists inside a multipolar hidden order (HO) phase. We show that hidden order leaves an imprint on the symmetry of QPI pattern that may be used to determine the essential question whether HO in URu2Si2 breaks the in-plane rotational symmetry or not. We also demonstrate that the chiral d-wave SC gap leads to a crossover to a quasi-2D QPI spectrum below Tc which sharpens the HO features. Furthermore we investigate the QPI image of chiral p-wave multigap superconductor Sr2RuO4.

  10. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  11. A Batch Fabricated SECM-AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. S.; Macpherson, J. V.; Holder, M.; Weaver, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A scheme for the fabrication of combined Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy — Atomic Force Microscopy (SECM-AFM) probes is presented for both silicon nitride and silicon cantilevers. The advantages over exsisting methods used for their production is explained. The process flow is described and initial results from electrodeposition of silver are presented.

  12. Direct Imaging Searches with the Apodizing Phase Plate Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, M.; Meshkat, T.; Otten, , G.; Codona, J.

    2014-03-01

    The sensitivity of direct imaging searches for extrasolar planets is limited by the presence of diffraction rings from the primary star. Coronagraphs are angular filters that minimise these diffraction structures whilst allowing light from faint companions to shine through. The Apodizing Phase Plate (APP; Kenworthy 2007) coronagraph is a simple pupil plane optic that suppresses diffraction over a 180 degree region around each star simultaneously, providing easy beam switching observations and requiring no time consuming optical alignment at the telescope. We will present our results on using the APP at the Very Large Telescope in surveys for extrasolar planets around A/F and debris disk hosting stars in the L' band (3.8 microns) in the Southern Hemisphere, where we reach a contrast of 12 magnitudes at 0.5 arcseconds (Meshkat 2013). In Leiden, we are also developing the next generation of broadband achromatic coronagraphs that can simultaneously image both sides of the star using Vector APPs (Snik 2012, Otten 2012). Recent laboratory results showing the potential of this technology for future ELTs will also be presented.

  13. Quantitative phase imaging applied to laser damage detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Douti, Dam-Bé L; Chrayteh, Mhamad; Aknoun, Sherazade; Doualle, Thomas; Hecquet, Christophe; Monneret, Serge; Gallais, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    We investigate phase imaging as a measurement method for laser damage detection and analysis of laser-induced modification of optical materials. Experiments have been conducted with a wavefront sensor based on lateral shearing interferometry associated with a high-magnification optical microscope. The system has been used for the in-line observation of optical thin films and bulk samples, laser irradiated in two different conditions: 500 fs pulses at 343 and 1030 nm, and millisecond to second irradiation with a CO2 laser at 10.6 μm. We investigate the measurement of the laser-induced damage threshold of optical material by detection and phase changes and show that the technique realizes high sensitivity with different optical path measurements lower than 1 nm. Additionally, the quantitative information on the refractive index or surface modification of the samples under test that is provided by the system has been compared to classical metrology instruments used for laser damage or laser ablation characterization (an atomic force microscope, a differential interference contrast microscope, and an optical surface profiler). An accurate in-line measurement of the morphology of laser-ablated sites, from few nanometers to hundred microns in depth, is shown. PMID:26479612

  14. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  15. Quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells using phase-shifting white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Mehta, Dalip; Srivastava, Vishal

    2012-11-01

    We report quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs) using phase-shifting interference microscopy. Five phase-shifted white light interferograms are recorded using colour charge coupled device camera. White light interferograms were decomposed into red, green, and blue colour components. The phase-shifted interferograms of each colour were then processed by phase-shifting analysis and phase maps for red, green, and blue colours were reconstructed. Wavelength dependent refractive index profiles of RBCs were computed from the single set of white light interferogram. The present technique has great potential for non-invasive determination of refractive index variation and morphological features of cells and tissues.

  16. Recovery of image distorted by turbulent atmosphere using phase-conjugate image generated by difference frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xingquan; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate dynamic recovery of blurred images caused by atmospheric turbulence. In particular, using a phase-conjugate wave generated by a second-order nonlinear crystal or composite, we restore the original quality of the image after the optical radiation forming the image propagates through the turbulent atmosphere. One of the key elements for our experiment is a rotating phase plate being placed in the beam path for simulating turbulent atmosphere. Using the nonlinear composite, we demonstrate that the image recovery is insensitive to the polarization of the optical radiation forming the image.

  17. Recovery of image distorted by turbulent atmosphere using phase-conjugate image generated by difference frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Xingquan; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J.

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate dynamic recovery of blurred images caused by atmospheric turbulence. In particular, using a phase-conjugate wave generated by a second-order nonlinear crystal or composite, we restore the original quality of the image after the optical radiation forming the image propagates through the turbulent atmosphere. One of the key elements for our experiment is a rotating phase plate being placed in the beam path for simulating turbulent atmosphere. Using the nonlinear composite, we demonstrate that the image recovery is insensitive to the polarization of the optical radiation forming the image.

  18. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  19. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  20. Filling factor characteristics of masking phase-only hologram on the quality of reconstructed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuanbo; Chu, Daping

    2016-03-01

    The present study evaluates the filling factor characteristics of masking phase-only hologram on its corresponding reconstructed image. A square aperture with different filling factor is added on the phase-only hologram of the target image, and average cross-section intensity profile of the reconstructed image is obtained and deconvolved with that of the target image to calculate the point spread function (PSF) of the image. Meanwhile, Lena image is used as the target image and evaluated by metrics RMSE and SSIM to assess the quality of reconstructed image. The results show that the PSF of the image agrees with the PSF of the Fourier transform of the mask, and as the filling factor of the mask decreases, the width of PSF increases and the quality of reconstructed image drops. These characteristics could be used in practical situations where phase-only hologram is confined or need to be sliced or tiled.

  1. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes. PMID:21446752

  2. A quantitative, non-interferometric X-ray phase contrast imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Peter R.T.; Rigon, Luigi; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Lopez, Frances C.M.; Dreossi, Diego; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative, non-interferometric, X-ray differential phase contrast imaging technique based on the edge illumination principle. We derive a novel phase retrieval algorithm which requires only two images to be acquired and verify the technique experimentally using synchrotron radiation. The technique is useful for planar imaging but is expected to be important for quantitative phase tomography also. The properties and limitations of the technique are studied in detail. PMID:23388958

  3. Experimental evidence of the theoretical spatial frequency response of cubic phase mask wavefront coding imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, Manjunath; Bhakta, Vikrant R; Christensen, Marc P

    2012-01-16

    The optical transfer function of a cubic phase mask wavefront coding imaging system is experimentally measured across the entire range of defocus values encompassing the system's functional limits. The results are compared against mathematical expressions describing the spatial frequency response of these computational imagers. Experimental data shows that the observed modulation and phase transfer functions, available spatial frequency bandwidth and design range of this imaging system strongly agree with previously published mathematical analyses. An imaging system characterization application is also presented wherein it is shown that the phase transfer function is more robust than the modulation transfer function in estimating the strength of the cubic phase mask. PMID:22274533

  4. Implementation of measure of relative tendency to phase image filtering spacial based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syakrani, Nurjannah; Baskoro, Edy T.; Mengko, Tati L. R.; Suksmono, A. B.

    2014-03-01

    Complex image can split to magnitudo and phase images. The phase of complex function is uniquely defined only in the principal or wrapped value range (-π, π]. Complex image is producted by special equipment as MRI, InSAR and Optics. Image acquisition has noise mostly. The noise come from modality, transmission media or object of image. Generally, the noise has two classification that are additive as Gaussian or multiplicative as speckle. The noise make image processing effectiveless. One of measure of relative tendency in Statistics is quartile consist of low, middle (median) and upper quartiles. Until now, basic spatial filtering method is constructed mean based that linear category or median based that simple nonlinear category. There is different formulation to get measure of central or relatif tendency between magnitudo and phase data. This paper propose a new filtering method base on quartile to phase image specially. Using 3×3 window to implementation of quartile algorithm in Matlab is tested to simulation phase image named Peak2XY by two kind of noises that are Gaussian and Speckle. For example, PSNR of upper quartile filtering to Peak2XY by Gaussian noise with mean =0, variance=0.01, are LoQu = +20.2622; MidQu = +23.7045; UpQu = +21.3528. The quartile filtering method also tested to head phase image of Magnetics Resonance Imaging and Fuji of InSAR phase image.

  5. Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, A.; Beckmann, F.; Lytaev, P.; Greving, I.; Lottermoser, L.; Dose, T.; Kirchhof, R.; Burmester, H.; Schreyer, A.; Herzen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Conventional absorption-based imaging often lacks in good contrast at special applications like visualization of soft tissue or weak absorbing material in general. To overcome this limitation, several new X-ray phase-contrast imaging methods have been developed at synchrotron radiation facilities. Our aim was to establish the possibility of different phase-contrast imaging modalities at the Imaging Beamline (IBL, P05) and the High Energy Material Science beamline (HEMS, P07) at Petra III (DESY, Germany). Here we present the instrumentation and the status of the currently successfully established phase-contrast imaging techniques. First results from measurements of biomedical samples will be presented as demonstration.

  6. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  7. Understanding brownout using dual-phase particle image velocimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydney, Anish Joshua

    To better understand the development of brownout dust clouds generated by rotor- craft, the dual-phase flow environment produced by one- and two-bladed laboratory-scale rotors operating over a mobile sediment bed were studied. Three size ranges of characterized glass microspheres were used to represent the sediment particles. Time-resolved flow visualization, particle image velocimetry, and particle tracking velocimetry were used to make the flow measurements. The high imaging rate of these systems allowed the time-history of the rotor wake interactions with the sediment bed to be documented, providing a better understanding of the transient processes and mechanisms that lead to the uplift of sediment and the formation of dust clouds near a rotor in ground effect operation. In particular, the fluid dynamics of the blade tip vortices near the bed were examined in detail, which were shown to have a primary influence on the mobilization of sediment. In general, the near-wall measurements documented at least five fundamental uplift and sediment transport mechanisms below the rotor: 1. Creep, 2. Modified saltation and saltation bombardment, 3. Vortex induced trapping, 4. Reingestion bombardment (local and global), and 5. Secondary suspension. In addition, a further mechanism related to the local unsteady pressure field induced by the convecting wake vortices was hypothesized to contribute to the uplift of sediment. The highest sediment entrainment levels occurred within the wake impingement zone, mainly from the erosion aspects of the tip vortices on the bed. Once entrained, significant quantities of sediment were intermittently trapped in the vortex-induced upwash field. Secondary sediment suspension was found to be more prevalent with the two-bladed rotor because of the propensity for merging of adjacent blade tip vortices and the resulting higher upwash velocities. The trapping of suspended sediment particles into the vortex flow was shown to cause recirculation of

  8. Phase-sensitive swept source OCT imaging of the human retina with a VCSEL light source

    PubMed Central

    Choi, WooJhon; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Baumann, Bernhard; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Cable, Alex E.; Huang, David; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the challenges in achieving high phase stability, Doppler swept source / Fourier domain OCT has advantages of less fringe washout and faster imaging speeds compared to spectral / Fourier domain detection. This manuscript demonstrates swept source OCT with a VCSEL light source at 400kHz sweep rate for phase-sensitive Doppler imaging, measuring pulsatile total retinal blood flow with high sensitivity and phase stability. A robust, simple, and computationally efficient phase stabilization approach for phase-sensitive swept source imaging is also presented. PMID:23381430

  9. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  10. Sparse Auto-Calibration for Radar Coincidence Imaging with Gain-Phase Errors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. The sparsity-driven approaches are commonly used in RCI, while the prior knowledge of imaging models needs to be known accurately. However, as one of the major model errors, the gain-phase error exists generally, and may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. In the present report, the sparse auto-calibration method is proposed to compensate the gain-phase error in RCI. The method can determine the gain-phase error as part of the imaging process. It uses an iterative algorithm, which cycles through steps of target reconstruction and gain-phase error estimation, where orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) and Newton’s method are used, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the imaging quality significantly and estimate the gain-phase error accurately. PMID:26528981

  11. Extended depth-of-field imaging through radially symmetrical conjugate phase masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouqian; Le, Van Nhu; Fan, Zhigang; Tran, Hong Cam

    2015-11-01

    We proposed a radially symmetrical conjugate phase mask (PM) pair to yield an invariant imaging property for extending depth-of-field imaging. This conjugate PM pair is a two-radially symmetrical phase function with opposite orientation of the phase modulation. Compared with a single-radially symmetrical PM, the proposed conjugate PM pair shows a symmetrically imaging property on both sides of the focal plane and high magnitude of modulation transfer function (MTF). The quartic phase mask (QPM) with optimized phase parameters is employed to demonstrate our concept. Several evaluation approaches, including point-spread function, MTF, and image simulation, are used to realize the performance comparison among a traditional imaging system, an original QPM system, and a conjugate QPM. The results are proof that the proposed conjugate PM has a superior performance in extending depth of field imaging.

  12. Radar coincidence imaging with phase error using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. In sparsity-driven RCI, the prior knowledge of imaging model requires to be known accurately. However, the phase error generally exists as a model error, which may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. The problem is formulated using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling, and the self-calibration variational message passing (SC-VMP) algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of RCI with phase error. The algorithm determines the phase error as part of the imaging process. The scattering coefficient and phase error are iteratively estimated using VMP and Newton's method, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can estimate the phase error accurately and improve the imaging quality significantly.

  13. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  14. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  15. Modeling and Analysis of Phase Contrast Imaging Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J. R.; Candy, J.; Burrell, K. H.

    2007-11-01

    The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic on DIII-D has been operated in several configurations over its lifetime. The beam path was changed in 2003 from tangential at the midplane LCFS to a path passing through the edge at an angle near 45 degrees and reaching typically r/a=0.8, and the maximum wavenumber has been increased from 7 to 30 cm-1. A synthetic diagnostic (SD) has been created to model all configurations of the PCI by post-processing the output of the GYRO gyrokinetic simulation. The SD includes line integration along the full path and models the detector to obtain the high- and low-k cutoffs. Modeling of a plasma discharge typical of DIII-D is used to interpret the PCI spectra S(k,f) in terms of turbulent ballooning modes and local S(kr,kθ,f). This allows us to identify parts of the PCI spectra with different plasma modes (ITG, TEM, ETG), separate effects of Doppler shift and intrinsic mode velocity in the measurement, and improve comparisons with other diagnostics. The SD will contribute to validation of the model through comparison between simulation and experiment.

  16. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 µm) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  17. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  18. Simultaneous transmission for an encrypted image and a double random-phase encryption key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Zhou, Xin; Li, Da-Hai; Zhou, Ding-Fu

    2007-06-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously transmit double random-phase encryption key and an encrypted image by making use of the fact that an acceptable decryption result can be obtained when only partial data of the encrypted image have been taken in the decryption process. First, the original image data are encoded as an encrypted image by a double random-phase encryption technique. Second, a double random-phase encryption key is encoded as an encoded key by the Rivest-Shamir-Adelman (RSA) public-key encryption algorithm. Then the amplitude of the encrypted image is modulated by the encoded key to form what we call an encoded image. Finally, the encoded image that carries both the encrypted image and the encoded key is delivered to the receiver. Based on such a method, the receiver can have an acceptable result and secure transmission can be guaranteed by the RSA cipher system.

  19. Dual AFM probes alignment based on vision guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-kun; Gao, Si-tian; Lu, Ming-zhen; Wang, Long-long

    2013-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) with dual probes that operate together can measure both side walls excellently at the same time, which virtually eliminates the prevalent effect of probe width that contributes a large component of uncertainty in measurement results and finally obtains the critical dimension (CD)(e.g. the linewidth) through data synthesis. In calibration process, the dual probes must contact each other in advance, which realizes the alignment in the three dimensions, to establish a zero reference point and ensure the accuracy of measurement. Because nowadays the optical resolution of advanced lens have exceeded micrometer range, and the size of probes is within micro level, it is possible to acquire dual probes images in both horizontal and vertical directions, through which the movement of the probes can be controlled in time. In order to further enhance the alignment precision, sub-pixel edge detection method based on Zernike orthogonal moment is used to obtain relative position between these two probes, which helps the tips alignment attains sub-micron range. Piezoelectric nanopositioning stages calibrated by laser interferometer are used to implement fine movement of the probes to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. To simplify the system, novel self-sensing and self-actuating probe based on a quartz tuning fork combined with a micromachined cantilever is used for dynamic mode AFM. In this case, an external optical detection system is not needed, so the system is simple and small.

  20. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  1. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  2. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  3. The structure of high-methoxyl sugar acid gels of citrus pectin as determined by AFM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images of native high methoxyl sugar acid gels (HMSAG) were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the Tapping ModeTM. Electronic thinning of the pectin strands to one pixel wide allowed the pectin network to be viewed in the absence of variable strand widths related to preferentially solvate...

  4. PHASE CORRELATION METHOD FOR THE ALIGNMENT OF TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Druckmueller, M.

    2009-12-01

    A modified phase correlation method, based on Fourier transform, which enables the alignment of solar coronal images taken during the total solar eclipses, is presented. The method enables the measurement of translation, rotation, and scaling factor between two images. With the application of this technique, pairs of images with different exposure times, different brightness scale, such as linear for CCD and nonlinear for images taken with photographic film, and even images from different emission lines can be aligned with sub-pixel precision.

  5. Measurements of liquid-phase turbulence in gas-liquid two-phase flows using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinquan; Doup, Benjamin; Sun, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Liquid-phase turbulence measurements were performed in an air-water two-phase flow loop with a circular test section of 50 mm inner diameter using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. An optical phase separation method--planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique—which uses fluorescent particles and an optical filtration technique, was employed to separate the signals of the fluorescent seeding particles from those due to bubbles and other noises. An image pre-processing scheme was applied to the raw PIV images to remove the noise residuals that are not removed by the PLIF technique. In addition, four-sensor conductivity probes were adopted to measure the radial distribution of the void fraction. Two benchmark tests were performed: the first was a comparison of the PIV measurement results with those of similar flow conditions using thermal anemometry from previous studies; the second quantitatively compared the superficial liquid velocities calculated from the local liquid velocity and void fraction measurements with the global liquid flow rate measurements. The differences of the superficial liquid velocity obtained from the two measurements were bounded within ±7% for single-phase flows and two-phase bubbly flows with the area-average void fraction up to 18%. Furthermore, a preliminary uncertainty analysis was conducted to investigate the accuracy of the two-phase PIV measurements. The systematic uncertainties due to the circular pipe curvature effects, bubble surface reflection effects and other potential uncertainty sources of the PIV measurements were discussed. The purpose of this work is to facilitate the development of a measurement technique (PIV-PLIF) combined with image pre-processing for the liquid-phase turbulence in gas-liquid two-phase flows of relatively high void fractions. The high-resolution data set can be used to more thoroughly understand two-phase flow behavior, develop liquid-phase turbulence models, and assess high

  6. Ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging technology for NDT of offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Baohua; Wang, Hua; Liang, Yongning; Duan, Zhongdong; Ou, Jinping

    2008-03-01

    In order to improve inspection result repetition and flaw ration veracity of manual ultrasonic inspection of offshore platform structure, an ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging technology for NDT of offshore platform structures is proposed in this paper. Aimed at the practical requirement of tubular joint welds inspection of offshore platform structures, the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structures is developed, which is composed of computer, ultrasonic circuit system, scanning device, phased array transducer and inspection imaging software system. The experiment of Y shape tubular joint model of 60 degree is performed with the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structures, the flaws characteristic could be exactly estimated and the flaws size could be measured through ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging software system for offshore platform structures. Experiment results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging technology for offshore platform structures is feasible, the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system could detect flaws in tubular joint model, the whole development trend of flaws is factually imaging by the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology of offshore platform structures.

  7. Double color image encryption using iterative phase retrieval algorithm in quaternion gyrator domain.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhuhong; Shu, Huazhong; Wu, Jiasong; Dong, Zhifang; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Coatrieux, Jean Louis

    2014-03-10

    This paper describes a novel algorithm to encrypt double color images into a single undistinguishable image in quaternion gyrator domain. By using an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the phase masks used for encryption are obtained. Subsequently, the encrypted image is generated via cascaded quaternion gyrator transforms with different rotation angles. The parameters in quaternion gyrator transforms and phases serve as encryption keys. By knowing these keys, the original color images can be fully restituted. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the validity of the proposed encryption system as well as its robustness against loss of data and additive Gaussian noise. PMID:24663832

  8. Multiple sclerosis lesion geometry in Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) and phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eskreis-Winkler, Sarah; Deh, Kofi; Gupta, Ajay; Liu, Tian; Wisnieff, Cynthia; Jin, Moonsoo; Gauthier, Susan A.; Wang, Yi; Spincemaille, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the phase and QSM patterns created by solid and shell spatial distributions of magnetic susceptibility in MS lesions. Materials and Methods Numerical simulations and experimental phantoms of solid- and shell-shaped magnetic susceptibility sources were used to generate magnitude, phase, and QSM images. Imaging of 20 consecutive MS patients was also reviewed for this IRB-approved MRI study to identify appearance of solid and shell lesions on phase and QSM images. Results Solid and shell susceptibility sources were correctly reconstructed in QSM images, while the corresponding phase images depicted both geometries with shell-like patterns, making the underlying susceptibility distribution difficult to determine using phase alone. In MS patients, of the 60 largest lesions identified on T2, 30 lesions were detected on both QSM and phase, of which 83% were solid and 17% were shells on QSM, and of which 30% were solid and 70% were shell on phase. Of the 21 shell-like lesions on phase, 76% appeared solid on QSM, 24% appeared shell on QSM. Of the five shell-like lesions on QSM, all were shell-like on phase. Conclusion QSM accurately depicts both solid and shell patterns of magnetic susceptibility, while phase imaging fails to distinguish them. PMID:25174493

  9. Optical digital coherent detection technology enabled flexible and ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan-Hua; Lu, Xing; Song, Lu; Guo, Xiaojie; Wang, Yawei; Zhu, Linyan; Sui, Qi; Li, Jianping; Shi, Kebin; Li, Zhaohui

    2016-07-25

    Quantitative phase imaging has been an important labeling-free microscopy modality for many biomedical and material science applications. In which, ultra-fast quantitative phase imaging is indispensable for dynamic or transient characteristics analysis. Conventional wide field optical interferometry is a common scheme for quantitative phase imaging, while its data acquisition rate is usually hindered by the frame rate of arrayed detector. By utilizing novel balanced-photo-detector based digital optics coherent detection techniques, we report on a method of constructing ultra-fast quantitative phase microscopy at the line-scan rate of 100 MHz with ~2 μm spatial resolution. PMID:27464166

  10. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  11. One-exposure phase-shifting digital holography based on the self-imaging effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, Agnieszka; Sypek, Maciej; Makowski, Michał; Suszek, Jaroslaw; Siemion, Andrzej; Wojnowski, Dariusz; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2010-05-01

    A diffractive optical element with self-imaging capabilities is used to make a phase-shifting digital holography optical system simpler and cheaper. Sequential phase-shifting requires multiple exposures, and parallel phase-shifting demands a more complicated optical system. As opposed to typical phase-shifting methods, using the self-imaging diffractive optical element requires only one exposure on a low-cost CMOS matrix, and due to the small number of needed elements, the optical system is very compact. Instead of the approximation and interpolation methods, the properties of the self-imaging effect are utilized in the recording process and in the numerical reconstruction process.

  12. Simplified approach for quantitative digital holographic phase contrast imaging of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Vollmer, Angelika; Rommel, Christina E.; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Bally, Gert Von

    2011-02-01

    Many interferometry-based quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques require a separately generated coherent reference wave. This results in a low phase stability and the demand for a precise adjustment of the intensity ratio between object and reference wave. To overcome these problems, the performance of a Michelson interferometer approach for digital holographic microscopy was analyzed that avoids a separately generated reference wave by superposition of different image areas. It is shown that this simplified arrangement yields improved phase stability. Furthermore, results from time-lapse investigations on living pancreas tumor cells demonstrate the capability of the method for reliable quantitative phase contrast imaging.

  13. The dynamic response of high pressure phase of Si using phase contrast imaging and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Xing, Z.; Gleason, A.; Granados, E.; Tavella, F.; Schropp, A.; Seiboth, F.; Schroer, C.; Higginbotham, A.; Brown, S.; Arnold, B.; Curiel, R.; Peterswright, D.; Fry, A.; Nagler, B.

    2015-11-01

    Static compression studies have revealed that crystalline silicon undergoes phase transitions from a cubic diamond structure to a variety of phases including body-centered tetragonal phase, an orthorhombic phase, and a hexagonal primitive phase. However, the dynamic response of silicon at high pressure is not well understood. Phase contrast imaging has proven to be a powerful tool for probing density changes caused by the shock propagation into a material. With respect to the elastic and plastic compression, we image shock waves in Si with high spatial resolution using the LCLS X-ray free electron laser and Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument. In this study, the long pulse optical laser with pseudoflat top shape creates high pressures up to 60 GPa. We also measure the crystal structure by observing the X-ray diffraction orthogonal to the shock propagation direction over a range of pressure. In this talk, we will present the capability of simultaneously performing phase contrast imaging and in situ X-ray diffraction during shock loading and will discuss the dynamic response of Si in high pressure phases

  14. H-ATLAS: PACS imaging for the Science Demonstration Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibar, Edo; Ivison, R. J.; Cava, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Buttiglione, S.; Temi, P.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Leeuw, L.; Baes, M.; Rigby, E.; Verma, A.; Serjeant, S.; Müller, T.; Auld, R.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Maddox, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Smith, D.; de Zotti, G.; Vaccari, M.; Hopwood, R.; Cooray, A.; Burgarella, D.; Jarvis, M.

    2010-11-01

    We describe the reduction of data taken with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory in the Science Demonstration Phase of the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey, specifically data obtained for a 4 × 4 deg2 region using Herschel's fast-scan (60arcsecs-1) parallel mode. We describe in detail a pipeline for data reduction using customized procedures within HIPE from data retrieval to the production of science-quality images. We found that the standard procedure for removing cosmic ray glitches also removed parts of bright sources and so implemented an effective two-stage process to minimize these problems. The pronounced 1/f noise is removed from the timelines using 3.4- and 2.5-arcmin boxcar high-pass filters at 100 and 160μm. Empirical measurements of the point spread function (PSF) are used to determine the encircled energy fraction as a function of aperture size. For the 100- and 160-μm bands, the effective PSFs are ~9 and ~13arcsec (FWHM), and the 90-per cent encircled energy radii are 13 and 18arcsec. Astrometric accuracy is good to <~2arcsec. The noise in the final maps is correlated between neighbouring pixels and rather higher than advertised prior to launch. For a pair of cross-scans, the 5σ point-source sensitivities are 125-165mJy for 9-13 arcsec radius apertures at 100μm and 150-240mJy for 13-18 arcsec radius apertures at 160μm.

  15. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  16. An effective approach for iris recognition using phase-based image matching.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Kazuyuki; Ito, Koichi; Aoki, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Koji; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents an efficient algorithm for iris recognition using phase-based image matching--an image matching technique using phase components in 2D Discrete Fourier Transforms (DFTs) of given images. Experimental evaluation using CASIA iris image databases (versions 1.0 and 2.0) and Iris Challenge Evaluation (ICE) 2005 database clearly demonstrates that the use of phase components of iris images makes possible to achieve highly accurate iris recognition with a simple matching algorithm. This paper also discusses major implementation issues of our algorithm. In order to reduce the size of iris data and to prevent the visibility of iris images, we introduce the idea of 2D Fourier Phase Code (FPC) for representing iris information. The 2D FPC is particularly useful for implementing compact iris recognition devices using state-of-the-art Digital Signal Processing (DSP) technology. PMID:18703828

  17. Three-dimensional phase-contrast imaging of single floating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Ishimaru, Ichirou; Yasokawa, Toshiki; Ishizaki, Katsumi; Kuriyama, Shigeki; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nakai, Seiji; Takegawa, Kaoru; Tanaka, Naotaka

    2006-12-11

    A three-dimensional phase-contrast imaging technique that does not involve fluorescent labeling has been developed for observing floating cells. In this method, a single floating cell is made to rotate and images are acquired at several orientations of the cell using a phase-contrast microscope. From these two-dimensional phase-contrast images, three-dimensional cross-sectional images are obtained using the conventional computed tomography algorithm. This proposed method enabled successful rotation of a floating cell (a breast cancer cell line) and reconstruction of three-dimensional phase-contrast images. In these reconstructed three-dimensional images, the distribution of cell organelles is obtained and the cell nucleus is clearly distinguishable.

  18. Process for rapid detection of fratricidal defects on optics using Linescan Phase Differential Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ravizza, F L; Nostrand, M C; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hawley, R A; Johnson, M A

    2009-11-05

    Phase-defects on optics used in high-power lasers can cause light intensification leading to laser-induced damage of downstream optics. We introduce Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI), a large-area dark-field imaging technique able to identify phase-defects in the bulk or surface of large-aperture optics with a 67 second scan-time. Potential phase-defects in the LPDI images are indentified by an image analysis code and measured with a Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer (PSDI). The PSDI data is used to calculate the defects potential for downstream damage using an empirical laser-damage model that incorporates a laser propagation code. A ray tracing model of LPDI was developed to enhance our understanding of its phase-defect detection mechanism and reveal limitations.

  19. A sub-50 nm three-step height sample for AFM calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuming; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a sub-50 nm three-step height sample was made for vertical calibration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a new step height evaluation algorithm based on polynomial fitting is discussed. The influences of AFM artefacts such as particles, image bow and high-order errors on step height were studied. The experimental results showed that the polynomial order p2 and threshold t were not critical factors. However, the increment Δh and the polynomial order p used in the calculation of optimal shifting distance were important and must be carefully considered. Δh = 0.1 nm and p ≥ 4 were determined to get a stable step height. The sample had small roughness and good uniformity. It has the potential to serve as a high quality step height standard sample for AFM calibration.

  20. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  1. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application. Graphical abstract Silver nanoparticles attached to AFM tips using dielectrophoresis. Comparing nanoparticles attached using 1 kHz (left) to 1 MHz (right), SEM and optical (inset) images. PMID:26968565

  2. The extended depth of field microscope imaging system with the phase pupil mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Qinghua; Zhai, Zhongsheng; Sharp, Martin; French, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A `0/π' phase pupil mask was developed to extend the depth of field of a circularly symmetric optical microscope imaging system. The modulation transfer function curves, the normalized point spread function figures and the spot diagrams of the imaging system with the optimal mask were analyzed and simulated. The results show that the large depth of field imaging system with the `0/π' phase pupil mask has a high resolution in a long frequency band and can obtain clear images without any post-processing. The experimental results also demonstrate that the depth of field of the imaging system is extended successfully.

  3. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  4. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  5. Phase and TV Based Convex Sets for Blind Deconvolution of Microscopic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, Mohammad; Yorulmaz, Onur; Kose, Kivanc; Yildirim, Deniz Cansen; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Cetin, A. Enis

    2016-02-01

    In this article, two closed and convex sets for blind deconvolution problem are proposed. Most blurring functions in microscopy are symmetric with respect to the origin. Therefore, they do not modify the phase of the Fourier transform (FT) of the original image. As a result blurred image and the original image have the same FT phase. Therefore, the set of images with a prescribed FT phase can be used as a constraint set in blind deconvolution problems. Another convex set that can be used during the image reconstruction process is the epigraph set of Total Variation (TV) function. This set does not need a prescribed upper bound on the total variation of the image. The upper bound is automatically adjusted according to the current image of the restoration process. Both of these two closed and convex sets can be used as a part of any blind deconvolution algorithm. Simulation examples are presented.

  6. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  7. Double image encryption based on random phase encoding in the fractional Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ran; Xin, Yi; Wang, Yue

    2007-11-26

    A novel image encryption method is proposed by utilizing random phase encoding in the fractional Fourier domain to encrypt two images into one encrypted image with stationary white distribution. By applying the correct keys which consist of the fractional orders, the random phase masks and the pixel scrambling operator, the two primary images can be recovered without cross-talk. The decryption process is robust against the loss of data. The phase-based image with a larger key space is more sensitive to keys and disturbances than the amplitude-based image. The pixel scrambling operation improves the quality of the decrypted image when noise perturbation occurs. The novel approach is verified by simulations. PMID:19550895

  8. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D

    2005-02-04

    Locating specific 3D objects in overhead images is an important problem in many remote sensing applications. 3D objects may contain either one connected component or multiple disconnected components. Solutions must accommodate images acquired with diverse sensors at various times of the day, in various seasons of the year, or under various weather conditions. Moreover, the physical manifestation of a 3D object with fixed physical dimensions in an overhead image is highly dependent on object physical dimensions, object position/orientation, image spatial resolution, and imaging geometry (e.g., obliqueness). This paper describes a two-stage computer-assisted approach for locating 3D objects in overhead images. In the matching stage, the computer matches models of 3D objects to overhead images. The strongest degree of match over all object orientations is computed at each pixel. Unambiguous local maxima in the degree of match as a function of pixel location are then found. In the cueing stage, the computer sorts image thumbnails in descending order of figure-of-merit and presents them to human analysts for visual inspection and interpretation. The figure-of-merit associated with an image thumbnail is computed from the degrees of match to a 3D object model associated with unambiguous local maxima that lie within the thumbnail. This form of computer assistance is invaluable when most of the relevant thumbnails are highly ranked, and the amount of inspection time needed is much less for the highly ranked thumbnails than for images as a whole.

  10. Value of a 24-hour image (four-phase bone scan) in assessing osteomyelitis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Dries, D.; Datz, F.; Lawrence, P.; Greenberg, E.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    The delayed images of the four-phase /sup 99m/Tc phosphonate bone scan are compared with the delayed images of the three-phase study in patients with diabetes mellitus and/or peripheral vascular disease and suspected osteomyelitis. Three-phase bone imaging includes an immediate postinjection radionuclide angiogram, a blood-pool image, and delayed static images to 7 hr. The four-phase study adds a 24-hr static image. The scan is positive for osteomyelitis if images show progressively increasing lesion to background activity ratios over time. The results of analyzing 21 three- and four-phase bone scans in 17 patients were correlated with clinical course, cultures, and/or x-rays, gallium scans, and CT scans. The accuracy of four-phase bone imaging for diagnosing osteomyelitis was 85%; for three phase, 80%. Sensitivity for four phase was 80%; specificity was 87%. Sensitivity for three phase was 100%; specificity was 73%.

  11. Fast multi-element phase-controlled photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Da; Gu, Huaimin; Yang, Diwu

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we have constructed an integrative fast photoacoustic (PA) imaging system for fast photoacoustic imaging, which includes a fiber, ultrasonic coupling medium, and a multi-element linear transducer array (MLTA). The PA signals were received by the MLTA in a reflection mode arid collected by a computer, reconstructed by limited-field filtered back projection algorithm. The PA images of different depth of phantom and animal blood vessels of different diameters were obtained. The lateral resolution of the system was 0.2mm. It would provide a new approach to tissue functional images in vivo and may have potentials in developing into an appliance for clinic diagnosis of disease.

  12. High speed moire based phase retrieval method for quantitative phase imaging of thin objects without phase unwrapping or aberration compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Xue, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Phase retrieval composed of phase extracting and unwrapping is of great significance in different occasions, such as fringe projection based profilometry, quantitative interferometric microscopy and moire detections. Compared to phase extracting, phase unwrapping occupies most time consuming in phase retrieval, and it becomes an obstacle to realize real time measurements. In order to increase the calculation efficiency of phase retrieval as well as simplify its procedures, here, a high speed moire based phase retrieval method is proposed which is capable of calculating quantitative phase distributions without phase unwrapping or aberration compensation. We demonstrate the capability of the presented phase retrieval method by both theoretical analysis and experiments. It is believed that the proposed method will be useful in real time phase observations and measurements.

  13. Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Various Dairy Products: Evidence for Biologically Reduced Amount of AFM1 in Yoghurt

    PubMed Central

    RAHIMIRAD, Amir; MAALEKINEJAD, Hassan; OSTADI, Araz; YEGANEH, Samal; FAHIMI, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a carcinogenic substance is found in milk and dairy products. The effect of season and type of dairy products on AFMi level in northern Iran was investigated in this study. Methods Three hundred samples (each season 75 samples) including raw and pasteurized milk, yoghurt, cheese, and cream samples were collected from three distinct milk producing farms. The samples were subjected to chemical and solid phase extractions and were analyzed by using HPLC technique. Recovery percentages, limit of detection and limit of quantification values were determined. Results Seventy percent and 98% were the minimum and maximum recoveries for cheese and raw milk, respectively and 0.021 and 0.063 ppb were the limit of detection and limit of quantification values for AFM1. We found that in autumn and winter the highest level (0.121 ppb) of AFM1 in cheese and cream samples and failed to detect any AFM1 in spring samples. Interestingly, our data showed that the yoghurt samples had the lowest level of AFM1 in all seasons. Conclusion There are significant differences between the AFM1 levels in dairy products in various seasons and also various types of products, suggesting spring and summer yoghurt samples as the safest products from AFM1 level point of view. PMID:25927044

  14. Digital multi-step phase-shifting profilometry for three-dimensional ballscrew surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Yang; Yen, Tzu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    A digital multi-step phase-shifting profilometry for three-dimensional (3-D) ballscrew surface imaging is presented. The 3-D digital imaging system is capable of capturing fringe pattern images. The straight fringe patterns generated by software in the computer are projected onto the ballscrew surface by the DLP projector. The distorted fringe patterns are captured by the CCD camera at different detecting directions for reconstruction algorithms. The seven-step phase-shifting algorithm and quality guided path unwrapping algorithm are used to calculate absolute phase at each pixel position. The 3-D calibration method is used to obtain the relationship between the absolute phase map and ballscrew shape. The angular dependence of 3-D shape imaging for ballscrews is analyzed and characterized. The experimental results may provide a novel, fast, and high accuracy imaging system to inspect the surface features of the ballscrew without length limitation for automated optical inspection industry.

  15. Security enhanced multiple-image authentication based on cascaded optical interference and sparse phase mixed encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qu; Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.

    2016-08-01

    An interference-based cascaded filtering method is proposed to perform multiple-image authentication. By using spatial phase mixed encoding technique and phase retrieval iteration in Fresnel transform domain, multiple original images are encoded in two phase-only cipher texts. Using correct keys in an interference-based configuration, one can only recover a noisy image without any secret information revealed. A cascaded phase-only filtering structure, instead of correlation methods, is applied to perform authentication where the decrypted image is converted into a pre-specified irregular pattern that functions as authentication criterion. The proposed structure can strengthen security greatly because authentication output strongly depends on the decrypted images and authentication keys. Moreover, the decryption and authentication procedures can be completed optically in a more compact way than previous methods. Simulation results have been given to prove the effectiveness of this proposal and evaluate its performance.

  16. 3D imaging of amplitude objects embedded in phase objects using transport of intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Partha; Basunia, Mahmudunnabi

    2015-09-01

    The amplitude and phase of the complex optical field in the Helmholtz equation obey a pair of coupled equations, arising from equating the real and imaginary parts. The imaginary part yields the transport of intensity equation (TIE), which can be used to derive the phase distribution at the observation plane. If a phase object is approximately imaged on the recording plane(s), TIE yields the phase without the need for phase unwrapping. In our experiment, the 3D image of a phase object and an amplitude object embedded in a phase object is recovered. The phase object is created by heating a liquid, comprising a solution of red dye in alcohol, using a focused 514 nm laser beam to the point where self-phase modulation of the beam is observed. The optical intensities are recorded at various planes during propagation of a low power 633 nm laser beam through the liquid. In the process of applying TIE to derive the phase at the observation plane, the real part of the complex equation is also examined as a cross-check of our calculations. For pure phase objects, it is shown that the real part of the complex equation is best satisfied around the image plane. Alternatively, it is proposed that this information can be used to determine the optimum image plane.

  17. Low-coherence wavelength shifting interferometry for high-speed quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2016-08-01

    We propose low-coherence wavelength shifting interferometry and demonstrate its application to quantitative phase imaging of dynamic specimens. By shifting the source wavelength, multiple interferograms of the sample can be acquired at different spectral bands. A sample phase is thus encoded in the phase step between consecutive acquisitions. For the particular case of four-band imaging, we show that the phase can be extracted with a modified Carré algorithm. We describe signal demodulation in detail and discuss its implication on system implementation. A swept laser-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to demonstrate the technique for real-time imaging of live sperm cells at 62.5 Hz. The dynamic dry mass of the sperm head is measured with a full-scale error of ±2%, validating the technique's capability for high-sensitivity, high-speed quantitative phase imaging. PMID:27472586

  18. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-08-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  19. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  20. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  1. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  2. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called `magic condition' that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used. PMID:25931100

  3. LOW COST IMAGER FOR POLLUTANT GAS LEAK DETECTION - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infrared (IR) imaging is the best method for detecting leaks of pollutant gases, but current technology based on cooled IR imagers is far too expensive ($75,000 to $150,000) for everyday field use by those who need it to meet regulatory limits—electric and petrochemical ...

  4. Phase correction algorithms for a snapshot hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Victoria C.; Kudenov, Michael; Dereniak, Eustace

    2015-09-01

    We present image processing algorithms that improve spatial and spectral resolution on the Snapshot Hyperspectral Imaging Fourier Transform (SHIFT) spectrometer. Final measurements are stored in the form of threedimensional datacubes containing the scene's spatial and spectral information. We discuss calibration procedures, review post-processing methods, and present preliminary results from proof-of-concept experiments.

  5. Optical image encryption via reverse engineering of a modified amplitude-phase retrieval-based attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Dai, Chaoqing; Chen, Junlang

    2014-10-01

    By reverse-engineering the modified amplitude-phase retrieval-based attack that has deciphered the phase-truncated double random phase encoding scheme, we proposed a new cryptosystem to encode a target image into a preselected fake image using a modified phase retrieval algorithm under the framework of phase-truncated double random phase encoding. With two private keys that are generated during the encryption, the decryption can be optically realized using a classical linear double random phase encoding method. The proposed cryptosystem has immunity against the recently proposed specific attack and the new attack based on a modified amplitude-phase retrieval algorithm. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the validity and good performance of our proposed algorithm.

  6. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  7. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  8. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of dAFM in the transient and steady state motions.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir Farokh

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, based on the slow time varying function theory, dynamical equations for the amplitude and phase of the dynamic atomic force microscope are derived. Then, the sensitivity of the amplitude and phase to the dissipative and conservative parts of interaction force is investigated. The most advantage of this dynamical model is the ability to simulate and analysis the dynamics behavior of amplitude and phase of the AFM tip motion not only in the steady state but also in the transient regime. Using numerical analysis the transient and steady state behavior of amplitude and phase is studied and the sensitivity of amplitude and phase to the interaction force is analyzed. PMID:27448201

  9. Recent developments on techniques for differential phase imaging at the medical beamline of ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Astolfo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; Cardarelli, P.; Dreossi, D.; Lagomarsino, S.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Sodini, N.; Menk, R. H.

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade different phase contrast approaches have been exploited at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste, Italy. In particular special focus has been drawn to analyzer based imaging and the associated imaging theory and processing. Analyzer based Imaging (ABI) and Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) techniques have been successfully applied in several biomedical applications. Recently it has been suggested to translate the acquired knowledge in this field towards a Thomson Backscattering Source (TBS), which is presently under development at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) in Rome, Italy. Such source is capable of producing intense and quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray beams. For the technical implementation of biomedical phase imaging at the TBS a grating interferometer for differential phase contrast imaging has been designed and successfully tested at SYRMEP beamline.

  10. Optimization of phase mask-based iris imaging system through the optical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-qing; Li, Jia-qi; Pan, Jing; Li, Ying-jiao

    2013-06-01

    Iris recognition is the most reliable method in personal identification. However, the current fixed-focus iris imaging system has small depth of field (DOF), which limits the wide application of the iris recognition system. This paper presents the design method and optimization of a phase mask based iris imaging system. Through wavefront coding, it can extend the DOF and enhance the convenience of iris image acquisition. Through analyzing the modulation transfer function and optical parameters of the cubic phase mask, we can get the wavefront coding iris imaging system's optimal parameter and it's structure. Experimental results show that the cubic phase mask based iris imaging system has larger DOF and better imaging performance.

  11. Multi-camera PIV imaging in two-phase flow for improved dispersed-phase concentration and velocity calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Kiger, Ken

    2015-11-01

    PIV/PTV has been widely used in making simultaneous measurements of velocity and concentration within multi-phase flows. A major problem confronted by researchers during data processing is to separate the image signals of the dispersed phase from carrier phase reliably and within the same measurement volume. For dilute concentrations, size and brightness criteria have been shown to provide satisfying results in identifying the dispersed phase. However this method is limited to fairly small concentrations due to effects of multiple-scattering and obscuration. To extend this technique, we introduce multi-camera imaging as a means to provide a more precise and reliable identification of the dispersed phase in the face of increased concentration. Specifically, the size-brightness criteria is used to nominally match corresponding dispersed-phase images of the same particle within the other views, and the subsequent out-of-plane position is used to get a more precise 3D location of the particle. In order to demonstrate this method, experiments using static test cell of solid glass sphere suspended in an aqueous gel have been conducted under various concentration and compared to corresponding single camera results.

  12. Polarization-phase filtering of laser images of biological liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Yu. A.; Sidor, M.

    2013-06-01

    Our work is aimed at searching the possibilities to perform diagnostics and differentiation of structures inherent to liquid-crystal networks of blood plasma with various pathologies (health - breast cancer) by using the method to determine the coordinate distributions of phase shifts (phase maps) between orthogonal components of laser radiation amplitudes with the following statistical, fractal and singular analyses of these distributions.

  13. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum

  14. Nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic systems, thermal near-fields, and phase separation in complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew C.

    -rods. Strong spatial field variation on lengths scales as short as 20 nm is observed associated with the dipolar and quadrupolar modes of both systems with details sensitively depending on the nanoparticle structure and environment. In light of recent publications predicting distinct spectral characteristics of thermal electromagnetic near-fields, I demonstrate the extension of s-SNOM techniques through the implementation of a heated atomic force microscope (AFM) tip acting as its own intrinsic light source for the characterization of thermal near-fields. Here, I detail the spectrally distinct and orders of magnitude enhanced resonant spectral near-field energy density associated with vibrational, phonon, and phonon-polariton modes. Modeling the thermal light scattering by the AFM, the scattering cross-section for thermal light may be related to the electromagnetic local density of states (EM-LDOS) above a surface. Lastly, the unique capability of s-SNOM techniques to characterize phase separation phenomena in correlated electron systems is discussed. This measurement capability provides new microscopic insight into the underlying mechanisms of the rich phase transition behavior exhibited by these materials. As a specific example, the infrared s-SNOM mapping of the metal-insulator transition and the associated nano-domain formation in individual VO2 micro-crystals subject to substrate stress is presented. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of the investigations of conventional polycrystalline thin films where the mutual interaction of constituent crystallites may affect the nature of phase separation processes.

  15. Non-interferometer Phase-differential Imaging Method with a Single Telescope Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    Non-interferometer phase-differential imaging method for direct imaging of the astronomical objects will be presented. The feasibility of non-interferometry method to retrieve the phase differential images of the astronomical objects is demonstrated in the laboratory experiments exploiting the two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge filtering method which is installed on a single telescope. The experiment setup is essentially analogous to the Schlieren imaging apparatus that can be taken images using an incoherent light source. The fractional derivation filtering by the two-dimensional knife-edge filter is developed in order to acquire the phase information of the object. The intensities of filtering images by the 2D knife-edge at several points along the optical axis of the telescope are substituted in the transport-intensity equation to obtain phase-differential images of the astronomical objects. Then the phase-differential images are obtained by two image intensities taken along the optical axis. In our experiment, a mono-directional scanning scheme of the 2DFK was exploited to reduce number of scan as well as increase the spatial resolution of images. An illuminated light out of a bundle of optical fibers as an artificial astronomical object is used our laboratory based experiment. The light from the each optical fibers in the fiber bundle that intensities have exiguously different or barely visible are represented the brightness of the astronomical objects. The experiment result, the phase contrast images, shows that barely identified object from an intensity based image has rendered almost equivalent contrast as the bright object. It represents that our proposed method can be recovered from phase difference of the object light that could not be identified from the intensity of objects brightness. The proposed method has a feature of render phase-differential images as well as compensates atmospheric turbulence with the setup mounting on a single-telescope. The

  16. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  17. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  18. Prospects and challenges of quantitative phase imaging in tumor cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Götte, Martin; Greve, Burkhard; Ketelhut, Steffi

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) techniques provide high resolution label-free quantitative live cell imaging. Here, prospects and challenges of QPI in tumor cell biology are presented, using the example of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). It is shown that the evaluation of quantitative DHM phase images allows the retrieval of different parameter sets for quantification of cellular motion changes in migration and motility assays that are caused by genetic modifications. Furthermore, we demonstrate simultaneously label-free imaging of cell growth and morphology properties.

  19. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods: basic physical principles and potential medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Qi, Zhihua; Li, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Phase sensitive imaging theoretically allows for a drastic reduction in x-ray dose while simultaneously achieving comparable or better spatial and contrast resolution compared to traditional x-ray absorption based imaging. Several techniques exist to extract the phase information from an x-ray signal, including x-ray interferometry, diffraction enhanced imaging, in-line holography, coded aperture x-ray imaging, and grating-based interferometry. The physics of each method is reviewed, along with the potential clinical applications. PMID:23970846

  20. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  1. Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry for quantitative phase microscopy: applications to long-duration imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, Pierre; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge; Marguet, Didier

    2010-02-01

    Phase imaging with a high-resolution wavefront sensor is a useful setup for biological imaging. Our setup is based on a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer mounted on a non-modified transmission white-light microscope. We propose here to study long-time duration imaging on different type of adherent cells: green monkey kidney COS7 cells, human breast epithelial MCF10A cells, and human breast cancer derived from MDA-231 cells. This study permits a enhanced visualization of the whole cell life at different levels of confluence. Post treatments on phase-shift images are proposed and become very interesting for enhanced visualization of small details and thresholding.

  2. Digital image profilers for detecting faint sources which have bright companions, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Elena; Flint, Graham

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard image profiling system developed for the first phase of this project demonstrated the potential for detecting extremely faint optical sources in the presence of light companions. Experimental data derived from laboratory testing of the device supports the theory that image profilers of this type may approach the theoretical limit imposed by photon statistics. The objective of Phase 2 of this program is the development of a ground-based multichannel image profiling system capable of detecting faint stellar objects slightly displaced from brighter stars. We have finalized the multichannel image profiling system and attempted three field tests.

  3. Applications of AFM in semiconductor R&D and manufacturing at 45 nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moon-Keun; Shin, Minjung; Bao, Tianming; Song, Chul-Gi; Dawson, Dean; Ihm, Dong-Chul; Ukraintsev, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    Continuing demand for high performance microelectronic products propelled integrated circuit technology into 45 nm node and beyond. The shrinking device feature geometry created unprecedented challenges for dimension metrology in semiconductor manufacturing and research and development. Automated atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to meet the challenge and characterize narrower lines, trenches and holes at 45nm technology node and beyond. AFM is indispensable metrology techniques capable of non-destructive full three-dimensional imaging, surface morphology characterization and accurate critical dimension (CD) measurements. While all available dimensional metrology techniques approach their limits, AFM continues to provide reliable information for development and control of processes in memory, logic, photomask, image sensor and data storage manufacturing. In this paper we review up-todate applications of automated AFM in every mentioned above semiconductor industry sector. To demonstrate benefits of AFM at 45 nm node and beyond we compare capability of automated AFM with established in-line and off-line metrologies like critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM), optical scatterometry (OCD) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM).

  4. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  5. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  6. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  7. Effect of masking phase-only holograms on the quality of reconstructed images.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuanbo; Chu, Daping

    2016-04-20

    A phase-only hologram modulates the phase of the incident light and diffracts it efficiently with low energy loss because of the minimum absorption. Much research attention has been focused on how to generate phase-only holograms, and little work has been done to understand the effect and limitation of their partial implementation, possibly due to physical defects and constraints, in particular as in the practical situations where a phase-only hologram is confined or needs to be sliced or tiled. The present study simulates the effect of masking phase-only holograms on the quality of reconstructed images in three different scenarios with different filling factors, filling positions, and illumination intensity profiles. Quantitative analysis confirms that the width of the image point spread function becomes wider and the image quality decreases, as expected, when the filling factor decreases, and the image quality remains the same for different filling positions as well. The width of the image point spread function as derived from different filling factors shows a consistent behavior to that as measured directly from the reconstructed image, especially as the filling factor becomes small. Finally, mask profiles of different shapes and intensity distributions are shown to have more complicated effects on the image point spread function, which in turn affects the quality and textures of the reconstructed image. PMID:27140082

  8. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  9. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  13. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Fields by Application of Dynamic Electrical Impedance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, KyungYoun; Kang, Sook In; Kim, Ho Chan; Kim, Sin; Lee, Yoon Joon; Kim, Min Chan; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-07-01

    This study presents a visualization technique for the phase distribution in a two-phase flow field with an electrical impedance imaging technique, which reconstructs the resistivity distribution with electrical responses that are determined by corresponding excitations. Special emphasis is placed on the development of dynamic imaging technique for two-phase system undergoing a rapid transient, which could not be visualized with conventional static imaging techniques. The proposed algorithm treats the image reconstruction problem as a nonlinear state estimation problem and the unknown state (resistivity distribution, i.e. phase distribution) is estimated with the aid of a Kalman filter in a minimum mean square error sense. Several illustrative examples with computer simulations are successfully provided to verify the reconstruction performance of the proposed algorithm. (authors)

  14. Communication: SHG-detected circular dichroism imaging using orthogonal phase-locked laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, Jeremy W.; Liu, Xiaoying; Nealey, Paul F.; Vaia, Richard A.; Cerullo, Giulio; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for second harmonic generation-detected circular dichroism (CD) imaging based on the use of phase-locked, temporally delayed femtosecond laser pulses. The polarization state of the fundamental wave was controllably changed over 2π rad by using a birefringent delay line, which provided attosecond inter-pulse delays for orthogonal phase-locked replicas; the achievable phase stability was 14 as. By introducing either a positive or negative delay of ˜667 as, we induced a ±π/2 phase shift between the orthogonally polarized pulses, resulting in left circularly polarized or right circularly polarized light. CD imaging performance using the pulse sequence was compared to results obtained for plasmonic nanoantennas using a rotating quarter-wave plate. The pulse sequence is expected to simplify polarization-resolved optical imaging by reducing experimental artifacts and decreasing image acquisition times. This method can be easily extended to other CD spectroscopy measurements.

  15. Quantitative x-ray phase imaging at the nanoscale by multilayer Laue lenses

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hanfei; Chu, Yong S.; Maser, Jörg; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Kim, Jungdae; Kang, Hyon Chol; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2013-01-01

    For scanning x-ray microscopy, many attempts have been made to image the phase contrast based on a concept of the beam being deflected by a specimen, the so-called differential phase contrast imaging (DPC). Despite the successful demonstration in a number of representative cases at moderate spatial resolutions, these methods suffer from various limitations that preclude applications of DPC for ultra-high spatial resolution imaging, where the emerging wave field from the focusing optic tends to be significantly more complicated. In this work, we propose a highly robust and generic approach based on a Fourier-shift fitting process and demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode by multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs). The high sensitivity of the phase to structural and compositional variations makes our technique extremely powerful in correlating the electrode performance with its buried nanoscale interfacial structures that may be invisible to the absorption and fluorescence contrasts. PMID:23419650

  16. Color image encryption using iterative phase retrieve process in quaternion Fourier transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Duan, Kuaikuai

    2015-02-01

    A single-channel color image encryption method is proposed based on iterative phase iterative process in quaternion Fourier transform domain. First, three components of the plain color image is confused respectively by using cat map. Second, the confused components are combined into a pure quaternion image, which is encode to the phase only function by using an iterative phase retrieval process. Finally, the phase only function is encrypted into the gray scale ciphertext with stationary white noise distribution based on the chaotic diffusion, which has camouflage property to some extent. The corresponding plain color image can be recovered from the ciphertext only with correct keys in the decryption process. Simulation results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. A phantom study to characterize the imaging quality of a phase-contrast tomosynthesis prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Miao, Hui; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This research is aimed at studying the advantages of an x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis prototype by using phantoms. A prototype system is assembled with a micro-focus x-ray source, a rotating stage and a computed radiography detector mounted on an optical rail. A custom designed bubble wrap phantom is used in experiments. Angular projection images are acquired from -20° to +20° with 2° interval. The in-plane slices are reconstructed. The feature area on the phantom is observed. The prototype system provides an intrinsic way to investigate the potential and imaging quality of a phase-contrast tomosynthesis imaging method. As the result, phase-contrast tomosynthesis imaging method is demonstrated for its advantages in avoiding structure noise and overlapping issues by comparing the results acquired by computed radiography and phase-contrast radiography.

  18. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-08-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise. PMID:27570687

  19. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  20. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise. PMID:27570687

  1. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  2. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  3. Early-phase myocardial infarction: Evaluation by MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tscholakoff, D.; Higgins, C.B.; McNamara, M.T.; Derugin, N.

    1986-06-01

    In vivo gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 12 dogs immediately after occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and serially up to 5 hours and again between 4 and 14 days. This was done to evaluate the appearance of acute myocardial infarcts and to determine how soon after coronary artery occlusion MR imaging can demonstrate the site of acute myocardial ischemia. In nine dogs with postmortem evidence of myocardial infarction, regional increase of signal intensity of the myocardium was present by 3 hours after coronary occlusion and conformed to the site of myocardial infarct found at autopsy. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images of the infarcted on T2-weighted images of the infarcted myocardium was significantly greater than that of normal myocardium at 3, 4, and 5 hours after occlusion. The T2 (spin-spin) relaxation time was significantly prolonged in the region of myocardial infarct at 3, 4, and 5 hours post-occlusion compared with normal myocardium. Myocardial wall thinning and increased intracavitary flow signal were found in six dogs with comparable pre- and postocclusion images in late systole.

  4. Combined mixed approach algorithm for in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Giannini, Cinzia; Tangaro, Sabina; Rigon, Luigi; Longo, Renata; Bellotti, Roberto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In the past decade, phase-contrast imaging (PCI) has been applied to study different kinds of tissues and human body parts, with an increased improvement of the image quality with respect to simple absorption radiography. A technique closely related to PCI is phase-retrieval imaging (PRI). Indeed, PCI is an imaging modality thought to enhance the total contrast of the images through the phase shift introduced by the object (human body part); PRI is a mathematical technique to extract the quantitative phase-shift map from PCI. A new phase-retrieval algorithm for the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging is here proposed. Methods: The proposed algorithm is based on a mixed transfer-function and transport-of-intensity approach (MA) and it requires, at most, an initial approximate estimate of the average phase shift introduced by the object as prior knowledge. The accuracy in the initial estimate determines the convergence speed of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm retrieves both the object phase and its complex conjugate in a combined MA (CMA). Results: Although slightly less computationally effective with respect to other mixed-approach algorithms, as two phases have to be retrieved, the results obtained by the CMA on simulated data have shown that the obtained reconstructed phase maps are characterized by particularly low normalized mean square errors. The authors have also tested the CMA on noisy experimental phase-contrast data obtained by a suitable weakly absorbing sample consisting of a grid of submillimetric nylon fibers as well as on a strongly absorbing object made of a 0.03 mm thick lead x-ray resolution star pattern. The CMA has shown a good efficiency in recovering phase information, also in presence of noisy data, characterized by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratios down to a few dBs, showing the possibility to enhance with phase radiography the signal-to-noise ratio for features in the submillimetric scale with respect to the attenuation

  5. AFM characterization of spin coated carboxylated polystyrene nanospheres/xyloglucan layers on mica and silicon.

    PubMed

    Lubambo, Adriana F; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Petzhold, Cesar L; Sierakowski, Maria-R; Schreiner, Wido H; Saul, Cyro K

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembled nano-arrays have a potential application as solid-phase diagnostics in many biomedical devices. The easiness of its production is directly connected to manufacture cost reduction. In this work, we present self-assembled structures starting from spin coated thin films of carboxylated polystyrene (PSC) and xyloglucan (XG) mixtures on both mica and silicon substrates. AFM images showed PSC nanospheres on top of a homogeneous layer of XG, for both substrates. The average nanosphere diameter fluctuated for a constant speed and it was likely to be independent of the component proportions on the mixture within a range of 30-50% (v/v) PSC. It was also observed that the largest diameters were found at the center of the sample and the smallest at the border. The detected nanospheres were also more numerous at the border. This behavior presents a similarity to spin coated colloidal dispersions. We observed that the average nanosphere diameter on mica substrates was bigger than the nanosphere diameters obtained on top of silicon substrates, under the same conditions. This result seems to be possibly connected to different mixture-surface interactions. PMID:23465925

  6. In-line phase-contrast imaging based on Tsinghua Thomson scattering x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Hua, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Xiao, Yongshun; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2014-08-01

    Thomson scattering x-ray sources can produce ultrashort, energy tunable x-ray pulses characterized by high brightness, quasi-monochromatic, and high spatial coherence, which make it an ideal source for in-line phase-contrast imaging. We demonstrate the capacity of in-line phase-contrast imaging based on Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source. Clear edge enhancement effect has been observed in the experiment. PMID:25173262

  7. Actinic imaging and evaluation of phase structures on EUV lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth; Huh, Sungmin

    2010-09-28

    The authors describe the implementation of a phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct phase and complex amplitude of structures on EUV lithography masks. Many native defects commonly found on EUV reticles are difficult to detect and review accurately because they have a strong phase component. Understanding the complex amplitude of mask features is essential for predictive modeling of defect printability and defect repair. Besides printing in a stepper, the most accurate way to characterize such defects is with actinic inspection, performed at the design, EUV wavelength. Phase defect and phase structures show a distinct through-focus behavior that enables qualitative evaluation of the object phase from two or more high-resolution intensity measurements. For the first time, phase of structures and defects on EUV masks were quantitatively reconstructed based on aerial image measurements, using a modified version of a phase-retrieval algorithm developed to test optical phase shifting reticles.

  8. Motion-induced phase error estimation and correction in 3D diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Van, Anh T; Hernando, Diego; Sutton, Bradley P

    2011-11-01

    A multishot data acquisition strategy is one way to mitigate B0 distortion and T2∗ blurring for high-resolution diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging experiments. However, different object motions that take place during different shots cause phase inconsistencies in the data, leading to significant image artifacts. This work proposes a maximum likelihood estimation and k-space correction of motion-induced phase errors in 3D multishot diffusion tensor imaging. The proposed error estimation is robust, unbiased, and approaches the Cramer-Rao lower bound. For rigid body motion, the proposed correction effectively removes motion-induced phase errors regardless of the k-space trajectory used and gives comparable performance to the more computationally expensive 3D iterative nonlinear phase error correction method. The method has been extended to handle multichannel data collected using phased-array coils. Simulation and in vivo data are shown to demonstrate the performance of the method. PMID:21652284

  9. Subsurface imaging and cell refractometry using quantitative phase/ shear-force feedback microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2009-10-01

    Over the last few years, several novel quantitative phase imaging techniques have been developed for the study of biological cells. However, many of these techniques are encumbered by inherent limitations including 2π phase ambiguities and diffraction limited spatial resolution. In addition, subsurface information in the phase data is not exploited. We hereby present a novel quantitative phase imaging system without 2 π ambiguities, which also allows for subsurface imaging and cell refractometry studies. This is accomplished by utilizing simultaneously obtained shear-force topography information. We will demonstrate how the quantitative phase and topography data can be used for subsurface and cell refractometry analysis and will present results for a fabricated structure and a malaria infected red blood cell.

  10. Quantitative phase imaging by wide field lensless digital holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinda-Ougba, A.; Koukourakis, N.; Essaidi, A.; Ger­hardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.

    2015-05-01

    Wide field, lensless microscopes have been developed for telemedicine and for resource limited setting [1]. They are based on in-line digital holography which is capable to provide amplitude and phase information resulting from numerical reconstruction. The phase information enables achieving axial resolution in the nanometer range. Hence, such microscopes provide a powerful tool to determine three-dimensional topologies of microstructures. In this contribution, a compact, low-cost, wide field, lensless microscope is presented, which is capable of providing topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material. Our setup consist only of two main components: a CMOSsensor chip and a laser diode without any need of a pinhole. We use this very simple setup to record holograms of microobjects. A wide field of view of ~24 mm², and a lateral resolution of ~2 μm are achieved. Moreover, amplitude and phase information are obtained from the numerical reconstruction of the holograms using a phase retrieval algorithm together with the angular spectrum propagation method. Topographic information of highly transparent micro-objects is obtained from the phase data. We evaluate our system by recording holograms of lines with different depths written by a focused laser beam. A reliable characterization of laser written microstructures is crucial for their functionality. Our results show that this system is valuable for determination of topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material.

  11. Quantitative appraisal for noise reduction in digital holographic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Silvio; Picart, Pascal

    2016-06-27

    This paper discusses on a quantitative comparison of the performances of different advanced algorithms for phase data de-noising. In order to quantify the performances, several criteria are proposed: the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio, the Q index, the standard deviation of the phase error, and the signal to distortion ratio. The proposed methodology to investigate de-noising algorithms is based on the use of a realistic simulation of noise-corrupted phase data. A database including 25 fringe patterns divided into 5 patterns and 5 different signal-to-noise ratios was generated to evaluate the selected de-noising algorithms. A total of 34 algorithms divided into different families were evaluated. Quantitative appraisal leads to ranking within the considered criteria. A fairly good correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio gain and the quality index has been observed. There exists an anti-correlation between the phase error and the quality index which indicates that the phase errors are mainly structural distortions in the fringe pattern. Experimental results are thoroughly discussed in the paper. PMID:27410587

  12. Development of CCD imaging sensors for space applications, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliffe, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation to develop a large area charge coupled device (CCD) imager for space photography applications are described. Details of the design and processing required to achieve 400 X 400 imagers are presented together with a discussion of the optical characterization techniques developed for this program. A discussion of several aspects of large CCD performance is given with detailed test reports. The areas covered include dark current, uniformity of optical response, square wave amplitude response, spectral responsivity and dynamic range.

  13. Phase-Sensitive Coherence and the Classical-Quantum Boundary in Ghost Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Venkatraman, Dheera; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of partial coherence has a long and storied history in classical statistical optics. the vast majority of this work addresses fields that are statistically stationary in time, hence their complex envelopes only have phase-insensitive correlations. The quantum optics of squeezed-state generation, however, depends on nonlinear interactions producing baseband field operators with phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive correlations. Utilizing quantum light to enhance imaging has been a topic of considerable current interest, much of it involving biphotons, i.e., streams of entangled-photon pairs. Biphotons have been employed for quantum versions of optical coherence tomography, ghost imaging, holography, and lithography. However, their seemingly quantum features have been mimicked with classical-sate light, questioning wherein lies the classical-quantum boundary. We have shown, for the case of Gaussian-state light, that this boundary is intimately connected to the theory of phase-sensitive partial coherence. Here we present that theory, contrasting it with the familiar case of phase-insensitive partial coherence, and use it to elucidate the classical-quantum boundary of ghost imaging. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that classical phase-sensitive light produces ghost imaging most closely mimicking those obtained in biphotons, and we derived the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of a standoff-sensing ghost imager, taking into account target-induced speckle.

  14. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  15. Dynamic imaging of the lungs using x-ray phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Kitchen, M. J.; Morgan, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Siu, K. K. W.; Pavlov, K.; Williams, I.; Uesugi, K.; Wallace, M. J.; Hall, C. J.; Whitley, J.; Hooper, S. B.

    2005-11-01

    High quality real-time imaging of lungs in vivo presents considerable challenges. We demonstrate here that phase contrast x-ray imaging is capable of dynamically imaging the lungs. It retains many of the advantages of simple x-ray imaging, whilst also being able to map weakly absorbing soft tissues based on refractive index differences. Preliminary results reported herein show that this novel imaging technique can identify and locate airway liquid and allows lung aeration in newborn rabbit pups to be dynamically visualized.

  16. Should single-phase radionuclide bone imaging be used in suspected osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Fihn, S.D.; Larson, E.B.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.; Gerber, F.H.

    1984-10-01

    The records of 69 patients who had 86 delayed, static radionuclide bone images for suspected osteomyelitis were studied to determine the effects of this procedure on diagnosis and treatment. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were lower than reported in several other studies. When osteomyelitis was unlikely, imaging was either negative or falsely positive and rarely affected treatment. In 46 cases where osteomyelitis was more likely, imaging potentially changed therapy in 19 but was unhelpful or misleading in 15. Static-phase images with ''definite'' interpretations, particularly when negative, are specific, but ''equivocal'' studies may lead to diagnostic and therapeutic errors. When ostemyelitis is improbable, imaging rarely changes diagnosis or therapy.

  17. Small animal lung imaging with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B.; Gunsten, S.; Guan, H.; Vasireddi, S.; Brody, S.; Anastasio, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from a benchtop X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging that represents a paradigm shift in the way small animal lung imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes, air volumes, and compliance, to name a few. Such functional information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different time points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging can be potentially achieved without the need for tomography.

  18. Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometry in an Achromatic and Continuously Self-imaging Regime for Future X-ray Phase Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J Rizzi; T Weitkamp; N Guerineau; M Idir; P Mercere; G Druart; G Vincent; P da Silva; J Primont

    2011-12-31

    We present in this Letter a type of quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer for x-ray phase imaging. This device is based on a phase chessboard, and we take advantage of the large spectrum of the source to produce interferograms with a propagation-invariant contrast. Such a grating has been created for hard x-ray interferometry and experimentally tested on a synchrotron beamline at Soleil.

  19. Extending the dynamic range of phase contrast magnetic resonance velocity imaging using advanced higher-dimensional phase unwrapping algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Salfity, M.F; Huntley, J.M; Graves, M.J; Marklund, O; Cusack, R; Beauregard, D.A

    2005-01-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance velocity imaging is a powerful technique for quantitative in vivo blood flow measurement. Current practice normally involves restricting the sensitivity of the technique so as to avoid the problem of the measured phase being ‘wrapped’ onto the range −π to +π. However, as a result, dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio are sacrificed. Alternatively, the true phase values can be estimated by a phase unwrapping process which consists of adding integral multiples of 2π to the measured wrapped phase values. In the presence of noise and data undersampling, the phase unwrapping problem becomes non-trivial. In this paper, we investigate the performance of three different phase unwrapping algorithms when applied to three-dimensional (two spatial axes and one time axis) phase contrast datasets. A simple one-dimensional temporal unwrapping algorithm, a more complex and robust three-dimensional unwrapping algorithm and a novel velocity encoding unwrapping algorithm which involves unwrapping along a fourth dimension (the ‘velocity encoding’ direction) are discussed, and results from the three are presented and compared. It is shown that compared to the traditional approach, both dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by a factor of up to five times, which demonstrates considerable promise for a possible eventual clinical implementation. The results are also of direct relevance to users of any other technique delivering time-varying two-dimensional phase images, such as dynamic speckle interferometry and synthetic aperture radar. PMID:16849270

  20. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view has been processed to extract the lower body depth profile and distance features. Feature vector extracted from image is the same as observation vector of hidden Markov model, and the phases of gait are considered as hidden states of the model. After training the model using the images which are randomly selected as training samples, the phase estimation of gait becomes possible using the model. The results confirm the rate of 60–40% of two major phases of the gait and also the mid-stance phase is recognized with 85% precision. PMID:27563572

  1. Phase-based binarization of ancient document images: model and applications.

    PubMed

    Nafchi, Hossein Ziaei; Moghaddam, Reza Farrahi; Cheriet, Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a phase-based binarization model for ancient document images is proposed, as well as a postprocessing method that can improve any binarization method and a ground truth generation tool. Three feature maps derived from the phase information of an input document image constitute the core of this binarization model. These features are the maximum moment of phase congruency covariance, a locally weighted mean phase angle, and a phase preserved denoised image. The proposed model consists of three standard steps: 1) preprocessing; 2) main binarization; and 3) postprocessing. In the preprocessing and main binarization steps, the features used are mainly phase derived, while in the postprocessing step, specialized adaptive Gaussian and median filters are considered. One of the outputs of the binarization step, which shows high recall performance, is used in a proposed postprocessing method to improve the performance of other binarization methodologies. Finally, we develop a ground truth generation tool, called PhaseGT, to simplify and speed up the ground truth generation process for ancient document images. The comprehensive experimental results on the DIBCO'09, H-DIBCO'10, DIBCO'11, H-DIBCO'12, DIBCO'13, PHIBD'12, and BICKLEY DIARY data sets show the robustness of the proposed binarization method on various types of degradation and document images. PMID:24816587

  2. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view has been processed to extract the lower body depth profile and distance features. Feature vector extracted from image is the same as observation vector of hidden Markov model, and the phases of gait are considered as hidden states of the model. After training the model using the images which are randomly selected as training samples, the phase estimation of gait becomes possible using the model. The results confirm the rate of 60-40% of two major phases of the gait and also the mid-stance phase is recognized with 85% precision. PMID:27563572

  3. Three dimensional imaging of gold-nanoparticles tagged samples using phase retrieval with two focus planes

    PubMed Central

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Ilovitsh, Asaf; Weiss, Aryeh; Meir, Rinat; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    Optical sectioning microscopy can provide highly detailed three dimensional (3D) images of biological samples. However, it requires acquisition of many images per volume, and is therefore time consuming, and may not be suitable for live cell 3D imaging. We propose the use of the modified Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval algorithm to enable full 3D imaging of gold-particle tagged samples using only two images. The reconstructed field is free space propagated to all other focus planes using post processing, and the 2D z-stack is merged to create a 3D image of the sample with high fidelity. Because we propose to apply the phase retrieving on nano particles, the regular ambiguities typical to the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, are eliminated. The proposed concept is presented and validated both on simulated data as well as experimentally. PMID:26498517

  4. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  5. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23896957

  6. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  7. Practical loss tangent imaging with amplitude-modulated atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, Roger; Kocun, Marta; Hurley, Donna; Viani, Mario; Labuda, Aleks; Meinhold, Waiman; Bemis, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude-modulated (AM) atomic force microscopy (AFM), also known as tapping or AC mode, is a proven, reliable, and gentle imaging method with widespread applications. Previously, the contrast in AM-AFM has been difficult to quantify. AFM loss tangent imaging is a recently introduced technique that recasts AM mode phase imaging into a single term tan δ that includes both the dissipated and stored energy of the tip-sample interaction. It promises fast, versatile mapping of variations in near-surface viscoelastic properties. However, experiments to date have generally obtained values larger than expected for the viscoelastic loss tangent of materials. Here, we explore and discuss several practical considerations for AFM loss tangent imaging experiments. A frequent limitation to tapping in air is Brownian (thermal) motion of the cantilever. This fundamental noise source limits the accuracy of loss tangent estimation to approximately 0.01 imaging in a two-component polymeric film demonstrates that this technique can identify temperature-dependent phase transitions, even in the presence of such non-ideal interactions. These results help understand the limits and opportunities not only of this particular technique but also of AM mode with phase imaging in general.

  8. Modeling and Observations of Phase-Mask Trapezoidal Profiles with Grating-Fiber Image Reproduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Lindesay, James V.; Lee, Hyung R.; Ndlela, Zolili U.; Thompso, Erica J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the trapezoidal design and fabrication defects in phase masks used to produce Bragg reflection gratings in optical fibers. We used a direct visualization technique to examine the nonuniformity of the interference patterns generated by several phase masks. Fringe patterns from the phase masks are compared with the analogous patterns resulting from two-beam interference. Atomic force microscope imaging of the actual phase gratings that give rise to anomalous fringe patterns is used to determine input parameters for a general theoretical model. Phase masks with pitches of 0.566 and 1.059 microns are modeled and investigated.

  9. Continuous volumetric imaging via an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Little, Justin P.; Yu, Yang; Lämmermann, Tim; Lin, Charles P.; Germain, Ronald N.; Cui, Meng

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging at high spatiotemporal resolution holds the key to the fundamental understanding of complex biological systems. Integrating an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a conventional two-photon fluorescence microscope, we achieved microsecond scale axial scanning, which enabled high-speed volumetric imaging. We applied this system to multicolor volumetric imaging of fast processes, including calcium dynamics in the cerebral cortex of behaving mice, and transient morphology changes and trafficking of immune cells. PMID:26167641

  10. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  11. Continuous volumetric imaging via an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Little, Justin P; Yu, Yang; Lämmermann, Tim; Lin, Charles P; Germain, Ronald N; Cui, Meng

    2015-08-01

    In vivo imaging at high spatiotemporal resolution is key to the understanding of complex biological systems. We integrated an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a two-photon fluorescence microscope and achieved microsecond-scale axial scanning, thus enabling volumetric imaging at tens of hertz. We applied this system to multicolor volumetric imaging of processes sensitive to motion artifacts, including calcium dynamics in behaving mouse brain and transient morphology changes and trafficking of immune cells. PMID:26167641

  12. The influence of the choice of the oceanic phase function on imaging under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braesicke, K.; Repasi, E.

    2015-05-01

    There is a large diversity of phase functions for the computer simulation of light under water. Some papers look at the influence of these phase functions on the results of computer simulations of the remote sensing reflectance. We study the influence of these phase functions on the computer simulation of the resulting image of a target illuminated by a laser. For these simulations we are only interested in those parts of the light that reach the camera position. Therefor we investigate the influence of the phase function on the image. We use a Monte Carlo Simulator with several Fournier-Forand, Henyey-Greenstein phase functions. The resulting signals at the receiver of these simulations are compared to a simulation with a Petzold function that is based on measurements of the phase function.

  13. Investigation of the effect of tube voltage and imaging geometry on phase contrast imaging for a micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Jianbao; Zou, Jing; Rong, Junyan; Hu, Zhanli; Zhang, Qiyang; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2012-03-01

    Based upon a bench-top micro-CT system, propagation-based phase-contrast imaging has been investigated using insects and a thin plastic sheet. The system mainly includes a micro-focus source with focal spot size of 13-20 μm and a cooled X-ray CCD detector with pixel size of 24 μm. The edge-enhancement effect can be found clearly in the acquired images. With a 0.5 mm thickness plastic edge phantom, the effects of X-ray tube voltage and imaging geometry on the phase-contrast imaging were investigated, and quantitative index, edge-enhancement index (EEI), were also calculated. In our study, an interesting phenomenon was observed that the phase-contrast effect becomes more pronounced as the tube voltage increases from 20 kVp to 90 kVp. Further investigation indicates that smaller focal spot size resulting from the reduction of tube current at higher tube voltage, has caused the unexpected phenomenon. Inferred from our results, phase-contrast effect is insensitive to the tube voltage in the range of 20-90 kVp (widely used in medical diagnosis); however, it is sensitive to the focal spot size. In addition, for the investigation of the effect of imaging geometry, an optimal geometric magnification range of 2.5-4.5 is suggested to get a good phase-contrast imaging for a micro-CT system with source-to-detector distance of 720 mm.

  14. Phase noise optimization in temporal phase-shifting digital holography with partial coherence light sources and its application in quantitative cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Remmersmann, Christian; Stürwald, Stephan; Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert

    2009-03-10

    In temporal phase-shifting-based digital holographic microscopy, high-resolution phase contrast imaging requires optimized conditions for hologram recording and phase retrieval. To optimize the phase resolution, for the example of a variable three-step algorithm, a theoretical analysis on statistical errors, digitalization errors, uncorrelated errors, and errors due to a misaligned temporal phase shift is carried out. In a second step the theoretically predicted results are compared to the measured phase noise obtained from comparative experimental investigations with several coherent and partially coherent light sources. Finally, the applicability for noise reduction is demonstrated by quantitative phase contrast imaging of pancreas tumor cells. PMID:19277078

  15. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Millard, T. P.; Endrizzi, M.; Everdell, N.; Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Menk, R. H.; Stride, E.; Olivo, A.

    2015-01-01

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities. PMID:26219661

  16. Estimation of the sugar cane cultivated area from LANDSAT images using the two phase sampling method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Cappelletti, C. A.; Mendonca, F. J.; Lee, D. C. L.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase sampling method and the optimal sampling segment dimensions for the estimation of sugar cane cultivated area were developed. This technique employs visual interpretations of LANDSAT images and panchromatic aerial photographs considered as the ground truth. The estimates, as a mean value of 100 simulated samples, represent 99.3% of the true value with a CV of approximately 1%; the relative efficiency of the two phase design was 157% when compared with a one phase aerial photographs sample.

  17. Single-shot phase imaging with randomized light (SPIRaL).

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Ryoichi; Egami, Riki; Tanida, Jun

    2016-02-22

    We present a method for single-shot phase imaging with randomized light (SPIRaL). In SPIRaL, the complex (amplitude and phase) field of an object illuminated with a randomized coherent beam is captured with an image sensor, without the need for any reference light. The object field is retrieved from the single captured intensity image by a compressive sensing-based algorithm with a sparsity constraint. SPIRaL has higher observation speed, light efficiency, and flexibility of the implementation compared with previous methods. We demonstrate SPIRaL numerically and experimentally. PMID:26907032

  18. Two dimensional density and its fluctuation measurements by using phase imaging method in GAMMA 10.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Negishi, S; Shima, Y; Hojo, H; Mase, A; Kogi, Y; Imai, T

    2010-10-01

    Two dimensional (2D) plasma image analysis is useful to study the improvement of plasma confinement in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We have constructed a 2D interferometer system with phase imaging method for studying 2D plasma density distribution and its fluctuation measurement in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10. 2D profiles of electron density and its fluctuation have been successfully obtained by using this 2D phase imaging system. We show that 2D plasma density and fluctuation profiles clearly depends on the axial confining potential formation with application of plug electron cyclotron heating in GAMMA 10. PMID:21033869

  19. Comparison between in-phase and opposed-phase T1-weighted breath-hold FLASH sequences for hepatic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rofsky, N.M.; Weinreb, J.C.; Ambrosino, M.M.; Safir, J.; Krinsky, G.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare in-phase (IP) and opposed-phase (OP) sequences for GRE breath-hold hepatic imaging. Non-contrast-enhanced IP and OP GRE breath-hold images were obtained in 104 consecutive patients referred for abdominal MRI at 1.0 T. For both sequences, the TR, FA, matrix, FOV, slice thickness, interslice gap, and measurements were kept constant. Images were compared quantitatively [liver/spleen and liver/lesion signal difference/noise ratio, (SD/N)] and qualitatively (artifacts, lesion detection and conspicuity, and intrahepatic anatomy). There was no statistically significant difference when comparing IP and OP sequences for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SD/N or for the qualitative parameters. In patients with fatty infiltration, the OP sequences yielded substantially lower values for liver/spleen and liver/lesion SD/N (0.9 and - 1.2, respectively) than the IP sequences (20 and 17, respectively). Furthermore, in several cases with fatty infiltration, many more lesions were identified using IP images. The use of IP and OP GRE sequences provides complementary diagnostic information. Focal liver lesions may be obscured in the setting of fatty infiltration if only OP sequences are employed. A complete assessment of the liver with MR should include both IP and OP imaging. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Robust, fast, and effective two-dimensional automatic phase unwrapping algorithm based on image decomposition.

    PubMed

    Herráez, Miguel Arevallilo; Gdeisat, Munther A; Burton, David R; Lalor, Michael J

    2002-12-10

    We describe what is to our knowledge a novel approach to phase unwrapping. Using the principle of unwrapping following areas with similar phase values (homogenous areas), the algorithm reacts satisfactorily to random noise and breaks in the wrap distributions. Execution times for a 512 x 512 pixel phase distribution are in the order of a half second on a desktop computer. The precise value depends upon the particular image under analysis. Two inherent parameters allow tuning of the algorithm to images of different quality and nature. PMID:12502302

  1. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-09-01

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography. PMID:23453793

  2. Lensless two-photon imaging through a multicore fiber with coherence-gated digital phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conkey, Donald B.; Stasio, Nicolino; Morales-Delgado, Edgar E.; Romito, Marilisa; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-04-01

    We performed near-diffraction limited two-photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging through a lensless, multicore-fiber (MCF) endoscope utilizing digital phase conjugation. The phase conjugation technique is compatible with commercially available MCFs with high core density. We demonstrate focusing of ultrashort pulses through an MCF and show that the method allows for resolution that is not limited by the MCF core spacing. We constructed TPF images of fluorescent beads and cells by digital scanning of the phase-conjugated focus on the target object and collection of the emitted fluorescence through the MCF.

  3. Lensless two-photon imaging through a multicore fiber with coherence-gated digital phase conjugation.

    PubMed

    Conkey, Donald B; Stasio, Nicolino; Morales-Delgado, Edgar E; Romito, Marilisa; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-04-30

    We performed near-diffraction limited two-photon fluorescence (TPF) imaging through a lensless, multicore-fiber (MCF) endoscope utilizing digital phase conjugation. The phase conjugation technique is compatible with commercially available MCFs with high core density. We demonstrate focusing of ultrashort pulses through an MCF and show that the method allows for resolution that is not limited by the MCF core spacing. We constructed TPF images of fluorescent beads and cells by digital scanning of the phase-conjugated focus on the target object and collection of the emitted fluorescence through the MCF. PMID:27086688

  4. Rotational artifact in phase imaging of cardiac scans: potential pitfalls in diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Getchell, J.; Foster, J.E.; Salzman, L.; Plehn, J.

    1987-10-01

    In the past few years, we have occasionally observed linear bands in the phase images of gated cardiac blood-pool scans along the interventricular septum region among patients with normal septal motions. Our retrospective study investigated the cause of out-of-phase bands of 12 patients. We documented through review of cines, computer analysis of gated cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy data, and correlation with echocardiograms that this phenomenon was artifact introduced by rotational movements of the heart. It is important for nuclear physicians to recognize this rotational artifact on the phase analysis image in order to avoid the erroneous misdiagnosis of wall motion abnormalities of the septum.

  5. Simulation of ocean SAR images via phase history generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, John R.; Clinthorne, James T.; Scheffler, Albert O.; Lyden, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A method for simulating an ocean synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) image is illustrated for a simple internal wave current pattern. The method calculates both the amplitude image and the radar signal history. The simulation model used consists of six stages. In the first stage, the full wave spectrum in two spatial coordinates is calculated from the wind speed and direction using the action spectral density equation. In the second stage, the pixel size is selected and used as the basis for dividing the spectrum into large and small scale motions. Realizations for the large-scale ocean surface height and velocity are then calculated. In the third stage, the sensor wavelength and geometry are used to calculate the small scale statistics (radar cross section, coherence time, root-mean square (RMS), radial velocity and RMS slope). In the fourth stage, an autoregressive method is used to generate a realization of the surface reflectivity history that is consistent with the radial velocity and the radial velocity variance. In the fifth stage, the signal history is generated by summing the reflectivities at the proper times with the appropriate antenna weighting function for the SAR. As a consequence of this process, speckle is automatically included in the signal. In the final stage, the SAR image can be created by using any of the traditional ways to process the signal history, including variable focusing and multilook processing.

  6. Off-axis sparse aperture imaging using phase optimization techniques for application in wide-area imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Neifeld, Mark; Bhagavatula, Vijaya Kumar; Haberfelde, Thomas; Brady, David

    2009-10-01

    Sparse apertures find imaging applications in diverse fields such as astronomy and medicine. We are motivated by the design of a wide-area imaging system where sparse apertures can be used to construct novel and efficient optical designs. Specifically, we investigate the use of sparse apertures for off-axis imaging at infrared wavelengths while combating the effects of chromaticity to preserve resolution. In principle, several such sparse apertures can be interleaved within a common aperture to simultaneously image in multiple directions. This can ultimately lead to the design of wide-area imaging systems that require considerably less optical and electronic hardware. The resolution achievable using a sparse aperture is the same as that of a fully open aperture. In the case of off-axis imaging, however, the point spread function (PSF) introduces a blur due to chromaticity that degrades the resolution of the system. Of course, the blur can be eliminated by imaging at a single wavelength. However the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is poor, which ultimately degrades image quality. To improve SNR, it is necessary to widen the band of wavelengths, which of course degrades resolution due to chromaticity. Hence there is a fundamental trade between the SNR and the resolution as a function of bandwidth. We show that by using a combination of microprisms and phase optimized micropistons it is possible to reduce the chromatic blur over a band of wavelengths and improve the PSF considerably to restore the resolution of the image. The concepts are validated by means of simulations and verified with experimental data to demonstrate the advantages of phase optimized micropistons in off-axis sparse aperture imaging systems. PMID:19798359

  7. Evaluation of shooting distance by AFM and FTIR/ATR analysis of GSR.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongyan; Lakadwar, Jyoti; Rabalais, J Wayne

    2008-11-01

    The techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy are applied to the analysis of gun-shot residue (GSR) to test their ability to determine shooting distance and discrimination of the powder manufacturers. AFM is a nondestructive technique that is capable of characterizing the shapes and size distributions of GSR particles with resolution down to less than a nanometer. This may be useful for estimation of the shooting distance. Our AFM images of GSR show that the size distribution of the particles is inversely proportional to the shooting distance. Discrimination of powder manufacturers is tested by FTIR/ATR investigation of GSR. Identifying the specific compounds in the GSR by FTIR/ATR was not possible because it is a mixture of the debris of several compounds that compose the residue. However, it is shown that the GSR from different cartridges has characteristic FTIR/ATR bands that may be useful in differentiating the powder manufacturers. It appears promising that the development of AFM and FTIR/ATR databases for various powder manufacturers may be useful in analysis and identification of GSR. PMID:18761553

  8. Charge Measurement of Atoms and Atomic Resolution of Molecules with Noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo

    2010-03-01

    Individual gold and silver adatoms [1] and pentacene molecules [2] on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) were investigated using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 Kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the sub-ångstrom regime. Charging a gold adatom by one electron charge increased the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Employing Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) we also measured the local contact potential difference (LCPD). We observed that the LCPD is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. To image pentacene molecules we modified AFM tips by means of vertical manipulation techniques, i.e. deliberately picking up known atoms and molecules, such as Au, Ag, Cl, CO, and pentacene. Using a CO terminated tip we resolved all individual atoms and bonds within a pentacene molecule. Three dimensional force maps showing the site specific distance dependence above the molecule were extracted. We compared our experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain insight on the physical origin of AFM contrast formation. We found that atomic resolution is only obtained due to repulsive force contributions originating from the Pauli exclusion principle. [4pt] [1] L. Gross, F. Mohn, P. Liljeroth, J. Repp, F. J. Giessibl, G. Meyer, Science 324, 1428 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Gross, F. Mohn, N. Moll, P. Liljeroth, G. Meyer, Science 325, 1110 (2009).

  9. Afm Measrurements of Martian Soil Particles Using Mems Technology - Results from the PHOENIX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautsch, S.; Parrat, D.; de Rooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Morookian, J. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Vijendran, S.; Sykulska, H.; Pike, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Light scattering experiments conducted on Mars indicated that soil particles have dimensions around 1 μm. Particles in that range play an important role in the gas exchange between sub-surface water ice and the atmosphere. Their shape can help tracing the geological history and may indicate past presence of liquid water. NASA's Phoenix mission therefore decided to analyze soil and dust particles in the sub-micrometer to a few micrometer range using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the first time on another planet. The co-axially mounted AFM was capable of resolving particles with 10nm lateral resolution. A MEMS approach combined with mechatronic concepts for the scanner was selected for implementing the AFM. For redundancy, the sensor chip featured eight silicon cantilevers each with a 7 to 8 μm high tip. The cantilevers could be cleaved off if contaminated. During NASA's Phoenix Mission, which operated on the red planet from May to October 2008, we could demonstrate successful AFM operations. The instrument has executed 85 experiments of which 26 were needed for calibration. Of the remaining experiments about half (28) returned images where signatures of particles could be discerned.

  10. Effective AFM cantilever tip size: methods for in-situ determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Glia, Ayoub; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations, knowledge of the cantilever tip radius R is essential for the quantitative interpretation of experimental observables. Here we propose two techniques to rapidly quantify in-situ the effective tip radius of AFM probes. The first method is based on the strong dependency of the minimum value of the free amplitude required to observe a sharp transition from attractive to repulsive force regimes on the AFM probe radius. Specifically, the sharper the tip, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe such a transition. The key trait of the second method is to treat the tip-sample system as a capacitor. Provided with an analytical model that takes into account the geometry of the tip-sample’s capacitance, one can quantify the effective size of the tip apex fitting the experimental capacitance versus distance curve. Flowchart-like algorithms, easily implementable on any hardware, are provided for both methods, giving a guideline to AFM practitioners. The methods’ robustness is assessed over a wide range of probes of different tip radii R (i.e. 4 < R < 50 nm) and geometries. Results obtained from both methods are compared with the nominal values given by manufacturers and verified by acquiring scanning electron microscopy images. Our observations show that while both methods are reliable and robust over the range of tip sizes tested, the critical amplitude method is more accurate for relatively sharp tips (4 nm < R < 10 nm).

  11. Use of functional imaging across clinical phases in CNS drug development

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, D; Becerra, L; Fava, M

    2013-01-01

    The use of novel brain biomarkers using nuclear magnetic resonance imaging holds potential of making central nervous system (CNS) drug development more efficient. By evaluating changes in brain function in the disease state or drug effects on brain function, the technology opens up the possibility of obtaining objective data on drug effects in the living awake brain. By providing objective data, imaging may improve the probability of success of identifying useful drugs to treat CNS diseases across all clinical phases (I–IV) of drug development. The evolution of functional imaging and the promise it holds to contribute to drug development will require the development of standards (including good imaging practice), but, if well integrated into drug development, functional imaging can define markers of CNS penetration, drug dosing and target engagement (even for drugs that are not amenable to positron emission tomography imaging) in phase I; differentiate objective measures of efficacy and side effects and responders vs non-responders in phase II, evaluate differences between placebo and drug in phase III trials and provide insights into disease modification in phase IV trials. PMID:23860483

  12. Single-channel color image encryption using phase retrieve algorithm in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Liansheng; Xin, Meiting; Tian, Ailing; Jin, Haiyan

    2013-12-01

    A single-channel color image encryption is proposed based on a phase retrieve algorithm and a two-coupled logistic map. Firstly, a gray scale image is constituted with three channels of the color image, and then permuted by a sequence of chaotic pairs generated by the two-coupled logistic map. Secondly, the permutation image is decomposed into three new components, where each component is encoded into a phase-only function in the fractional Fourier domain with a phase retrieve algorithm that is proposed based on the iterative fractional Fourier transform. Finally, an interim image is formed by the combination of these phase-only functions and encrypted into the final gray scale ciphertext with stationary white noise distribution by using chaotic diffusion, which has camouflage property to some extent. In the process of encryption and decryption, chaotic permutation and diffusion makes the resultant image nonlinear and disorder both in spatial domain and frequency domain, and the proposed phase iterative algorithm has faster convergent speed. Additionally, the encryption scheme enlarges the key space of the cryptosystem. Simulation results and security analysis verify the feasibility and effectiveness of this method.

  13. ISAR Imaging of Maneuvering Targets Based on the Modified Discrete Polynomial-Phase Transform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Abdelkader, Ali Cherif; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of a maneuvering target is a challenging task in the field of radar signal processing. The azimuth echo can be characterized as a multi-component polynomial phase signal (PPS) after the translational compensation, and the high quality ISAR images can be obtained by the parameters estimation of it combined with the Range-Instantaneous-Doppler (RID) technique. In this paper, a novel parameters estimation algorithm of the multi-component PPS with order three (cubic phase signal-CPS) based on the modified discrete polynomial-phase transform (MDPT) is proposed, and the corresponding new ISAR imaging algorithm is presented consequently. This algorithm is efficient and accurate to generate a focused ISAR image, and the results of real data demonstrate the effectiveness of it. PMID:26404299

  14. Remote laboratory for phase-aided 3D microscopic imaging and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Yin, Yongkai; Liu, Zeyi; He, Wenqi; Li, Boqun; Peng, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the establishment of a remote laboratory for phase-aided 3D microscopic imaging and metrology is presented. Proposed remote laboratory consists of three major components, including the network-based infrastructure for remote control and data management, the identity verification scheme for user authentication and management, and the local experimental system for phase-aided 3D microscopic imaging and metrology. The virtual network computer (VNC) is introduced to remotely control the 3D microscopic imaging system. Data storage and management are handled through the open source project eSciDoc. Considering the security of remote laboratory, the fingerprint is used for authentication with an optical joint transform correlation (JTC) system. The phase-aided fringe projection 3D microscope (FP-3DM), which can be remotely controlled, is employed to achieve the 3D imaging and metrology of micro objects.

  15. ISAR Imaging of Maneuvering Targets Based on the Modified Discrete Polynomial-Phase Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Abdelkader, Ali Cherif; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of a maneuvering target is a challenging task in the field of radar signal processing. The azimuth echo can be characterized as a multi-component polynomial phase signal (PPS) after the translational compensation, and the high quality ISAR images can be obtained by the parameters estimation of it combined with the Range-Instantaneous-Doppler (RID) technique. In this paper, a novel parameters estimation algorithm of the multi-component PPS with order three (cubic phase signal-CPS) based on the modified discrete polynomial-phase transform (MDPT) is proposed, and the corresponding new ISAR imaging algorithm is presented consequently. This algorithm is efficient and accurate to generate a focused ISAR image, and the results of real data demonstrate the effectiveness of it. PMID:26404299

  16. Phase separation in lipid bilayers triggered by low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Swetha; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Lipid bilayers have been imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). {yields} At pH 5 phase separation occurs in lipid bilayers containing mixed acyl chains. {yields} Phase separation does not occur when lipids have only unsaturated chains. {yields} Phase separation might drive protein clustering during endocytosis. -- Abstract: Endocytosis involves the capture of membrane from the cell surface in the form of vesicles, which become rapidly acidified to about pH 5. Here we show using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging that this degree of acidification triggers phase separation in lipid bilayers containing mixed acyl chains (e.g. palmitoyl/oleoyl) or complex mixtures (e.g. total brain extract) but not in bilayers containing only lipids with unsaturated chains (e.g. dioleoyl). Since mixed-chain lipids are major constituents of the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, the type of phase separation reported here might support protein clustering and signaling during endocytosis.

  17. Towards the clinical application of X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Williams, I M; Siu, K K W; Gan, R; Runxuan, G; He, X; Hart, S A; Styles, C B; Lewis, R A

    2008-12-01

    Synchrotron-based propagation-based imaging, a type of phase contrast imaging, produces better soft tissue image contrast than conventional radiography. To determine whether the technique is directly transferable to the clinical environment for routine diagnostic or screening imaging, a micro-focus (100 microm spot-size) Molybdenum X-ray source with 0.03 mm molybdenum filtration was installed at a local hospital. Breast tissue samples, excised masses and mastectomies, were obtained directly from surgery and imaged at three geometries. The first geometry was optimised for visualizing phase contrast effects using a ray-line argument, the second was the same as that employed by Konica-Minolta in their commercial phase contrast system, and the third was the conventional contact arrangement. The three images taken of each tissue sample were comparatively scored in a pair-wise fashion. Scoring was performed by radiologist expert in mammography, general radiologists, associated clinicians and radiographers on high-resolution mammography rated monitors at two separate locations. Scoring indicated that the optimised and Konica geometries both outperformed the conventional mammographic geometry. An unexpected complication within the trial was the effect that the scoring platform and the associated display tools had on some of the scorer's responses. Additionally, the trial revealed that none of the conventional descriptors for image quality were adequate in the presence of phase contrast enhancements. PMID:18996661

  18. Computer-generated phase-modulated full parallax holographic stereograms without conjugate images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chuang; Yan, Xingpeng; Jiang, Xiaoyu

    2014-10-01

    A pure phase-modulated computer-generated hologram (CGH) method is presented to generate a full parallax holographic stereogram. The holographic stereogram plane is divided into several two-dimensional holographic elements (hogels). The spectra of the hogels are rendered from multiview full parallax images of three-dimensional (3-D) objects. The phase-modulated hogel is calculated by iterative Fourier transform algorithms to improve diffraction efficiency and eliminate conjugate images. A gray calibration technique is introduced to generate the accurate intensity modulation of pure phase hogels. The holographic stereogram that we proposed is reconstructed by an optical system based on a phase only spatial light modulator. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can successfully reconstruct parallax images of 3-D objects.

  19. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  20. Simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging by use of digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2012-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance imaging technique provides a tool that allows high-throughput analysis and real-time kinetic measurement. A simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast surface plasmon resonance imaging method is presented. The amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast images are simultaneously obtained by use of digital holography. The detection sensitivity of amplitude-contrast imaging and phase-contrast imaging can compensate for each other. Thus, the detectable sample components may cover a wider range of refractive index values for the simultaneous amplitude-contrast and phase-contrast imaging method than for the phase-contrast imaging method or amplitude-contrast imaging method. A detailed description of the theory and an experiment of monitoring the evaporation process of a drop of NaCl injection in real time are presented. In addition, the amplitude-contrast image has less coherent noise by digital holography. PMID:23243569