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Sample records for afm sem tem

  1. Characterization of Pebax angioplasty balloon surfaces with AFM, SEM, TEM, and SAXS.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jacob A; Forsyth, Bruce; Zhou, Fang; Myers, Jason; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In the medical device industry, angioplasty balloons have been widely used in the less invasive treatment of heart disease by expanding and relieving clogged structures in various arterial segments. However, new applications using thin coatings on the balloon surface have been explored to enhance therapeutic value in the delivery of pharmaceuticals (drug-elution) or control thermal energy output (RF ablation). In this study, angioplasty balloon materials comprised of poly(ether-block-amide) (Pebax) were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize physical properties at the balloon surface that may affect coating adhesion. The soft segment of this Pebax 1074 material is polyethylene oxide (PEO) and the hard segment is nylon-12. The morphology of the hard segments of this block co-polymer are found via AFM stiffness measurements to be (40 ± 20) nm by (300 ± 150) nm and are oriented parallel to the surface of the balloon. SAXS measurements found the lamellar spacing to be (18.5 ± 0.5) nm, and demonstrate a preferential orientation in agreement with TEM and AFM measurements. Fixation of this balloon in resin, followed by cryo-sectioning is shown to provide a novel manner in which to investigate surface characteristics on the balloon such as material or coating thickness as well as uniformity in comparison to the bulk structure. These outputs were deemed critical to improve overall balloon processing such as molding and surface treatment options for robust designs toward better procedural outcomes targeting new therapeutic areas. PMID:25891789

  2. Morphostructural Damage in Food-Spoiling Bacteria due to the Lemon Grass Oil and Its Vapour: SEM, TEM, and AFM Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Malik, Anushree

    2012-01-01

    In this study, antimicrobial activity and morphostructural damages due to lemon grass oil (LGO) and its vapour (LGOV) against Escherichia coli strains were investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of LGO were determined by broth-dilution method to be 0.288 mg/mL and 0.567 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the zone of inhibition (45 mm) due to the vapour phase antimicrobial efficacy evaluated using disc volatilization assay was compared with that using disc diffusion assay (i.e., 13.5 mm for the same dose of oil). The morphological and ultrastructural alterations in LGO- and LGOV-treated E. coli cells were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic-force microscopy (AFM). In SEM observation, LGO-treated cells appeared to be aggregated and partially deformed, while LGOV-treated cells lost their turgidity, and the cytoplasmic material completely leaked from the cells. In TEM observation, extensive intracytoplasmic changes and various abnormalities were observed in LGOV-treated cells more than LGO-treated cells. Significant variations in the height and root mean square values of untreated, LGO-, and LGOV-treated E. coli cells were noticed by AFM. Present results indicate that LGO is highly effective against E. coli in vapour phase. PMID:23082083

  3. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  4. Characterization of some biological specimens using TEM and SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Smith, Don W.

    2009-05-01

    The advent of novel techniques using the Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes improved observation on various biological specimens to characterize them. We studied some biological specimens using Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes. We followed negative staining technique with Phosphotungstic acid using bacterial culture of Bacillus subtilis. Negative staining is very convenient technique to view the structural morphology of different samples including bacteria, phage viruses and filaments in a cell. We could observe the bacterial cell wall and flagellum very well when trapped the negative stained biofilm from bacterial culture on a TEM grid. We cut ultra thin sections from the fixed root tips of Pisum sativum (Garden pea). Root tips were pre fixed with osmium tetroxide and post fixed with uranium acetate and placed in the BEEM capsule for block making. The ultrathin sections on the grid under TEM showed the granular chromatin in the nucleus. The protein bodies and large vacuoles with the storage materials were conspicuous. We followed fixation, critical point drying and sputter coating with gold to view the tissues with SEM after placing on stubs. SEM view of the leaf surface of a dangerous weed Tragia hispida showed the surface trichomes. These trichomes when break on touching releases poisonous content causing skin irritation. The cultured tissue from in vitro culture of Albizia lebbeck, a tree revealed the regenerative structures including leaf buds and stomata on the tissue surface. SEM and TEM allow investigating the minute details characteristic morphological features that can be used for classroom teaching.

  5. Microstructural Study of Superhard Coatings With TEM And SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Tsiaoussis, I.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.; Kolaklieva, L.; Kakanakov, R.

    2007-04-23

    In the present work, TiN was deposited on stainless steel (SS420) using the cathode-spot arc method and the effect of the N2 flow and the chamber pressure on the coating microstructure was studied. TEM examination showed a columnar growth of TiN crystals with different size, while the average thickness was about 0.7 to 1.05 {mu}m and increased as the chamber pressure increased.

  6. Final Report - SRNL Agreement #AC51296V SEM, FIB, TEM Studies of CZT Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J; Dai, Z R; Graham, G A; Teslich, N E

    2007-08-28

    The aims of this study are: (1) to characterize the surfaces of samples 3-7-8-3 and 4-1-3 using SEM, FIB and TEM techniques; (2) identify raised surface features; (3) prepare FIB-TEM lift-out sections from identified raised surfaces; and (4) perform detailed TEM characterization of FIB Sections. Focusing on the composition and crystallinity of the phases within the sections, including impurities.

  7. Direct comparison of AFM and SEM measurements on the same set of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvallée, A.; Feltin, N.; Ducourtieux, S.; Trabelsi, M.; Hochepied, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    This article is the first step in the development of a hybrid metrology combining AFM and SEM techniques for measuring the dimensions of a nanoparticle population in 3D space (X,Y,Z). This method exploits the strengths of each technique on the same set of nanoparticles. AFM is used for measuring the nanoparticle height and the measurements along X and Y axes are deduced from SEM images. A sampling method is proposed in order to obtain the best deposition conditions of SiO2 and gold nanoparticles on mica or silicon substrates. Only the isolated nanoparticles are taken into account in the histogram of size distribution. Moreover, a semi-automatic Matlab routine has also been developed to process the AFM and SEM images, measure and count the nanoparticles. This routine allows the user to exclusively select the isolated nanoparticles through a control interface. The measurements have been performed on spherical-like nanoparticles to test the method by comparing the results obtained with both techniques.

  8. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7) and mouse melanoma (B16F1) cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 might be

  9. Combined AES, LEED, SEM and TEM characterizations of CuSi(100) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbücken, M.; Métois, J. J.; Mathiez, P.; Salvan, F.

    1985-10-01

    CuSi(100) interfaces prepared under UHV at different substrate temperatures ( TS) have been characterized using in-situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as well as ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). At room temperature (RT), the film grows in a layer by layer like mode. With increasing TS, the intensity of the Cu M 2,3VV (61 eV) Auger transition decreases and at TS = 500°C no Cu Auger signal could be measured below θ ˜ 100. Yet SEM and TEM observations of these deposits show islands in epitaxial relation with the substrate. It can be determined from TEM images that these islands are covered with a Si skin ( ˜ 50 Å; thick) and that they are deeply implanted in the Si substrate. This explains the AES measurements.

  10. Comparative studies of thin film growth on aluminium by AFM, TEM and GDOES characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jiantao; Thompson, George E.

    2016-07-01

    In this present study, comparative studies of trivalent chromium conversion coating formation, associated with aluminium dissolution process, have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). High-resolution electron micrographs revealed the evident and uniform coating initiation on the whole surface after conversion treatment for only 30 s, although a network of metal ridges was created by HF etching pre-treatment. In terms of conversion treatment process on electropolished aluminium, constant kinetics of coating growth, ∼0.30 ± 0.2 nm/s, were found after the prolonged conversion treatment for 600 s. The availability of electrolyte anions for coating deposition determined the growth process. Simultaneously, a proceeding process of aluminium dissolution during conversion treatment, of ∼0.11 ± 0.02 nm/s, was found for the first time, indicating constant kinetics of anodic reactions. The distinct process of aluminium consumption was assigned with loss of corrosion protection of the deposited coating material as evidenced in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Based on the present data, a new mechanism of coating growth on aluminium was proposed, and it consisted of an activation period (0-30 s), a linear growth period (0.30 nm/s, up for 600 s) and limited growth period (0.17 nm/s, 600-1200 s). In addition, the air-drying post-treatment and a high-vacuum environment in the microscope revealed a coating shrinkage, especially in the coatings after conversion treatments for longer time.

  11. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    PubMed

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes. PMID:24767501

  12. The role of different toothpastes on preventing dentin erosion: an SEM and AFM study®.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco; Vigorelli, Paolo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was the evaluation of new formulation toothpastes on preventing dentin erosion produced by a soft drink (Coca Cola®), using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fifty dentin specimens were divided in treatment and control halves and were than assigned to 5 groups of 10 specimens each: group 1a: intact dentin, group 1b: dentin + soft drink, group 2a: intact dentin + Biorepair Plus-Sensitive Teeth®, group 2b: dentin + soft drink + Biorepair Plus-Sensitive Teeth®, group 3a: intact dentin + Biorepair Plus-Total Protection®, group 3b: dentin + soft drink + Biorepair Plus-Total Protection®, group 4a: intact dentin + Sensodyne Repair & Protect®, group 4b: dentin + soft drink + Sensodyne Repair & Protect®, group 5a: intact dentin + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief®, group 5b: dentin + soft drink + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief®. The surface of each specimen was imaged by AFM and SEM. Comparing specimens of group a and b (no demineralization and demineralization), a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) in Rrms values was registered. Comparing b groups, all the analyzed toothpastes tended to remineralize the dentine surface in different extent. Biorepair Plus-Total Protection® and Sensodyne Repair & Protect® provided higher protective effect against dentin demineralization. PMID:23784952

  13. Comparative quantification and statistical analysis of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 by TEM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan Lopez-Jimenez, Luis Barceinas-Sanchez, J.D. Oscar

    2014-01-15

    Quantification of nanometric precipitates in metallic alloys has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy, which is nominally a low throughput technique. This work presents a comparative study of quantification of η′ and η precipitates in aluminum alloy AA7075-T651 using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM quantification was compared with 2-D stereological results reported elsewhere. Also, a method was developed, using specialized software, to characterize nanometric size precipitates observed in dark-field TEM micrographs. Statistical analysis of the quantification results from both measurement techniques supports the use of AFM for precipitate characterization. Once the precipitate stoichiometry has been determined by appropriate analytical techniques like TEM, as it is the case for η′ and η in AA7075-T651, the relative ease with which specimens are prepared for AFM analysis could be advantageous in product and process development, and quality control, where a large number of samples are expected for analysis on a regular basis. - Highlights: • Nanometric MgZn{sub 2} precipitates in AA7075-T651 were characterized using AFM and TEM. • Phase-contrast AFM was used to differentiate metal matrix from MgZn{sub 2} precipitates. • TEM and AFM micrographs were analyzed using commercially available software. • AFM image analysis and TEM 2-D stereology render statistically equivalent results.

  14. A holistic metrology approach: hybrid metrology utilizing scatterometry, CD-AFM, and CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, Alok; Yan, Bin Bin; Jiang, Yun Tao; Kelling, Mark; Hartig, Carsten; Allgair, John; Ebersbach, Peter; Sendelbach, Matthew; Rana, Narender; Katnani, Ahmad; Mclellan, Erin; Archie, Chas; Bozdog, Cornel; Kim, Helen; Sendler, Michael; Ng, Susan; Sherman, Boris; Brill, Boaz; Turovets, Igor; Urensky, Ronen

    2011-03-01

    Shrinking design rules and reduced process tolerances require tight control of CD linewidth, feature shape, and profile of the printed geometry. The Holistic Metrology approach consists of utilizing all available information from different sources like data from other toolsets, multiple optical channels, multiple targets, etc. to optimize metrology recipe and improve measurement performance. Various in-line critical dimension (CD) metrology toolsets like Scatterometry OCD (Optical CD), CD-SEM (CD Scanning Electron Microscope) and CD-AFM (CD Atomic Force Microscope) are typically utilized individually in fabs. Each of these toolsets has its own set of limitations that are intrinsic to specific measurement technique and algorithm. Here we define "Hybrid Metrology" to be the use of any two or more metrology toolsets in combination to measure the same dataset. We demonstrate the benefits of the Hybrid Metrology on two test structures: 22nm node Gate Develop Inspect (DI) & 32nm node FinFET Gate Final Inspect (FI). We will cover measurement results obtained using typical BKM as well as those obtained by utilizing the Hybrid Metrology approach. Measurement performance will be compared using standard metrology metrics for example accuracy and precision.

  15. Multi-scale characterization by FIB-SEM/TEM/3DAP.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, T; Sepehri-Amin, H; Sasaki, T T; Hono, K

    2014-11-01

    In order to improve properties of functional materials, it is important to understand the relation between the structure and the properties since the structure has large effect to the properties. This can be done by using multi-scale microstructure analysis from macro-scale to nano and atomic scale. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with focused ion beam (FIB), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and 3D atom probe (3DAP) are complementary analysis tools making it possible to know the structure and the chemistry from micron to atomic resolution. SEM gives us overall microstructural and chemical information by various kinds of detectors such as secondary electron, backscattered electron, EDS and EBSD detectors. Also, it is possible to analyze 3D structure and chemistry via FIB serial sectioning. In addition, using TEM we can focus on desired region to get more complementary information from HRTEM/STEM/Lorentz images, SAED/NBD patterns and EDS/EELS to see the detail micro or nano-structure and chemistry. Especially, combination of probe Cs corrector and split EDS detectors with large detector size enable us to analyze the atomic scale elemental distribution. Furthermore, if the specimen has a complicated 3D nanostructure, or we need to analyze light elements such as hydrogen, lithium or boron, 3DAP can be used as the only technique which can visualize and analyze distribution of all constituent atoms of our materials within a few hundreds nm area. Hence, site-specific sample preparation using FIB/SEM is necessary to get desired information from region of interest. Therefore, this complementary analysis combination works very well to understand the detail of materials.In this presentation, we will show the analysis results obtained from some of functional materials by Carl Zeiss CrossBeam 1540EsB FIB/SEM, FEI Tecnai G(2) F30, Titan G2 80-200 TEMs and locally build laser assisted 3DAP. As the one of the example, result of multi-scale characterization for

  16. In situ TEM/SEM electronic/mechanical characterization of nano material with MEMS chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuelin, Wang; Tie, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Hongjiang, Zeng; Qinhua, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Our investigation of in situ observations on electronic and mechanical properties of nano materials using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the help of traditional micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology has been reviewed. Thanks to the stability, continuity and controllability of the loading force from the electrostatic actuator and the sensitivity of the sensor beam, a MEMS tensile testing chip for accurate tensile testing in the nano scale is obtained. Based on the MEMS chips, the scale effect of Young's modulus in silicon has been studied and confirmed directly in a tensile experiment using a transmission electron microscope. Employing the nanomanipulation technology and FIB technology, Cu and SiC nanowires have been integrated into the tensile testing device and their mechanical, electronic properties under different stress have been achieved, simultaneously. All these will aid in better understanding the nano effects and contribute to the designation and application in nano devices.

  17. Crystal polymer interaction with new injectable bone substitute; SEM and Hr TEM study.

    PubMed

    Daculsi, G; Rohanizadeh, R; Weiss, P; Bouler, J M

    2000-04-01

    A composite constituted of calcium phosphate (CaP) granules and a hydrophilic polymer as a carrier (hydroxy-propyl-methyl cellulose, HPMC) was developed to be an injectable bone substitute (IBS, CNRS patent). IBS is a composite and not an ionic cement. The composite obtained is ready to use and sterile. Chemical interactions between organic and inorganic components appeared during the association of the two. The interactions of the CaP and the polymer have been studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe (EDX), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HrTEM) SEM revealed a degradation of the granules into smaller particles while EDX was unable to show significant changes in the Ca/P ratio during aging of the composite. With Hr TEM, however, we observed hydrolysis (process of dissolution and precipitation) from the surface to about 13 nm into the HA crystals and occasional dissolution with precipitation of beta-TCP crystals. In HA, the first zone of interaction consisted of a single layer of small globular crystals of 2 to 3 nm in diameter. Numerous lattice patterns in all three axes could be observed. Under the globular crystals zone, the inter-reticular distances of the single crystals appeared enlarged by 1.2% (from 0.817 to 0.827 nm). The enlargement seems to correspond to diffusion of HPO(4) into the crystal lattice. In beta-TCP crystals, dissolution was observed to be several nanometers deep, but globular surface precipitation rarely was observed. With time or after steam sterilization, no changes were observed. These data demonstrate the strong interactions of the hydrophylic polymer with calcium phosphate, but only in the first several nanometers of thickness. PMID:10644956

  18. Morphological and Structural Changes on Human Dental Enamel After Er:YAG Laser Irradiation: AFM, SEM, and EDS Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Olea-Mejìa, Oscar Fernando; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the morphological and structural changes of the enamel after irradiation with the Er:YAG laser. Background data: A previous study showed that subablative Er:YAG laser irradiation produced undesirable morphological changes on the enamel surface, such as craters and cracks; however, the enamel acid resistance was not increased. Methods: Fifty-two samples of human enamel were divided into four groups (n = 13): Group I was the control (no laser irradiation), whereas Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with the Er:YAG 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 100 mJ (7.5 J/cm2), and 150 mJ (11 J/cm2), respectively, at 10 Hz with water spray. The morphological changes were observed by AFM and SEM. The weight percentages (wt%) of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) were determined in the resultant craters and their periphery using EDS. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests were performed (p ≤ 0.05) to distinguish significant differences among the groups. Results: The AFM images showed cracks with depths between 250 nm and 750 nm for Groups II and IV, respectively, and the widths of these cracks were 5.37 μm and 2.58 μm. The interior of the cracks showed a rough surface. The SEM micrographs revealed morphological changes. Significant differences were detected in Ca, P, and Cl in the crater and its periphery. Conclusions: AFM observations showed triangular-shaped cracks, whereas craters and cracks were evident by SEM in all irradiated samples. It was not possible to establish a characteristic chemical pattern in the craters. PMID:21417912

  19. Application of the Discrete Wavelet Transform to SEM and AFM Micrographs for Quantitative Analysis of Complex Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Workman, Michael J; Serov, Alexey; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2015-05-01

    The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has found significant utility in process monitoring, filtering, and feature isolation of SEM, AFM, and optical images. Current use of the DWT for surface analysis assumes initial knowledge of the sizes of the features of interest in order to effectively isolate and analyze surface components. Current methods do not adequately address complex, heterogeneous surfaces in which features across multiple size ranges are of interest. Further, in situations where structure-to-property relationships are desired, the identification of features relevant for the function of the material is necessary. In this work, the DWT is examined as a tool for quantitative, length-scale specific surface metrology without prior knowledge of relevant features or length-scales. A new method is explored for determination of the best wavelet basis to minimize variation in roughness and skewness measurements with respect to change in position and orientation of surface features. It is observed that the size of the wavelet does not directly correlate with the size of features on the surface, and a method to measure the true length-scale specific roughness of the surface is presented. This method is applied to SEM and AFM images of non-precious metal catalysts, yielding new length-scale specific structure-to-property relationships for chemical speciation and fuel cell performance. The relationship between SEM and AFM length-scale specific roughness is also explored. Evidence is presented that roughness distributions of SEM images, as measured by the DWT, is representative of the true surface roughness distribution obtained from AFM. PMID:25879382

  20. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  1. Microhardness, chemical etching, SEM, AFM and SHG studies of novel nonlinear optical crystal -L-threonine formate

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumantha Rao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness studies of novel LTF crystal reported first time in the literature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface studies are done by AFM, chemical etching and SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer From SHG studies, it is known that LTF is potential NLO crystal. -- Abstract: The crystal L-threonine formate, an organic NLO crystal was synthesized from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystal surface has been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), chemical etching and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM analysis reveals pyramidal shaped minute crystallites on the growth surface. The etching study indicates the occurrence of etch pit patterns like striations and step like pattern. The mechanical properties of LTF crystals were evaluated by mechanical testing which reveals certain mechanical characteristics like elastic stiffness constant (C{sub 11}) and young's modulus (E). The Vickers and Knoop microhardness studies have been carried out on LTF crystals over a range of 10-50 g. Hardness anisotropy has been observed in accordance with the orientation of the crystal. AFM image shows major hillock on growth surface. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency has been tested by the Kurtz powder technique using Nd:YAG laser and found to be about 1.21 times in comparison with standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals.

  2. Microscopic characterization of FO/PRO membranes--a comparative study of CLSM, TEM and SEM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ning; Wei, Jing; She, Qianhong; Pacheco, Federico; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-09-18

    Osmotically driven membrane processes (including forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO)) have received increasing attention in recent decades. The performance of an FO/PRO membrane is significantly limited by internal concentration polarization, which is a strong function of the membrane support layer pore structure. The objective of the current study was to develop microscopic characterization methods for quantitative/semiquantitative analysis of membrane pore structure (both pore diameter and porosity distribution across membrane thickness). The use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for noninvasive characterization of the internal pore structure of FO/PRO membranes is reported for the first time. By performing optical sectioning, information on pore diameter, porosity depth profile and pore connectivity can be obtained. The CLSM porosity results are further compared to those obtained using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and reasonably good agreement was observed. A comparison of these characterization methods reveals their complementary nature, and a combination of these techniques may allow a more comprehensive understanding of membrane structure. The current study also provided a comprehensive insight into the pore structure of commercially available FO/PRO membranes. PMID:22897436

  3. SEM and TEM Characterization of As-Fabricated U-7Mo Disperson Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate can have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of dispersion fuel plates, SEM and TEM analysis have been performed on RERTR-9A archive fuel plates, which went through an additional hot isostatic procsssing (HIP) step during fabrication. The fuel plates had depleted U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in either Al-2Si or 4043 Al alloy matrix. For the characterized samples, it was observed that a large fraction of the ?-phase U-7Mo alloy particles had decomposed during fabrication, and in areas near the fuel/matrix interface where the transformation products were present significant fuel/matrix interaction had occurred. Relatively thin Si-rich interaction layers were also observed around the U-7Mo particles. In the thick interaction layers, (U)(Al,Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were identified, and in the thin interaction layers U(Al,Si)3, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and USi1.88-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this work, exposure of dispersion fuel plates to relatively high temperatures during fabrication impacts the overall microstructure, particularly the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. The time and temperature of fabrication should be carefully controlled in order to produce the most uniform Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles.

  4. AFM, ellipsometry, XPS and TEM on ultra-thin oxide/polymer nanocomposite layers in organic thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Fian, A; Haase, A; Stadlober, B; Jakopic, G; Matsko, N B; Grogger, W; Leising, G

    2008-03-01

    Here we report on the fabrication and characterization of ultra-thin nanocomposite layers used as gate dielectric in low-voltage and high-performance flexible organic thin film transistors (oTFTs). Reactive sputtered zirconia layers were deposited with low thermal exposure of the substrate and the resulting porous oxide films with high leakage currents were spin-coated with an additional layer of poly-alpha-methylstyrene (P alphaMS). After this treatment a strong improvement of the oTFT performance could be observed; leakage currents could be eliminated almost completely. In ellipsometric studies a higher refractive index of the ZrO(2)/P alphaMS layers compared to the "as sputtered" zirconia films could be detected without a significant enhancement of the film thickness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of the surface topography clearly showed a surface smoothing after the P alphaMS coating. Further studies with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also indicated that the polymer definitely did not form an extra layer. The polymer chains rather (self-)assemble in the nano-scaled interspaces of the porous oxide film giving an oxide-polymer "nanocomposite" with a high oxide filling grade resulting in high dielectric constants larger than 15. The dielectric strength of more than 1 MV cm(-1) is in good accordance with the polymer-filled interspaces. PMID:17952415

  5. Utilization of profilometry, SEM, AFM and contact angle measurements in describing surfaces of plastic floor coverings and explaining their cleanability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuisma, R.; Pesonen-Leinonen, E.; Redsven, I.; Kymäläinen, H.-R.; Saarikoski, I.; Sjöberg, A.-M.; Hautala, M.

    2005-06-01

    The tendency to soil and cleanability of ten commercial plastic floor coverings: eight vinyl (PVC) floor coverings, one vinyl composite tile and one plastic composite tile, were examined. Floor coverings were soiled with inorganic, organic and biological soil. The cleanability was measured both by bioluminescence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and colorimetrically. The surface topography was studied by AFM, SEM and with a profilometer. From the 2D- and 3D-profilometric measurements several characteristic parameters of the surface profiles were extracted. The tendency to soil and cleanability were compared with the characteristics of the surface. A weak correlation was found between roughness and soilability but no correlation between roughness and cleanability. Roughness had no correlation with contact angle.

  6. Extracting 3-D information from SEM and TEM images: Approaches and applications in the physical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    L`Esperance, G.; Dionne, M.; Tremblay, S.

    1996-12-31

    Techniques for extracting 3-D information from TEM samples in life sciences have considerably progressed in recent years. One approach has been the use of serial prepared by ultramicrotomy from which the volume of the sample and of various constituents can be reconstructed. In the case of engineering materials, however, ultramicrotomy generally induces severe deformation resulting in a large density of structural defects (dislocations, stacking faults etc.). This leads to significant diffraction contrast effects which mask microstructural features such as second phase particles, precipitates etc. Recently, a series of TEM bright field images taken at different tilts have been used in combination with image analysis to determine the volume fraction (V{sub f}) of second phase particles in thin foils of aluminum alloys. Although the technique was successful to remove most of the diffraction contrast effects and to make the particles visible, the need to acquire and process a large number of images makes the technique laborious and can lead to artefacts.

  7. SEM, TEM and SLEEM (scanning low energy electron microscopy) of CB2 steel after creep testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasl, J.; Mikmeková, Š.; Jandová, D.

    2014-03-01

    The demand to produce electrical power with higher efficiency and with lower environmental pollution is leading to the use of new advanced materials in the production of power plant equipment. To understand the processes taking place in parts produced from these materials during their operation under severe conditions (such as high temperature, high stress, and environmental corrosion) requires detailed evaluation of their substructure. It is usually necessary to use transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, this method is very exacting and time-consuming. So there is an effort to use new scanning electron microscopy techniques instead of TEM. One of them is scanning low energy electron microscopy (SLEEM). This paper deals with an assessment of the possibility to use SLEEM for describing the substructure of creep resistant steel CB2 after long-term creep testing. In the SLEEM images more information is contained about the microstructure of the material in comparison with standard scanning electron microscopy. Study of materials using slow and very slow electrons opens the way to better understanding their microstructures.

  8. A novel approach to TEM preparation with a (7-axis stage) triple-beam FIB-SEM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Jamil J.

    2015-10-01

    Preparation of lamellae from bulk to grid for Cs-corrected Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) observation has mostly become routine work on the latest FIB-SEM systems, with standardized techniques that often are left to automation for the initial steps. The finalization of lamellae however, has mostly become, non-routine, non-repeatable and often driven by user experience level in most cases to produce high quality damage-less cross section. Materials processing of the latest technologies, with ever-shrinking Nano-sized structures pose challenges to modern FIB-SEM systems. This can often lead to specialized techniques and hyper-specific functions for producing ultra-thin high quality lamellae that often are lab specific, preventing practical use of such techniques across multiple materials and applications. Several factors that should be incorporated in processing fine structured materials successfully include how the use of electron and ion scan conditions can affect a thin section during ion milling, the type of ion species applied for material processing during the finalization of lamellae with gallium ions or of a smaller ion species type such as Ar/Xe, sample orientation of the lamella during the thinning process which is linked to ion beam incident angle as a direct relationship in the creation of waterfall effects or curtain effects, and how software can be employed to aid in the reduction of these artifacts with reproducible results regardless of FIB-SEM experience for site-specific lift outs. A traditional TEM preparation was performed of a fine structure specimen in pursuit of a process technique to produce a high quality TEM lamella which would address all of the factors mentioned. These new capabilities have been refined and improved upon during the FIB-SEM design and development stages with an end result of a new approach that yields an improvement in quality by the reduction of common ion milling artifacts such as curtain effects, amorphous

  9. FE-SEM, FIB and TEM Study of Surface Deposits of Apollo 15 Green Glass Volcanic Spherules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Daniel K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Rahman, Z.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Surface deposits on lunar pyroclastic green (Apollo 15) and orange (Apollo 17) glass spherules have been attributed to condensation from the gas clouds that accompanied fire-fountain eruptions. The fire fountains cast molten lava high above the lunar surface and the silicate melt droplets quenched before landing producing the glass beads. Early investigations showed that these deposits are rich in sulfur and zinc. The deposits are extremely fine-grained and thin, so that it was never possible to determine their chemical compositions cleanly by SEM/EDX or electron probe x-ray analysis because most of the excited volume was in the under-lying silicate glass. We are investigating the surface deposits by TEM, using focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy to extract and thin the surface deposits. Here we report on chemical mapping of a FIB section of surface deposits of an Apollo green glass bead 15401using the ultra-high resolution JEOL 2500 STEM located at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  10. First ultrastructural data on the human tapeworm Taenia asiatica eggs by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM).

    PubMed

    Galán-Puchades, M Teresa; Yang, Yichao; Marcilla, Antonio; Choe, Seongjun; Park, Hansol; Osuna, Antonio; Eom, Keeseon S

    2016-09-01

    Humans are definitive hosts of three species of the Taenia genus, namely Taenia solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica. The relative novelty of the latter explains the lack of knowledge concerning certain relevant aspects related to this parasite, such as its definite geographical distribution and whether its eggs can infect humans or not. So far, only the eggs of T. solium are known to be infective for humans, producing cysticercosis. Although eggs contain the infective stage, the oncosphere, there is a lack of research on the ultrastructure of eggs of human taeniids. We show, for the first time, the ultrastructure of eggs of T. asiatica by means of SEM and TEM analyses. We detected all the envelopes, namely the egg shell, vitelline layer, outer embryophoric membrane, embryophore, granular layer, basal membrane, oncospheral membrane and oncospheral tegument. Hooks surrounded by myofibrils and glycogen-like particles, the two types of secretory granules of the penetration glands, as well as several nuclei and mitochondria were also revealed in the oncospheres. In addition to the already known structures in eggs from other Taenia species, the presence of two types of small vesicles is described herein, possibly corresponding to exosomes and ectosomes because of their shape and size, which could participate in the host/parasite intercellular communication. PMID:27277232

  11. Transformation and Immobilization of Chromium by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi as Revealed by SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS, and XAFS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Su, Dan; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Baodong

    2015-12-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), ubiquitous soil fungi that form symbiotic relationships with the majority of terrestrial plants, are known to play an important role in plant tolerance to chromium (Cr) contamination. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially the direct influences of AMF on the translocation and transformation of Cr in the soil-plant continuum, are still unresolved. In a two-compartment root-organ cultivation system, the extraradical mycelium (ERM) of mycorrhizal roots was treated with 0.05 mmol L(-1) Cr(VI) for 12 days to investigate the uptake, translocation, and transformation of Cr(VI) by AMF using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS), and X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) technologies. The results indicated that AMF can immobilize quantities of Cr via reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), forming Cr(III)-phosphate analogues, likely on the fungal surface. Besides this, we also confirmed that the extraradical mycelium (ERM) can actively take up Cr [either in the form of Cr(VI) or Cr(III)] and transport Cr [potentially in the form of Cr(III)-histidine analogues] to mycorrhizal roots but immobilize most of the Cr(III) in the fungal structures. Based on an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy analysis of Cr(VI)-treated roots, we proposed that the intraradical fungal structures can also immobilize Cr within mycorrhizal roots. Our findings confirmed the immobilization of Cr by AMF, which plays an essential role in the Cr(VI) tolerance of AM symbioses. PMID:26551890

  12. Cryo-FE-SEM & TEM immuno-techniques reveal new details for understanding white-rot decay of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Geoffrey; Volc, Jindrich; Niku-Paavola, Marja-Leena

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution Cryo-Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (HR-Cryo-FE-SEM) and immuno-cytochemistry were used to reveal novel details on the morphological events and spatial distribution of oxidoreductive enzymes during the degradation of birch wood by the white-rot fungi Phlebia radiata and mutant strain P radiata Cel 26. Cryo-observations of fractured fibres showed degradation across the cell wall by P. radiata (wild) to progress by delamination and removal of concentric orientated aggregates from the secondary S2 cell wall. Decay by P radiata Cel 26 progressed by removal of materials (lignin and hemicelluloses) between the aggregates (primarily cellulose) that remained even after advanced decay. With both decay patterns, extracellular slime materials were present uniting lumina hyphae with the attacked fibre wall. The extracellular slime material had two morphological forms: viz a fibrillar (often tripartite) and a 'gel-form', the former found in discrete bands progressing across the lumen onto the fibre wall. Using TEM immunocytochemistry, laccase, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and diarylpropane enzymes were localized in the periplasmic space of luminal hyphae, in association with the cell membrane, periplasmic vesicles and fungal cell wall. Extracellularly, the three enzymes were found associated with the slime and tripartite membranes and with the birch cell walls at all stages of attack through to middle lamella corner decay. Enzyme distribution was correlated with morphological changes in cell wall structure. The association of extracellular slime with these enzymes and sites of decay strongly suggests a major role for this matrix in fibre cell wall decomposition. PMID:15587077

  13. Chemical and structural analysis of the bone-implant interface by TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM: Experimental study in animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Anders; Emanuelsson, Lena; Sjövall, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Although bone-anchored implants are widely used in reconstructive medicine, the mechanism of osseointegration is still not fully understood. Novel analytical tools are needed to further understand this process, where both the chemical and structural aspects of the bone-implant interface are important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of combining time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) with optical (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for studying the bone-implant interface of bone-anchored implants. Laser-modified titanium implants with surrounded bone retrieved after 8 weeks healing in rabbit were dehydrated and resin embedded. Three types of sample preparation were studied to evaluate the information gained by combining TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM. The results show that imaging TOF-SIMS can provide detailed chemical information, which in combination with structural information from microscopy methods provide a more complete characterization of anatomical structures at the bone-implant interface. By investigating various sample preparation techniques, it is shown that grinded cross section samples can be used for chemical imaging using TOF-SIMS, if careful consideration of potential preparation artifacts is taken into account. TOF-SIMS analysis of FIB-prepared bone/implant cross section samples show distinct areas corresponding to bone tissue and implant with a sharp interface, although without chemical information about the organic components.

  14. A detailed description of the development of the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii using SEM, TEM, Histology and 3D-reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, the origin of the third germ layer and its special formation of coelomic cavities by enterocoely is regarded to be an informative character in phylogenetic analyses. In early deuterostomes such as sea urchins, the mesoderm forms through a single evagination pinching off from the apical end of the archenteron which then gives off mesocoela and metacoela on each side. This echinoid-type coelom formation has conventionally been assumed to be ancestral for Deuterostomia. However, recent phylogenetic analyses show that Echinodermata hold a more derived position within Deuterostomia. In this regard a subgroup of Hemichordata, namely enteropneusts, seem to host promising candidates, because they are supposed to have retained many ancestral deuterostome features on the one hand, and furthermore share some characteristics with chordates on the other hand. In enteropneusts a wide range of different modes of coelom formation has been reported and in many cases authors of the original observations carefully detailed the limitations of their descriptions, while these doubts disappeared in subsequent reviews. In the present study, we investigated the development of all tissues in an enteropneust, Saccoglossus kowalevskii by using modern morphological techniques such as complete serial sectioning for LM and TEM, and 3D-reconstructions, in order to contribute new data to the elucidation of deuterostome evolution. Results Our data show that in the enteropneust S. kowalevskii all main coelomic cavities (single protocoel, paired mesocoela and metacoela) derive from the endoderm via enterocoely as separate evaginations, in contrast to the aforementioned echinoid-type. The anlagen of the first pair of gill slits emerge at the late kink stage (~96 h pf). From that time onwards, we documented a temporal left-first development of the gill slits and skeletal gill rods in S. kowalevskii until the 2 gill slit juvenile stage. Conclusions The condition of coelom

  15. Chemically modified carbon paste and membrane sensors for the determination of benzethonium chloride and some anionic surfactants (SLES, SDS, and LABSA): Characterization using SEM and AFM.

    PubMed

    Issa, Yousry M; Mohamed, Sabrein H; Baset, Mohamed Abd-El

    2016-08-01

    Chemically modified carbon-paste (CMCP) and membrane- sensors based on incorporating benzothonium-tetraphenylborate (BT-TPB) were constructed for the analysis of benzethonium chloride, and some other surfactants such as sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), and linear alkylbenzene sulphonic acid (LABSA). All sensors showed good sensitivity and reverse wide linearity over a concentration range of 5.97×10(-7) to 1.00×10(-3) and 5.96×10(-7) to 3.03×10(-3)molL(-1) with limit of detection of 3.92×10(-7)and 3.40×10(-7)molL(-1) for membrane and chemically modified carbon paste sensors, respectively, with respect to benzethonium chloride (BT.Cl). They could be used over a wide pH range of 2.0-10.0. The thermal coefficients of membrane and CMCP sensors are 5.40×10(-4), 1.17×10(-4)V/°C, respectively. The sensors indicated a wide selectivity over different inorganic cations. The effect of soaking on the surface morphology of the membrane sensor was studied using EDX-SEM and AFM techniques. The response time was <10s The freshly prepared, exhausted membrane, and CMCP sensors were successfully applied for the potentiometric determination of the pure BT.Cl solution. They were also used for the determination of its pharmaceutical formulation Dermoplast(®) antibacterial spray (20% benzocaine+0.2% benzethonium chloride) with recovery values ranging from 97.54±1.70 to 101.25±1.12 and from 96.32±2.49 to 101.23±2.15%. The second goal of these sensors is the potentiometric determination of different surfactants such as SLES, SDS, and LABSA with good recovery values using BT.Cl as a titrant in their pure forms, and in samples containing one of them (shampoo, Touri(®) dishwashing liquid, and waste water). The statistical analysis of the obtained data was studied. PMID:27216669

  16. Monolayer to MTS: using SEM, HIM, TEM and SERS to compare morphology, nanosensor uptake and redox potential in MCF7 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, L. E.; Bell, A. P.; Harrison, D. J.; Campbell, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Cellular redox potential is important for the control and regulation of a vast number of processes occurring in cells. When the fine redox potential balance within cells is disturbed it can have serious consequences such as the initiation or progression of disease. It is thought that a redox gradient develops in cancer tumours where the peripheral regions are well oxygenated and internal regions, further from vascular blood supply, become starved of oxygen and hypoxic. This makes treatment of these areas more challenging as, for example, radiotherapy relies on the presence of oxygen. Currently techniques for quantitative analysis of redox gradients are limited. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors (NS) have been used to detect redox potential in a quantitative manner in monolayer cultured cells with many advantages over other techniques. This technique has considerable potential for use in multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) - a three dimensional (3D) cell model which better mimics the tumour environment and gradients that develop. MTS are a more realistic model of the in vivo cellular morphology and environment and are becoming an increasingly popular in vitro model, replacing traditional monolayer culture. Imaging techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM) were used to investigate differences in morphology and NS uptake in monolayer culture compared to MTS. After confirming NS uptake, the first SERS measurements revealing quantitative information on redox potential in MTS were performed.

  17. Characterization of low alloy ferritic steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interface by SPM techniques, SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS and SVET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Siyan; Ding, Jie; Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-02-15

    The interface region of welded A508–Alloy 52 M is characterized by scanning probe microscope (SPM) techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning vibrate electrode technique (SVET). The regions along the welded A508–Alloy 52 M interface can be categorized into two types according to their different microstructures. In the type-I interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by the fusion boundary, while in the type-II interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by a martensite zone. A508, martensite zone and grain boundaries in Alloy 52 M are ferromagnetic while the Alloy 52 M matrix is paramagnetic. The Volta potentials measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) of A508, martensite zone and Alloy 52 M follow the order: V{sub 52} {sub M} > V{sub A508} > V{sub martensite}. The corrosion behavior of A508–Alloy 52 M interface region is galvanic corrosion, in which Alloy 52 M is cathode while A508 is anode. The martensite dissolves faster than Alloy 52 M, but slower than A508 in the test solution. - Highlights: • The A508–Alloy 52 M interface regions can be categorized into two types. • The chromium depleted region is observed along the Alloy 52 M grain boundary. • The Alloy 52 M grain boundaries which are close to the interface are ferromagnetic. • Martensite zone has lower Volta potential but higher corrosion resistance than A508.

  18. M23C6 carbides and Cr2N nitrides in aged duplex stainless steel: A SEM, TEM and FIB tomography investigation.

    PubMed

    Maetz, J-Y; Douillard, T; Cazottes, S; Verdu, C; Kléber, X

    2016-05-01

    The precipitation evolution during ageing of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel was investigated, revealing that the precipitate type and morphology depends on the nature of the grain boundary. Triangular M23C6 carbides precipitate only at γ/δ interfaces and rod-like Cr2N nitrides precipitate at both γ/δ and δ/δ interfaces. After 15min of ageing, the M23C6 size no longer evolves, whereas that of the Cr2N continues to evolve. For Cr2N, the morphology is maintained at γ/δ interfaces, whereas percolation occurs to form a continuous layer at δ/δ interfaces. By combining 2D and 3D characterisation at the nanoscale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, a complete description of the precipitation evolution was obtained, including the composition, crystallographic structure, orientation relationship with the matrix phases, location, morphology, size and volume fraction. PMID:26925831

  19. The SEM and TEM study on the laminated structure of individual aragonitic nacre tablet in freshwater bivalve H. cumingii Lea shell.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Xiang; Li, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Nacre (mother-of-pearl), one of the natural composite materials, is renowned for its excellent mechanical properties and becomes a model for study on the biominerals. In the present study on bivalve H. cumingii Lea, the forming nacre tablet was observed with SEM to show laminated character on the lateral growing surfaces. Correspondingly, HRTEM showed dense crystal defects on (001) plane of the aragonite nacre tablet which might be caused by the adsorption of organic macromolecules on the plane. The correlation of the laminated growth mode and crystal defects on (001) plane was discussed. These findings could enhance our understanding to the formation mechanism of the nacre tablet as well as the superior mechanical properties of the nacre. PMID:19733246

  20. SEM and TEM Observation of the Surfaces of the Fine-Grained Particles Retrieved from the Muses-C Regio on the Asteroid 25413 Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noguchi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Tanaka, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Konno, M.; Nakato, A.; Ogami, T.; Fujimura, A.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Mukai, T.; Ueno, M.; Okada, T.; Shirai, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Okazaki, R.

    2011-01-01

    Surface materials on airless solar system bodies exposed to interplanetary space are gradually changed their visible to near-infrared reflectance spectra by the process called "space weathering", which makes the spectra darker and redder. Hapke et al. proposed a model of space weathering: vapor deposition of nanophase reduced iron (npFe(sup 0)) on the surfaces of the grains within the very surface of lunar regolith. This model has been proved by detailed observation of the surfaces of the lunar soil grains by transmission electron microscope (TEM). They demonstrated that npFe(sup 0) was formed by a combination of vapor deposition and irradiation effects. In other words, both micrometeorite impacts and irradiation by solar wind and galactic cosmic ray play roles on the space weathering on the Moon. Because there is a continuum of reflectance spectra from those of Q-type asteroids (almost the same as those of ordinary chondrites) to those of S-type asteroids, it is strongly suggested that reflectance spectra of asteroids composed of ordinary chondrite-like materials were modified over time to those of S-type asteroids due to space weathering. It is predicted that a small amount of npFe(sup 0) on the surface of grains in the asteroidal regolith composed of ordinary chondrite-like materials is the main agent of asteroidal space weathering.

  1. SEM/TEM characterization of periodical novel amorphous/nano-crystalline micro-composites obtained by laser interference structuring: The system HAlO-Al?Al2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Christian; Lasagni, Andres Fabian; Holzapfel, Christian; Daniel, Claus; M�cklich, Frank; Veith, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Layers of the metastable, amorphous HAlO are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition from the molecular compound tert-butoxyalane ([tBu-O-AlH2]2). At temperatures above 500 C, these layers transform to biphasic Al Al2O3 due to the elimination of di-hydrogen. The interaction of HAlO films with short laser pulses causes partial transformation of amorphous HAlO into nano-crystalline Al Al2O3. Using an interference pattern of two coherent high-power Nd:YAG laser beams produces local and periodic heating, inducing crystallization at equally distant lines in the HAlO layer. Depending on the laser fluence, different morphologies and different amounts of crystalline phases are obtained. In this study, the surface morphology and the distribution of crystalline phases of the structured samples are analyzed using SEM, FIB and TEM. The two-dimensional structures consist of periodic variations of morphology, chemical composition, and phase identity with a well-defined long-range order. When bio-functionalized, the structured samples may be used as carriers for structurally controlled cell-cultivation.

  2. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  3. Analysis of corrosion layers on protective coatings and high temperature materials in simulated service environments of modern power plants using SNMS, SIMS, SEM, TEM, RBS and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, H; Quadakkers, W J; Singheiser, L

    2002-10-01

    In three different examples, the effects of the oxidation behaviour as well as the microstructural stability of high temperature materials and protective coatings was determined by combining the results of kinetic studies with extensive analytical investigations using, among other techniques, SNMS, SIMS, SEM, TEM, Rutherford back scattering (RBS) as well as X-ray diffraction. 1). The effect of water vapour on the oxidation behaviour of 9% Cr steels in simulated combustion gases has been determined. The effects of O2 and H2O content on the oxidation behaviour of 9% Cr steel in the temperature range 600-800 degrees C showed that in dry oxygen a protective scale was formed with an oxidation rate controlled by diffusion in the protective scale. In the presence of water vapour, after an incubation period, the scales became non-protective as a result of a change in the oxidation limiting process. The destruction of the protective scale by water vapour does not only depend on H2O content but also on the H2O/O2-ratio. 2). The increase of component surface temperature in modern gas turbines leads to an enhanced oxidation attack of the blade coating. Improvements in corrosion resistance and longer lifetime thermal barrier coatings in gas turbines have been achieved by improvement of the high temperature properties of MCrAlY coatings by additions of minor alloying elements such as yttrium, silicon and titanium. 3). The use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys provides excellent creep resistance up to much higher temperatures than can be achieved with conventional wrought or cast alloys in combination with suitable high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance. Investigation of the growth mechanisms of protective chromia and alumina scales were examined by a two-stage oxidation method with 18O tracer. The distribution of the oxygen isotopes in the oxide scale was determined by SIMS and SNMS. The results show the positive influence of a Y2O3 dispersion on the

  4. Evidence of a close link between petrology and isotope records: constraints from SEM, EMP, TEM and in situ 40Ar- 39Ar laser analyses on multiple generations of white micas (Lanterman Range, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Ghiribelli, Barbara; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Palmeri, Rosaria

    2001-10-01

    K-Ar ages from white mica are commonly interpreted to record cooling below a certain temperature with the implicit assumption that all the requirements of the volume diffusion theory are fulfilled. Nevertheless, studies on metamorphic white micas have highlighted discrepancies with previously inferred closure temperatures and have evidenced a close link between petrology and argon isotope age records. This study uses the in situ 40Ar- 39Ar laserprobe method in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to examine the relations between argon isotope records and microtextural, microchemical and microstructural variations in white mica. Gneisses and micaschists belonging to three different tectono-metamorphic complexes of the Lanterman Range (Antarctica) contain multiple generations of potassic white micas and are well-suited to investigate the relation between petrology and argon dating. Texturally resolvable white mica generations show microchemical and microstructural (TEM scale) variations that suggest development under different P- T deformation regimes, ranging from an eclogite facies stage down to low greenschist facies conditions. In situ 40Ar- 39Ar laserprobe analyses on white mica samples from the three complexes reveal a complex intragrain and intergrain spatial distribution of argon ages which is closely linked to microtextural, microchemical and microstructural variations: texturally, compositionally and microstructurally older generations yield older ages whereas the younger ones yield younger ages. Results show that in the absence of re-crystallisation, white mica preserves argon isotope records pertaining to the high-pressure stage which survived amphibolite retrogression at temperatures of 550-650°C. The texture, petrology and isotope record of white micas in the studied samples preserve a nearly continuous record of P, T and deformation history within the same orogenic

  5. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. PMID:21721701

  6. TEM and SEM (EBIC) investigations of silicon bicrystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleichmann, R.; Ast, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical and structural properties of low and medium angle tilt grain boundaries in silicon bicrystals were studied in order to obtain insight into the mechanisms determining the recombination activity. The electrical behavior of these grain boundaries was studied with the EBIC technique. Schottky barriers rather than p-n junctions were used to avoid annealing induced changes of the structure and impurity content of the as-grown crystals. Transmission electron spectroscopy reveals that the 20 deg boundary is straight, homogeneous, and free of extrinsic dislocations. It is concluded that, in the samples studied, the electrical effect of grain boundaries appears to be independent of the boundary misorientation. The dominant influence appears to be impurity segregation effects to the boundary. Cleaner bicrystals are required to study intrinsic differences in the electrical activity of the two boundaries.

  7. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  8. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  9. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  10. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  11. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  12. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation. PMID:26694687

  13. Shocked Quartz in the SEM: Distinction Between Amorphous and Healed PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, M. F.; Pennock, G. M.; Drury, M. R.

    2012-09-01

    Combined SEM techniques show that different CL signatures of PDFs are related to fresh and healed microstructures of PDFs and host quartz. This is confirmed by TEM results. A combination of SEM techniques can give the same type of information as TEM.

  14. The Aberration Corrected SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, David C.

    2005-09-09

    The performance of the conventional low-energy CD-SEM is limited by the aberrations inherent in the probe forming lens. Multi-pole correctors are now available which can reduce or eliminate these aberrations. An SEM equipped with such a corrector offers higher spatial resolution and more probe current from a given electron source, and other aspects of the optical performance are also improved, but the much higher numerical aperture associated with an aberration corrected lens results in a reduction in imaging depth of field.

  15. PM APPORTIONMENT: SEM METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy combined with individual-particle X-ray analysis (CCSEM or SEM/EDX) is being used to measure the chemical and physical characteristics of ambient and source-derived particles. CCSEM can determine particle size, shape and major che...

  16. Single ricin detection by AFM chemomechanical mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research reports a method of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified gold (Au;111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single...

  17. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  18. SEM/AFM studies of cementitious binder modified by MWCNT and nano-sized Fe needles

    SciTech Connect

    Cwirzen, A.; Habermehl-Cwirzen, K.; Nasibulin, A.G.; Kaupinen, E.I.; Mudimela, P.R.; Penttala, V.

    2009-07-15

    Several compositions of cement paste samples containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes were produced using a small-size vacuum mixer. The mixes had water-to-binder ratios of 0.25 and 0.3. Sulfate resistant cement has been used. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes were introduced as a water suspension with added surfactant admixtures. The used surfactant acted as plasticizing agents for the cement paste and as dispersant for the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. A set of beams was produced to determine the compressive and flexural strengths. The scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope studies of fractured and polished samples showed a good dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the cement matrix. The studies revealed also sliding of multiwalled carbon nanotubes from the matrix in tension which indicates their weak bond with cement matrix. In addition to multiwalled carbon nanotubes also steel wires covered with ferrite needles were investigated to determine the bond strength between the matrix and the steel wire. These later samples consisted of 15-mm-high cylinders of cement paste with vertically cast-in steel wires. As reference, plain steel wires were cast, too. The bond strength between steel wires covered with nano-sized Fe needles appeared to be lower in comparison with the reference wires. The scanning electron microscope studies of fractured samples indicated on brittle nature of Fe needles resulting in shear-caused breakage of the bond to the matrix.

  19. Pregrowth and Biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis on Glass Studied via AFM, SEM and Optical Microsopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, Sydney; Otte, Michelle; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Reshani; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2014-03-01

    Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania - Research into surface adhesion properties and the selectivity of bacteria towards glass will provide a better understanding of biofilm formation and how this formation will in turn effect hospital and laboratory settings. Investigation was focused on quantifying the selectivity of non-pathogenic B. subtilis - on soda lime glass substrates. Standardized Corning 2947-75X25 microscope glass slides were used as the surface for bacterial attachment and facilitation of preliminary growth and formation of biofilms. Observations will be discussed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Structure morphology was investigated via Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and complemented with Optical Microscopy.

  20. ezAFM: A low cost Atomic Force Microscope(AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Umit; Celik, Kubra; Aslan, Husnu; Kehribar, Ihsan; Dede, Munir; Ozgur Ozer, H.; Oral, Ahmet

    2012-02-01

    A low cost AFM, ezAFM is developed for educational purposes as well as research. Optical beam deflection method is used to measure the deflection of cantilever. ezAFM scanner is built using voice coil motors (VCM) with ˜50x50x6 μm scan area. The microscope uses alignment free cantilevers, which minimizes setup times. FPGA based AFM feedback Control electronics is developed. FPGA technology allows us to drive all peripherals in parallel. ezAFM Controller is connected to PC by USB 2.0 interface as well as Wi-Fi. We have achieved <5nm lateral and ˜0.01nm vertical resolution. ezAFM can image single atomic steps in HOPG and mica. An optical microscope with <3 μm resolution is also integrated into the system. ezAFM supports different AFM operation modes such as dynamic mode, contact mode, lateral force microscopy. Advanced modes like magnetic force microscopy and electric force microscopy will be implemented later on. The new ezAFM system provides, short learning times for student labs, quick setup and easy to transport for portable applications with the best price/performance ratio. The cost of the system starts from 15,000, with system performance comparable with the traditional AFM systems.

  1. High precision attachment of silver nanoparticles on AFM tips by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Leiterer, Christian; Wünsche, Erik; Singh, Prabha; Albert, Jens; Köhler, Johann M; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    AFM tips are modified with silver nanoparticles using an AC electrical field. The used technique works with sub-micron precision and also does not require chemical modification of the tip. Based on the electrical parameters applied in the process, particle density and particle position on the apex of the tip can be adjusted. The feasibility of the method is proven by subsequent tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) measurements using the fabricated tips as a measurement probe. Since this modification process itself does not require any lithographic processing, the technique can be easily adapted to modify AFM tips with a variety of nanostructures with pre-defined properties, while being parallelizable for a potential commercial application. Graphical abstract Silver nanoparticles attached to AFM tips using dielectrophoresis. Comparing nanoparticles attached using 1 kHz (left) to 1 MHz (right), SEM and optical (inset) images. PMID:26968565

  2. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  3. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  4. Antimicrobial Potential and Chemical Characterization of Serbian Liverwort (Porella arboris-vitae): SEM and TEM Observations.

    PubMed

    Kumar Tyagi, Amit; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Veljic, Milan; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Malik, Anushree; Marin, Petar D

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of Porella arboris-vitae extracts was determined by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS), and 66 constituents were identified. The dominant compounds in methanol extract of P. arboris-vitae were β-caryophyllene (14.7%), α-gurjunene (10.9%), α-selinene (10.8%), β-elemene (5.6%), γ-muurolene (4.6%), and allo-aromadendrene (4.3%) and in ethanol extract, β-caryophyllene (11.8%), α-selinene (9.6%), α-gurjunene (9.4%), isopentyl alcohol (8.8%), 2-hexanol (3.7%), β-elemene (3.7%), allo-aromadendrene (3.7%), and γ-muurolene (3.3%) were the major components. In ethyl acetate extract of P. arboris-vitae, undecane (11.3%), β-caryophyllene (8.4%), dodecane (6.4%), α-gurjunene (6%), 2-methyldecane (5.1%), hemimellitene (4.9%), and D-limonene (3.9%) were major components. The antimicrobial activity of different P. arboris-vitae extracts was evaluated against selected food spoilage microorganisms using microbroth dilution method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) varied from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/mL and 1.25 to 2 mg/mL for yeast and bacterial strains, respectively. Significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations due to the effect of methanolic and ethanolic P. arboris-vitae extracts on S. Enteritidis have also been observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results provide the evidence of antimicrobial potential of P. arboris-vitae extracts and suggest its potential as natural antimicrobial agents for food preservation. PMID:23365607

  5. Antimicrobial Potential and Chemical Characterization of Serbian Liverwort (Porella arboris-vitae): SEM and TEM Observations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Tyagi, Amit; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Veljic, Milan; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Malik, Anushree; Marin, Petar D.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of Porella arboris-vitae extracts was determined by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS), and 66 constituents were identified. The dominant compounds in methanol extract of P. arboris-vitae were β-caryophyllene (14.7%), α-gurjunene (10.9%), α-selinene (10.8%), β-elemene (5.6%), γ-muurolene (4.6%), and allo-aromadendrene (4.3%) and in ethanol extract, β-caryophyllene (11.8%), α-selinene (9.6%), α-gurjunene (9.4%), isopentyl alcohol (8.8%), 2-hexanol (3.7%), β-elemene (3.7%), allo-aromadendrene (3.7%), and γ-muurolene (3.3%) were the major components. In ethyl acetate extract of P. arboris-vitae, undecane (11.3%), β-caryophyllene (8.4%), dodecane (6.4%), α-gurjunene (6%), 2-methyldecane (5.1%), hemimellitene (4.9%), and D-limonene (3.9%) were major components. The antimicrobial activity of different P. arboris-vitae extracts was evaluated against selected food spoilage microorganisms using microbroth dilution method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) varied from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/mL and 1.25 to 2 mg/mL for yeast and bacterial strains, respectively. Significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations due to the effect of methanolic and ethanolic P. arboris-vitae extracts on S. Enteritidis have also been observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results provide the evidence of antimicrobial potential of P. arboris-vitae extracts and suggest its potential as natural antimicrobial agents for food preservation. PMID:23365607

  6. Deformation microstructures of Barre granite: An optical, Sem and Tem study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schedl, A.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Tullis, J.

    1986-01-01

    New scanning electron microscope techniques have been developed for characterizing ductile deformation microstructures in felsic rocks. In addition, the thermomechanical history of the macroscopically undeformed Barre granite (Vermont, U.S.A.) has been reconstructed based on examination of deformation microstructures using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructures reveal three distinct events: 1. (1) a low-stress, high-temperature event that produced subgrains in feldspars, and subgrains and recrystallized grains in quartz; 2. (2) a high-stress, low-temperature event that produced a high dislocation density in quartz and feldspars; and 3. (3) a lowest-temperature event that produced cracks, oriented primarily along cleavage planes in feldspars, and parallel to the macroscopic rift in quartz. The first two events are believed to reflect various stages in the intrusion and cooling history of the pluton, and the last may be related to the last stages of cooling, or to later tectonism. ?? 1986.

  7. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Hiesgen, Renate; Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium-sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)(-1) after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  8. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)−1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  9. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  10. AFM indentation study of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.S.; Lee, G.Y.H.; Ong, C.N.; Lim, C.T.

    2008-10-03

    Mechanical properties of individual living cells are known to be closely related to the health and function of the human body. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation using a micro-sized spherical probe was carried out to characterize the elasticity of benign (MCF-10A) and cancerous (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells. AFM imaging and confocal fluorescence imaging were also used to investigate their corresponding sub-membrane cytoskeletal structures. Malignant (MCF-7) breast cells were found to have an apparent Young's modulus significantly lower (1.4-1.8 times) than that of their non-malignant (MCF-10A) counterparts at physiological temperature (37 deg. C), and their apparent Young's modulus increase with loading rate. Both confocal and AFM images showed a significant difference in the organization of their sub-membrane actin structures which directly contribute to their difference in cell elasticity. This change may have facilitated easy migration and invasion of malignant cells during metastasis.

  11. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  12. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  13. A Batch Fabricated SECM-AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, P. S.; Macpherson, J. V.; Holder, M.; Weaver, J. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A scheme for the fabrication of combined Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy — Atomic Force Microscopy (SECM-AFM) probes is presented for both silicon nitride and silicon cantilevers. The advantages over exsisting methods used for their production is explained. The process flow is described and initial results from electrodeposition of silver are presented.

  14. RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

  15. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Phil

    1991-01-01

    The Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7) test was a full-scale, full duration static test firing of a high performance motor-configuration solid rocket motor with nozzle vectoring. The final test report documents the procedures, performance, and results of the static test firing of TEM-7. All observations, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations included in the report are complete and final except for the TEM-7 fixed housing unbond investigation. A presentation and discussion of TEM-7 performance, anomalies, and test result concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0107, Rev A, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-7) Static Fire Test Plan are included.

  16. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Duff, M.

    2008-10-07

    High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study

  17. Applications of AFM in semiconductor R&D and manufacturing at 45 nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moon-Keun; Shin, Minjung; Bao, Tianming; Song, Chul-Gi; Dawson, Dean; Ihm, Dong-Chul; Ukraintsev, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    Continuing demand for high performance microelectronic products propelled integrated circuit technology into 45 nm node and beyond. The shrinking device feature geometry created unprecedented challenges for dimension metrology in semiconductor manufacturing and research and development. Automated atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to meet the challenge and characterize narrower lines, trenches and holes at 45nm technology node and beyond. AFM is indispensable metrology techniques capable of non-destructive full three-dimensional imaging, surface morphology characterization and accurate critical dimension (CD) measurements. While all available dimensional metrology techniques approach their limits, AFM continues to provide reliable information for development and control of processes in memory, logic, photomask, image sensor and data storage manufacturing. In this paper we review up-todate applications of automated AFM in every mentioned above semiconductor industry sector. To demonstrate benefits of AFM at 45 nm node and beyond we compare capability of automated AFM with established in-line and off-line metrologies like critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM), optical scatterometry (OCD) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM).

  18. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  19. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  20. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10) was static fired on 27 Apr. 1993 at the Thiokol Corporation full-scale motor static test bay, T-24. This final test report documents the procedures, performance, and results of the static test firing of TEM-10. All observations, discussions, conclusions, and recommendations contained are final. Included is a presentation and discussion of TEM-10 performance, anomalies, and test results in concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0110, Revision D, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor No. 10 (TEM-10) Static Fire Test Plan.

  1. Observations from TEM Analysis of Swift Creek Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Samples analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) from suspended sediments in Swift Creek have unique characteristics compared to other naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) sites across the country. Our first introduction to the uniqueness of the Swift Creek site came about when we analyzed soil sediments by polarized light microscopy (PLM) and found relatively low or nonexistent levels of chrysotile asbestos. Upon submission of these samples for TEM analysis, we found that the samples were literally filled with small chrysotile fibers and bundles. We also notice a high number of dark, rounded particles which were not asbestiform. Out of curiosity, we viewed the surface features of one of these particles using scanning electron microscopy to find compacted chrysotile fibers bundled inside these particles. These particles contained the vast majority of chrysotile in the sample. This finding began our approach to provide more advanced TEM/SEM methods for identifying and characterizing complex arrangements of asbestos from NOA sites. We will present some of our experiences and methods for characterizing these types of particles common to NOA sites.

  2. AFM-based force microsensor for a microrobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatikow, Sergej; Fahlbusch, Stephan

    2001-10-01

    Microrobots are the result of increasing research activities at the border between microsystem technology and robotics. Today already, robots with dimensions of a few cubic- centimeters can be developed. Like conventional robots, microrobots represent a complex system that usually contains several different types of actuators and sensors. The measurement of gripping forces is the most important sensor application in micromanipulation besides visual servoing to protect the parts from too high surface pressures and thereby damage during the assembly process. Very small forces in the range of 200 (mu) N down to 0.1 (mu) N or even less have to be sensed. Thus, the aim of our current research activities is the development of a high-resolution integrated force microsensor for measuring gripping forces in a microhandling robot. On the one hand, the sensor should be a device for teleoperated manipulation tasks in a flexible microhandling station. On the other hand, typical microhandling operations should to a large extend be automated with the aid of computer-based signal processing of sensor information. The user should be provided with an interface for teleoperated manipulation and an interface for partially automated manipulation of microobjects. In this paper, a concept for the measurement of gripping forces in microrobotics using piezoresistive AFM (atomic force microscope) cantilevers is introduced. Further on, the concept of a microrobot-based SEM station and its applications are presented.

  3. AFM and TEM study of cyclic slip localization in fatigued ferritic X10CrAl24 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Man, J. . E-mail: man@ipm.cz; Petrenec, M.; Obrtlik, K.; Polak, J.

    2004-11-08

    Atomic force microscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy were applied to the study of surface relief evolution at emerging persistent slip bands (PSBs) in individual grains of ferritic X10CrAl24 stainless steel cycled with constant plastic strain amplitude. Only the combination of both methods can reveal the true shape and fine details of extrusions and intrusions. Quantitative data on the changes of the surface topography of persistent slip markings and on the kinetics of extrusion growth during the fatigue life were obtained. Transmission electron microscopy of surface foils revealed PSBs with the typical, well-known ladder structure. Experimental data on cyclic slip localization in PSBs are compared with those in fcc metals and discussed in terms of vacancy models of surface relief evolution and fatigue crack initiation.

  4. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. SEM: A Cultural Change Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bradley; Bourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The authors advance the concept that institutional culture is a purposeful framework by which to view SEM's utility, particularly as a cultural change agent. Through the connection of seemingly independent functions of performance and behavior, implications emerge that deepen the understanding of the influence of culture on performance outcomes…

  6. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell. PMID:27562998

  7. Technical Evaluation Motor no. 5 (TEM-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1990-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor No. 5 (TEM-5) was static test fired at the Thiokol Corporation Static Test Bay T-97. TEM-5 was a full scale, full duration static test fire of a high performance motor (HPM) configuration solid rocket motor (SRM). The primary purpose of TEM static tests is to recover SRM case and nozzle hardware for use in the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) flight program. Inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-5 static test firing was successful. The ambient temperature during the test was 41 F and the propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) was 72 F. Ballistics performance values were within the specified requirements. The overall performance of the TEM-5 components and test equipment was nominal. Dissembly inspection revealed that joint putty was in contact with the inner groove of the inner primary seal of the ignitor adapter-to-forward dome (inner) joint gasket; this condition had not occurred on any previous static test motor or flight RSRM. While no qualification issues were addressed on TEM-5, two significant component changes were evaluated. Those changes were a new vented assembly process for the case-to-nozzle joint and the installation of two redesigned field joint protection systems. Performance of the vented case-to-nozzle joint assembly was successful, and the assembly/performance differences between the two field joint protection system (FJPS) configurations were compared.

  8. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  10. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. Reconstruction of an AFM image based on estimation of the tip shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Luan, Fangjun; Song, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lianqing; Liu, Jifei

    2013-10-01

    From the viewpoint of mathematical morphology, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) image contains the distortion effect of the tip convolution on a real sample surface. If tip shape can be characterized accurately, mathematical deconvolution can be applied to reduce the distortion to obtain more precise AFM images. AFM image reconstruction has practical significance in nanoscale observation and manipulation technology. Among recent tip modeling algorithms, the blind tip evaluation algorithm based on mathematical morphology is widely used. However, it takes considerable computing time, and the noise threshold is hard to optimize. To tackle these problems, a new blind modeling method is proposed in this paper to accelerate the computation of the algorithm and realize the optimum threshold estimation to build a precise tip model. The simulation verifies the efficiency of the new algorithm by comparing the computing time with the original one. The calculated tip shape is also validated by comparison with the SEM image of the tip. Finally, the reconstruction of a carbon nanotube image based on the precise tip model illustrates the feasibility and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  12. SEM metrology for advanced lithographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Rice, Bryan J.; Byers, Jeff; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-zvi, Maayan; Adan, Ofer; Swyers, John; Shneck, Roni Z.

    2007-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle for keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. The industry standard lithographic wavelength has evolved many times, from G-line to I-line, deep ultraviolet (DUV) based on KrF, and 193nm based on ArF. At each of these steps, new photoresist materials have been used. For the 45nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques are being considered, including immersion ArF lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability of printing 45nm node (and beyond) feature widths and pitches. This paper will show results of an evaluation of the critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM)-based metrology capabilities and limitations for the 193nm immersion and EUV lithography techniques that are suggested in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. In this study, we will print wafers with these emerging technologies and evaluate the performance of SEM-based metrology on these features. We will conclude with preliminary findings on the readiness of SEM metrology for these new challenges.

  13. Analysis of Open TEM-Waveguide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambousky, R.; Garbe, H.

    This work belongs to a research project on the analysis and characterization of higher order modes occurring in open TEM-waveguide structures. An open TEM waveguide, derived from a conventional GTEM cell by removing the sidewalls, is investigated. The intrinsic resonances of the electromagnetic field occurring in the test volume of the waveguide are analyzed in frequency domain by computer simulation and measurement. This resonance behavior is compared to that of more simplified wire models, describing just the planar septum of the original TEM waveguide. The influence of the number of wires used in the wire model is investigated with respect to the resonant behavior. The use of wire structures is a prerequisite for application of transmission-line super theory (TLST) for further analysis.

  14. Technical Evaluation Motor No. 7 (TEM-07)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugh, Phil

    1991-01-01

    Technical Evaluation Motor Number 7 (TEM-7) was a full scale, full-duration static test firing of a high performance motor (HPM) configuration solid rocket motor (SRM) with nozzle vectoring. The static test fire occurred on 11 December 1990 at the Thiokol Corporation Static Test Bay T-97. Documented here are the procedures, performance, and results available through 22 January 1991. Critical post test hardware activities and assessment of the test data are not complete. A completed test report will be submitted 60 days after the test date. Included here is a presentation and discussion of the TEM-7 performance, anomalies, and test result concurrence with the objectives outlined in CTP-0107 Revision A, Space Shuttle Technical Evaluation Motor number 7 (TEM-07) Static Fire Test Plan.

  15. TEM-nanoindentation studies of semiconducting structures.

    PubMed

    Le Bourhis, E; Patriarche, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of nanoindentation coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigations of the plastic behaviour of semiconducting structures and its implication for device design. Instrumented nanoindentation has been developed to extract the mechanical behaviour of small volumes scaled to those encountered in semiconductor heterostructures. We illustrate that TEM is a powerful complementary tool for the study of local plasticity induced by nanoindentation. TEM-nanoindentation allows for detailed understanding of the plastic deformation in semiconducting structures and opens practical routes for improvement of devices. Performances of heterostructures are deteriously affected by dislocations that relax the lattice mismatched layers. Different ways to obtain compliant substructures are being developed in order to concentrate the plastic relaxation underneath the heterostructure. Such approaches allow for mechanical design of micro- and opto-electronic devices to be considered throughout the fabrication process. PMID:16901706

  16. Achieving 50 nm lateral-resolution quantitative EDX SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Lozano-Perez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) has become a very promising approach to perform Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) chemical mapping with high- lateral resolution [1]. Using voltages as low as 1.5keV, sub-10nm resolutions can be achieved. In this work, we try to take advantage of the small interaction volume in order to simplify the otherwise more complex SEM quantitative methodology. This way, phenomena such as absorption and fluorescence can be ignored and, effectively treat the quantification as with the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)-based Cliff-Lorimer method. Experimental k- factors have been obtained from a series of standards and used to quantify complex oxide phases in steels.

  17. Particle deformation induced by AFM tapping under different setpoint voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Lin; Farkas, Natalia; Dagata, John A.; He, Bo-Ching; Fu, Wei-En

    2014-09-01

    The measured height of polystyrene nanoparticles varies with setpoint voltage during atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping-mode imaging. Nanoparticle height was strongly influenced by the magnitude of the deformation caused by the AFM tapping forces, which was determined by the setpoint voltage. This influence quantity was studied by controlling the operational AFM setpoint voltage. A test sample consisting of well-dispersed 60-nm polystyrene and gold nanoparticles co-adsorbed on poly-l-lysine-coated mica was studied in this research. Gold nanoparticles have not only better mechanical property than polystyrene nanoparticles, but also obvious facets in AFM phase image. By using this sample of mixed nanoparticles, it allows us to confirm that the deformation resulted from the effect of setpoint voltage, not noise. In tapping mode, the deformation of polystyrene nanoparticles increased with decreasing setpoint voltage. Similar behavior was observed with both open loop and closed loop AFM instruments.

  18. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context.

    PubMed

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, M K; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; VAN Brempt, R; Visser, Y; Guérin, C J

    2015-08-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many years scientists struggled to achieve three-dimensional (3D) EM using serial section reconstructions, TEM tomography, and scanning EM (SEM) techniques such as freeze-fracture. Although each technique yielded some special information, they required a significant amount of time and specialist expertise to obtain even a very small 3D EM dataset. Almost 20 years ago scientists began to exploit SEMs to image blocks of embedded tissues and perform serial sectioning of these tissues inside the SEM chamber. Using first focused ion beams (FIB) and subsequently robotic ultramicrotomes (serial block-face, SBF-SEM) microscopists were able to collect large volumes of 3D EM information at resolutions that could address many important biological questions, and do so in an efficient manner. We present here some examples of 3D EM taken from the many diverse specimens that have been imaged in our core facility. We propose that the next major step forward will be to efficiently correlate functional information obtained using light microscopy (LM) with 3D EM datasets to more completely investigate the important links between cell structures and their functions. PMID:25623622

  19. Cryo-SEM of hydrated high temperature proton exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R; Benicewicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Alternative energy technologies, such as high temperature fuel cells and hydrogen pumps, rely on proton exchange membranes (PEM). A chemically and thermally stable PEM with rapid proton transport is sol-gel phosphoric acid (PA)-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes. It is believed that the key to the high ionic conductivity of PA-doped PBI membranes is related to the gel morphology. However, the gel structure and general morphology of this PA-doped PBI membrane has not been widely investigated. In an effort to understand the gel morphology, two SEM sample preparation methodologies have been developed for PA-doped PBI membranes. Due to the high vacuum environment of conventional SEM, the beam-sensitivity of these membranes was reduced with a mild 120 C heat treatment to remove excess water without structural rearrangement (as verified from wide angle X-ray scattering). Cryo-SEM has also been implemented for both initial and heated membranes. Cryo-SEM is known to prevent dehydration of the specimen and reduce beam-sensitivity. The SEM cross-section image (Fig. 1A) of the heated samples exhibit 3{micro}m spheroidal features that are elongated in the direction of the casting blade. These features are distorted to 2{micro}m under conventional SEM conditions (Fig. 1B). The fine-scale gel morphology image (Fig. 2) is composed of 65nm diameter domains and 30nm walls, which resembles a cellular structure. In the future, the PA-doped PBI membranes will be cryo-microtomed and cryotransferred for elemental analysis in a TEM.

  20. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  1. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  2. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Silver Trees: Chemistry on a TEM Grid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The copper/carbon substrate of a TEM grid reacted with aqueous silver nitrate solution within minutes to yield spectacular tree-like silver dendrites, without using any added capping or reducing reagents. These results demonstrate a facile, aqueous, room temperature synthesis of...

  4. Test for English Majors (TEM) in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Yan; Fan, Jinsong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Test for English Majors (TEM) is to measure the English proficiency of Chinese university undergraduates majoring in English Language and Literature and to examine whether these students meet the required levels of English language abilities as specified in the National College English Teaching Syllabus for English Majors…

  5. Experimental Space Weathering of Ordinary Chondrites by Nanopulse Laser: TEM Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Hiroi, T.; Keller, L. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    A set of ordinary chondrite meteorites has been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser to simulate the effects of micrometeorite bombardment. Three meteorites, an H (Ehole), L (Chateau Renard - CR), and LL (Appley Bridge - AB) were lasered following the method of Sasaki et al [1]. Near IR spectra were taken before and after exposure to examine the optical changes induced and the samples were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) to understand the physical changes.

  6. Segmental calibration for commercial AFM in vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Lu, Mingzhen; Li, Wei; Xu, Xuefang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is most widely applied in scientific research and industrial production. AFM is a scanning probe imaging and measuring device, useful for physical and chemical studies. Depends on its basic structure, microscopic surface pattern can be measured and captured by mechanically scanning. Its vertical and horizon resolution can reach to 0.01nm and 0.1nm. Commonly the measurement values of commercial AFM are directly from scanning piezoelectric tube, so that it not a traceable value. In order to solve the problem of commercial AFM's traceability, step height standard references are applied to calibrate the piezoelectric ceramic housing in scanning tube. All of the serial of step height standard references, covering the commercial AFM vertical scale, are calibrated by Metrology AFM developed by National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Three interferometers have been assembled in its XYZ axis, therefore the measurement value can directly trace to laser wavelength. Because of nonlinear characteristic of PZT, the method of segmental calibration is proposed. The measurement scale can be divided into several subsections corresponding to the calibrated values of the series of step height standards references. By this method the accuracy of measurements can be ensured in each segment measurement scale and the calibration level of the whole instrument can be promoted. In order to get a standard step shape by commercial AFM, substrate removal method is applied to deal with the bow shape problem.

  7. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Dhaliwal, A. S.; Sonkawade, R. G.

    2013-02-05

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV {sup 60}Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  8. Dynamics of the nanoneedle probe in trolling mode AFM.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ahmad; Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat; Keramati, Ramtin; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2015-05-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), as an indispensable tool for nanoscale characterization, presents major drawbacks for operation in a liquid environment arising from the large hydrodynamic drag on the vibrating cantilever. The newly introduced 'Trolling mode' (TR-mode) AFM resolves this complication by using a specialized nanoneedle cantilever that keeps the cantilever outside of the liquid. Herein, a mechanical model with a lumped mass was developed to capture the dynamics of such a cantilever with a nanoneedle tip. This new developed model was applied to investigate the effects of the needle-liquid interface on the performance of the AFM, including the imaging capability in liquid. PMID:25915451

  9. AFM Studies of Conformational Changes in Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Sukthankar, Pinakin; Tomich, John; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present estimates of molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors for some examples of proteins and peptides. The results are obtained from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. To determine molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors we developed a model based on measuring several resonance frequencies of an AFM cantilever in contact with either single protein molecule or peptides adsorbed on arbitrary surface. We used compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio - a ratio of length to width - in air and in liquid, including biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium. Department of Physics.

  10. Physical approach of seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua

    2010-05-01

    Numerous seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) have been reported independently and even been applied to short-term prediction of earthquakes, still SEMS are on great debates. The main concerns include the physical generation mechanism of SEMS. Thus, the study on physics of SEMS is important for understanding SEMS phenomena and strengthening the applications of SEMS. As a potential physical approach, we present an integrated working scheme, which take into account the interaction among observation, methodology and physical model. The main approach includes the following key problems: how to perform a reliable and appropriate observation; how to reveal weak SEMS signals from noisy background; how to develop physical models based on theoretical analyses and/or laboratory experiments for SEMS. This study is supported by the National R&D Special Fund for Public Welfare Industry (200808069) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (40974038, 40774028, 40821062).

  11. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1996-09-10

    On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

  12. 10nm three-dimensional CD-SEM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladár, András. E.; Villarrubia, John S.; Chawla, Jasmeet; Ming, Bin; Kline, Joseph R.; List, Scott; Postek, Michael T.

    2014-04-01

    The shape and dimensions of a challenging pattern have been measured using a model-based library scanning electron microscope (MBL SEM) technique. The sample consisted of a 4-line repeating pattern. Lines were narrow (10 nm), asymmetric (different edge angles and significant rounding on one corner but not the other), and situated in a complex neighborhood, with neighboring lines as little as 10 nm or as much as 28 nm distant. The shape cross-section determined by this method was compared to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and critical dimension small angle x-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) measurements of the same sample with good agreement. A recently-developed image composition method was used to obtain sharp SEM images, in which blur from vibration and drift were minimized. A Monte Carlo SEM simulator (JMONSEL) produced a model-based library that was interpolated to produce the best match to measured SEM images. Three geometrical and instrument parameterizations were tried. The first was a trapezoidal geometry. In the second one corner was significantly rounded. In the last, the electron beam was permitted to arrive with stray tilt. At each stage, the fit to the data improved by a statistically significant amount, demonstrating that the measurement remained sensitive to the new parameter. Because the measured values represent the average unit cell, the associated repeatabilities are at the tenths of a nanometer level, similar to scatterometry and other area-averaging techniques, but the SEM's native high spatial resolution also permitted observation of defects and other local departures from the average.

  13. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  14. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  15. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis. PMID:24056758

  16. The Conductance of Nanotubes Deformed by the AFM Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anantram, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The conductance drop under AFM-tip deformation can be explained by stretching of the tube length. NT sensors can be built utilizing uniform stretching. Single sp3 bond cross section cannot block electrons, because another conducting path may exist. AFM tip which forms sp3 bonds with the tube will decrease conductance. In the "table experiment" a conductance drop of 2 orders of magnitude happened only after some bonds were broken.

  17. Characterization of the interaction between AFM tips and surface nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-06-24

    While the presence of gaseous enclosures observed at various solid-water interfaces, the so-called "surface nanobubles", has been confirmed by many groups in recent years, their formation, properties, and stability have not been convincingly and exhaustively explained. Here we report on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of argon nanobubbles on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) in water to elucidate the properties of nanobubble surfaces and the mechanism of AFM tip-nanobubble interaction. In particular, the deformation of the nanobubble-water interface by the AFM tip and the question whether the AFM tip penetrates the nanobubble during scanning were addressed by this combined intermittent contact (tapping) mode and force volume AFM study. We found that the stiffness of nanobubbles was smaller than the cantilever spring constant and comparable with the surface tension of water. The interaction with the AFM tip resulted in severe quasi-linear deformation of the bubbles; however, in the case of tip-bubble attraction, the interface deformed toward the tip. We tested two models of tip-bubble interaction, namely, the capillary force and the dynamic interaction model, and found, depending on the tip properties, good agreement with experimental data. The results showed that the tip-bubble interaction strength and the magnitude of the bubble deformation depend strongly on tip and bubble geometry and on tip and substrate material, and are very sensitive to the presence of contaminations that alter the interfacial tension. In particular, nanobubbles interacted differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic AFM tips, which resulted in qualitatively and quantitatively different force curves measured on the bubbles in the experiments. To minimize bubble deformation and obtain reliable AFM results, nanobubbles must be measured with a sharp hydrophilic tip and with a cantilever having a very low spring constant in a contamination-free system. PMID:24856074

  18. Modeling the Interaction between AFM Tips and Pinned Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenjiang; Liu, Yawei; Xiao, Qianxiang; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Xianren

    2016-01-26

    Although the morphology of surface nanobubbles has been studied widely with different AFM modes, AFM images may not reflect the real shapes of the nanobubbles due to AFM tip-nanobubble interactions. In addition, the interplay between surface nanobubble deformation and induced capillary force has not been well understood in this context. In our work we used constraint lattice density functional theory to investigate the interaction between AFM tips and pinned surface nanobubbles systematically, especially concentrating on the effects of tip hydrophilicity and shape. For a hydrophilic tip contacting a nanobubble, its hydrophilic nature facilitates its departure from the bubble surface, displaying a weak and intermediate-range attraction. However, when the tip squeezes the nanobubble during the approach process, the nanobubble shows an elastic effect that prevents the tip from penetrating the bubble, leading to a strong nanobubble deformation and repulsive interactions. On the contrary, a hydrophobic tip can easily pierce the vapor-liquid interface of the nanobubble during the approach process, leading to the disappearance of the repulsive force. In the retraction process, however, the adhesion between the tip and the nanobubble leads to a much stronger lengthening effect on nanobubble deformation and a strong long-range attractive force. The trends of force evolution from our simulations agree qualitatively well with recent experimental AFM observations. This favorable agreement demonstrates that our model catches the main intergradient of tip-nanobubble interactions for pinned surface nanobubbles and may therefore provide important insight into how to design minimally invasive AFM experiments. PMID:26751634

  19. Characterization of magnetite in silico-aluminous fly ash by SEM, TEM, XRD, magnetic susceptibility, and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Abdelmoula, M.; Refait, P.; Pellissier, C.; Evrard, O.

    1999-11-01

    Spinel magnetite contained in a silico-aluminous fly ash (originating from la Maxe's power plant, near Metz in the east of France) issued from bituminous coal combustion has been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy linked with energy dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction, susceptibility measurements, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The results show that in this magnetite Mg is strongly substituted for Fe and the chemical formula is closer to MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Magnetite also contains Mn, Ca, and Si elements, but at a lower proportion. The results are compatible with the chemical formula Fe{sub 2.08}Mg{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.11}Ca{sub 0.04}Si{sub 0.02}O{sub 4} and crystallochemical formula [Fe{sup 2{minus}}{sub 0.92}Ca{sup 2+}{sub 0.06}Si{sup 4+}{sub 0.02}]{sup tetra}[Fe{sup 3+}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 0.16}Mg{sup 2+}{sub 0.73}Mn{sup 2+}{sub 0.11}]{sup octa}O{sub 4}, showing the cation distribution on octahedral and tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure. The reason Mg element is not incorporated in soluble surface salt and in glass composition of the silico-aluminous fly ashes is now understood.

  20. Epifluorescence, SEM, TEM and nanoSIMS image analysis of the cold phenotype of Clostridium psychrophilum at subzero temperatures.

    PubMed

    Perfumo, Amedea; Elsaesser, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Foster, Rachel A; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Cockell, Charles S; Kminek, Gerhard

    2014-12-01

    We have applied an image-based approach combining epifluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) with stable isotope probing to examine directly the characteristic cellular features involved in the expression of the cold phenotype in the Antarctic bacterium Clostridium psychrophilum exposed to a temperature range from +5 to -15 °C under anoxic conditions. We observed dramatic morphological changes depending on temperature. At temperatures below -10 °C, cell division was inhibited and consequently filamentous growth predominated. Bacterial cells appeared surrounded by a remarkably thick cell wall and a capsule formed of long exopolysaccharide fibres. Moreover, bacteria were entirely embedded within a dense extracellular matrix, suggesting a role both in cryo-protection and in the cycling of nutrients and genetic material. Strings of extracellular DNA, transient cell membrane permeability and release of membrane vesicles were observed that suggest that evolution via transfer of genetic material may be especially active under frozen conditions. While at -5 °C, the bacterial population was metabolically healthy, at temperatures below -10 °C, most cells showed no sign of active metabolism or the metabolic flux was extremely slowed down; instead of being consumed, carbon was accumulated and stored in intracellular granules as in preparation for a long-term survival. PMID:25319134

  1. Structural stress responses and degradation of dictyosomes in algae analysed by TEM and FIB-SEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Lütz-Meindl, U; Luckner, M; Andosch, A; Wanner, G

    2016-08-01

    Stress-induced physiological deficiencies in cells are reflected in structural, morphological and functional reactions of organelles. Although numerous investigations have focused on chloroplasts and mitochondria as main targets of different stressors in plant cells, there is insufficient information on the plant Golgi apparatus as stress sensor. By using the advantages of field emission scanning electron microscopy tomography in combination with classical ultrathin sectioning and transmission electron microscopic analyses, we provide structural evidence for common stress responses of the large and highly stable dictyosomes in the algal model system Micrasterias. Stress is induced by different metals such as manganese and lead, by starvation in 9 weeks of darkness or by inhibiting photosynthesis or glycolysis and by disturbing ionic homeostasis via KCl. For the first time a stress-induced degradation pathway of dictyosomes is described that does not follow "classical" autophagy but occurs by disintegration of cisternae into single membrane balls that seem to be finally absorbed by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Comparison of the morphological features that accompany dictyosomal degradation in Micrasterias to similar reactions observed during the same stress application in Nitella indicates an ubiquitous degradation process at least in algae. As the algae investigated belong to the closest relatives of higher land plants these results may also be relevant for understanding dictyosomal stress and degradation responses in the latter phylogenetic group. In addition, this study shows that two-dimensional transmission electron microscopy is insufficient for elucidating complex processes such as organelle degradation, and that information from three-dimensional reconstructions as provided by field emission scanning electron microscopy tomography is absolutely required for a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon. PMID:26708415

  2. 2.5 D Transrotational Microcrystals and Nanostructures Revealed by TEM in Crystallizing Amorphous Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Unexpected transrotational microcrystals can be grown in thin 10-100 nm amorphous films. Crystals of different morphology (from nanowhiskers to spherulites, complex textures) and chemical nature (oxides, chalcogenides, metals and alloys) grown in thin films prepared by various methods are studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We use primarily our TEM bend-contour method and SAED (HREM, AFM are also performed). The phenomenon resides in strong (up to 300 degrees/ μm) regular internal bending of crystal lattice planes in a growing crystal. It can be traced inside TEM in situ. Usual translation is complicated by slight regular rotation of the crystal unit cell (transrotation) most prominent at the mesoscale. Different geometries of transrotation of positive and negative curvature are revealed. Transrotational crystal resembles ideal single crystal enclosed in a curved space. It can be also considered similar to hypothetical endless 2.5 D analogy of MW nanotube/nano-onion halves. Transrotation is strongly increasing as the film gets thinner in the range 100-15 nm. Transrotations supplement dislocations and disclinations. New transrotational nanocrystalline model of amorphous state is proposed. Support of Ministry of Higher Education and Science is acknowledged.

  3. Automated transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) for large volume analysis at nanoscale resolution.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Masaaki; Mendenhall, John M; Lindsey, Laurence F; Harris, Kristen M

    2013-01-01

    Transmission-mode scanning electron microscopy (tSEM) on a field emission SEM platform was developed for efficient and cost-effective imaging of circuit-scale volumes from brain at nanoscale resolution. Image area was maximized while optimizing the resolution and dynamic range necessary for discriminating key subcellular structures, such as small axonal, dendritic and glial processes, synapses, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, vesicles, microtubules, polyribosomes, and endosomes which are critical for neuronal function. Individual image fields from the tSEM system were up to 4,295 µm(2) (65.54 µm per side) at 2 nm pixel size, contrasting with image fields from a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) system, which were only 66.59 µm(2) (8.160 µm per side) at the same pixel size. The tSEM produced outstanding images and had reduced distortion and drift relative to TEM. Automated stage and scan control in tSEM easily provided unattended serial section imaging and montaging. Lens and scan properties on both TEM and SEM platforms revealed no significant nonlinear distortions within a central field of ∼100 µm(2) and produced near-perfect image registration across serial sections using the computational elastic alignment tool in Fiji/TrakEM2 software, and reliable geometric measurements from RECONSTRUCT™ or Fiji/TrakEM2 software. Axial resolution limits the analysis of small structures contained within a section (∼45 nm). Since this new tSEM is non-destructive, objects within a section can be explored at finer axial resolution in TEM tomography with current methods. Future development of tSEM tomography promises thinner axial resolution producing nearly isotropic voxels and should provide within-section analyses of structures without changing platforms. Brain was the test system given our interest in synaptic connectivity and plasticity; however, the new tSEM system is readily applicable to other biological systems. PMID:23555711

  4. Tribological behavior of micro/nano-patterned surfaces in contact with AFM colloidal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiu; Kong, Wen; Yi, Gewen; Jia, Junhong

    2011-10-01

    In effort to investigate the influence of the micro/nano-patterning or surface texturing on the nanotribological properties of patterned surfaces, the patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars were fabricated by replica molding technique. The surface morphologies of patterned PDMS surfaces with varying pillar sizes and spacing between pillars were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AFM/FFM was used to acquire the friction force images of micro/nano-patterned surfaces using a colloidal probe. A difference in friction force produced a contrast on the friction force images when the colloidal probe slid over different regions of the patterned polymer surfaces. The average friction force of patterned surface was related to the spacing between the pillars and their size. It decreased with the decreasing of spacing between the pillars and the increasing of pillar size. A reduction in friction force was attributed to the reduced area of contact between patterned surface and colloidal probe. Additionally, the average friction force increased with increasing applied load and sliding velocity.

  5. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  6. Technical Evaluation Motor 3 (TEM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garecht, Diane

    1989-01-01

    A primary objective of the technical evaluation motor program is to recover the case, igniter and nozzle hardware for use on the redesigned solid rocket motor flight program. Two qualification objectives were addressed and met on TEM-3. The Nylok thread locking device of the 1U100269-03 leak check port plug and the 1U52295-04 safe and arm utilizing Krytox grease on the barrier-booster shaft O-rings were both certified. All inspection and instrumentation data indicate that the TEM-3 static test firing conducted 23 May 1989 was successful. The test was conducted at ambient conditions with the exception of the field joints (set point of 121 F, with a minimum of 87 F at the sensors), igniter joint (set point at 122 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors) and case-to-nozzle joint (set point at 114 F with a minimum of 87 F at sensors). Ballistics performance values were within specification requirements. Nozzle performance was nominal with typical erosion. The nozzle and the case joint temperatures were maintained at the heaters controlling set points while electrical power was supplied. The water and the CO2 quench systems prevented damage to the metal hardware. All other test equipment performed as planned, contributing to a successful motor firing. All indications are that the test was a success, and all expected hardware will be refurbished for the RSRM program.

  7. Graphene nanoscrolls and live TEM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokkapati, Venkata; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Matsudaira, Paul; Oezyilmaz, Barbaros; Graphene research laboratory Team; Centerbio-imaging sciences/Mechanobiology institute Team

    2013-03-01

    It has been theoretically hypothesized and predicted that graphene when in contact with water, wraps itself around the droplets and forms graphene nanoscrolls. Studying the applications of these nanoscrolls can open a new area of research especially in the bio-medical field. Here we present a method where partially suspended graphene nanoscrolls were fabricated on carbon mesh attached to a gold TEM grid. The process involves sandwiching of two graphene layers with water being encapsulated within these nanoscrolls. Gold nanoparticles were encapsulated and live imaging of water and gold nanoparticles was carried out under the TEM. The dynamics of the encapsulated water and nanobubbles is being studied. The encapsulated water within these graphene nanoscrolls lasted for more than three months (till the date of publication). It was also realized that the formation/abundance of these nanoscrolls is concentration dependent of the etching solution (Ammonium persulfate) with a saturation point. Large area, uniform, monolayer graphene films can also be produced by varying the concentration of Ammonium persulfate. Further studies are being carried out to live image TMV/protein and liposome encapsulated drugs using nanoscrolls and films respectively. The authors would like to acknowledge A*Star for funding this research

  8. Three-dimensional characterization of Gd nanoparticles using STEM-in-SEM tomography in a dual-beam FIB-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Leer, Brandon; Bouchet-Marquis, Cedric; Cheng, Huikai

    2015-10-01

    Serial sectioning using the FIB and subsequent imaging of the same FIB-exposed surface by both FIB microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a DualBeam has proven especially useful to study the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of complex engineered materials systems. The technique was first introduced as an automated process in 2004 and since then has established itself as one of the primary applications for FIB and DualBeams. While state-of-the-art systems can produce datasets with a z-axis slice thickness of 3-5 nm, FIB nanotomography remains a destructive technique and is limited in resolution by the z-axis slice thickness. Electron tomography is another technique used to visualize 3D structures within a transmission electron microscope used in TEM or STEM mode. Using a thin sample focused on a region of interest, the electron beam passes through the specimen incrementally tilting around the center of the region of interest as images are acquired sequentially on a camera (TEM) or a Detector (STEM). The resulting images are reconstructed into a 3D volume using a variety of algorithms including Weighted Back Projection (WBP), or Serial Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT). Low energy STEM in SEM is a routine analysis in SEMs and DualBeam FIB-SEM instrumentation for morphological characterization and ultra high-resolution imaging. With a DualBeam or SEM configured with a solid state silicon diode STEM detector and a stage with adequate tilt freedom, it is possible to acquire a sufficient number of images for 3D reconstruction using STEM tomography in SEMs and DualBeam instruments. A thin section sample of gadolinium nanoparticles ranging in size up to 50 nm mounted on an aluminum substrate was prepared using in-situ lift-out (INLO) by FIB. The sample was thinned using 30 kV Ga+ FIB to approximately 125 nm. Using an in-situ stage with 360 degree continuous tilt, the thin section was imaged every 1 degree with 30 keV SEM and the STEM detector through

  9. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper. PMID:17760618

  10. Developing 3D SEM in a broad biological context

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A; Lippens, S; Bartunkova, S; Asselbergh, B; Blanpain, C; Fendrych, M; Goossens, A; Holt, M; Janssens, S; Krols, M; Larsimont, J-C; Mc Guire, C; Nowack, MK; Saelens, X; Schertel, A; Schepens, B; Slezak, M; Timmerman, V; Theunis, C; Van Brempt, R; Visser, Y; GuÉRin, CJ

    2015-01-01

    When electron microscopy (EM) was introduced in the 1930s it gave scientists their first look into the nanoworld of cells. Over the last 80 years EM has vastly increased our understanding of the complex cellular structures that underlie the diverse functions that cells need to maintain life. One drawback that has been difficult to overcome was the inherent lack of volume information, mainly due to the limit on the thickness of sections that could be viewed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For many years scientists struggled to achieve three-dimensional (3D) EM using serial section reconstructions, TEM tomography, and scanning EM (SEM) techniques such as freeze-fracture. Although each technique yielded some special information, they required a significant amount of time and specialist expertise to obtain even a very small 3D EM dataset. Almost 20 years ago scientists began to exploit SEMs to image blocks of embedded tissues and perform serial sectioning of these tissues inside the SEM chamber. Using first focused ion beams (FIB) and subsequently robotic ultramicrotomes (serial block-face, SBF-SEM) microscopists were able to collect large volumes of 3D EM information at resolutions that could address many important biological questions, and do so in an efficient manner. We present here some examples of 3D EM taken from the many diverse specimens that have been imaged in our core facility. We propose that the next major step forward will be to efficiently correlate functional information obtained using light microscopy (LM) with 3D EM datasets to more completely investigate the important links between cell structures and their functions. Lay Description Life happens in three dimensions. For many years, first light, and then EM struggled to image the smallest parts of cells in 3D. With recent advances in technology and corresponding improvements in computing, scientists can now see the 3D world of the cell at the nanoscale. In this paper we present the

  11. Three dimensional rock microstructures: insights from FIB-SEM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Martyn; Pennock, Gill; de Winter, Matthijs

    2016-04-01

    Most studies of rock microstructures investigate two-dimensional sections or thin slices of three dimensional grain structures. With advances of X-ray and electron tomography methods the 3-D microstructure can be(relatively) routinely investigated on scales from a few microns to cm. 3D studies are needed to investigate the connectivity of microstructures and to test the assumptions we use to calculate 3D properties from 2D sections. We have used FIB-SEM tomography to study the topology of melts in synthetic olivine rocks, 3D crystal growth microstructures, pore networks and subgrain structures. The technique uses a focused ion beam to make serial sections with a spacing of tens to hundreds of nanometers. Each section is then imaged or mapped using the electron beam. The 3D geometry of grains and subgrains can be investigated using orientation contrast or EBSD mapping. FIB-SEM tomography of rocks and minerals can be limited by charging of the uncoated surfaces exposed by the ion beam. The newest generation of FIB-SEMs have much improved low voltage imaging capability allowing high resolution charge free imaging. Low kV FIB-SEM tomography is now widely used to study the connectivity of pore networks. In-situ fluids can also be studied using cryo-FIB-SEM on frozen samples, although special freezing techniques are needed to avoid artifacts produced by ice crystallization. FIB-SEM tomography is complementary, in terms of spatial resolution and sampled volume, to TEM tomography and X-ray tomography, and the combination of these methods can cover a wide range of scales. Our studies on melt topology in synthetic olivine rocks with a high melt content show that many grain boundaries are wetted by nanometre scale melt layers that are too thin to resolve by X-ray tomography. A variety of melt layer geometries occur consistent with several mechanisms of melt layer formation. The nature of melt geometries along triple line junctions and quadruple points can be resolved

  12. EBSD and TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, Melissa C.; Gorman, Brian P.; Miller, Brandon D.; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to approximately 1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had approximately 2.5x higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice approximately 25 um cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel.

  13. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R; Barth, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. PMID:26617348

  14. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  15. Imaging resolution of AFM with probes modified with FIB.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, J; Rebis, J; Wejrzanowski, T; Rozniatowski, K; Pressard, K; Kurzydlowski, K J

    2014-11-01

    This study concerns imaging of the structure of materials using AFM tapping (TM) and phase imaging (PI) mode, using probes modified with focused ion beam (FIB). Three kinds of modifications were applied - thinning of the cantilever, sharpening of the tip and combination of these two modifications. Probes shaped in that way were used for AFM investigations with Bruker AFM Nanoscope 8. As a testing material, titanium roughness standard supplied by Bruker was used. The results show that performed modifications influence the oscillation of the probes. In particular thinning of the cantilever enables one to acquire higher self-resonant frequencies, which can be advantageous for improving the quality of imaging in PI mode. It was found that sharpening the tip improves imaging resolution in tapping mode, which is consistent with existing knowledge, but lowered the quality of high frequency topography images. In this paper the Finite Element Method (FEM) was used to explain the results obtained experimentally. PMID:25080273

  16. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  17. Improvement in metrology on new 3D-AFM platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Ingo; Osborn, Marc; Hand, Sean; Chen, Qi

    2008-10-01

    According to the 2007 edition of the ITRS roadmap, the requirement for CD uniformity of isolated lines on a binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 2.1nm (3σ) in 2008 and requires improvement to1.3 nm (3σ) in 2010. In order to meet the increasing demand for CD uniformity on photo masks, improved CD metrology is required. A next generation AFM, InSightTM 3DAFM, has been developed to meet these increased requirements for advanced photo mask metrology. The new system achieves 2X improvement in CD and depth precision on advanced photo masks features over the previous generation 3D-AFM. This paper provides measurement data including depth, CD, and sidewall angle metrology. In addition the unique capabilities of damage-free defect inspection and Nanoimprint characterization by 3D AFM are presented.

  18. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  19. Surface Morphological Studies on Nerve Cells by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-03-01

    Surface morphological properties of fixed and living nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis have been studied by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Identified, individual neurons were removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis and plated into poly-L-lysine coated glass cover-slips. The growth of the nerve cells was stopped and fixed with 0.1% Glutaraldehyde and 4% Formaldehyde solution after extension of growth cones at the tip of the axons. Topography and softness of growth cone filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) were probed by AFM. Information obtained from AFM's amplitude and phase channels have been used for determination of softness of the region probed. The results of structural studies on the cells are linked to their mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution.

  20. Quantifying Nonspecific TEM β-Lactamase (blaTEM) Genes in a Wastewater Stream▿

    PubMed Central

    Lachmayr, Karen L.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Ford, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    To control the antibiotic resistance epidemic, it is necessary to understand the distribution of genetic material encoding antibiotic resistance in the environment and how anthropogenic inputs, such as wastewater, affect this distribution. Approximately two-thirds of antibiotics administered to humans are β-lactams, for which the predominant bacterial resistance mechanism is hydrolysis by β-lactamases. Of the β-lactamases, the TEM family is of overriding significance with regard to diversity, prevalence, and distribution. This paper describes the design of DNA probes universal for all known TEM β-lactamase genes and the application of a quantitative PCR assay (also known as Taqman) to quantify these genes in environmental samples. The primer set was used to study whether sewage, both treated and untreated, contributes to the spread of these genes in receiving waters. It was found that while modern sewage treatment technologies reduce the concentrations of these antibiotic resistance genes, the ratio of blaTEM genes to 16S rRNA genes increases with treatment, suggesting that bacteria harboring blaTEM are more likely to survive the treatment process. Thus, β-lactamase genes are being introduced into the environment in significantly higher concentrations than occur naturally, creating reservoirs of increased resistance potential. PMID:18997031

  1. Charging C60 islands with the AFM tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Brice; Henry, Claude R.; Barth, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system.We show that electrons can be transferred on demand from an AFM tip into single bulk-like C60 islands, which are supported on the insulating NaCl(001) surface. We exemplify this by controlled charge-manipulation experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum by noncontact AFM (nc-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). KPFM shows a homogeneous contrast at the islands, which is a signature for an equal distribution of the electrons in the T1u band. The charge dissipates during half a day due to an interaction of the charged C60 islands with defects in the near surface region of NaCl. Our results open the perspective in photo-voltaics to study charge attachment, stability and charge exchange with the environment of any C60 bulk-like system. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04541J

  2. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  4. In situ Electrochemical-AFM Study of LiFePO4 Thin Film in Aqueous Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaxiong; Cai, Wei; Shang, Guangyi

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have been widely used in various kinds of electronic devices in our daily life. The use of aqueous electrolyte in Li-ion battery would be an alternative way to develop low cost and environmentally friendly batteries. In this paper, the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) thin film cathode for the aqueous rechargeable Li-ion battery is prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering deposition method. The XRD, SEM, and AFM results show that the film is composed of LiFePO4 grains with olivine structure and the average size of 100 nm. Charge-discharge measurements at current density of 10 μAh cm(-2) between 0 and 1 V show that the LiFePO4 thin film electrode is able to deliver an initial discharge capacity of 113 mAh g(-1). Specially, the morphological changes of the LiFePO4 film electrode during charge and discharge processes were investigated in aqueous environment by in situ EC-AFM, which is combined AFM with chronopotentiometry method. The changes in grain area are measured, and the results show that the size of the grains decreases and increases during the charge and discharge, respectively; the relevant mechanism is discussed. PMID:27117633

  5. In situ Electrochemical-AFM Study of LiFePO4 Thin Film in Aqueous Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiaxiong; Cai, Wei; Shang, Guangyi

    2016-04-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have been widely used in various kinds of electronic devices in our daily life. The use of aqueous electrolyte in Li-ion battery would be an alternative way to develop low cost and environmentally friendly batteries. In this paper, the lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) thin film cathode for the aqueous rechargeable Li-ion battery is prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering deposition method. The XRD, SEM, and AFM results show that the film is composed of LiFePO4 grains with olivine structure and the average size of 100 nm. Charge-discharge measurements at current density of 10 μAh cm-2 between 0 and 1 V show that the LiFePO4 thin film electrode is able to deliver an initial discharge capacity of 113 mAh g-1. Specially, the morphological changes of the LiFePO4 film electrode during charge and discharge processes were investigated in aqueous environment by in situ EC-AFM, which is combined AFM with chronopotentiometry method. The changes in grain area are measured, and the results show that the size of the grains decreases and increases during the charge and discharge, respectively; the relevant mechanism is discussed.

  6. A-10/TF34 Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware and software development of the A-10/TF34 turbine engine monitoring system (TEMS) is described. The operation and interfaces of the A-10/TF34 TEMS hardware are discussed with particular emphasis on function, capabilities, and limitations. The TEMS data types are defined and the various data acquisition modes are explained. Potential data products are also discussed.

  7. Use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for microfabric study of cohesive soils.

    PubMed

    Sachan, A

    2008-12-01

    Microfabric reflects the imprints of the geologic and stress history of the soil deposit, the depositional environment and weathering history. Many investigators have been concerned with the fundamental problem of how the engineering properties of clay depend on the microfabric, which can be defined as geometric arrangement of particles within the soil mass. It is believed that scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are the only techniques that can reveal particle arrangements of clayey soils directly; however, current research introduces a novel and more advanced technique, atomic force microscopy, to evaluate the microfabric of cohesive materials. The atomic force microscopy has several advantages over SEM/TEM for characterizing cohesive particles at the sub-micrometre range by providing 3D images and 2D images with Z-information used in quantitative measurements of soil microfabric using SPIP software, and having the capability of obtaining images in all environments (ambient air, liquids and vacuums). This paper focuses on the use of atomic force microscopy technique to quantify the microfabric of clayey soils by developing the criteria for average and maximum values of angle of particle orientation within the soil mass using proposed empirical equations for intermediate and extreme microfabrics (dispersed, flocculated). PMID:19094019

  8. TEM identification of subsurface phases in ternary U-Pu-Zr fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2016-05-01

    Phases and microstructure in as-cast, annealed at 850 °C, and subsequently cooled U-23Pu-9Zr fuel were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. SEM examination shows formation of three phases in the alloy that were identified in TEM using selective area diffraction pattern analysis: α-Zr globular and elongated δ-UZr2 inclusions and a thick oxide layer formed on top of β-Pu phase, which has been initially assumed to be ζ-(U, Pu). However, further examination of the cross-sectional TEM specimens identified the matrix phases as δ-UZr2, β-Pu, and (U, Zr)ht. Two types of inclusions were observed in the immediate vicinity of the specimen surface and they were consistent with α-Zr and ζ-(U, Pu).

  9. SIMS and TEM Analysis of Niobium Bicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maheshwari, P; Griffis, D P; Stevie, F A; Zhou, C; Ciovati, G; Myneni, R; Spradlin, J K

    2011-07-01

    The behaviour of interstitial impurities(C,O,N,H) on the Nb surface with respect to grain boundaries may affect cavity performance. Large grain Nb makes possible the selection of bicrystal samples with a well defined grain boundary. In this work, Dynamic SIMS was used to analyze two Nb bicrystal samples, one of them heat treated and the other non heat treated (control). H levels were found to be higher for the non heat treated sample and a difference in the H intensity and sputtering rate was also observed across the grain boundary for both the samples. TEM results showed that the bicrystal interface showed no discontinuity and the oxide layer was uniform across the grain boundary for both the samples. TOF-SIMS imaging was also performed to analyze the distribution of the impurities across the grain boundary in both the samples. C was observed to be segregated along the grain boundary for the control sample, while H and O showed a difference in signal intensity across the grain boundary. Crystal orientation appears to have an important role in the observed sputtering rate and impurity ion signal differences both across the grain boundary and between samples

  10. Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas Karl; Andresen, Nord

    2010-12-14

    The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

  11. Microstructure development in particulate composite coatings by cryo-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui

    and methyl ethyl ketone, two polymer binders of poly(vinyl chloride) and polyurethane, and magnetic nanoparticles. CryoTEM results show the solvent mixture can be vitrified in liquid nitrogen. Cryo-SEM images show a uniform and random distribution of magnetic particles in the dispersion, and the particles rotate into planes parallel to the coating surface during drying. Moreover, the particles align to one direction in those planes when early drying is in a magnetic field.

  12. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  13. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  15. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  16. Hydrodynamic effects in fast AFM single-molecule force measurements.

    PubMed

    Janovjak, Harald; Struckmeier, Jens; Müller, Daniel J

    2005-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the critical forces that unfold single proteins and rupture individual receptor-ligand bonds to be measured. To derive the shape of the energy landscape, the dynamic strength of the system is probed at different force loading rates. This is usually achieved by varying the pulling speed between a few nm/s and a few microm/s, although for a more complete investigation of the kinetic properties higher speeds are desirable. Above 10 microm/s, the hydrodynamic drag force acting on the AFM cantilever reaches the same order of magnitude as the molecular forces. This has limited the maximum pulling speed in AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Here, we present an approach for considering these hydrodynamic effects, thereby allowing a correct evaluation of AFM force measurements recorded over an extended range of pulling speeds (and thus loading rates). To support and illustrate our theoretical considerations, we experimentally evaluated the mechanical unfolding of a multi-domain protein recorded at 30 microm/s pulling speed. PMID:15257425

  17. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  18. Conductive supports for combined AFM SECM on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Chami, Mohamed; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Blackstock, Jason J.; Dooleweerdt, Karin; de Rooij, Nico F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Four different conductive supports are analysed regarding their suitability for combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) on biological membranes. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), MoS2, template stripped gold, and template stripped platinum are compared as supports for high resolution imaging of reconstituted membrane proteins or native membranes, and as electrodes for transferring electrons from or to a redox molecule. We demonstrate that high resolution topographs of the bacterial outer membrane protein F can be recorded by contact mode AFM on all four supports. Electrochemical feedback experiments with conductive cantilevers that feature nanometre-scale electrodes showed fast re-oxidation of the redox couple Ru(NH3)63+/2+ with the two metal supports after prolonged immersion in electrolyte. In contrast, the re-oxidation rates decayed quickly to unpractical levels with HOPG or MoS2 under physiological conditions. On HOPG we observed heterogeneity in the re-oxidation rate of the redox molecules with higher feedback currents at step edges. The latter results demonstrate the capability of conductive cantilevers with small electrodes to measure minor variations in an SECM signal and to relate them to nanometre-scale features in a simultaneously recorded AFM topography. Rapid decay of re-oxidation rate and surface heterogeneity make HOPG or MoS2 less attractive for combined AFM-SECM experiments on biological membranes than template stripped gold or platinum supports.

  19. High-Temperature TEM investigation of the phase composition and structure of the Zr-Y-O/Si-Al-N multilayer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorischeva, M.; Kalashnikov, M.; Sergeev, V.; Bozhko, I.

    2016-04-01

    Deposition of nanostructured multi-layered coatings on the basis of Zr-Y-0 was implemented by the pulse magnetron methods. Structural-phase states and morphology of the nanostructured coatings were investigated by SEM and the high-temperature TEM method. The high-temperature TEM revealed the presence of reversible phase transition of the tetragonal phase to the monoclinic phase, which can ensure stress relaxation and closure of surface cracks.

  20. Novel Polymer Linkers for Single Molecule AFM Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Mikheikin, Andrey; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey; Lv, Zhengjian; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible polymer linkers play an important role in various imaging and probing techniques that require surface immobilization, including atomic force microscopy (AFM). In AFM force spectroscopy, polymer linkers are necessary for the covalent attachment of molecules of interest to the AFM tip and the surface. The polymer linkers tether the molecules and provide their proper orientation in probing experiments. Additionally, the linkers separate specific interactions from nonspecific short-range adhesion and serve as a reference point for the quantitative analysis of single molecule probing events. In this report, we present our results on the synthesis and testing of a novel polymer linker and the identification of a number of potential applications for its use in AFM force spectroscopy experiments. The synthesis of the linker is based on the well-developed phosphoramidate (PA) chemistry that allows the routine synthesis of linkers with predetermined lengths and PA composition. These linkers are homogeneous in length and can be terminated with various functional groups. PA linkers with different functional groups were synthesized and tested in experimental systems utilizing different immobilization chemistries. We probed interactions between complementary DNA oligonucleotides; DNA and protein complexes formed by the site-specific binding protein SfiI; and interactions between amyloid peptide (Aβ42). The results of the AFM force spectroscopy experiments validated the feasibility of the proposed approach for the linker design and synthesis. Furthermore, the properties of the tether (length, functional groups) can be adjusted to meet the specific requirements for different force spectroscopy experiments and system characteristics, suggesting that it could be used for a large number of various applications. PMID:23624104

  1. MOS-based nanocapacitor using C-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Daniel; Sadewasser, Sascha; Aymerich, Xavier

    2003-04-01

    This report details the attempts made to realise nanocapacitors for nanoscale MOS based integrated circuits by AFM anodic oxidation, and therefore isolation, of nano-sized squares of poly-silicon, titanium and aluminium on Si/SiO2. Conductive AFM (C-AFM) was used to perform topographical and electrical characterisation. The experiments were performed with contact mode C-AFM, in ambient air, using Pt-Ir, Co-Cr and Ti coated (20nm) n-type silicon cantilevers. Each sample consisted of a 3-5nm thick conductor deposited on 6nm of SiO2, which was thermally grown on Phosphorus doped (1019 cm-3) n-type Si(100) substrates. Standard cleaning and passivation processes were used. Poly-silicon was immediately found to be too rough to oxidise. Initial current-voltage measurements inside of the titanium-oxide squares suggest initial isolation followed by degradation through Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling. Measurement inconsistencies seen suggest charge storage on the surface or tip with the barrier height of the native titanium oxide thought to be responsible. Al has a thicker natural oxide. To overcome this we designed a series of structures consisting of a Ti finger on SiO2, that is connected to a Ti bond pad, allowing direct probing by a semiconductor parameter analyser. AFM anodic oxidation was performed upon these Ti fingers to reduce their in-plane dimensions towards the nanoscale. To confirm the existence of a nanocapacitor topographical and electrical measurements were then done on and around them.

  2. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  3. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    PubMed

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. PMID:25173605

  4. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in

  5. SEM probe of IC radiation sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Stanley, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) used to irradiate single integrated circuit (IC) subcomponent to test for radiation sensitivity can localize area of IC less than .03 by .03 mm for determination of exact location of radiation sensitive section.

  6. STM and AFM; Which is Better for Surface Structural Analysis? Non- contact AFM Studies on Ge/Si(105) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been utilized to determine surface atomic structure with its highly resolved images. Probing surface electronic states near the Fermi energy (EF), STM images, however, do not necessarily represent the atomic structure of surfaces. It has been believed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides us surface topographic images without being disturbed by the electronic states. In order to prove the surpassing performance, we performed noncontact (nc) AFM on the Ge/Si(105) surface [1], which is a facet plane of the ?hut? clusters formed on Ge-deposited Si(001) surface. It is found that STM images taken on the surface, either filled- or empty-state images, do not show all surface atoms because of the electronic effect; some surface atoms have dangling bond states below EF and other surface atoms have states above EF. [2]. In a nc-AFM image, on the other hand, all surface atoms having a dangling bond are observed [3], directly representing an atomic structure of the surface. Electronic information can also be obtained in AFM by using a Kelvin-probe method. From atomically resolved potential profile we obtained, charge transfer among the dangling bond states is directly demonstrated. These results clearly demonstrate that highly-resolved nc-AFM with a Kelvin-probe method is an ideal tool for analysis of atomic structures and electronic properties of surfaces. This work was done in collaboration with T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama, T. An, and M. Ono, ISSP, Univ. Tokyo and JST, Y. Fujikawa and T. Sakurai, IMR. Tohoku Univ. T. Hashimoto, AIST, Y. Morikawa, ISIR, Osaka Univ. K. Terakura, Hokkaido Univ., and M.G. Lagally, University of Wisconsin-Madison. [1] T. Eguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 266102 (2004). [2] Y. Fujikawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 176101 (2002). [3] T. Eguchi and Y. Hasegawa, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 256105 (2002)

  7. Substitution of Thr for Ala-237 in TEM-17, TEM-12 and TEM-26: alterations in beta-lactam resistance conferred on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Giakkoupi, P; Hujer, A M; Miriagou, V; Tzelepi, E; Bonomo, R A; Tzouvelekis, L S

    2001-07-10

    Non-naturally occurring mutants of TEM-17 (E104K), TEM-12 (R164S) and TEM-26 (E104K:R164S) extended-spectrum (ES) beta-lactamases bearing threonine at position 237 were constructed by site-specific mutagenesis and expressed under isogenic conditions in Escherichia coli. Quantification of beta-lactamase activities and immunoblotting indicated that Ala-237-->Thr did not significantly affect expression levels of these ES enzymes. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics showed that the presence of threonine at position 237 exerted a dominant effect increasing the enzymes' preference for various early generation cephalosporins over penicillins. Activity against broad-spectrum oxyimino-beta-lactams was also changed. The effect of Ala-237-->Thr on the activity against ceftazidime, aztreonam, cefepime and cefpirome of all three ES TEM enzymes was detrimental. Introduction of Thr-237 improved activity against cefotaxime and ceftriaxone in TEM-12 and TEM-26, but not in TEM-17. PMID:11445164

  8. A Model for Step Height, Edge Slope and Linewidth Measurements Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Fu, Joseph; Song, John; Nguyen, Cattien V.

    2003-09-01

    Nano-scale linewidth measurements are performed in semiconductor manufacturing and in the data storage industry and will become increasingly important in micro-mechanical engineering. With the development of manufacturing technology in recent years, the sizes of linewidths are steadily shrinking and are in the range of hundreds of nanometers. As a result, it is difficult to achieve accurate measurement results for nanometer scale linewidth, primarily because of the interaction volume of electrons in materials for an SEM probe or the tip size of an AFM probe. However, another source of methods divergence is the mathematical model of the line itself. In order to reduce the methods divergences caused by different measurement methods and instruments for an accurate determination of nanometer scale linewidth parameters, a metrological model and algorithm are proposed for linewidth measurements with AFM. The line profile is divided into 5 parts with 19 sections and 20 key derived points. Each section is fitted by a least squares straight line, so that the profile can be represented by a set of straight lines and 6 special points, or by a 20×2 matrix of fitted points and a 6×2 matrix of starter points. According to the algorithm, WT and WTF, WM and WMF, WB and WBF represent the widths at the top, the middle and the bottom of the line profile before and after the least squares fitting, respectively. AL and AR represent the left and right sidewall angles, and H represents the step height of the line profile. Based on this algorithm, software has been developed using MATLAB for the calculation of width and height parameters of the line profile. A NIST nanometer scale linewidth artifact developed at NIST's Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory (EEEL) was measured using a commercial AFM with nanotube tips. The measured linewidth profiles are analyzed using our model, algorithm and software. The model developed in this paper is straightforward to understand, and

  9. Wedged AFM-cantilevers for parallel plate cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Hodel, Adrian W; Spielhofer, Andreas; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Helenius, Jonne

    2013-04-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy has gained popularity for mechanical analysis of living cells. In particular, recent AFM-based assays featuring tipless cantilevers and whole-cell deformation have yielded insights into cellular function, structure, and dynamics. However, in these assays the standard ≈10° tilt of the cantilever prevents uniaxial loading, which complicates assessment of cellular geometry and can cause cell sliding or loss of loosely adherent cells. Here, we describe an approach to modify tipless cantilevers with wedges and, thereby, achieve proper parallel plate mechanics. We provide guidance on material selection, the wedge production process, property and geometry assessment, and the calibration of wedged cantilevers. Furthermore, we demonstrate their ability to simplify the assessment of cell shape, prevent lateral displacement of round cells during compression, and improve the assessment of cell mechanical properties. PMID:23473778

  10. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Neugirg, Benedikt R; Koebley, Sean R; Schniepp, Hannes C; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-28

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches-AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation-proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field. PMID:27055900

  11. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  12. AFM-based mechanical characterization of single nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugirg, Benedikt R.; Koebley, Sean R.; Schniepp, Hannes C.; Fery, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Nanofibres are found in a broad variety of hierarchical biological systems as fundamental structural units, and nanofibrillar components are playing an increasing role in the development of advanced functional materials. Accurate determination of the mechanical properties of single nanofibres is thus of great interest, yet measurement of these properties is challenging due to the intricate specimen handling and the exceptional force and deformation resolution that is required. The atomic force microscope (AFM) has emerged as an effective, reliable tool in the investigation of nanofibrillar mechanics, with the three most popular approaches--AFM-based tensile testing, three-point deformation testing, and nanoindentation--proving preferable to conventional tensile testing in many (but not all) cases. Here, we review the capabilities and limitations of each of these methods and give a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in this field.

  13. Molecular modeling of enzyme attachment on AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guedmiller S; Leite, Fabio L; Amarante, Adriano M; Franca, Eduardo F; Cunha, Richard A; Briggs, James M; Freitas, Luiz C G

    2013-09-01

    The immobilization of enzymes on atomic force microscope tip (AFM tip) surface is a crucial step in the development of nanobiosensors to be used in detection process. In this work, an atomistic modeling of the attachment of the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC enzyme) on a functionalized AFM tip surface is proposed. Using electrostatic considerations, suitable enzyme-surface orientations with the active sites of the ACC enzyme available for interactions with bulk molecules were found. A 50 ns molecular dynamics trajectory in aqueous solution was obtained and surface contact area, hydrogen bonding and protein stability were analyzed. The enzyme-surface model proposed here with minor adjustment can be applied to study antigen-antibody interactions as well as enzyme immobilization on silica for chromatography applications. PMID:24029365

  14. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  15. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. Adhesion forces in AFM of redox responsive polymer grafts: Effects of tip hydrophilicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueling; Kieviet, Bernard D.; Song, Jing; Schön, Peter M.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-02-01

    The adherence between silicon nitride AFM tips and redox-active poly(ferrocenylsilanes) (PFS) grafts on gold was investigated by electrochemical AFM force spectroscopy. Before the adhesion measurements silicon nitride AFM probes were cleaned with organic solvents (acetone and ethanol) or piranha solution. Interestingly, these different AFM tip cleaning procedures drastically affected the observed adhesion forces. Water contact angle measurements on the corresponding AFM probe chips showed that piranha treatment resulted in a significant increase of AFM probe chip surface hydrophilicity compared to the organic solvent treatment. Obviously this hydrophilicity change caused drastic, even opposite changes in the tip-PFS adhesive force measurement upon electrode potential change to reversibly oxidize and reduce the PFS grafts. Our findings are of pivotal importance for AFM tip adhesion measurements utilizing standard silicon nitride AFM tips. Probe hydrophilicity must be carefully taken into consideration and controlled.

  17. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  18. AFM and SThM Characterization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Christopher; Sidorov, Anton; Chen, Xunchi; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report on detailed characterization of epitaxial grown graphene on SiC and chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu foil using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). We focus on the electronic and thermal properties of graphene grain boundaries, and thus providing valuable feedback to materials growth. Specifically, we perform thermal conductivity contrast mapping and surface potential mapping of graphene, and compare with that obtained on the Au electrodes and the substrate.

  19. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  20. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  1. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  2. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  3. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  4. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  5. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  6. AFM imaging of functionalized carbon nanotubes on biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Liashkovich, I.; Neves, V.; Danzberger, J.; Heister, E.; Rangl, M.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Flahaut, E.; Gruber, H. J.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Kienberger, F.; Ebner, A.

    2009-10-01

    Multifunctional carbon nanotubes are promising for biomedical applications as their nano-size, together with their physical stability, gives access into the cell and various cellular compartments including the nucleus. However, the direct and label-free detection of carbon nanotube uptake into cells is a challenging task. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of resolving details of cellular surfaces at the nanometer scale and thus allows following of the docking of carbon nanotubes to biological membranes. Here we present topographical AFM images of non-covalently functionalized single walled (SWNT) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) immobilized on different biological membranes, such as plasma membranes and nuclear envelopes, as well as on a monolayer of avidin molecules. We were able to visualize DWNT on the nuclear membrane while at the same time resolving individual nuclear pore complexes. Furthermore, we succeeded in localizing individual SWNT at the border of incubated cells and in identifying bundles of DWNT on cell surfaces by AFM imaging.

  7. Investigation of the Mechanoelectrical Transduction at Single Stereocilia by Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, M. G.; Fink, S.; Löffler, K.; Koitschev, A.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2003-02-01

    The transduction of sound into an electrical signal in the inner ear is closely related to the mechanical properties of the hair bundles cytoskeleton and cross-linkage. In this study the effect of lateral cross-links on hair bundle mechanics and the transduction current response is demonstrated on the level of individual stereocilia. For experiments stereocilia of outer hair cells of postnatal rats (P3 - P8) were scanned with a sharp AFM tip at nanometerscale. Transduction currents were simultaneously recorded in the whole-cell-recording mode with patch clamp. AFM was used as a nanotool for local mechanical stimulation and force measurement at stereocilia whereas patch clamp serves as a detector for the electrical response of the cell. In a first experiment force transmission between adjacent stereocilia of the V- and W- shaped hair bundles of outer hair cells was investigated. Results showed that a force exerted to a single stereocilium declined to 36 % at the nearest adjacent stereocilium of the same row. This result supposes AFM to be convenient for local displacement of single stereocilia. For control, the local response of transduction channels was measured at single stereocilia of the same hair bundle. Measured transduction current amplitudes ranged from 9 to 49 pA supposing an opening of one to five transduction channels. Both, weak force transmission by lateral cross-links and small transduction current amplitudes indicate a weak mechanical interaction between individual stereocilia of the tallest row of stereocilia of outer hair cells from postnatal rats.

  8. Oxide nanocrystal based nanocomposites for fabricating photoplastic AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Llobera, Andreu; Innocenti, Claudia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Striccoli, Marinella; Agostiano, Angela; Voigt, Anja; Gruetzner, Gabi; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Curri, Maria Lucia

    2011-11-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel nanocomposite made of a negative tone epoxy based photoresist modified with organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) nanocrystals (NCs). The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite drastically improve upon incorporation of a suitable concentration of NCs in the polymer, without deteriorating its photolithography performance. High aspect ratio 3D microstructures made of the nanocomposite have been fabricated with a uniform surface morphology and with a resolution down to few micrometres. The embedded organic-capped Fe(2)O(3) NCs drastically increase the stiffness and hardness of the epoxy based photoresist matrix, making the final material extremely interesting for manufacturing miniaturized polymer based mechanical devices and systems. In particular, the nanocomposite has been used as structural material for fabricating photoplastic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) probes with integrated tips showing outstanding mechanical response and high resolution imaging performance. The fabricated probes consist of straight cantilevers with low stress-gradient and high quality factors, incorporating sharp polymeric tips. They present considerably improved performance compared to pure epoxy based photoresist AFM probes, and to commercial silicon AFM probes. PMID:21858377

  9. Oxford CyberSEM: remote microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Kirkland, A.; Cockayne, D.; Meyer, R.

    2008-08-01

    The Internet has enabled researchers to communicate over vast geographical distances, sharing ideas and documents. e-Science, underpinned by Grid [1] and Web Services, has enabled electronic communications to the next level where, in addition to document sharing, researchers can increasingly control high precision scientific instruments over the network. The Oxford CyberSEM project developed a simple Java applet via which samples placed in a JEOL 5510LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) can be manipulated and examined collaboratively over the Internet. Designed with schoolchildren in mind, CyberSEM does not require any additional hardware or software other than a generic Java-enabled web browser. This paper reflects on both the technical and social challenges in designing real-time systems for controlling scientific equipments in collaborative environments. Furthermore, it proposes potential deployment beyond the classroom setting.

  10. Safety in the SEM laboratory--1981 update

    SciTech Connect

    Bance, G.N.; Barber, V.C.; Sholdice, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The article reviews recent information on hazards as they relate to safety in SEM laboratories. The first section lists the safety equipment that should be available in a SEM laboratory. Flammable and combustible liquids are discussed, and particular warnings are given concerning the fire and explosion risks associated with diethyl ether and diisopropyl ether. The possible hazards associated with electrical equipment, and the risk of X-ray emissions from EM's are briefly outlined. The hazards associated with acute and chronic toxicity of chemicals used in the EM laboratory are discussed. The need to reduce exposure to a growing list of recognizable hazardous chemicals is emphasized. This reduction can be accomplished by more extensive use of functioning fume hoods, and the use of more appropriate and effective protective gloves. Allergies and the hazards of dangerous pathogens in the SEM laboratory are discussed. The explosion and other hazards associated with cryogens, vacuum evaporators, critical point dryers, and compressed gas cylinders are emphasized.

  11. The Structural Bases of Antibiotic Resistance in the Clinically Derived Mutant beta-Lactamases TEM-30, TEM-32, and TEM-34

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Widespread use of {beta}-lactam antibiotics has promoted the evolution of {beta}-lactamase mutant enzymes that can hydrolyze ever newer classes of these drugs. Among the most pernicious mutants are the inhibitor-resistant TEM {beta}-lactamases (IRTs), which elude mechanism-based inhibitors, such as clavulanate. Despite much research on these IRTs, little is known about the structural bases of their action. This has made it difficult to understand how many of the resistance substitutions act as they often occur far from Ser-130. Here, three IRT structures, TEM-30 (R244S), TEM-32 (M69I/M182T), and TEM-34 (M69V), are determined by x-ray crystallography at 2.00, 1.61, and 1.52 {angstrom}, respectively. In TEM-30, the Arg-244 {yields} Ser substitution (7.8 {angstrom} from Ser-130) displaces a conserved water molecule that usually interacts with the {beta}-lactam C3 carboxylate. In TEM-32, the substitution Met-69 {yields} Ile (10 {angstrom} from Ser-130) appears to distort Ser-70, which in turn causes Ser-130 to adopt a new conformation, moving its O{gamma} further away, 2.3 {angstrom} from where the inhibitor would bind. This substitution also destabilizes the enzyme by 1.3 kcal/mol. The Met-182 {yields} Thr substitution (20 {angstrom} from Ser-130) has no effect on enzyme activity but rather restabilizes the enzyme by 2.9 kcal/mol. In TEM-34, the Met-69 {yields} Val substitution similarly leads to a conformational change in Ser-130, this time causing it to hydrogen bond with Lys-73 and Lys-234. This masks the lone pair electrons of Ser-130 O{gamma}, reducing its nucleophilicity for cross-linking. In these three structures, distant substitutions result in accommodations that converge on the same point of action, the local environment of Ser-130. TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is the predominant source of resistance to {beta}-lactams, such as the penicillins. TEM-1 and related class A {beta}-lactamases confer resistance by hydrolyzing the {beta}-lactam ring of these antibiotics

  12. X-ray nanotomography in a SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauwels, Bart; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    We have developed an x-ray computer tomography (CT) add-on to perform X-ray micro- and nanotomography in any scanning electron microscope (SEM). The electron beam inside the SEM is focused on a metal target to generate x-rays. Part of the X-rays pass through the object that is installed on a rotation stage. Shadow X-ray images are collected by a CCD camera with direct photon detection mounted on the external wall of the SEM specimen chamber. An extensive description on the working principles of this micro/nano-CT add-on together with some examples of CT-scans will be given in this paper. The resolution that can be obtained with this set-up and the influence of the shape of the electron beam are discussed. Furthermore, possible improvements on this SEM-CT set-up will be discussed: replacing the backilluminated CCD with a fully depleted CCD with improved quantum efficiency (QE) for higher energies, reduces the exposure time by 6 when using metal targets with x-ray characteristic lines around 10 keV.

  13. Recognition and Resistance in TEM [superscript beta]-Lactamase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Blazquez, Jesus; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Developing antimicrobials that are less likely to engender resistance has become an important design criterion as more and more drugs fall victim to resistance mutations. One hypothesis is that the more closely an inhibitor resembles a substrate, the more difficult it will be to develop resistant mutations that can at once disfavor the inhibitor and still recognize the substrate. To investigate this hypothesis, 10 transition-state analogues, of greater or lesser similarity to substrates, were tested for inhibition of TEM-1 beta-lactamase, the most widespread resistance enzyme to penicillin antibiotics. The inhibitors were also tested against four characteristic mutant enzymes: TEM-30, TEM-32, TEM-52, and TEM-64. The inhibitor most similar to the substrate, compound 10, was the most potent inhibitor of the WT enzyme, with a K(i) value of 64 nM. Conversely, compound 10 was the most susceptible to the TEM-30 (R244S) mutant, for which inhibition dropped by over 100-fold. The other inhibitors were relatively impervious to the TEM-30 mutant enzyme. To understand recognition and resistance to these transition-state analogues, the structures of four of these inhibitors in complex with TEM-1 were determined by X-ray crystallography. These structures suggest a structural basis for distinguishing inhibitors that mimic the acylation transition state and those that mimic the deacylation transition state; they also suggest how TEM-30 reduces the affinity of compound 10. In cell culture, this inhibitor reversed the resistance of bacteria to ampicillin, reducing minimum inhibitory concentrations of this penicillin by between 4- and 64-fold, depending on the strain of bacteria. Notwithstanding this activity, the resistance of TEM-30, which is already extant in the clinic, suggests that there can be resistance liabilities with substrate-based design.

  14. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  15. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  16. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  17. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  18. Comparison of dynamic lever STM and noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Bammerlin, M.; Lüthi, R.; Loppacher, C.; Battiston, F.; Lü, J.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    We investigate interaction effects which occur in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by performing local force spectroscopy with an oscillating tip while imaging Si(111)7×7 terraces in the dynamic lever STM mode (constant time-averaged current). It is found that true atomic resolution is achieved close to the minimum of the resonance frequency vs. distance curve and even closer to the sample. On the other hand true atomic resolution in noncontact AFM (constant frequency shift) is expected several nm away from this minimum, in the range where the frequency shift becomes more negative with decreasing distance.

  19. Automated CD-SEM recipe creation: a new paradigm in CD-SEM utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Lipscomb, William; Allgair, John; Yang, Kyoungmo; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Page, Lorena; Danilevsky, Alex

    2006-03-01

    As the trends in integrated circuit fabrication follow Moore's Law to smaller feature sizes, one trend seen in lithographic technology is the continually increasing use of optical enhancements such as Optical Proximity Correction (OPC). Small size perturbations are designed into the nominal feature shapes on the reticle such that the intended shape is printed. Verifying the success of OPC is critical to ramp-up and production of new process technologies. CD-SEMs are imaging tools which are capable of measuring feature sizes in any part of a chip, either in a test structure or within a circuit. A new trend in CD-SEM utilization is the implementation of automated recipe generation of complex CD-SEM recipes. The DesignGauge system uses design-to-SEM recipe creation and data collection. Once the recipe creation flow is implemented, the task of recipe creation can be accomplished within minutes. These applications enable a CD-SEM to be utilized to collect data for very complex OPC CD-SEM recipe runs which measure many different unique linewidths, spaces, and pattern placements within a circuit to check OPC success and lithographic fidelity. The data collection can provide accurate data results that can be utilized for comparing achieved feature measurements to nominal values from the design layout. This new application adds much value to the CD-SEM compared to other technologies such as OCD, as it completes the evaluation of in-circuit behavior to test structures in a scribe lane, something OCD currently cannot do. The present work evaluates the capabilities of DesignGauge, which is available for the latest-generation Hitachi S-9380II CD-SEMs. The evaluation includes rigorous tests of navigation, pattern recognition success rates, SEM image placement, throughput of recipe creation and recipe execution.

  20. Characterization of microscale wear in a ploysilicon-based MEMS device using AFM and PEEM-NEXAFS spectromicroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, D. S.; Konicek, A. R.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Sumant, A. V.; de Boer, M. P.; Corwin, A. D.; Carpick, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms of microscale wear in silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are elucidated by studying a polysilicon nanotractor, a device specifically designed to conduct friction and wear tests under controlled conditions. Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) was combined with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantitatively probe chemical changes and structural modification, respectively, in the wear track of the nanotractor. The ability of PEEM-NEXAFS to spatially map chemical variations in the near-surface region of samples at high lateral spatial resolution is unparalleled and therefore ideally suited for this study. The results show that it is possible to detect microscopic chemical changes using PEEM-NEXAFS, specifically, oxidation at the sliding interface of a MEMS device. We observe that wear induces oxidation of the polysilicon at the immediate contact interface, and the spectra are consistent with those from amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The oxidation is correlated with gouging and debris build-up in the wear track, as measured by AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  1. Multiplexed TEM Specimen Preparation and Analysis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Sėan K; Speir, Jeffrey A; Razinkov, Ivan; Cheng, Anchi; Crum, John; Jain, Tilak; Duggan, Erika; Liu, Er; Nolan, John P; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2015-08-01

    We describe a system for rapidly screening hundreds of nanoparticle samples using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The system uses a liquid handling robot to place up to 96 individual samples onto a single standard TEM grid at separate locations. The grid is then transferred into the TEM and automated software is used to acquire multiscale images of each sample. The images are then analyzed to extract metrics on the size, shape, and morphology of the nanoparticles. The system has been used to characterize plasmonically active nanomaterials. PMID:26223550

  2. Multiplexed TEM Specimen Preparation and Analysis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anchi; Crum, John; Jain, Tilak; Duggan, Erika; Liu, Er; Nolan, John P.; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a system for rapidly screening hundreds of nanoparticle samples using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The system uses a liquid handling robot to place up to 96 individual samples onto a single standard TEM grid at separate locations. The grid is then transferred into the TEM and automated software is used to acquire multi-scale images of each sample. The images are then analyzed to extract metrics on the size, shape, and morphology of the nanoparticles. The system has been used to characterize plasmonically-active nanomaterials. PMID:26223550

  3. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R.; Amoroso, M.

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm3 blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  4. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    SciTech Connect

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  5. Viewing Integrated-Circuit Interconnections By SEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, Russel A.; Gauldin, Robert E.; Ruiz, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    Back-scattering of energetic electrons reveals hidden metal layers. Experiment shows that with suitable operating adjustments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) used to look for defects in aluminum interconnections in integrated circuits. Enables monitoring, in situ, of changes in defects caused by changes in temperature. Gives truer picture of defects, as etching can change stress field of metal-and-passivation pattern, causing changes in defects.

  6. Curvelet Based Offline Analysis of SEM Images

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Syed Hamad; Haq, Nuhman ul; Hayat, Khizar; Naz, Saeeda; Haque, Ihsan ul

    2014-01-01

    Manual offline analysis, of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image, is a time consuming process and requires continuous human intervention and efforts. This paper presents an image processing based method for automated offline analyses of SEM images. To this end, our strategy relies on a two-stage process, viz. texture analysis and quantification. The method involves a preprocessing step, aimed at the noise removal, in order to avoid false edges. For texture analysis, the proposed method employs a state of the art Curvelet transform followed by segmentation through a combination of entropy filtering, thresholding and mathematical morphology (MM). The quantification is carried out by the application of a box-counting algorithm, for fractal dimension (FD) calculations, with the ultimate goal of measuring the parameters, like surface area and perimeter. The perimeter is estimated indirectly by counting the boundary boxes of the filled shapes. The proposed method, when applied to a representative set of SEM images, not only showed better results in image segmentation but also exhibited a good accuracy in the calculation of surface area and perimeter. The proposed method outperforms the well-known Watershed segmentation algorithm. PMID:25089617

  7. Multi-signal FIB/SEM tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, Lucille A.

    2012-06-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the same platform enables 3D microstructural analysis of structures using FIB for serial sectioning and SEM for imaging. Since FIB milling is a destructive technique, the acquisition of multiple signals from each slice is desirable. The feasibility of collecting both an inlens backscattered electron (BSE) signal and an inlens secondary electron (SE) simultaneously from a single scan of the electron beam from each FIB slice is demonstrated. The simultaneous acquisition of two different SE signals from two different detectors (inlens vs. Everhart-Thornley (ET) detector) is also possible. Obtaining multiple signals from each FIB slice with one scan increases the acquisition throughput. In addition, optimization of microstructural and morphological information from the target is achieved using multi-signals. Examples of multi-signal FIB/SEM tomography from a dental implant will be provided where both material contrast from the bone/ceramic coating/Ti substrate phases and porosity in the ceramic coating will be characterized.

  8. Hybrid Metrology and 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.

    2011-11-10

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R and D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials...). Therefore, time for R and D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam.In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R and D and production. The final goal for 'chip makers' is to improve yield and save R and D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2{sup nd} part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  9. Hybrid Metrology & 3D-AFM Enhancement for CD Metrology Dedicated to 28 nm Node and Below Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, J.; Faurie, P.; Dourthe, L.; Irmer, B.; Penzkofer, C.

    2011-11-01

    The measurement accuracy is becoming one of the major components that have to be controlled in order to guarantee sufficient production yield. Already at the R&D level, we have to come up with the accurate measurements of sub-40 nm dense trenches and contact holes coming from 193 immersion lithography or E-Beam lithography. Current production CD (Critical Dimension) metrology techniques such as CD-SEM (CD-Scanning Electron Microscope) and OCD (Optical Critical Dimension) are limited in relative accuracy for various reasons (i.e electron proximity effect, outputs parameters correlation, stack influence, electron interaction with materials…). Therefore, time for R&D is increasing, process windows degrade and finally production yield can decrease because you cannot manufactured correctly if you are unable to measure correctly. A new high volume manufacturing (HVM) CD metrology solution has to be found in order to improve the relative accuracy of production environment otherwise current CD Metrology solution will very soon get out of steam. In this paper, we will present a potential Hybrid CD metrology solution that smartly tuned 3D-AFM (3D-Atomic Force Microscope) and CD-SEM data in order to add accuracy both in R&D and production. The final goal for "chip makers" is to improve yield and save R&D and production costs through real-time feedback loop implement on CD metrology routines. Such solution can be implemented and extended to any kind of CD metrology solution. In a 2nd part we will discuss and present results regarding a new AFM3D probes breakthrough with the introduction of full carbon tips made will E-Beam Deposition process. The goal is to overcome the current limitations of conventional flared silicon tips which are definitely not suitable for sub-32 nm nodes production.

  10. Physical properties of polyacrylamide gels probed by AFM and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidine, Yara; Laurent, Valérie M.; Michel, Richard; Duperray, Alain; Iulian Palade, Liviu; Verdier, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Polymer gels have been shown to behave as viscoelastic materials but only a small amount of data is usually provided in the glass transition. In this paper, the dynamic moduli G\\prime and G\\prime\\prime of polyacrylamide hydrogels are investigated using both an AFM in contact force modulation mode and a classical rheometer. The validity is shown by the matching of the two techniques. Measurements are carried out on gels of increasing polymer concentration in a wide frequency range. A model based on fractional derivatives is successfully used, covering the whole frequency range. G\\text{N}0 , the plateau modulus, as well as several other parameters are obtained at low frequencies. The model also predicts the slope a of both moduli in the glass transition, and a transition frequency f\\text{T} is introduced to separate the gel-like behavior with the glassy state. Its variation with polymer content c gives a dependence f\\text{T}∼ c1.6 , in good agreement with previous theories. Therefore, the AFM data provides new information on the physics of polymer gels.

  11. Dual AFM probes alignment based on vision guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-kun; Gao, Si-tian; Lu, Ming-zhen; Wang, Long-long

    2013-10-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) with dual probes that operate together can measure both side walls excellently at the same time, which virtually eliminates the prevalent effect of probe width that contributes a large component of uncertainty in measurement results and finally obtains the critical dimension (CD)(e.g. the linewidth) through data synthesis. In calibration process, the dual probes must contact each other in advance, which realizes the alignment in the three dimensions, to establish a zero reference point and ensure the accuracy of measurement. Because nowadays the optical resolution of advanced lens have exceeded micrometer range, and the size of probes is within micro level, it is possible to acquire dual probes images in both horizontal and vertical directions, through which the movement of the probes can be controlled in time. In order to further enhance the alignment precision, sub-pixel edge detection method based on Zernike orthogonal moment is used to obtain relative position between these two probes, which helps the tips alignment attains sub-micron range. Piezoelectric nanopositioning stages calibrated by laser interferometer are used to implement fine movement of the probes to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. To simplify the system, novel self-sensing and self-actuating probe based on a quartz tuning fork combined with a micromachined cantilever is used for dynamic mode AFM. In this case, an external optical detection system is not needed, so the system is simple and small.

  12. Viscoelasticity of gelatin surfaces probed by AFM noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Benmouna, Farida; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2004-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of surfaces of swollen gelatin were investigated by analyzing the Brownian motion of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever in contact with the gel surface. A micron-sized glass sphere attached to the AFM cantilever is used as the dynamic probe. When the sphere approaches the gelatin surface, there is a static repulsive force without a jump into contact. The cantilever's Brownian movement is monitored in parallel, providing access to the dynamic sphere-surface interaction as quantified by the dynamic spring constant, kappa, and the drag coefficient, xi. Gelatin is used as a model substance for a variety of other soft surfaces, where the stiffness of the gel can be varied via the solvent quality, the bloom number, and the pH. The modulus derived from the static force-distance curve is in the kPa range, consistent with the literature. However, the dynamic spring constant as derived from the Brownian motion is much larger than the static differential spring constant dF/dz. On retraction, one observes a rather strong adhesion hysteresis. The strength of the bridge (as given by the dynamic spring constant and the drag coefficient) is very small. PMID:15745019

  13. Analysis of AFM cantilever dynamics close to sample surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, A.; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2013-07-01

    For imaging and manipulation of biological specimens application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid is necessary. In this paper, tapping-mode AFM cantilever dynamics in liquid close to sample surface is modeled and simulated by well defining the contact forces. The effect of cantilever tilting angle has been accounted carefully. Contact forces have some differences in liquid in comparison to air or vacuum in magnitude or formulation. Hydrodynamic forces are also applied on the cantilever due to the motion in liquid. A continuous beam model is used with its first mode and forward-time simulation method for simulation of its hybrid dynamics and the frequency response and amplitude versus separation diagrams are extracted. The simulation results show a good agreement with experimental results. The resonance frequency in liquid is so small in comparison to air due to additional mass and also additional damping due to the viscosity of the liquid around. The results show that the effect of separation on free vibration amplitude is great. Its effect on resonance frequency is considerable too.

  14. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  15. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  16. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m‑1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  17. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  18. Surface-enhanced spectroscopy on plasmonic oligomers assembled by AFM nanoxerography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutet, Pierre; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Ressier, Laurence; Vilar-Vidal, Noelia; Comesaña-Hermo, Miguel; Ravaine, Serge; Vallée, Renaud A. L.; Gabudean, Ana Maria; Astilean, Simion; Farcau, Cosmin

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) from individual plasmonic oligomers are investigated by confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence microscopy coupled to steady state micro-spectroscopy. The nanoparticle (NP) oligomers are made of either ligand protected Au or Au@SiO2 core-shell colloidal NPs, which were assembled into ordered arrays by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoxerography. A strong dependence of the SERS emission on the polarization of incident light relative to the specific geometry of the plasmonic oligomer was observed. The SEF studies, performed on a large collection of NP oligomers of various known configurations showed interesting fluorophore decay rate modification and red-shift of the emission spectra. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by employing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations on equivalent realistic structures, within the local density of optical states (LDOS) framework. The presented results, together with the proven potential of the LDOS approach as a useful common tool for analyzing both SERS and SEF effects further the general understanding of plasmon-related phenomena in nanoparticle oligomers.Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) from individual plasmonic oligomers are investigated by confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence microscopy coupled to steady state micro-spectroscopy. The nanoparticle (NP) oligomers are made of either ligand protected Au or Au@SiO2 core-shell colloidal NPs, which were assembled into ordered arrays by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoxerography. A strong dependence of the SERS emission on the polarization of incident light relative to the specific geometry of the plasmonic oligomer was observed. The SEF studies, performed on a large collection of NP oligomers of various known configurations showed interesting fluorophore decay rate

  19. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  20. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  1. Preparation of carbon-free TEM microgrids by metal sputtering.

    PubMed

    Janbroers, S; de Kruijff, T R; Xu, Q; Kooyman, P J; Zandbergen, H W

    2009-08-01

    A new method for preparing carbon-free, temperature-stable Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids is presented. An 80% Au/20% Pd metal film is deposited onto a 'holey' microgrid carbon supported on standard mixed-mesh Au TEM grids. Subsequently, the carbon film is selectively removed using plasma cleaning. In this way, an all-metal TEM film is made containing the 'same' microgrid as the original carbon film. Although electron transparency of the foil is reduced significantly, the open areas for TEM inspection of material over these areas are maintained. The metal foil can be prepared with various thicknesses and ensures good electrical conductivity. The new Au/Pd grids are stable to at least 775K under vacuum conditions. PMID:19450927

  2. TEM Study of Internal Crystals in Supernova Graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Bernatowicz, T.; Stadermann, F. J.; Messenger, S.; Amari, S.

    2003-03-01

    A coordinated TEM and isotopic study of ten supernova (SN) graphites from the Murchison meteorite has revealed many internal grains, mostly titanium carbides (TiCs) and TiC-kamacite composite grains, which were accreted during the graphite growth.

  3. Phase velocity of the TEM (1,0)+TEM (0,1) mode laser and electron accelerations in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Kong, Q.; Ho, Y. K.; Wang, P. X.; Xu, J. J.; Lin, D.; Kawata, S.

    2007-04-01

    Unlike at any single TEM (n, m) mode laser, there is a subluminous phase velocity region located along the central region of a TEM (1,0)+TEM (0,1) mode laser. In conjunction with the high longitudinal electric field in this region, it forms another acceleration channel, which also locates inside the transverse ponderomotive potential trap. Through simulation, it is found that relativistic electrons injected into this acceleration channel can stand at the acceleration phase for a long time and be synchronously accelerated to high energies. Also, the accelerated electrons can be well confined inside the trap avoiding the transverse scattering problem.

  4. Experimental verification of the SP-100 TEM pump analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Salamah, S.A.; Miller, D.D.; Sinha, U.N.; Narkiewicz, R.S. )

    1993-01-15

    Validation of the TEM pump analytical model is conducted via experimental verification of the model prediction. Two key tests that have provided essential information toward this objective are the Magnetic Bench Test (MBT) and the ElectroMagnetic Integration Test (EMIT). The tests are briefly described and experimental results are compared with predictions of simulation models that form part of overall TEM pump performance model.

  5. Mechanical characterization of pristine and hydrogen-exposed palladium nanowires by in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Yang, Dachi; Kim, Jae-Woo; Park, Cheol; Fonseca, Luis F

    2013-01-25

    Changes in the crystal lattice of palladium nanowires (Pd NWs) upon hydrogen exposure by absorption and interstitial introduction of hydrogen atoms within the matrix can induce swelling of the nanostructure and generate dislocations through the solid that may alter the overall mechanical performance of the material. Understanding the mechanical behavior of Pd NW-based hydrogen sensors may provide crucial information regarding material changes where the integrity of the sensing device can be compromised. The plastic behavior of hydrogen sensing Pd NWs was studied prior to-and subsequently to-hydrogen exposure via in situ transmission electron microscope-atomic force microscope (TEM-AFM) experiments to understand the role of hydrogenation in the NWs mechanical performance simultaneous to real-time observation. Quantitative and qualitative analysis was performed for deformed NWs upon compression and tension. Large plastic deformation was observed for pristine Pd NWs whereas little plastic deformation was observed for hydrogen-exposed Pd NWs. Tested pristine NWs behaved in a ductile manner, and necking events were observed for all tested specimens upon tension. Lowered ductility was observed for the hydrogen-exposed specimen, in accordance with hydrogen embrittlement observed in bulk palladium. PMID:23262467

  6. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  7. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  8. Effect of tip mass on frequency response and sensitivity of AFM cantilever in liquid.

    PubMed

    Farokh Payam, Amir; Fathipour, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    The effect of tip mass on the frequency response and sensitivity of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever in the liquid environment is investigated. For this purpose, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and considering tip mass and hydrodynamic functions in a liquid environment, an expression for the resonance frequencies of AFM cantilever in liquid is derived. Then, based on this expression, the effect of the surface contact stiffness on the flexural mode of a rectangular AFM cantilever in fluid is investigated and compared with the case where the AFM cantilever operates in the air. The results show that in contrast with an air environment, the tip mass has no significant impact on the resonance frequency and sensitivity of the AFM cantilever in the liquid. Hence, analysis of AFM behaviour in liquid environment by neglecting the tip mass is logical. PMID:25562584

  9. Tools to measure CD-SEM performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Jalhadi, Kiran; Deo, Sachin; Lee, Soo-Young; Joy, David

    2006-03-01

    It is important to be able to quantify the imaging performance of CD-SEMs for such purposes as verifying the specification, rechecking after a routine maintenance, or for tool matching. To perform tests such as these it is necessary to have both appropriate software for image analysis and suitable test samples. A package of 2-D Fourier transform and analysis software, designed as a plug-in for the shareware IMAGE-Java program, has been developed and is freely available on line. The requirement for a reproducible and well characterized sample has been met by using direct-write electron beam lithography to fabricate suitable Fresnel zone plate structures.

  10. AFM surface investigation of polyethylene modified by ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Arenholz, E.; Hnatowicz, V.; Rybka, V.; Öchsner, R.; Ryssel, H.

    1998-07-01

    Polyethylene (PE) was irradiated with 63 keV Ar + and 155 keV Xe + ions to fluences of 1 × 10 13 to 3 × 10 15 cm -2 with ion energies being chosen in order to achieve approximately the same penetration depth for both species. The PE surface morphology was examined by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereas the concentration of free radicals and conjugated double bonds, both created by the ion irradiation, were determined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-VIS spectroscopy, respectively. As expected, the degradation of PE was higher after irradiation with heavier Xe + ions but the changes in the PE surface morphology were more pronounced for Ar + ions. This newly observed effect can be explained by stronger compaction of the PE surface layer in the case of the Xe + irradiation, connected with a reduction of free volume available.

  11. FM-AFM crossover in vanadium oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demishev, S. V.; Chernobrovkin, A. L.; Glushkov, V. V.; Grigorieva, A. V.; Goodilin, E. A.; Sluchanko, N. E.; Samarin, N. A.; Semeno, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic properties of nanomaterials based on vanadium oxide (multiwall nanotubes, nanorods, and nanolayers) have been investigated in the temperature range of 1.8-220 K by high-frequency (60-GHz) EPR. A transition from a ferromagnetic temperature dependence to an antiferromagnetic temperature dependence has been observed in nanorods and nanotubes with a decrease in the temperature. The FM-AFM crossover observed near T C ˜ 110 K is accompanied by a low-temperature increase in the Curie constant by a factor of 2.7-7. The comparison of the experimental data for various VO x nanoparticles indicates that the most probable cause of the change in the type of magnetic interaction is a change in the concentration of V4+ magnetic ions.

  12. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. PMID:22472512

  13. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits. PMID:26005137

  15. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  16. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinkable Hydrogels with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Alyssa; Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Aidala, Katherine

    2012-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogel films formed from photo-crosslinkable polymers are versatile materials for controlled drug delivery devices, three-dimensional micro-assemblies, and components in microfluidic systems. For such applications, it is important to understand both the mechanical properties and the dynamics responses of these materials. We describe the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) based indentation experiments to characterize the properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer films, crosslinked by activation of pendent benzophenone units using ultraviolet light. In particular, we study how the elastic modulus of the material, determined using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts model, depends on UV dose, and simultaneously investigate stress relaxation in these materials in the context of viscoelastic and poroelastic relaxation models.

  17. Recent advances in exchange bias of layered magnetic FM/AFM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ZhongYuan

    2013-01-01

    The exchange bias (EB) has been investigated in magnetic materials with the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) contacting interfaces for more than half a century. To date, the significant progress has been made in the layered magnetic FM/AFM thin film systems. EB mechanisms have shown substantive research advances. Here some of the new advances are introduced and discussed with the emphasis on the influence of AFM layer, the interlayer EB coupling across nonmagnetic spacer, and the interlayer coupling across AFM layer, as well as EB related to multiferrioc materials and electrical control.

  18. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Barker, Trevor M; Crozier, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. PMID:25974880

  19. Subgrain boundary analyses in deformed orthopyroxene by TEM/STEM with EBSD-FIB sample preparation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Kumamoto, Akihito; Fujii, Eiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution structure analyses using electron beam techniques have been performed for the investigation of subgrain boundaries (SGBs) in deformed orthopyroxene (Opx) in mylonite from Hidaka Metamorphic Belt, Hokkaido, Japan, to understand ductile deformation mechanism of silicate minerals in shear zones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis of Opx porphyroclasts in the mylonitic rock indicated that the crystal orientation inside the Opx crystals gradually changes by rotation about the b-axis by SGBs and crystal folding. In order to observe the SGBs along the b-axis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM), the following sample preparation protocol was adopted. First, petrographic thin sections were slightly etched with hydrofluoric acid to identify SGBs in SEM. The Opx crystals whose b-axes were oriented close to the normal of the surface were identified by EBSD, and the areas containing SGBs were picked and thinned for (S) TEM analysis with a focused ion beam instrument with micro-sampling system. High-resolution TEM imaging of the SGBs in Opx revealed various boundary structures from a periodic array of dissociated (100) [001] edge dislocations to partially or completely incoherent crystals, depending on the misorientation angle. Atomic-resolution STEM imaging clearly confirmed the formation of clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure between the dissociated partial dislocations. Moreover, X-ray microanalysis in STEM revealed that the Cpx contains a considerable amount of calcium replacing iron. Such chemical inhomogeneity may limit glide motion of the dislocation and eventually the plastic deformation of the Opx porphyroclasts at a low temperature. Chemical profiles across the high-angle incoherent SGB also showed an enrichment of the latter in calcium at the boundary, suggesting that SGBs are an efficient diffusion pathway of calcium out of host Opx grain during cooling.

  20. Detecting flaws in Portland cement concrete using TEM horn antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qadi, Imad L.; Riad, Sedki M.; Su, Wansheng; Haddad, Rami H.

    1996-11-01

    To understand the dielectric properties of PCC and better correlate them with type and severity of PCC internal defects, a study was conducted to evaluate PCC complex permittivity and magnetic permeability over a wideband of frequencies using both time domain and frequency domain techniques. Three measuring devices were designed and fabricated: a parallel plate capacitor, a coaxial transmission line, and transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antennae. The TEM horn antenna covers the microwave frequencies. The measurement technique involves a time domain setup that was verified by a frequency domain measurement. Portland cement concrete slabs, 60 by 75 by 14 cm, were cast; defects include delamination, delamination filled with water, segregation, and chloride contamination. In this paper, measurements using the TEM horn antennae and the feasibility of detecting flaws at microwave frequency are presented.

  1. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  2. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  3. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  4. Biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface via AFM-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W; Lu, X Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip≈5µm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model, and the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1±0.8MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean±SEM, n=13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4±0.1MPa, n=6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  5. Biomechanical Properties of Murine Meniscus Surface via AFM-based Nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip ≈ 5 μm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction observed on 12-week old menisci. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD, and the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1 ± 0.8 MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean ± SEM, n = 13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4 ± 0.1 MPa, n = 6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  6. Solar variability observed with GMS/SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tsugunobu

    1987-06-01

    Daily averaged data on energetic protons, alpha particles, and electrons obtained between 1978-1986 with different channels of SEM aboard the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 'Himawari' are presented and discussed. Most solar particle events (SPEs), observed in the P2-P6 and A1-A5 channels, show a gradual rise and a further gradual decay of the particle fluxes, although some SREs displayed a sharp rise and a gradual decay. SPEs, which occurred frequently in the 1978-1979 and 1981-1982 periods, were less frequent after 1983; however, there occurred several large and energetic SREs between 1983 and 1986. Therefore, the long-term trend in the high-energy particle ejection from the sun is quite different from that in the sunspot number. The fluxes from the EL and P1 channel response, largely due to energetic particles trapped in the earth's magnetic field, show substorm-induced variations, the characteristics of which depend highly on local time.

  7. SEMS: System for Environmental Monitoring and Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this project was to establish a computational and data management system, SEMS, building on our existing system and MTPE-related research. We proposed that the new system would help support Washington University's efforts in environmental sustainability through use in: (a) Problem-based environmental curriculum for freshmen and sophomores funded by the Hewlett Foundation that integrates scientific, cultural, and policy perspectives to understand the dynamics of wetland degradation, deforestation, and desertification and that will develop policies for sustainable environments and economies; (b) Higher-level undergraduate and graduate courses focused on monitoring the environment and developing policies that will lead to sustainable environmental and economic conditions; and (c) Interdisciplinary research focused on the dynamics of the Missouri River system and development of policies that lead to sustainable environmental and economic floodplain conditions.

  8. Data fusion for CD metrology: heterogeneous hybridization of scatterometry, CDSEM, and AFM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazart, J.; Chesneau, N.; Evin, G.; Largent, A.; Derville, A.; Thérèse, R.; Bos, S.; Bouyssou, R.; Dezauzier, C.; Foucher, J.

    2014-04-01

    The manufacturing of next generation semiconductor devices forces metrology tool providers for an exceptional effort in order to meet the requirements for precision, accuracy and throughput stated in the ITRS. In the past years hybrid metrology (based on data fusion theories) has been investigated as a new methodology for advanced metrology [1][2][3]. This paper provides a new point of view of data fusion for metrology through some experiments and simulations. The techniques are presented concretely in terms of equations to be solved. The first point of view is High Level Fusion which is the use of simple numbers with their associated uncertainty postprocessed by tools. In this paper, it is divided into two stages: one for calibration to reach accuracy, the second to reach precision thanks to Bayesian Fusion. From our perspective, the first stage is mandatory before applying the second stage which is commonly presented [1]. However a reference metrology system is necessary for this fusion. So, precision can be improved if and only if the tools to be fused are perfectly matched at least for some parameters. We provide a methodology similar to a multidimensional TMU able to perform this matching exercise. It is demonstrated on a 28 nm node backend lithography case. The second point of view is Deep Level Fusion which works on the contrary with raw data and their combination. In the approach presented here, the analysis of each raw data is based on a parametric model and connections between the parameters of each tool. In order to allow OCD/SEM Deep Level Fusion, a SEM Compact Model derived from [4] has been developed and compared to AFM. As far as we know, this is the first time such techniques have been coupled at Deep Level. A numerical study on the case of a simple stack for lithography is performed. We show strict equivalence of Deep Level Fusion and High Level Fusion when tools are sensitive and models are perfect. When one of the tools can be considered as a

  9. Sem analysis zirconia-ceramic adhesion interface

    PubMed Central

    CARDELLI, P.; VERTUCCI, V.; MONTANI, M.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Modern dentistry increasingly tends to use materials aesthetically acceptable and biomimetic. Among these are zirconia and ceramics for several years, a combination that now has becoming synonym of aesthetic; however, what could be the real link between these two materials and especially its nature, remains a controversial topic debated in the literature. The aim of our study was to “underline” the type of bonding that could exist between these materials. Materials and methods To investigate the nature of this bond we used a SEM microscopy (Zeiss SUPRA 25). Different bilaminar specimens: “white” zirconia Zircodent® and ceramic “Noritake®”, after being tested with loading test in bending (three-point-bending) and FEM analysis, were analyzed by SEM. Fragments’ analysis in closeness of the fracture’s point has allowed us to be able to “see” if at large magnifications between these two materials, and without the use of linear, could exist a lasting bond and the possible type of failure that could incur. Results From our analysis of the specimens’ fragments analyzed after test Equipment, it is difficult to highlight a clear margin and no-adhesion zones between the two materials, although the analysis involving fragments adjacent to the fracture that has taken place at the time of Mechanical test Equipment. Conclusions According to our analysis and with all the clarification of the case, we can assume that you can obtain a long and lasting bond between the zirconia and ceramics. Agree to the data present in the literature, we can say that the type of bond varies according to the type of specimens and of course also the type of failure. In samples where the superstructure envelops the ceramic framework Zirconium we are in the presence of a cohesive failure, otherwise in a presence of adhesive failure. PMID:27555905

  10. CD bias reduction in CD-SEM linewidth measurements for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Maki; Meessen, Jeroen; Shishido, Chie; Watanabe, Kenji; Minnaert-Janssen, Ingrid; Vanoppen, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The linewidth measurement capability of the model-based library (MBL) matching technique was evaluated experimentally. This technique estimates the dimensions and shape of a target pattern by comparing a measured SEM image profile to a library of simulated line scans. The simulation model uses a non-linear least squares method to estimate pattern geometry parameters. To examine the application of MBL matching in an advanced lithography process, a focus-exposure matrix wafer was prepared with a leading-edge immersion lithography tool. The evaluation used 36 sites with target structures having various linewidths from 45 to 200 nm. The measurement accuracy was evaluated by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a reference measurement system. The results of a first trial indicated that two or more solutions could exist in the parameter space in MBL matching. To solve this problem, we obtained a rough estimation of the scale parameter in SEM imaging, based on experimental results, in order to add a constraint in the matching process. As a result, the sensitivity to sidewall variation in MBL matching was improved, and the measurement bias was reduced from 22.1 to 16 nm. These results indicate the possibility of improving the CD measurement capability by applying this tool parameter appropriately.

  11. Nondestructive SEM for surface and subsurface wafer imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Propst, Roy H.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Cole, Edward I., Jr.; Davies, Brian G.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Johnson, Darryl G.; Oxford, William V.; Smith, Craig A.

    1987-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is considered as a tool for both failure analysis as well as device characterization. A survey is made of various operational SEM modes and their applicability to image processing methods on semiconductor devices.

  12. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  13. Beyond topography - enhanced imaging of cometary dust with the MIDAS AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, M. S.; Torkar, K.; Jeszenszky, H.; Romstedt, J.

    2013-09-01

    The MIDAS atomic force microscope (AFM) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft is primarily designed to return the 3D shape and structure of cometary dust particles collected at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Commercial AFMs have, however, been further developed to measure many other sample properties. The possibilities to make such measurements with MIDAS are explored here.

  14. Aβ1-16 conformational changes induced by heavy metals, antioxidants, and corn zeins: CD, AFM, SEM, and FT-IR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murariu, Manuela; Mihai, Marcela; Zaharia, Marius; Drochioiu, Gabi

    2014-10-01

    Amyloid-beta (known also as Aβ or A-beta or beta-amyloid) is a peptide of 36-43 amino acids that appears to be the main constituent of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The transformation process from α-helix to β-sheet structures appears to be one of the major factors in the genesis and evolution of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, Parkinson's disease (PD), and several prion diseases [1,2]. Metal-based reactions of some polypeptides and proteins are considered as a common denominator for neurodegenerative diseases (Figure 1) [3,4]. Amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and may be promoted by the trace amounts of metal ions like aluminium, iron, zinc or copper [5-11]. For example, copper ions cause the peptide aggregation to a great extent and highly increase the neurotoxicity exhibited by Aβ1-40 in cell culture [11].

  15. Imaging and diffraction of protein crystallization using TEM.

    PubMed

    Gomery, Kathryn; Humphrey, Elaine C; Herring, Rodney

    2013-06-01

    Structural biology relies on good-quality protein crystals in order for structure determination. Many factors affect the growth process of a protein crystal including the way it nucleates and the types of damage and contamination during its growth. Although the nucleation process and quality of a crystal is vital to structure determination, they are both under-studied areas of research. Our research begins to explore ways of measuring the quality of protein crystals, using TEM, thus overcoming the problems associated with viewing wet specimens in a vacuum. Our current understanding of nucleation is that it is a two-step mechanism involving the formation of nuclei from dense liquid clusters; however; it is still unclear whether nuclei first start as amorphous aggregates or as crystalline lattices. Potentially, electron diffraction may be capable of uncovering this process. Using TEM imaging and diffraction of lysozyme as a model protein crystal, we report the internal two-dimensional strain and the density of crystallites in a protein crystal, at a resolution never seen before. The TEM diffraction shows unique features of crystal mosaicity that can be directly correlated to TEM images. PMID:23250893

  16. Unexpected Enzyme TEM-126: Role of Mutation Asp179Glu

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, J.; Robin, F.; Bittar, F.; Chanal, C.; Bonnet, R.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical isolate Escherichia coli CF884 exhibited low-level resistance to ceftazidime (4 μg/ml) by a positive double-disk synergy test and apparent susceptibility to cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefpirome, and aztreonam. The enzyme implicated in this phenotype was a novel 180-kb plasmid-encoded TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase designated TEM-126 which harbors the mutations Asp179Glu and Met182Thr. TEM-126 exhibited significant hydrolytic activity (kcat, 2 s−1) and a Km value of 82 μM against ceftazidime. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the substitution Asp179Glu induces subtle conformational changes to the omega loop which may favor the insertion of ceftazidime in the binding site and the correct positioning of the crucial residue Glu166. Overall, these results highlight the remarkable plasticity of TEM enzymes, which can expand their activity against ceftazidime by the addition of one carbon atom in the side chain of residue 179. PMID:16189109

  17. Dopant profiling in the TEM, progress towards quantitative electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, David; Truche, Robert; Chabli, Amal; Twitchett-Harrison, Alison C.; Midgley, Paul A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2007-09-26

    Off-axis electron holography has been used to characterise the dopant potential in GaAs p-n junctions. We show that the measured potential across the junctions is affected by both FIB specimen preparation and by charging in the TEM and suggest methods that can be used to minimise these problems.

  18. Properties of linear microwave plasma sustained by coaxial TEM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun

    2013-09-01

    A linear 2.45GHz microwave plasma sustained by coaxial circular TEM waveguide has been developed for the low temperature large area plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition application. TE-TEM microwave power coupling was achieved by copper rod located at λg/4 from short-end of TE10 waveguide. TEM waveguide consists of quartz tube surrounded by plasma and copper rod electrode. TEM waveguide is 60 cm in length and 3 cm in diameter, which is terminated with shorted metal cap. For the operation condition of 300 W input power and Ar pressure of 200 mTorr, a clear standing wave pattern with wavelength of 10 cm was observed. Measured plasma density and temperature at 5 cm from quartz wall was 1.2 × 1017/cm3 and 1.7 eV respectively. Density non-uniformity was less than 6% along quartz tube in spite of standing wave set-up. In addition, properties of the microwave source are also investigated through electromagnetic field simulation coupled with drift-diffusion approximation of plasma. Calculated and measured standing wave pattern was almost identical. Electron density and temperature distribution show similar behavior with experimental results. S11 value of input port of TE10 waveguide was calculated as 17dB.

  19. High speed AFM studies of 193 nm immersion photoresists during TMAH development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngunjiri, Johnpeter; Meyers, Greg; Cameron, Jim; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Jeon, Hyun; Lee, Dave; Choi, Kwang Mo; Kim, Jung Woo; Im, Kwang-Hwyi; Lim, Hae-Jin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report on our studies of the dynamic process of resist development in real time. Using High Speed - Atomic Force Microscopy (HS-AFM) in dilute developer solution, changes in morphology and nanomechanical properties of patterned resist were monitored. The Bruker Dimension FastScan AFMTM was applied to analyze 193 nm acrylic-based immersion resists in developer. HS-AFM operated in Peak Force mapping mode allowed for concurrent measurements of image topography resist stiffness, adhesion to AFM probe and deformation during development. In our studies we focused on HS-AFM topography data as it readily revealed detailed information about initial resist morphology, followed by a resist swelling process and eventual dissolution of the exposed resist areas. HS-AFM showed potential for tracking and understanding development of patterned resist films and can be useful in evaluating the dissolution properties of different resist designs.

  20. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  1. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  2. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer. PMID:27058449

  3. In situ TEM studies of carbon and gold nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas Garcia, Gilberto

    Properties of matter change as structures go down in size to the nanoscale, creating new possibilities for creating new functional materials with better properties than the bulk. In situ TEM techniques were used to probe the properties of two different materials: atomic carbon chains and gold nanoparticles. Carbon chains were synthesized by in situ TEM electron beam irradiation from few-layers-graphene (FLG) flakes. Several chains up to 5 nm long were observed. Aberration corrected TEM confirmed the dimerization of the linear chain as predicted by Peierls. Moreover, it was observed that two linear carbon chains can cross-bond every 9 atoms, and it was confirmed by DFT calculations. Five-fold nanoparticles are not supposed to be stable beyond 5 nm size. Here, decahedra with high index facets in the order of 300 nm were studied by TEM. It was found that the high index facets were only stable by adding a capping agent, otherwise, smooth edges were observed. In this case, a (5x1) hexagonal surface reconstruction was observed on the {001} surfaces, with the hexagonal strings along a [110] and a [410] direction. Additionally, mechanical properties of gold nanoparticles, with and without twin boundaries, under 100 nm were measured by in situ TEM compression experiments. All of the nanoparticles presented yield strengths in the order of GPa. Multi twinned nanoparticles were found to be more malleable, reaching real compressing strains of 100 %, while the single crystal nanoparticle presented less plastic flow. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the twin boundaries contribute to the malleability of the nanoparticles, at the same time it provides a mechanism to stop dislocations, hence, strain hardening the nanoparticle at later stages of compression. Finally, the behavior of a single grain boundary was studied by in situ TEM manipulation of nanoparticles. A liquid-like behavior of a grain boundary is observed after two 40 nm gold nanoparticles are brought to

  4. In situ SEM Study of Lithium Intercalation in individual V2O5 Nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Cothren, Joshua E.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2015-01-08

    Progress in rational engineering of Li-ion batteries requires better understanding of the electrochemical processes and accompanying transformations in the electrode materials on multiple length scales. In spite of recent progress in utilizing transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze these materials, in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was mostly overlooked as a powerful tool that allows probing these phenomena on the nano and mesoscale. In this paper, we report on in situ SEM study of lithiation in a V2O5-based single-nanobelt battery with ionic liquid electrolyte. Coupled with cyclic voltammetry measurements, in situ SEM revealed the peculiarities of subsurface intercalation, formation ofmore » solid-electrolyte interface (SEI) and electromigration of liquid. We observed that single-crystalline vanadia nanobelts do not undergo large-scale amorphization or fracture during electrochemical cycling, but rather transform topochemically with only a slight shape distortion. Lastly, the SEI layer seems to have significant influence on the lithium ion diffusion and overall capacity of the single-nanobelt battery.« less

  5. STEM-in-SEM high resolution imaging of gold nanoparticles and bivalve tissues in bioaccumulation experiments.

    PubMed

    García-Negrete, C A; Jiménez de Haro, M C; Blasco, J; Soto, M; Fernández, A

    2015-05-01

    The methodology termed scanning transmission electron microscopy in scanning electron microscopy (STEM-in-SEM) has been used in this work to study the uptake of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (average particle sizes of 23.5 ± 4.0 nm) into tissue samples upon in vitro exposure of the dissected gills of the Ruditapes philippinarum marine bivalve to the nanoparticle suspensions. The STEM-in-SEM methodology has been optimized for achieving optimum resolution under SEM low voltage operating conditions (20-30 kV). Based on scanning microscope assessments and resolution testing (SMART), resolutions well below 10 nm were appropriately achieved by working at magnifications over 100k×, with experimental sample thickness between 300 and 200 nm. These relatively thick slices appear to be stable under the beam and help avoid NP displacement during cutting. We herein show that both localizing of the internalized nanoparticles and imaging of ultrastructural disturbances in gill tissues are strongly accessible due to the improved resolution, even at sample thicknesses higher than those normally employed in standard TEM techniques at higher voltages. Ultrastructural imaging of bio-nano features in bioaccumulation experiments have been demonstrated in this study. PMID:25685960

  6. Combined AC-STEM and FIB-SEM Characterization of Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Kotula, P.; Yoon, H.; Gardner, P.

    2013-12-01

    We examine shale samples with state-of-the-art aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM) and focused ion beam-scanning electron (FIB-SEM) microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction of pore space incorporates electron tomography using the AC-TEM and serial sectioning by FIB-SEM. Chemical analysis by X-ray energy dispersive microscopy reveals composition of pore-lining phases at ~ 1 nm resolution. Our methods reveal the left tail of the pore size distribution that FIB-SEM techniques typically do not capture (pore sizes < 7 nm). Water in pores of this size will deviate from those of bulk water, which can influence non-Darcy flow and mechanical response. The impact of these small pores on fluid and coupled tracer transport is examined by computation fluid dynamics using 3D pore reconstructions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  8. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  9. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, W. H.; Artoli, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  10. Development of an analytical environmental TEM system and its application.

    PubMed

    Kishita, Keisuke; Sakai, Hisashi; Tanaka, Hiromochi; Saka, Hiroyasu; Kuroda, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Masayuki; Watabe, Akira; Kamino, Takeo

    2009-12-01

    Many automotive materials, such as catalysts and fuel cell materials, undergo significant changes in structure or properties when subjected to temperature change or the addition of a gas. For this reason, in the development of these materials, it is important to study the behavior of the material under controlled temperatures and gaseous atmospheres. Recently, a new environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for observation with a high resolution at high temperatures and under gaseous atmospheres, thus making it possible to analyze reaction processes in details. Also, the new TEM provides a high degree of reproducibility of observation conditions, thus making it possible to compare and validate observation of various specimens under a given set of conditions. Furthermore, easiness of gas condition and temperature control can provide a powerful tool for the studying of the mechanism of material change, such as oxidation and reduction reactions. PMID:19520735

  11. Plastic deformation in zirconium nitride observed by nanoindentation and TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, G. W.; Wheeler, K.; Peralta, P.; McClellan, K. J.; Maloy, S. A.; Bond, G. M.

    2011-09-01

    A study on zirconium nitride using TEM and nanoindentation was performed to assess the significant surface plasticity found to be introduced by sample polishing. Cross-sectional TEM results show strong evidence of plasticity via dislocations produced directly from surface grinding and polishing. These dislocations were found to glide on the {0 1 1}<0 1¯ 1> slip system. Using nanoindentation to observe the effects of surface dislocation density, a critical shear stress was found that relates to dislocations nucleation and multiplication. Continued chemo-mechanical polishing increased the critical shear stress to approximately 1600 mN by reducing surface dislocations. It is postulated that vacancy clusters and oxide microcrystallites produced during surface processing provide dislocation nucleation and/or multiplication sites. Gentle chemo-mechanical polishing for several hours greatly reduced or eliminated preexisting dislocations such that the critical shear stress for nucleation approaches the theoretical limit (˜ G/5).

  12. Comparing Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) and Early-Time TEM for Mapping Highly Conductive Groundwater in Mars Analog Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernsletten, J. A.

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of (diffusive) Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) for sounding of subsurface water in conductive Mars analog environments. To provide a baseline for such studies, I show data from two field studies: 1) Diffusive sounding data (TEM) from Pima County, Arizona; and 2) Shallower sounding data using the Fast-Turnoff TEM method from Peña de Hierro in the Rio Tinto region of Spain. The latter is data from work conducted under the auspices of the Mars Analog Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). Pima County TEM Survey: A TEM survey was carried out in Pima County, Arizona, in January 2003. Data was collected using 100 m Tx loops and a ferrite-cored magnetic coil Rx antenna, and processed using commercial software. The survey used a 16 Hz sounding frequency, which is sensitive to slightly salty groundwater. Prominent features in the data from Arizona are the ~500 m depth of investigation and the ~120 m depth to the water table, confirmed by data from four USGS test wells surrounding the field area. Note also the conductive (~20-40 ω m) clay-rich soil above the water table. Rio Tinto Fast-Turnoff TEM Survey: During May and June of 2003, a Fast-Turnoff (early time) TEM survey was carried out at the Peña de Hierro field area of the MARTE project, near the town of Nerva, Spain. Data was collected using 20 m and 40 m Tx loop antennae and 10 m loop Rx antennae, with a 32 Hz sounding frequency. Data from Line 4 (of 16) from this survey, collected using 40 m Tx loops, show ~200 m depth of investigation and a conductive high at ~90 m depth below Station 20 (second station of 10 along this line). This is the water table, matching the 431 m MSL elevation of the nearby pit lake. The center of the "pileup" below Station 60 is spatially coincident with the vertical fault plane located here. Data from Line 15 and Line 14 of the Rio Tinto survey, collected using 20 m Tx loops, achieve ~50 m depth of investigation and

  13. Application of particle analysis to transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DaPonte, J.; Sadowski, T.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Day, D.; Lehman, A. H.; Krishna, D.; Marinella, L.; Munhutu, P.; Sawicki, M.

    2007-04-01

    Nanoparticles, particles with a diameter of 1-100 nanometers (nm), are of interest in many applications including device fabrication, quantum computing, and sensing because their size may give them properties that are very different from bulk materials. Further advancement of nanotechnology cannot be obtained without an increased understanding of nanoparticle properties such as size (diameter) and size distribution frequently evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the past, these parameters have been obtained from digitized TEM images by manually measuring and counting many of these nanoparticles, a task that is highly subjective and labor intensive. More recently, computer imaging particle analysis has emerged as an objective alternative by counting and measuring objects in a binary image. This paper will describe the procedures used to preprocess a set of gray scale TEM images so that they could be correctly thresholded into binary images. This allows for a more accurate assessment of the size and frequency (size distribution) of nanoparticles. Several preprocessing methods including pseudo flat field correction and rolling ball background correction were investigated with the rolling ball algorithm yielding the best results. Examples of particle analysis will be presented for different types of materials and different magnifications. In addition, a method based on the results of particle analysis for identifying and removing small noise particles will be discussed. This filtering technique is based on identifying the location of small particles in the binary image and removing them without affecting the size of other larger particles.

  14. TEM and XPS studies on CdS/CIGS interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Cha, Li-mei; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui; Besland, M.-P.

    2014-12-01

    Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) was deposited by metallic precursors sputtering and subsequently submitted to a selenization process. The upper CdS layers were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CIGS interfaces were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). As checked by XPS analysis, the CIGS surface exhibited a hydroxide-terminated CdSe layer when treated with Cd Partial Electrolyte solution (Cd PE). Its thickness was roughly estimated to several nanometers. A 100 nm thick CdS layer was deposited onto CIGS surface. The TEM images revealed a clear and sharp interface between CdS and CIGS. XPS analysis showed a CIGS surface covered by a pinhole free and homogeneous CdS layer. XPS depth profile measurement of the CdS/CIGS interface did not evidence elemental inter-diffusion between the CIGS and CdS layers, in very good agreement with TEM observations.

  15. Tuning the resonance of a photonic crystal microcavity with an AFM probe.

    PubMed

    Märki, Iwan; Salt, Martin; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2006-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results on switching and tuning of a two-dimensional photonic crystal resonant microcavity by means of a silicon AFM tip, probing the highly localized optical field in the vicinity of the cavity. On-off switching and modulation of the transmission signal in the kHz range is achieved by bringing an AFM tip onto the center of the microcavity, inducing a damping effect on the transmission resonance. Tuning of the resonant wavelength in the order of several nanometers becomes possible by inserting the AFM tip into one of the holes of the Bragg mirror forming the microcavity in the propagation direction. PMID:19516436

  16. Development of portable experimental set-up for AFM to work at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, D. H.; Bhatt, P. M.; Pathan, A. M.; Patel, Hitarthi; Joshi, U. S.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the designing aspects and fabrication of low temperature atomic force microscope (AFM) to study the surface structures of nanomaterials. Several key features of design including liquid nitrogen reservoir, vacuum chamber, vibration isolation table etc. have been presented. The whole set up was assembled in-house at a fairly low cost to be used with any commercial AFM system. The surface morphology of important oxide (In0.94Sn0.04)2O3 (ITO) thin film nanostructures has been investigated using the cryogenic AFM set up.

  17. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  18. MetaRep, an extended CMAS 3D program to visualize mafic (CMAS, ACF-S, ACF-N) and pelitic (AFM-K, AFM-S, AKF-S) projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Lydéric; Nicollet, Christian

    2010-06-01

    MetaRep is a program based on our earlier program CMAS 3D. It is developed in MATLAB ® script. MetaRep objectives are to visualize and project major element compositions of mafic and pelitic rocks and their minerals in the pseudo-quaternary projections of the ACF-S, ACF-N, CMAS, AFM-K, AFM-S and AKF-S systems. These six systems are commonly used to describe metamorphic mineral assemblages and magmatic evolutions. Each system, made of four apices, can be represented in a tetrahedron that can be visualized in three dimensions with MetaRep; the four tetrahedron apices represent oxides or combination of oxides that define the composition of the projected rock or mineral. The three-dimensional representation allows one to obtain a better understanding of the topology of the relationships between the rocks and minerals and relations. From these systems, MetaRep can also project data in ternary plots (for example, the ACF, AFM and AKF ternary projections can be generated). A functional interface makes it easy to use and does not require any knowledge of MATLAB ® programming. To facilitate the use, MetaRep loads, from the main interface, data compiled in a Microsoft Excel ™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching. We propose an application example that, by using two combined systems (ACF-S and ACF-N), provides strong confirmation in the petrological interpretation.

  19. Temperature-dependent XRD, IR, magnetic, SEM and TEM studies of Jahn–Teller distorted NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders

    SciTech Connect

    Ptak, M. Maczka, M.; Gągor, A.; Pikul, A.; Macalik, L.; Hanuza, J.

    2013-05-15

    In the present work we report detailed structural, magnetic and phonon properties of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders synthesized via a simple coprecipitation method. Temperature-dependent XRD as well as temperature-dependent IR studies reveal that cubic to tetragonal phase transition is lowered due to size effects. Observed changes in the IR spectra indicate that the paramagnetic–ferrimagnetic phase transition taking place at 74 K is related to further lowering of symmetry to orthorhombic system. Assignment of modes was proposed and factor group analyses in three possible symmetries were carried out. Our results show strong anomalies due to the Jahn–Teller tetragonal distortion and weak due to the orthorhombic distortion and onset of collinear ferrimagnetic order. Shifts of wavenumbers observed below 31 K, where the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering occurs, were attributed to spin–phonon interactions. - Graphical abstract: XRD pattern of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample synthesized via a coprecipitation method followed by calcination at 1000 {sup o}C. - Highlights: • NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} starts to crystallize near 750 °C. • Coexistence of cubic and tetragonal phases of NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was revealed. • Temperature of the Jahn–Teller distortion is lowered due to the size effects. • Evidences of tetragonal and orthorhombic distortions were found. • Weak spin–phonon interactions were evidenced.

  20. Temperature-dependent XRD, IR, magnetic, SEM and TEM studies of Jahn-Teller distorted NiCr2O4 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, M.; Maczka, M.; Gągor, A.; Pikul, A.; Macalik, L.; Hanuza, J.

    2013-05-01

    In the present work we report detailed structural, magnetic and phonon properties of NiCr2O4 powders synthesized via a simple coprecipitation method. Temperature-dependent XRD as well as temperature-dependent IR studies reveal that cubic to tetragonal phase transition is lowered due to size effects. Observed changes in the IR spectra indicate that the paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic phase transition taking place at 74 K is related to further lowering of symmetry to orthorhombic system. Assignment of modes was proposed and factor group analyses in three possible symmetries were carried out. Our results show strong anomalies due to the Jahn-Teller tetragonal distortion and weak due to the orthorhombic distortion and onset of collinear ferrimagnetic order. Shifts of wavenumbers observed below 31 K, where the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering occurs, were attributed to spin-phonon interactions.

  1. Recent improvement of a FIB-SEM serial-sectioning method for precise 3D image reconstruction - application of the orthogonally-arranged FIB-SEM.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru

    2014-11-01

    IntroductionWe installed the first "orthogonally-arranged" FIB-SEM in 2011. The most characteristic point of this instrument is that the FIB and SEM columns are perpendicularly mounted; this is specially designed to obtain a serial-sectioning dataset more accurately and precisely with higher contrast and higher spatial resolution compare to other current FIB-SEMs [1]. Since the installation in 2011, we have developed the hardware and methodology of the serial-sectioning based on this orthogonal FIB-SEM. In order to develop this technique, we have widely opened this instrument to every researcher of all fields. In the presentation, I would like to introduce some of application results that are obtained by users of this instrument. The characteristic points of the orthogonal systemFigure 1 shows a difference between the standard and the orthogonal FIB-SEM systems: In the standard system, shown in Fig.1(a), optical axes of a FIB and a SEM crosses around 60deg., while in the orthogonal system (Fig.1(b)), they are perpendicular to each other. The standard arrangement (a) is certainly suitable for TEM lamellae preparation etc. because the FIB and the SEM can see the same position simultaneously. However, for a serial-sectioning, it is not to say the best arrangement. One of the reasons is that the sliced plane by the FIB is not perpendicular to the electron beam so that the background contrast is not uniform and observed plane is distorted. On the other hand, in case of the orthogonally-arranged system,(b), these problems are resolved. In addition, spatial resolution can keep high enough even in a low accelerating voltage (e.g. 500V) because a working distance is set very small, 2mm. From these special design, we can obtain the serial-sectioning dataset from rather wide area (∼100um) with high spatial resolution (Max. 2×2×2nm). As this system has many kinds of detectors: SE, ET, Backscatter Electron(Energy-selective), EDS, EBSD, STEM(BF&ADF), with Ar+ ion-gun and a

  2. High-resolution noncontact AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy investigations of self-assembled photovoltaic donor–acceptor dyads

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Biniek, Laure; Brinkmann, Martin; Leclerc, Nicolas; Zaborova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Self-assembled donor–acceptor dyads are used as model nanostructured heterojunctions for local investigations by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). With the aim to probe the photo-induced charge carrier generation, thin films deposited on transparent indium tin oxide substrates are investigated in dark conditions and upon illumination. The topographic and contact potential difference (CPD) images taken under dark conditions are analysed in view of the results of complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments. After in situ annealing, it is shown that the dyads with longer donor blocks essentially lead to standing acceptor–donor lamellae, where the acceptor and donor groups are π-stacked in an edge-on configuration. The existence of strong CPD and surface photo-voltage (SPV) contrasts shows that structural variations occur within the bulk of the edge-on stacks. SPV images with a very high lateral resolution are achieved, which allows for the resolution of local photo-charging contrasts at the scale of single edge-on lamella. This work paves the way for local investigations of the optoelectronic properties of donor–acceptor supramolecular architectures down to the elementary building block level. PMID:27335768

  3. High-resolution noncontact AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy investigations of self-assembled photovoltaic donor-acceptor dyads.

    PubMed

    Grévin, Benjamin; Schwartz, Pierre-Olivier; Biniek, Laure; Brinkmann, Martin; Leclerc, Nicolas; Zaborova, Elena; Méry, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled donor-acceptor dyads are used as model nanostructured heterojunctions for local investigations by noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). With the aim to probe the photo-induced charge carrier generation, thin films deposited on transparent indium tin oxide substrates are investigated in dark conditions and upon illumination. The topographic and contact potential difference (CPD) images taken under dark conditions are analysed in view of the results of complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments. After in situ annealing, it is shown that the dyads with longer donor blocks essentially lead to standing acceptor-donor lamellae, where the acceptor and donor groups are π-stacked in an edge-on configuration. The existence of strong CPD and surface photo-voltage (SPV) contrasts shows that structural variations occur within the bulk of the edge-on stacks. SPV images with a very high lateral resolution are achieved, which allows for the resolution of local photo-charging contrasts at the scale of single edge-on lamella. This work paves the way for local investigations of the optoelectronic properties of donor-acceptor supramolecular architectures down to the elementary building block level. PMID:27335768

  4. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  5. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM.

    PubMed

    Avdic, A; Lugstein, A; Wu, M; Gollas, B; Pobelov, I; Wandlowski, T; Leonhardt, K; Denuault, G; Bertagnolli, E

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes. PMID:21368355

  6. Fabrication of cone-shaped boron doped diamond and gold nanoelectrodes for AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdic, A.; Lugstein, A.; Wu, M.; Gollas, B.; Pobelov, I.; Wandlowski, T.; Leonhardt, K.; Denuault, G.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a reliable microfabrication process for a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) measurement tool. Integrated cone-shaped sensors with boron doped diamond (BDD) or gold (Au) electrodes were fabricated from commercially available AFM probes. The sensor formation process is based on mature semiconductor processing techniques, including focused ion beam (FIB) machining, and highly selective reactive ion etching (RIE). The fabrication approach preserves the geometry of the original AFM tips resulting in well reproducible nanoscaled sensors. The feasibility and functionality of the fully featured tips are demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, showing good agreement between the measured and calculated currents of the cone-shaped AFM-SECM electrodes.

  7. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  8. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette.

    PubMed

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  9. A Multifunctional Frontloading Approach for Repeated Recycling of a Pressure-Controlled AFM Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Roder, Phillip; Hille, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Fluid force microscopy combines the positional accuracy and force sensitivity of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with nanofluidics via a microchanneled cantilever. However, adequate loading and cleaning procedures for such AFM micropipettes are required for various application situations. Here, a new frontloading procedure is described for an AFM micropipette functioning as a force- and pressure-controlled microscale liquid dispenser. This frontloading procedure seems especially attractive when using target substances featuring high costs or low available amounts. Here, the AFM micropipette could be filled from the tip side with liquid from a previously applied droplet with a volume of only a few μL using a short low-pressure pulse. The liquid-loaded AFM micropipettes could be then applied for experiments in air or liquid environments. AFM micropipette frontloading was evaluated with the well-known organic fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the AlexaFluor647-labeled antibody goat anti-rat IgG as an example of a larger biological compound. After micropipette usage, specific cleaning procedures were tested. Furthermore, a storage method is described, at which the AFM micropipettes could be stored for a few hours up to several days without drying out or clogging of the microchannel. In summary, the rapid, versatile and cost-efficient frontloading and cleaning procedure for the repeated usage of a single AFM micropipette is beneficial for various application situations from specific surface modifications through to local manipulation of living cells, and provides a simplified and faster handling for already known experiments with fluid force microscopy. PMID:26636981

  10. TEM Pump With External Heat Source And Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, Bill J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed thermoelectric/electromagnetic (TEM) pump driven by external source of heat and by two or more heat pipe radiator heat sink(s). Thermoelectrics generate electrical current to circulate liquid metal in secondary loop of two-fluid-loop system. Intended for use with space and terrestrial dual loop liquid metal nuclear reactors. Applications include spacecraft on long missions or terrestrial beacons or scientific instruments having to operate in remote areas for long times. Design modified to include multiple radiators, converters, and ducts, as dictated by particular application.

  11. Preparation of TEM samples for hard ceramic powders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Kumar, Vikas; de Kruijff, Tom; Jansen, Jacob; Zandbergen, Henny W

    2008-12-01

    It is challenging to prepare a good sample for high-resolution electron microscopy of polycrystalline ceramic powders containing hard particles or particles with a strong preferential cleavage. Here we demonstrate that embedding the particles in a Cu matrix in a pressed pellet allows for straightforward conventional ion milling. The method is applied to powders of Mg10Ir19B16 and Na0.5CoO2 to show its feasibility, whereby transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples with crystalline areas thinner than 10 nm can be obtained easily. PMID:18722061

  12. Modeling of planar quasi-TEM superconducting transmission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsos, Dimitrios; Chew, Wilbert; Riley, A. L.; Hunt, Brian D.; Foote, Marc C.; Bajuk, Louis J.; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Cooley, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    An application of the phenomenological loss equivalence method (Lee and Itoh, 1989) in modeling the microwave behavior of planar quasi-TEM superconducting transmission lines is presented. For validation of the model, data are used from measurements of a YBCO superconducting thin-film coplanar-waveguide lowpass filter on a lanthanum aluminate substrate. Measured and modeled S-parameters of an existing superconducting coplanar waveguide lowpass filter agree to within 0.3 dB in magnitude and 0.5 radians in phase. Extracted values for penetration depth and real part of the conductivity of the superconducting film are within 10 percent of other researchers' findings.

  13. Insight into mechanics of AFM tip-based nanomachining: bending of cantilevers and machined grooves.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, R S J; Brousseau, E B; Geng, Y; Borodich, F M

    2016-09-23

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-based nanomachining is currently the object of intense research investigations. Values of the load applied to the tip at the free end of the AFM cantilever probe used for nanomachining are always large enough to induce plastic deformation on the specimen surface contrary to the small load values used for the conventional contact mode AFM imaging. This study describes an important phenomenon specific for AFM nanomachining in the forward direction: under certain processing conditions, the deformed shape of the cantilever probe may change from a convex to a concave orientation. The phenomenon can principally change the depth and width of grooves machined, e.g. the grooves machined on a single crystal copper specimen may increase by 50% on average following such a change in the deformed shape of the cantilever. It is argued that this phenomenon can take place even when the AFM-based tool is operated in the so-called force-controlled mode. The study involves the refined theoretical analysis of cantilever probe bending, the analysis of experimental signals monitored during the backward and forward AFM tip-based machining and the inspection of the topography of produced grooves. PMID:27532247

  14. AFM/CLSM data visualization and comparison using an open-source toolkit.

    PubMed

    Rajwa, Bartek; McNally, Helen A; Varadharajan, Padma; Sturgis, Jennifer; Robinson, J Paul

    2004-06-01

    There is a vast difference in the traditional presentation of AFM data and confocal data. AFM data are presented as surface contours while confocal data are usually visualized using either surface- or volume-rendering techniques. Finding a common meaningful visualization platform is not an easy task. AFM and CLSM technologies are complementary and are more frequently being used to image common biological systems. In order to provide a presentation method that would assist us in evaluating cellular morphology, we propose a simple visualization strategy that is comparative, intuitive, and operates within an open-source environment of ImageJ, SurfaceJ, and VolumeJ applications. In order to find some common ground for AFM-CLSM image comparison, we have developed a plug-in for ImageJ, which allows us to import proprietary image data sets into this application. We propose to represent both AFM and CLSM image data sets as shaded elevation maps with color-coded height. This simple technique utilizes the open source VolumeJ and SurfaceJ plug-ins. To provide an example of this visualization technique, we evaluated the three-dimensional architecture of living chick dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia measured independently with AFM and CLSM. PMID:15352089

  15. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  16. Membrane-based actuation for high-speed single molecule force spectroscopy studies using AFM.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Krishna; Torun, Hamdi; Finkler, Ofer; Zhu, Cheng; Degertekin, Levent

    2010-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based dynamic force spectroscopy of single molecular interactions involves characterizing unbinding/unfolding force distributions over a range of pulling speeds. Owing to their size and stiffness, AFM cantilevers are adversely affected by hydrodynamic forces, especially at pulling speeds >10 microm/s, when the viscous drag becomes comparable to the unbinding/unfolding forces. To circumvent these adverse effects, we have fabricated polymer-based membranes capable of actuating commercial AFM cantilevers at speeds >or=100 microm/s with minimal viscous drag effects. We have used FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to simulate high-speed pulling and fast actuation of AFM cantilevers and membranes in different experimental configurations. The simulation results support the experimental findings on a variety of commercial AFM cantilevers and predict significant reduction in drag forces when membrane actuators are used. Unbinding force experiments involving human antibodies using these membranes demonstrate that it is possible to achieve bond loading rates >or=10(6) pN/s, an order of magnitude greater than that reported with commercial AFM cantilevers and systems. PMID:20054686

  17. Revealing local variations in nanoparticle size distributions in supported catalysts: a generic TEM specimen preparation method.

    PubMed

    Pingel, Torben; Skoglundh, Magnus; Grönbeck, Henrik; Olsson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The specimen preparation method is crucial for how much information can be gained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of supported nanoparticle catalysts. The aim of this work is to develop a method that allows for observation of size and location of nanoparticles deposited on a porous oxide support material. A bimetallic Pt-Pd/Al(2)O(3) catalyst in powder form was embedded in acrylic resin and lift-out specimens were extracted using combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM). These specimens allow for a cross-section view across individual oxide support particles, including the unaltered near surface region of these particles. A site-dependent size distribution of Pt-Pd nanoparticles was revealed along the radial direction of the support particles by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. The developed specimen preparation method enables obtaining information about the spatial distribution of nanoparticles in complex support structures which commonly is a challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:26139081

  18. Performance of membrane filters used for TEM analysis of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Webber, James S; Czuhanich, Alex G; Carhart, Laurie J

    2007-10-01

    This article presents findings related to characteristics of membrane filters that can affect the recovery of asbestos and the quality of preparations for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Certain applications and preparation steps can lead to unacceptable performance of membrane filters used in analysis of asbestos by TEM. Unless substantial care is used in the collapsing of mixed-cellulose ester (MCE) filters with an acetone hot block, grid preparations can suffer and fiber recoveries can be compromised. Calibration of the etching depth of MCE filters, especially at differing locations in an asher's chamber, is critical for reliable fiber recovery. Excessive etching of MCE filters with aerosol-deposited asbestos can lead to loss of short fibers, while insufficient etching of MCE filters with aqueous-deposited asbestos can, paradoxically, also lead to loss of short fibers. Interlaboratory precision on MCE filters is improved by aerosol-deposited asbestos, as opposed to aqueous deposition. In comparison, straightforward preparation, improved solvents, and reduced contamination make PC filters an increasingly acceptable alternative. Variations in the geometric configuration during application of carbon films can lead to fiber loss and unacceptable grid quality for either type of filter. PMID:17763069

  19. TEM investigations on the local microstructure of electrodeposited galfenol nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pohl, D; Damm, C; Pohl, D; Schultz, L; Schlörb, H

    2016-01-22

    The local microstructure of Fe-Ga nanowires is investigated considering dependence on the deposition technique. Using a complexed electrolyte, smooth and homogeneous Fe80Ga20 nanowires are deposited into anodic aluminum oxide templates by either applying pulse potential or potentiostatic deposition technique. At optimized deposition conditions the wires show the desired composition of Fe80±2Ga20±2 without a gradient along the growth direction. Composition distribution, structure and microstructure are examined in detail and reveal only minor differences. Line EELS and crystal lattice measurements reveal a negligible oxygen content for both preparation routines. Neither Fe/Ga oxides nor hydroxides were found. Both potentiostatically deposited as well as pulse deposited nanowires exhibit a preferred 〈110〉orientation, the latter with slightly larger crystals. Different contrast patterns were found by TEM that appear more pronounced in the case of pulse deposited wires. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis and comparison of differently prepared focused ion beam lamellas reveal that these contrasts are caused by defects in the alternating potential deposition itself and are not induced during the TEM preparation process. The alternating potential mode causes periodic growth thereby inducing different layers with reduced wire thickness/defects at the layer interfaces. PMID:26651087

  20. TEM investigations on the local microstructure of electrodeposited galfenol nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, D.; Damm, C.; Pohl, D.; Schultz, L.; Schlörb, H.

    2016-01-01

    The local microstructure of Fe-Ga nanowires is investigated considering dependence on the deposition technique. Using a complexed electrolyte, smooth and homogeneous Fe80Ga20 nanowires are deposited into anodic aluminum oxide templates by either applying pulse potential or potentiostatic deposition technique. At optimized deposition conditions the wires show the desired composition of Fe80±2Ga20±2 without a gradient along the growth direction. Composition distribution, structure and microstructure are examined in detail and reveal only minor differences. Line EELS and crystal lattice measurements reveal a negligible oxygen content for both preparation routines. Neither Fe/Ga oxides nor hydroxides were found. Both potentiostatically deposited as well as pulse deposited nanowires exhibit a preferred <110> orientation, the latter with slightly larger crystals. Different contrast patterns were found by TEM that appear more pronounced in the case of pulse deposited wires. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis and comparison of differently prepared focused ion beam lamellas reveal that these contrasts are caused by defects in the alternating potential deposition itself and are not induced during the TEM preparation process. The alternating potential mode causes periodic growth thereby inducing different layers with reduced wire thickness/defects at the layer interfaces.

  1. Studying dynamic processes in liquids by TEM/STEM/DTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abellan, Patricia; Evans, James; Woehl, Taylor; Jungjohann, Katherine; Parent, Lucas; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William; Browning, Nigel; Mater. Sci. Group Team; Microsc. Group Team; Catal. Sci. Group Collaboration; Ristenpart Res. Group Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    In order to study dynamic phenomena such as corrosion or catalysis, extreme environmental conditions must be reproduced around the specimen - these include high-temperatures, high-pressures, specific oxidizing/reducing atmospheres or a liquid environment. The use of environmental stages specifically designed to fit in any transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows us to apply the distinct capabilities of each instrument to study dynamic processes. Localized gas/fluid conditions are created around the sample and separated from the high vacuum inside the microscope using hermetically sealed windowed-cells. Advanced capabilities of these techniques include spatial resolutions of ~1 Angstrom or better in aberration corrected instruments or temporal resolutions in the microsecond-nanosecond range in a dynamic TEM (DTEM). Here, unique qualities of the DTEM that benefit the in-situ experiments with gas/fluid environmental cells will be discussed. We also present our results with a liquid stage allowing atomic resolution imaging of nanomaterials in a colloidal suspension, core EEL spectra acquisition, continuous flow, controlled growth of nanocrystals and systematic calibration of the effect of the electron dose on silver nuclei formation.

  2. On the Nature of SEM Estimates of ARMA Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamaker, Ellen L.; Dolan, Conor V.; Molenaar, Peter C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Reexamined the nature of structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models, replicated the simulation experiments of P. Molenaar, and examined the behavior of the log-likelihood ratio test. Simulation studies indicate that estimates of ARMA parameters observed with SEM software are identical to those…

  3. Structural Equations and Causal Explanations: Some Challenges for Causal SEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Keith A.

    2010-01-01

    One common application of structural equation modeling (SEM) involves expressing and empirically investigating causal explanations. Nonetheless, several aspects of causal explanation that have an impact on behavioral science methodology remain poorly understood. It remains unclear whether applications of SEM should attempt to provide complete…

  4. Description and calibration beamline SEM/Ion Chamber Current Digitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoo, D.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the following on beamline SEM/ion chamber current digitizers: Module description; testing and calibration; common setup procedures; summary of fault indications and associated causes; summary of input and output connections; SEM conversion constant table; ion chamber conversion constant table; hexadecimal to decimal conversion table; and schematic diagram.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy: preparation and imaging for SEM.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris G

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been almost universally applied for the surface examination and characterization of both natural and man-made objects. Although an invasive technique, developments in electron microscopy over the years has given the microscopist a much clearer choice in how invasive the technique will be. With the advent of low vacuum SEM in the 1970s (The environmental cold stage, 1970) and environmental SEM in the late 1980s (J Microsc 160(pt. 1):9-19, 1989), it is now possible in some circumstances to examine samples without preparation. However, for the examination of biological tissue and cells it is still advisable to chemically fix, dehydrate, and coat samples for SEM imaging and analysis. This chapter aims to provide an overview of SEM as an imaging tool, and a general introduction to some of the methods applied for the preparation of samples. PMID:22907399

  6. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  7. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  8. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area. PMID:27559679

  9. Nanomanipulation and electrical behaviour of a single gold nanowire using in-situ SEM-FIB-nanomanipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Luxmoore, I.; Forster, M. D.; Cullis, A. G.; Inkson, B. J.

    2008-08-01

    Gold nanowires were successfully fabricated by a DC electrodeposition technique into Anodic Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. The microstructure of 55nm gold nanowires released from AAO templates was observed by SEM and TEM to be polycrystalline, with a bamboo-type structure and grain sizes 20nm to several micrometers. Individual gold nanowires were picked up from bundles of gold nanowires using a super-sharp W tip attached to an in-situ Kleindiek nanomanipulator fitted in a SEM-FIB. The picked-up gold nanowires were then deposited onto a silicon wafer, or connected between two nanomanipulator tips, to fabricate single nanowire nano-circuits for electrical testing. The electrical properties of single manipulated nanowires are compared to that of bundles of gold nanowires for the two circuit types. The lowest resistance is achieved by connecting the gold nanowires between two FIB-milled tungsten tips.

  10. (S)TEM analysis of functional transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Miaofang

    Perovskite vanadates (AVO3) form an ideal family to study the structure-property relationships in transition metal oxides because their physical properties can easily be tailored by varying the A-site cations. (S)TEM is an ideal tool for this type of study due to its capacity for simultaneous imaging and chemical analysis. Determination of the oxidation state of vanadium in complex oxides have been carried out by electron energy loss spectroscopy. SrVO3/LaAlO3 is then studied both experimentally and theoretically as a prototype system. Extra electrons have been detected on the interface layer, and further proven to originate mainly from a change in the local bonding configuration of V at the La-O terminated substrate surface. Cr-containing stainless steel deposited with a LaCrO3 thin-film layer is a promising interconnect material of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Our investigation on its microstructural evolution reveals that the LaCrO 3 thin film plays a role in inhibiting the growth of an oxide layer on the metal surface and thus protects the surface of the stainless steel. Ca-doped LaCoO3 is a promising SOFC cathode material. The domain structures and the oxidation state of Co in Ca-doped LaCoO3, which are directly related to its mechanical properties and electronic conductivity, are investigated by in-situ TEM and EELS. The formation of microcracks is observed during thermal cycles. Ca-doping in LaCoO3 is shown to not only improve the electronic conductivity of the material, but is also likely to strengthen the grain boundaries. The realization of its application in SOFCs depends on depressing the ferroelastisity to reduce strain formation during thermal cycles. The application of the (S)TEM techniques used for studying the perovskite systems are further extended to other compounds containing transition metal elements. The refractory minerals from Comet 81 P/Wild-2 are studied to investigate the formation of the early solar system. A relatively high Ti3+/Ti 4

  11. SEM/EDS of Submicron and Coarse PM Using Modified Passive Aerosol Sampler Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Wang, Z.; Willis, B.; Casuccio, G.

    2008-12-01

    Deployment of multiple UNC Passive Aerosol Samplers is an inexpensive and unobtrusive technique for assessing airborne particulate matter (PM) exposure and spatial variability. Computer-controlled SEM/EDS (Scanning Electron Microscopy / Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) is used to measure the deposited particle mass and chemistry. A deposition velocity model is used to obtain ambient PM and elemental size distributions. Previous results have correlated well with active sampler results in environments dominated by coarse mineral dusts. To accurately measure submicron and carbonaceous aerosols, an improved collection substrate is needed. Previous studies used a double-sided carbon adhesive tab, which was ideal for coarse PM but under-detected submicron PM. One promising alternative is polycarbonate (PC) filter substrates. Another is transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with formvar films mounted over holes drilled in the samplers. Preliminary tests of PC filters and TEM grid substrates, including tests in areas with smoke aerosols, exhibited substantial submicron aerosol and differing elemental size distributions. Detailed qualitative and quantitative evidence shows that the PC filters retained coarse PM well and yielded improved submicron PM imaging. TEM grids yield the best imaging and chemistry of submicron carbonaceous PM, but potentially the poorest retention of coarse PM. PM and elemental size distributions are presented for collocated passive samplers using the three substrate types, in both indoor and outdoor environments. Several methods are proposed to further optimize passive sampling of both submicron and coarse PM. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  12. TEM observations of hydrogen nanobubbles in implanted amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.M.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Williamson, D.L.; Acco, S.

    1996-12-31

    Over the last two decades extensive studies on the optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) have been reported. However, less attention was given to the structural characterization of this material partly due to the insensitivity to hydrogen of structural probes such as x-rays and electron diffraction. From a recent set of experiments, results on the solubility limit of hydrogen in a special type of a-Si:H and the characterization of hydrogen induced complexes or nanobubbles has been reported. In this study, we report TEM observations of the structural morphology of hydrogen related defects that support these recent measurements obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS).

  13. Examination of subaerially altered basaltic glass with TEM and EELS

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.-S.

    1998-06-17

    We have examined the weathered surfaces of 720 year old Hawaiian basalt glasses that were recovered from a subaerial environment with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy filtered imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques. Whereas the alteration products (palagonite) were physically detached from the underlying glass in most samples, a gel-like amorphous layer was observed adjacent to the glass in a few samples. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gel layer has been observed on weathered basalt. This is significant because analogous gel layers have been observed on nuclear waste glasses reacted in laboratory tests, and this demonstrates an important similarity in the mechanisms of the weathering of basalt and the corrosion of waste glasses.

  14. Localized ion milling of metallic and ceramic TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.T.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of localized ion milling in the preparation of metallic and ceramic specimens for TEM and AEM is being evaluated from the standpoint of optimizing procedures and identifying limitations and milling characteristics. The equipment used was a Gatan model 645 precision ion milling system (PIMS). This device is a scanning ion beam instrument with which selected areas of a sample can be imaged by either secondary electron or secondary ion signals and selectively ion milled in a small region within the imaged area. The 1 to 10 keV ion beam can be focussed to a 2 ..mu..m spot. Specimens are thinned without removing them from the electron microscope specimen holder.

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  16. Identification of cooked bone using TEM imaging of bone collagen.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hannah E C

    2012-01-01

    Mild heating (≤100° C, 1 h)-typical of cooking-does not lead to detectable changes in any biochemical parameter yet measured; consequently bones that have been cooked, but which have not reached a temperature that will induce charring go undetected. We have used a microscopy based approach to investigate changes in the organization of the bone protein, collagen, as it is heated, using bone from heating experiments, short term burials, and archaeological sites. The work has revealed that the presence of a mineral matrix stabilizes the collagen enabling the damage to accumulate, but preventing it from causing immediate gelatinization. Once the mineral is removed, the damage can be observed using appropriate visualization methods. This chapter describes the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique that has been used to detect cooked bone by visualizing minor heat-induced damage at the level of the collagen fibril. PMID:22907413

  17. Analysis of the Tem Mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janaswamy, R.; Schaubert, D. H.; Pozar, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the radiation characteristics of the TEM mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) is presented. The theory presented is valid for antennas with air dielectric and forms the basis for analysis of the more popular dielectric-supported antennas. The method of analysis involves two steps. In the first step, the aperture distribution in the flared slot is determined. In the second step, the equivalent magnetic current in the slot is treated as radiating in the presence of a conducting half-plane and the far-field components are obtained. Detailed comparison with experiment is made and excellent agreement is obtained. Design curves for the variation of the 3 dB and 10 dB beamwidths as a function of the antenna length, with the flare angle as a parameter, are presented.

  18. FIM/IAP/TEM studies of ion implanted nickel emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Walck, S.D.; Hren, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate depth profiling of implanted hydrogen and its isotopes in metals is extremely important. Field ion microscopy and atom-probe techniques provide the most accurate depth profiling analytical method of any available. In addition, they are extremely sensitive to hydrogen. This paper reports our early work on hydrogen trapping at defects in metals using the Field Ion Microscope/Imaging Atom Probe (FIM/IAP). Our results deal primarily with the control experiments required to overcome instrumental difficulties associated with in situ implantation and the influence of a high electric field. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used extensively to independently examine the influence of high electric fields on emitters. 11 references, 7 figures.

  19. Correlation Analysis of TEM Images of Nanocrystal Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine; Zanchet, Daniele; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-21

    Quantitative characterizataion of images of naocrystals and nanostructures is a challenging but important task. The development and optimization of methods for the construction of complex nanostructures rely on imaging techniques. Computer programs were developed to quantify TEM images of nanocrystal/DNA nanostructures, and results are presented for heterodimers annd trimers of gold nanocrystals. The programs presented here have also been used to analyze more complex trimers and tetramers linked by branched DNA, as well as for structures made from attaching gold nanocrystals to CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots. This work has the additional goal of enabling others to quickly and easily adapt the methods for their own use.

  20. A TEM analysis of nanoparticulates in a Polar ice core

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, E.V.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    This paper explores the prospect for analyzing nanoparticulates in age-dated ice cores representing times in antiquity to establish a historical reference for atmospheric particulate regimes. Analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques were utilized to observe representative ice-melt water drops dried down on carbon/formvar or similar coated grids. A 10,000-year-old Greenland ice core was melted, and representative water drops were transferred to coated grids in a clean room environment. Essentially, all particulates observed were aggregates and either crystalline or complex mixtures of nanocrystals. Especially notable was the observation of carbon nanotubes and related fullerene-like nanocrystal forms. These observations are similar with some aspects of contemporary airborne particulates including carbon nanotubes and complex nanocrystal aggregates.

  1. An alternative to the TEM (Transformed Eulerian Mean) equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaßmann, Almut

    2013-04-01

    The TEM equations constitute a powerful means to get access to the residual circulation. However, due to their foundation on the wave perspective, they deliver only a zonally averaged picture without access to the three-dimensional structure or the local origins of the residual circulation. Therefore it is worth to investigate whether there are alternatives. The pathway followed here is to perform a transformation of the momentum and the potential temperature equation before taking the zonal mean. This is done by removing the steady state ideal wind solution vid = ?×?B-(?±P) from the equations (? - potential temperature, B - Bernoulli function, P - Ertel's potential vorticity EPV, ?± - density). The advantage of that approach is that the total EPV-flux does no longer contain an explicitly visible 'do-nothing-flux'. This flux, ?? ×?B, does only vanish when averaging on isentropic surfaces, but not on other isosurfaces. Here we find the reason why the conventional zonal mean on isentropes delivers a direct overturning cell on each hemisphere, whereas on other isosurfaces we obtain the typical three-cell structure with Headley, Ferrel, and polar cells. It will be demonstrated and made visible through idealized climate experiments with the ICON-IAP model that the zonal averages of the nonideal wind components vnid = v - vid and wnid = w - wid constitute similar direct overturning cells on non-isentropic surfaces as obtained with the TEM-generated v* and w*. It is also interesting to inspect fields of local nonideal wind components, the very origin of the residual circulation.

  2. Enabling direct nanoscale observations of biological reactions with dynamic TEM

    PubMed Central

    Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Biological processes occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales: from femtoseconds to hours and from angstroms to meters. Many new biological insights can be expected from a better understanding of the processes that occur on these very fast and very small scales. In this regard, new instruments that use fast X-ray or electron pulses are expected to reveal novel mechanistic details for macromolecular protein dynamics. To ensure that any observed conformational change is physiologically relevant and not constrained by 3D crystal packing, it would be preferable for experiments to utilize small protein samples such as single particles or 2D crystals that mimic the target protein's native environment. These samples are not typically amenable to X-ray analysis, but transmission electron microscopy has imaged such sample geometries for over 40 years using both direct imaging and diffraction modes. While conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have visualized biological samples with atomic resolution in an arrested or frozen state, the recent development of the dynamic TEM (DTEM) extends electron microscopy into a dynamic regime using pump-probe imaging. A new second-generation DTEM, which is currently being constructed, has the potential to observe live biological processes with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution by using pulsed electron packets to probe the sample on micro- and nanosecond timescales. This article reviews the experimental parameters necessary for coupling DTEM with in situ liquid microscopy to enable direct imaging of protein conformational dynamics in a fully hydrated environment and visualize reactions propagating in real time. PMID:23315566

  3. Sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube-polymer composites using dynamic AFM methods.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Maria J; Misiego, Rocio; Smith, Kyle C; Avila, Alba; Pipes, Byron; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution sub-surface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks within polymer nanocomposites is demonstrated through electrical characterization techniques based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). We compare three techniques implemented in the single-pass configuration: DC-biased amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in terms of the physics of sub-surface image formation and experimental robustness. The methods were applied to study the dispersion of sub-surface networks of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in a polyimide (PI) matrix. We conclude that among these methods, the KPFM channel, which measures the capacitance gradient (∂C/∂d) at the second harmonic of electrical excitation, is the best channel to obtain high-contrast images of the CNT network embedded in the polymer matrix, without the influence of surface conditions. Additionally, we propose an analysis of the ∂C/∂d images as a tool to characterize the dispersion and connectivity of the CNTs. Through the analysis we demonstrate that these AFM-based sub-surface methods probe sufficiently deep within the SWNT composites, to resolve clustered networks that likely play a role in conductivity percolation. This opens up the possibility of dynamic AFM-based characterization of sub-surface dispersion and connectivity in nanostructured composites, two critical parameters for nanocomposite applications in sensors and energy storage devices. PMID:23478510

  4. Nanoscale crystallization of phase change Ge2Sb2Te5 film with AFM lithography.

    PubMed

    Kim, JunHo

    2010-01-01

    We have made nanoindents on Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5)(GST) films using electric field-assisted atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography. GST shows increase of material density and electric conductivity as it changes from amorphous to crystalline phases. By applying electric field between AFM probe-tip and GST surface, nanoscale crystallization could be induced on tip contact area. As the crystallized GST exhibits increase of material density, that is to say depression of volume, nanoindented surface with crystallization is created on host amorphous GST (a-GST) film. For the AFM lithography, a highly conductive tip, which showed voltage-switching characteristics in current-voltage spectroscopy of GST film, was found to be very suitable for recording and sensing crystallized nanoindents on the GST film. By varying sample bias voltages, we performed nanoscale crystallization, and measured the nanostructured film in AFM conductance-image (C-image) mode and topography-image (T-image) mode, simultaneously. Two types of crystallized wires were fabricated on (a-GST) film. Type-I was sensed in only C-image, whereas Type-II was sensed in both C-image and T-image. These nanowires are discussed in terms of crystallization of GST and sensitivity of current (or topography) sensing. By repeated lithography, larger size of nanoindented wires were also produced, which indicates line-dimension controllability of AFM lithography. PMID:20853405

  5. Development of a new generation of active AFM tools for applications in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollier, A.-S.; Jenkins, D.; Dogheche, E.; Legrand, B.; Faucher, M.; Buchaillot, L.

    2010-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful imaging tool with high-resolution imaging capability. AFM probes consist of a very sharp tip at the end of a silicon cantilever that can respond to surface artefacts to produce an image of the topography or surface features. They are intrinsically passive devices. For imaging soft biological samples, and also for samples in liquid, it is essential to control the AFM tip position, both statically and dynamically, and this is not possible using external actuators mounted on the AFM chip. AFM cantilevers have been fabricated using silicon micromachining to incorporate a piezoelectric thin film actuator for precise control. The piezoelectric thin films have been fully characterized to determine their actuation performance and to characterize the operation of the integrated device. Examples of the spatial and vertical response are presented to illustrate their imaging capability. For operation in a liquid environment, the dynamic behaviour has been modelled and verified experimentally. The optimal drive conditions for the cantilever, along with their dynamic response, including frequency and phase in air and water, are presented.

  6. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials.

    PubMed

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-14

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized. PMID:26201503

  7. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  8. Unveil the Size-Dependent Mechanical Behaviors of Individual CNT/SiC Composite Nanofibers by In Situ Tensile Tests in SEM.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchao; Chen, Weibing; Hacopian, Emily; Dong, Pei; Sun, Anqi; Ci, Lijie; Lou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    In situ quantitative tensile tests of individual carbon nanotube (CNT)/SiC core-shell nanofibers are carried out in both a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The incorporation of CNTs into a SiC matrix led to improved elastic modulus and fracture strength of the CNT/SiC nanofibers as compared to SiC alone. PMID:27400777

  9. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mingdong; Bruun Hovgaard, Mads; Mamdouh, Wael; Xu, Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2008-09-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the β-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders. In addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications.

  10. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  11. A sub-50 nm three-step height sample for AFM calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuming; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a sub-50 nm three-step height sample was made for vertical calibration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a new step height evaluation algorithm based on polynomial fitting is discussed. The influences of AFM artefacts such as particles, image bow and high-order errors on step height were studied. The experimental results showed that the polynomial order p2 and threshold t were not critical factors. However, the increment Δh and the polynomial order p used in the calculation of optimal shifting distance were important and must be carefully considered. Δh = 0.1 nm and p ≥ 4 were determined to get a stable step height. The sample had small roughness and good uniformity. It has the potential to serve as a high quality step height standard sample for AFM calibration.

  12. Review and perspectives of AFM application on the study of deformable drop/bubble interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Kai; Ma, Mengyu; Jin, Hang; Angeli, Panagiota; Gong, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The applications of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) on the study of dynamic interactions and film drainage between deformable bodies dispersed in aqueous solutions are reviewed in this article. Novel experimental designs and recent advances in experimental methodologies are presented, which show the advantage of using AFM as a tool for probing colloidal interactions. The effects of both DLVO and non-DLVO forces on the colloid stabilization mechanism are discussed. Good agreement is found between the force - drop/bubble deformation behaviour revealed by AFM measurements and the theoretical modeling of film drainage process, giving a convincing explanation of the occurrence of certain phenomenon. However, the behaviour and shape of deformable drops as they approach or retract is still not well resolved. In addition, when surfactants are present further research is needed on the absorption of surfactant molecules into the interfaces, their mobility and the effects on interfacial film properties. PMID:26344865

  13. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  14. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  15. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution. PMID:24743419

  16. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  17. TEM characterization of microstructure and chemistry in magnesium diboride superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ye

    MgB2 is a superconductor with promising properties, but to meet application requirements, the properties of MgB2 have to be improved through microstructure modifications: chemical doping, introduction of precipitates, and atomic-scale control of defects. The small length scale of these modifications means that structure and chemistry characterization using the transmission electron microscope (TEM) are required to better understand the correlation between MgB2's superconducting properties and its microstructure. We have used TEM-based techniques to characterize microstructures of pure MgB2 bulks, SiC-doped MgB2 tapes, pure and C-doped MgB2 thin films prepared by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) method with different carbon precursors, degraded pure HPCVD thin films, and O-doped MgB2 thin films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Characterization results and effects of microstructure on superconducting properties are discussed for each material. We have found that in pure MgB2 the main contaminating current-blocking phases are MgO grains and amorphous MgO + boron + BxO y phases. Both second phase nano-segregations and grain boundaries are effective pinning defects in MgB2, which can enhance Jc(H) at high fields. However, second phases also act as current-blocking phases that reduce the measured Jc, which suggests that MgB2 samples with small grain size and without any boundary second phases are desirable to achieve higher Jc. Extensive studies have been made to understand the Hc 2 enhancement mechanisms in MgB2. Both carbon dopant and grain boundaries in MgB2 can cause more electron scattering that increases Hc2. Degradation in MgB 2 leads to the formation of the amorphous boundary phase which also enhances Hc2 by introducing electron scattering. The over 60 T Hc2 ||ab obtained in C-doped HPCVD MgB 2 films is caused by the two-band nature and strong pi-band scattering of MgB2. We believe that the strain fields generated from c-axis tilt boundaries

  18. An advanced AFM sensor for high-aspect ratio pattern profile in-line measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Baba, Shuichi; Nakata, Toshihiko; Kurenuma, Toru; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Hiroki, Takenori

    2006-03-01

    Design rule shrinkage and the wider adoption of new device structures such as STI, copper damascene interconnects, and deep trench structures have increased the necessity of in-line process monitoring of step heights and profiles of device structures. For monitoring active device patterns, not test patterns as in OCD, AFM is the only non-destructive 3D monitoring tool. The barriers to using AFM in-line monitoring are its slow throughput and the accuracy degradation associated with probe tip wear and spike noise caused by unwanted oscillation on the steep slopes of high-aspect-ratio patterns. Our proprietary AFM scanning method, Step in mode®, is the method best suited to measuring high-aspect-ratio pattern profiles. Because the probe is not dragged on the sample surface as in conventional AFM, the profile trace fidelity across steep slopes is excellent. Because the probe does not oscillate and hit the sample at a high frequency as in AC scanning mode, this mode is free from unwanted spurious noises on steep sample slopes and incurs extremely little probe tip wear. To fully take advantage of the above properties, we have developed an AFM sensor optimized for in-line use, which produces accurate profile data at high speeds. The control scheme we have developed for the AFM sensor, which we call "Smart Step-in", elaborately analyses the contact force signal, enabling efficient probe tip scanning and a low and stable contact force. The mechanism of the AFM sensor has been optimized for the higher scanning rate and has improved the accuracy, such as the scanning planarity, position and height accuracy, and slope angle accuracy. Our prototype AFM sensor can scan high-aspect-ratio patterns while stabilizing the contact force at 3 nN. The step height measurement repeatability was 0.8 nm (3σ). A STI-like test pattern was scanned, and the steep sidewalls with angles of 84° were measured with high fidelity and without spurious noises.

  19. MEMS piezoresistive ring resonator for AFM imaging with pico-Newton force resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z.; Walter, B.; Mairiaux, E.; Faucher, M.; Buchaillot, L.; Legrand, B.

    2013-03-01

    A new concept of atomic force microscope (AFM) oscillating probes using electrostatic excitation and piezoresistive detection is presented. The probe is characterized by electrical methods in vacuum and by mechanical methods in air. A frequency-mixing measurement technique is developed to reduce the parasitic signal floor. The probe resonance frequencies are in the 1 MHz range and the quality factor is measured about 53 000 in vacuum and 3000 in air. The ring probe is mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up and topographic images of patterned sample surfaces are obtained. The force resolution deduced from the measurements is about 10 pN Hz-0.5.

  20. Coexistence of orbital and CE-AFM orders in colossal magnetoresistance manganites: A symmetry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The complex interplay between order parameters of different nature that dominates the physics of colossal magnetoresistance manganites is analysed from a symmetry based perspective. Phenomenological energies are given for the different competing phases. It is shown that the general trends observed in different systems, such as the mutual exclusion of orbital order and A-AFM order and the related stabilization of the CE-AFM order, stem to large extend from the symmetry of the parameters involved. The possible stabilization of complex phases where charge and orbital order coexist with magnetic and ferroelectric states is also anticipated.

  1. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-01

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets. PMID:26972765

  2. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  3. Multiparametric imaging of biological systems by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Martínez-Martín, David; Medalsy, Izhar; Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how biological systems change their structural, biophysical and chemical properties to adjust functionality. Addressing this issue has been severely hampered by the lack of methods capable of imaging biosystems at high resolution while simultaneously mapping their multiple properties. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) now enable researchers to combine (sub)molecular imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological interactions. Here we discuss the principles and applications of advanced FD-based AFM tools for the quantitative multiparametric characterization of complex cellular and biomolecular systems under physiological conditions. PMID:23985731

  4. Probing the PEDOT:PSS/cell interface with conductive colloidal probe AFM-SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Zhang, H.; Kranz, C.; Wallace, G. G.; Higgins, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical information e.g., oxygen reduction can be obtained simultaneously. Conductive colloid AFM-SECM probes modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are used for single cell force measurements in mouse fibroblasts and single cell interactions are investigated as a function of the applied potential.Conductive colloidal probe Atomic Force-Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (AFM-SECM) is a new approach, which employs electrically insulated AFM probes except for a gold-coated colloid located at the end of the cantilever. Hence, force measurements can be performed while biasing the conductive colloid under physiological conditions. Moreover, such colloids can be modified by electrochemical polymerization resulting, e.g. in conductive polymer-coated spheres, which in addition may be loaded with specific dopants. In contrast to other AFM-based single cell force spectroscopy measurements, these probes allow adhesion measurements at the cell-biomaterial interface on multiple cells in a rapid manner while the properties of the polymer can be changed by applying a bias. In addition, spatially resolved electrochemical

  5. AFM and XPA data on structural features and properties of films and powders based on naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramonova, A. G.; Nakusov, A. T.; Sozanov, V. G.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2015-06-01

    The template synthesis is used to produce powders and films based on naphthalocyanines and the corresponding metal complexes (Pc, CuPc, and NiPc). The atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray phase analysis (XPA) are employed in the study of structure and phase of fine powders and nanostructured films. The AFM data are used to determine the orientation and density of primary particles packed in the film. The XPA method is used to study the chemical composition and crystal structure of the synthesized samples. The regularities related to the structural features that affect the electrophysical properties of the films under study are revealed.

  6. An Evaluation of the Impacts of AF-M315E Propulsion Systems for Varied Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fittje, James; Colozza, Anthony; Packard, Tom; Gyekenyesi, John; McLean, Christopher H.; Spores, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the AF-M315E COMPASS study is to identify near-term (3-5 years) and long term (5 years +) opportunities for infusion, specifically the thruster and associated component technologies being developed as part of the GPIM project. Develop design reference missions which show the advantages of the AF-M315E green propulsion system. Utilize a combination of past COMPASS designs and selected new designs to demonstrate AF-M315E advantages. Use the COMPASS process to show the puts and takes of using AF-M315E at the integrated system level.

  7. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  8. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Carter, C. Barry; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature with no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.

  9. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Carter, C. Barry; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature withmore » no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.« less

  10. Aquifer characterisation in East Timor, with ground TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley-Cooper, A.

    2011-12-01

    An assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Groundwater Resources in East Timor led by Geosciences Australia is aimed at assisting East Timor's government to better understand and manage their groundwater resources. Form the current known information most aquifers in Timor-Leste are recharged by rainfall during the wet season. There is a concern that without a regular recharge, the stored groundwater capacity will decrease. Timor's population increase has caused a higher demand for groundwater which is currently been met by regulated pumping bores which are taped into deep aquifers, plus the sprouting of unregulated spear point bores in the shallow aquifers . Both groundwater recharge and the aquifers morphology need to be better understood in order to ensure supply and so groundwater can be managed for the future. Current weather patterns are expected to change and this could cause longer periods of drought or more intense rainfall, which in turn, would affect the availability and quality of groundwater. Salt water intrusions pose a threat on the low-lying aquifers as sea level rises. Australia's CSIRO has undertaken a series hydrogeophysical investigations employing ground TEM to assist in the characterisation of three aquifers near Dili, Timor Leste's capital. Interpreting ground water chemistry and dating; jointly with EM data has enhanced the understanding of the aquifers architecture, groundwater quality and helped identify potential risks of seawater intrusions.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  12. Distinction between amorphous and healed planar deformation features in shocked quartz using composite color scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, Maartje F.; Pennock, Gill M.; Herwegh, Marco; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-08-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are one of the most reliable and most widely used forms of evidence for hypervelocity impact. PDFs can be identified in scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images, but not all PDFs show the same CL behavior: there are nonluminescent and red luminescent PDFs. This study aims to explain the origin of the different CL emissions in PDFs. Focused ion beam (FIB) thin foils were prepared of specific sample locations selected in composite color SEM-CL images and were analyzed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The FIB preparation technique allowed a direct, often one-to-one correlation between the CL images and the defect structure observed in TEM. This correlation shows that composite color SEM-CL imaging allows distinction between amorphous PDFs on one hand and healed PDFs and basal Brazil twins on the other: nonluminescent PDFs are amorphous, while healed PDFs and basal Brazil twins are red luminescent, with a dominant emission peak at 650 nm. We suggest that the red luminescence is the result of preferential beam damage along dislocations, fluid inclusions, and twin boundaries. Furthermore, a high-pressure phase (possibly stishovite) in PDFs can be detected in color SEM-CL images by its blue luminescence.

  13. Study of dislocations in copper by weak beam, stereo, and in situ straining TEM

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R. J.; Misra, A.; Mitchell, T. E.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been an invaluable tool for verifjhg and developing dislocation theories since the first direct observations of dislocations were made using a TEM in the 1950s. Several useful techniques and technological advancements have been made since, helping fbrther the advancement of dislocation knowledge. The present paper concerns two studies of dislocations in copper made by coupling several of these techniques, specifically weak beam, in situ straining, and stereo TEM. Stereo-TEM coupled with in situ straining TEM was used for tracking 3D dislocation motion and interactions in low dislocation density copper foils. A mechanism by which dislocations in a pileup bypass a dislocation node is observed and discussed. Weak beam TEM is used in conjunction with stereo-TEM to analyze the dislocation content of a dense dislocation wall (DDW).

  14. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  15. In-situ TEM characterization of Copper Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelberg, Daniel T.

    In-situ liquid experiments in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) allow dynamic phenomena to be imaged at the nanoscale. This opens the opportunity to view electrochemical depositions at the nano scale in real time. However, there are a number of issues regarding in situ imaging that prevent a straightforward approach. This thesis addresses two issues regarding in-situ experiments; the fabrication of electron transparent windows and the nucleation of a metal from an electrolyte as a result of beam damage. Silicon chips that were 2.6mm x 2.6mm with 50mum x 50mum windows consisting of 50nm S3N 4 were fabricated with the goal of minimizing fabrication complexity at a cost significantly below commercial prices. These silicon nitride windows were used to sandwich a small volume of CuSO4 solution and observe copper nucleation as a result of the radiolysis damage of water due to the electron beam. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was used to image growth, and reducing species are shown to diffuse on the order of hundreds of nanometers in solution. Copper nanoparticle growth was compared to Oswald ripening, and diffusion limited growth was observed at high electron dose rates. The diffusion limited growth was suppressed and led to a slower growth rate, with a calculated diffusion coefficient for Cu 2+ of 2 x 10--10 m2/s. Low electron dose rates corresponding to low magnifications in STEM yielded kinetic limited or mixed growth and yielded faceted nanoparticles. Atomic resolution was achieved in copper film deposited at low magnifications, and lattice fringes corresponding to the copper <111> were observed.

  16. Three Dimensional TEM Forward Modeling Using FDTD Accelerated by GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Three dimensional inversion of transient electromagnetic (TEM) data is still challenging. The inversion speed mostly depends on the forward modeling. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is one of the popular forward modeling scheme. In an explicit type, which is based on the Du Fort-Frankel scheme, the time step is under the constraint of quasi-static approximation. Often an upward-continuation boundary condition (UCBC) is applied on the earth-air surface to avoid time stepping in the model air. However, UCBC is not suitable for models with topography and has a low parallel efficiency. Modeling without UCBC may cause a much smaller time step because of the resistive attribute of the air and the quasi-static constraint, which may also low the efficiency greatly. Our recent research shows that the time step in the model air is not needed to be constrained by the quasi-static approximation, which can let the time step without UCBC much closer to that with UCBC. The parallel performance of FDTD is then largely released. On a computer with a 4-core CPU, this newly developed method is obviously faster than the method using UCBC. Besides, without UCBC, this method can be easily accelerated by Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). On a computer with a CPU of 4790k@4.4GHz and a GPU of GTX 970, the speed accelerated by CUDA is almost 10 times of that using CPU only. For a model with a grid size of 140×140×130, if the conductivity of the model earth is 0.02S/m, and the minimal space interval is 15m, it takes only 80 seconds to evolve the field from excitation to 0.032s.

  17. The structure of high-methoxyl sugar acid gels of citrus pectin as determined by AFM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Images of native high methoxyl sugar acid gels (HMSAG) were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the Tapping ModeTM. Electronic thinning of the pectin strands to one pixel wide allowed the pectin network to be viewed in the absence of variable strand widths related to preferentially solvate...

  18. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips.

  19. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods. PMID:26517548

  20. Tapping and contact mode imaging of native chromosomes and extraction of genomic DNA using AFM tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yingchun; Arakawa, Hideo; Osada, Toshiya; Ikai, Atsushi

    2002-03-01

    It is very important both in medicine and biology to clarify the chromosomal structure to understand its functions. In a standard cytogenetic procedure, chromosomes are often fixed in a mixture of acetic acid and methanol. This process most likely changes the mechanical property of chromosomes. We adopted a method to prepare native and unfixed chromosomes from mouse 3T3 cells and used tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image and manipulate them. Modified AFM tips were used to image chromosomes in contact mode in air, and then the chromosome samples were immobilized on a substrate and placed in a buffer solution to pull out DNA-histone complexes from them after they were optimally treated with trypsin. From the AFM images, we could see several bands and granular structures on chromosomes. We obtained force curves indicating long fiber extensions from native chromosomes both with low (in high concentration of NaCl) and high forces (physiological conditions). The result suggested that the degree of chromosome condensation decreased in high concentration of salt. It agrees with the known fact of histone H1 dissociation in a high concentration of salt. We intend to pull out DNA-histone complexes from chromosomes for later molecular operations on them using an AFM.

  1. Evaluation of shooting distance by AFM and FTIR/ATR analysis of GSR.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongyan; Lakadwar, Jyoti; Rabalais, J Wayne

    2008-11-01

    The techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy are applied to the analysis of gun-shot residue (GSR) to test their ability to determine shooting distance and discrimination of the powder manufacturers. AFM is a nondestructive technique that is capable of characterizing the shapes and size distributions of GSR particles with resolution down to less than a nanometer. This may be useful for estimation of the shooting distance. Our AFM images of GSR show that the size distribution of the particles is inversely proportional to the shooting distance. Discrimination of powder manufacturers is tested by FTIR/ATR investigation of GSR. Identifying the specific compounds in the GSR by FTIR/ATR was not possible because it is a mixture of the debris of several compounds that compose the residue. However, it is shown that the GSR from different cartridges has characteristic FTIR/ATR bands that may be useful in differentiating the powder manufacturers. It appears promising that the development of AFM and FTIR/ATR databases for various powder manufacturers may be useful in analysis and identification of GSR. PMID:18761553

  2. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  3. Nanomechanical probing of soft matter through hydrophobic AFM tips fabricated by two-photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Suriano, Raffaella; Zandrini, Tommaso; De Marco, Carmela; Osellame, Roberto; Turri, Stefano; Bragheri, Francesca

    2016-04-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation of soft materials is a powerful tool for probing mechanical properties of biomaterials. Though many results have been reported in this field over the last decade, adhesion forces between the tip and the sample hinder the elastic modulus measurement when hydrophilic soft samples are investigated. Here, two-photon polymerization (2PP) technology was used to fabricate hydrophobic perfluoropolyether-based AFM tips. The hydrophobic 2PP tips allowed us to overcome the limitations of commercial and functionalized tips as well as to successfully measure the elastic modulus of medically relevant soft materials in air. Our results obtained in the characterization of poly(dimethyl siloxane) and polyethylene glycol hydrogels showed lower adhesion forces over a larger measurement range when compared to measurements performed with commercial tips. The elastic moduli measured by means of hydrophobic 2PP AFM tips were also found to be comparable to those obtained using conventional techniques for macroscopic samples. We successfully showed that the hydrophobic AFM tips developed by this highly versatile technology enable the study of mechanical properties of soft matter, benefiting from reduced sample-tip interactions, and a custom-made shape and dimension of the tips. PMID:26926558

  4. Charge Measurement of Atoms and Atomic Resolution of Molecules with Noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Leo

    2010-03-01

    Individual gold and silver adatoms [1] and pentacene molecules [2] on ultrathin NaCl films on Cu(111) were investigated using a qPlus tuning fork atomic force microscope (AFM) operated at 5 Kelvin with oscillation amplitudes in the sub-ångstrom regime. Charging a gold adatom by one electron charge increased the force on the AFM tip by a few piconewtons. Employing Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) we also measured the local contact potential difference (LCPD). We observed that the LCPD is shifted depending on the sign of the charge and allows the discrimination of positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged atoms. To image pentacene molecules we modified AFM tips by means of vertical manipulation techniques, i.e. deliberately picking up known atoms and molecules, such as Au, Ag, Cl, CO, and pentacene. Using a CO terminated tip we resolved all individual atoms and bonds within a pentacene molecule. Three dimensional force maps showing the site specific distance dependence above the molecule were extracted. We compared our experimental results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to gain insight on the physical origin of AFM contrast formation. We found that atomic resolution is only obtained due to repulsive force contributions originating from the Pauli exclusion principle. [4pt] [1] L. Gross, F. Mohn, P. Liljeroth, J. Repp, F. J. Giessibl, G. Meyer, Science 324, 1428 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Gross, F. Mohn, N. Moll, P. Liljeroth, G. Meyer, Science 325, 1110 (2009).

  5. Analysis of grating inscribed micro-cantilever for high resolution AFM probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balajee, N.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Hegde, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a mathematical modelling and analysis of reflection grating etched Si AFM cantilever deflections under different loading conditions. A simple analysis of the effect of grating structures on cantilever deflection is carried out with emphasis on optimizing the beam and gratings such that maximum amount of diffracted light remains within the detector area.

  6. Relationship between model bacterial peptidoglycan network structures and AFM force-distance curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Aidan; Wickham, Robert; Touhami, Ahmed; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    Recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements have involved pulling on Gram-negative bacterial sacculi with the AFM tip as a means of distinguishing between different proposed structures of the peptidoglycan network. The goal of the present study is to provide the theoretical connection between a given network structure and its response to the pulling force. We model the glycan strands as hinged rods, and the peptide cross-links as wormlike chains. Using Monte Carlo simulation to equilibrate the three-dimensional network, subject to a fixed AFM tip-to-substrate distance, we can compute the force exerted by the network on the AFM tip. The effects of adhesion of the sacculi to the substrate and enzymatic action on the network are included. We have modeled both the layered and the scaffold model for the peptidoglycan network structure. We have compared our theoretical force-distance curves for each network structure with experimental curves to determine which structure provides the best agreement with experiment.

  7. Controlled AFM detachments and movement of nanoparticles: gold clusters on HOPG at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Paolicelli, Guido; D'Addato, Sergio; Valeri, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    The effect of temperature on the onset of movement of gold nanoclusters (diameter 27 nm) deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Using the AFM with amplitude modulation (tapping mode AFM) we have stimulated and controlled the movement of individual clusters. We show how, at room temperature, controlled detachments and smooth movements can be obtained for clusters having dimensions comparable to or smaller than the tip radius. Displacement is practically visible in real time and it can be started and stopped easily by adjusting only one parameter, the tip amplitude oscillation. Analysing the energy dissipation signal at the onset of nanocluster sliding we evaluated a detachment threshold energy as a function of temperature in the range 300-413 K. We also analysed single cluster thermal induced displacement and combining this delicate procedure with AFM forced movement behaviour we conclude that detachment threshold energy is directly related to the activation energy of nanocluster diffusion and it scales linearly with temperature as expected for a single-particle thermally activated process.

  8. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%. PMID:25763650

  9. [AFM-based technologies as the way towards the reverse Avogadro number].

    PubMed

    Pleshakova, T O; Shumov, I D; Ivanov, Yu D; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Achievement of the concentration detection limit for proteins at the level of the reverse Avogadro number determines the modern development of proteomics. In this review, the possibility of approximating the reverse Avogadro number by using nanotechnological methods (AFM-based fishing with mechanical and electrical stimulation, nanowire detectors, and other methods) are discussed. The ability of AFM to detect, count, visualize and characterize physico-chemical properties of proteins at concentrations up to 10(-17)-10(-18) M is demonstrated. The combination of AFM-fishing with mass-spectrometry allows the identification of proteins not only in pure solutions, but also in multi-component biological fluids (serum). The possibilities to improve the biospecific fishing efficiency by use of SOMAmers in both AFM and nanowire systems are discussed. The paper also provides criteria for evaluation of the sensitivity of fishing-based detection systems. The fishing efficiency depending on the detection system parameters is estimated. The practical implementation of protein fishing depending on the ratio of the sample solution volume and the surface of the detection system is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of today's promising nanotechnological protein detection methods implemented on the basis of these schemes. PMID:25978390

  10. Afm Measrurements of Martian Soil Particles Using Mems Technology - Results from the PHOENIX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautsch, S.; Parrat, D.; de Rooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Morookian, J. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Vijendran, S.; Sykulska, H.; Pike, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Light scattering experiments conducted on Mars indicated that soil particles have dimensions around 1 μm. Particles in that range play an important role in the gas exchange between sub-surface water ice and the atmosphere. Their shape can help tracing the geological history and may indicate past presence of liquid water. NASA's Phoenix mission therefore decided to analyze soil and dust particles in the sub-micrometer to a few micrometer range using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the first time on another planet. The co-axially mounted AFM was capable of resolving particles with 10nm lateral resolution. A MEMS approach combined with mechatronic concepts for the scanner was selected for implementing the AFM. For redundancy, the sensor chip featured eight silicon cantilevers each with a 7 to 8 μm high tip. The cantilevers could be cleaved off if contaminated. During NASA's Phoenix Mission, which operated on the red planet from May to October 2008, we could demonstrate successful AFM operations. The instrument has executed 85 experiments of which 26 were needed for calibration. Of the remaining experiments about half (28) returned images where signatures of particles could be discerned.

  11. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  12. Effective AFM cantilever tip size: methods for in-situ determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Glia, Ayoub; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations, knowledge of the cantilever tip radius R is essential for the quantitative interpretation of experimental observables. Here we propose two techniques to rapidly quantify in-situ the effective tip radius of AFM probes. The first method is based on the strong dependency of the minimum value of the free amplitude required to observe a sharp transition from attractive to repulsive force regimes on the AFM probe radius. Specifically, the sharper the tip, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe such a transition. The key trait of the second method is to treat the tip-sample system as a capacitor. Provided with an analytical model that takes into account the geometry of the tip-sample’s capacitance, one can quantify the effective size of the tip apex fitting the experimental capacitance versus distance curve. Flowchart-like algorithms, easily implementable on any hardware, are provided for both methods, giving a guideline to AFM practitioners. The methods’ robustness is assessed over a wide range of probes of different tip radii R (i.e. 4 < R < 50 nm) and geometries. Results obtained from both methods are compared with the nominal values given by manufacturers and verified by acquiring scanning electron microscopy images. Our observations show that while both methods are reliable and robust over the range of tip sizes tested, the critical amplitude method is more accurate for relatively sharp tips (4 nm < R < 10 nm).

  13. First-principles AFM image simulation with frozen density embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    We present efficient first-principles method of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Ordinary nc-AFM simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) require exhaustive computational cost because it involves thousands of total energy calculations. Regarding the sample as a fixed external potential can reduce the computational cost, and we adopt frozen density embedding theory (FDET) for this purpose. Simulated nc-AFM images with FDET using a carbon monoxide tip well reproduces the full DFT images of benzene, pentacene, and graphene, although optimized tip-sample distances and interaction energies in FDET are underestimated and overestimated, respectively. The FDET-based simulation method is promising for AFM image simulation of surfaces and two-dimensional materials. This work was supported by U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46286 and Award No. DE-SC0008877, and by Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources are provided by NERSC and TACC.

  14. CDSEM AFM hybrid metrology for the characterization of gate-all-around silicon nano wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Shimon; Schwarzband, Ishai; Weinberg, Yakov; Cornell, Roger; Adan, Ofer; Cohen, Guy M.; Gignac, Lynne; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Feinstein, Adam

    2014-04-01

    In an ongoing study of the physical characterization of Gate-All-Around Silicon Nano Wires (GAASiNW), we found that the thin, suspended wires are prone to buckling as a function of their length and diameter. This buckling takes place between the fixed source and drain regions of the suspended wire, and can affect the device performance and therefore must be studied and controlled. For cylindrical SiNW, theory predicts that buckling has no directional preference. However, 3D CDSEM measurement results indicated that cylindrical wires prefer to buckle towards the wafer. To validate these results and to determine if the electron beam or charging is affecting our observations, we used 3D-AFM measurements to evaluate the buckling. To assure that the CDSEM and 3D-AFM measure the exact same locations, we developed a design based recipe generation approach to match the 3D-AFM and CDSEM coordinate systems. Measuring the exact same sites enables us to compare results and use 3D-AFM data to optimize CDSEM models. In this paper we will present a hybrid metrology approach to the characterization of GAASiNW for sub-nanometer variations, validating experimental results, and proposing methods to improve metrology capabilities.

  15. Adsorption Behavior of Cellulose and Its Derivatives toward Ag(I) in Aqueous Medium: An AFM, Spectroscopic, and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chuantao; Dobryden, Illia; Rydén, Jens; Öberg, Sven; Holmgren, Allan; Mathew, Aji P

    2015-11-17

    The aim of this study was to develop a fundamental understanding of the adsorption behavior of metal ions on cellulose surfaces using experimental techniques supported by computational modeling, taking Ag(I) as an example. Force interactions among three types of cellulose microspheres (native cellulose and its derivatives with sulfate and phosphate groups) and the silica surface in AgNO3 solution were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using the colloidal probe technique. The adhesion force between phosphate cellulose microspheres (PCM) and the silica surface in the aqueous AgNO3 medium increased significantly with increasing pH while the adhesion force slightly decreased for sulfate cellulose microspheres (SCM), and no clear adhesion force was observed for native cellulose microspheres (CM). The stronger adhesion enhancement for the PCM system is mainly attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Ag(I) and the negative silica surface. The observed force trends were in good agreement with the measured zeta potentials. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analyses confirmed the presence of silver on the surface of cellulose microspheres after adsorption. This study showed that PCM with a high content of phosphate groups exhibited a larger amount of adsorbed Ag(I) than CM and SCM and possible clustering of Ag(I) to nanoparticles. The presence of the phosphate group and a wavenumber shift of the P-OH vibration caused by the adsorption of silver ions on the phosphate groups were further confirmed with computational studies using density functional theory (DFT), which gives support to the above findings regarding the adsorption and clustering of Ag(I) on the cellulose surface decorated with phosphate groups as well as IR spectra. PMID:26501836

  16. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pariona, Moises Meza; Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela; Riva, Rudimar

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  17. High sensitivity tracking of CD-SEM performance: QSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, S.; Huang, Jaffee; Yushmanov, P.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of CD-SEMs directly affects the measured values of critical dimensions (CDs) at the time of their measurement. Tracking the performance of CD-SEMs is necessary to establish trust in their results and provide guidance for preventive maintenance and tune-ups. When the measured CDs are out of specification in manufacturing, it is crucial to determine whether this is due to process variation or the metrology tool itself. Multiple methods that use linewidth measurements have been employed thus far; however, they suffer from linewidth variations on the wafer, as well as from variations of line edge and linewidth roughness. Here, we report a method that is capable of providing a quantitative extraction of the SEM performance based on advanced algorithms. The method is independent of linewidth, line edge roughness and linewidth roughness, and has high sensitivity. This software, QSEM, was developed to automatically evaluate image quality and assign a value to that quality. The image quality value is based on multiple factors such as noise, sharpness, analysis of histograms, and contrast. The sensitivity of the software was evaluated; a good correlation between image quality results and linewidth variation due to SEM performance was established. Using QSEM to analyze SEM images allows the performance of CDSEMs to be tracked for proper calibration and preventive maintenance, as well as to resolve the dispute between failure in the process or the metrology.

  18. 3DSEM++: Adaptive and intelligent 3D SEM surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Holz, Jessica D; Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Owen, Heather A; He, Max M; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-08-01

    Structural analysis of microscopic objects is a longstanding topic in several scientific disciplines, such as biological, mechanical, and materials sciences. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), as a promising imaging equipment has been around for decades to determine the surface properties (e.g., compositions or geometries) of specimens by achieving increased magnification, contrast, and resolution greater than one nanometer. Whereas SEM micrographs still remain two-dimensional (2D), many research and educational questions truly require knowledge and facts about their three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D surface reconstruction from SEM images leads to remarkable understanding of microscopic surfaces, allowing informative and qualitative visualization of the samples being investigated. In this contribution, we integrate several computational technologies including machine learning, contrario methodology, and epipolar geometry to design and develop a novel and efficient method called 3DSEM++ for multi-view 3D SEM surface reconstruction in an adaptive and intelligent fashion. The experiments which have been performed on real and synthetic data assert the approach is able to reach a significant precision to both SEM extrinsic calibration and its 3D surface modeling. PMID:27200484

  19. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-01

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  20. Characterization of Local Mechanical Properties of Polymer Thin Films and Polymer Nanocomposites via AFM indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xu

    AFM indentation has become a tool with great potential in the characterization of nano-mechanical properties of materials. Thanks to the nanometer sized probes, AFM indentation is capable of capturing the changes of multiple properties within the range of tens of nanometers, such task would otherwise be difficult by using other experiment instruments. Despite the great potentials of AFM indentation, it operates based on a simple mechanism: driving the delicate AFM probe to indent the sample surface, and recording the force-displacement response. With limited information provided by AFM indentation, efforts are still required for any practice to successfully extract the desired nano-scale properties from specific materials. In this thesis, we focus on the mechanical properties of interphase between polymer and inorganic materials. It is known that in nanocomposites, a region of polymer exist around nanoparticles with altered molecular structures and improved properties, which is named as interphase polymer. The system with polymer thin films and inorganic material substrates is widely used to simulate the interphase effect in nanocomposites. In this thesis, we developed an efficient and reliable method to process film/substrate samples and characterize the changes of local mechanical properties inside the interphase region with ultra-high resolution AFM mechanical mapping technique. Applying this newly developed method, the interphase of several film/substrate pairs were examined and compared. The local mechanical properties on the other side of the polymer thin film, the free surface side, was also investigated using AFM indentation equipped with surface modified probes. In order to extract the full spectrum of local elastic modulus inside the surface region in the range of only tens of nanometers, the different contact mechanics models were studied and compared, and a Finite Element model was also established. Though the film/substrate system has been wide used as

  1. Calibration of AFM cantilever stiffness: a microfabricated array of reflective springs.

    PubMed

    Cumpson, P J Peter J; Zhdan, Peter; Hedley, John

    2004-08-01

    Calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is necessary for the measurement of nanonewton and piconewton forces, which are critical to analytical applications of AFM in the analysis of polymer surfaces, biological structures and organic molecules. We have developed a compact and easy-to-use reference standard for this calibration. The new artifact consists of an array of 12 dual spiral-cantilever springs, each supporting a mirrored polycrystalline silicon disc of 160 microm in diameter. These devices were fabricated by a three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining method, including a reflective layer of gold on chromium. We call such an array a Microfabricated Array of Reference Springs (MARS). These devices have a number of advantages. Cantilever calibration using this device is straightforward and rapid. The devices have very small inertia, and are therefore resistant to shock and vibration. This means they need no careful treatment except reasonably clean laboratory conditions. The array spans the range of spring constant from around 0.16 to 11 N/m important in AFM, allowing almost all contact-mode AFM cantilevers to be calibrated easily and rapidly. Each device incorporates its own discrete gold mirror to improve reflectivity. The incorporation of a gold mirror both simplifies calibration of the devices themselves (via Doppler velocimetry) and allows interferometric calibration of the AFM z-axis using the apparent periodicity in the force-distance curve before contact. Therefore, from a single force-distance curve, taking about one second to acquire, one can calibrate the cantilever spring constant and, optionally, the z-axis scale. These are all the data one needs to make accurate and reliable force measurements. PMID:15231316

  2. SemVisM: semantic visualizer for medical image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landaeta, Luis; La Cruz, Alexandra; Baranya, Alexander; Vidal, María.-Esther

    2015-01-01

    SemVisM is a toolbox that combines medical informatics and computer graphics tools for reducing the semantic gap between low-level features and high-level semantic concepts/terms in the images. This paper presents a novel strategy for visualizing medical data annotated semantically, combining rendering techniques, and segmentation algorithms. SemVisM comprises two main components: i) AMORE (A Modest vOlume REgister) to handle input data (RAW, DAT or DICOM) and to initially annotate the images using terms defined on medical ontologies (e.g., MesH, FMA or RadLex), and ii) VOLPROB (VOlume PRObability Builder) for generating the annotated volumetric data containing the classified voxels that belong to a particular tissue. SemVisM is built on top of the semantic visualizer ANISE.1

  3. A TEM study of samples from acid mine drainage systems: metal-mineral association with implications for transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochella, Michael F.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Golla, Ute; Putnis, Andrew

    1999-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy/electron energy loss spectroscopy (EFTEM/EELS), as well as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), have been used to study bed sediments from two acid mine drainage (AMD) sites in western Montana, USA. TEM and associated techniques, including sample preparation via epoxy impregnation and ultramicrotome sectioning, afford the opportunity to better interpret and understand complex water-rock interactions in these types of samples. For the sample taken from the first site (Mike Horse mine), ferrihydrite is the dominant phase, Si and Zn are the most abundant elements sorbed to ferrihydrite surfaces, and Pb is notably absent from ferrihydrite association. Three additional important metal-containing phases (gahnite, hydrohetaerolite, and plumbojarosite), that were not apparent in the powder XRD pattern because of their relatively low concentration, were identified in the TEM. The presence of these phases is important, because, for example, gahnite and plumbojarosite act as sinks for Zn and Pb, respectively. Therefore, the mobility of Pb from this part of the drainage system depends on the stability of plumbojarosite and the ability of ferrihydrite to sorb the released Pb. From thermodynamic data in the literature, we predict that Pb will be released by the dissolution of plumbojarosite above a pH of 4 to 5, but it will then be recaptured by ferrihydrite if the pH continues to rise to 5.5 and higher, irrespective of competition effects from other metals. Therefore, only a relatively narrow pH window exists in which Pb can escape this portion of the system as an aqueous species. For the sample taken from the other site included in this study (the Carbonate mine), jarosite and quartz are the dominant phases. Interestingly, however, the jarosites are both Pb-poor and Pb-enriched. In addition, TEM reveals the

  4. Development of 89Zr-Ontuxizumab for in vivo TEM-1/endosialin PET applications

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sara E.S.; Zheleznyak, Alex; Studer, Matthew; O'Shannessy, Daniel J.; Lapi, Suzanne E.; Van Tine, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The complexity of sarcoma has led to the need for patient selection via in vivo biomarkers. Tumor endothelial marker-1 (TEM-1) is a cell surface marker expressed by the tumor microenvironment. Currently MORAb-004 (Ontuxizumab), an anti-TEM-1 humanized monoclonal antibody, is in sarcoma clinical trials. Development of positron emission tomography (PET) for in vivo TEM-1 expression may allow for stratification of patients, potentially enhancing clinical outcomes seen with Ontuxizumab. Results Characterization of cell lines revealed clear differences in TEM-1 expression. One high expressing (RD-ES) and one low expressing (LUPI) cell line were xenografted, and mice were injected with 89Zr-Ontuxizumab. PET imaging post-injection revealed that TEM-1 was highly expressed and readily detectable in vivo only in RD-ES. In vivo biodistribution studies confirmed high radiopharmaceutical uptake in tumor relative to normal organs. Experimental Design Sarcoma cell lines were characterized for TEM-1 expression. Ontuxizumab was labeled with 89Zr and evaluated for immunoreactivity preservation. 89Zr-Ontuxizumab was injected into mice with high or null expressing TEM-1 xenografts. In vivo PET imaging experiments were performed. Conclusion 89Zr-Ontuxizumab can be used in vivo to determine high versus low TEM-1 expression. Reliable PET imaging of TEM-1 in sarcoma patients may allow for identification of patients that will attain the greatest benefit from anti-TEM-1 therapy. PMID:26909615

  5. Major trends in extending CD-SEM utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Yang, Kyoungmo; Koshihara, Shunsuke; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Danilevsky, Alex; Parker, Cindy; Page, Lorena

    2007-03-01

    Requirements for increasingly integrated metrology solutions continue to drive applications that incorporate process characterization tools, as well as the ability to improve metrology production capability and cycle time, with a single application. All of the most critical device layers today, along with even non-critical layers, now require optical proximity correction (OPC), which must be rigorously modeled and calibrated as part of process development and extensively verified once new product reticles are released using critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM) tools. Automatic setup of complex recipes is one of the major trends in CD-SEM applications, which is adding much value to CD-SEM metrology. In addition, as integrated circuit dimensions continue to shrink, local line width variation influences the statistical confidence of a measured CD's representation of the process. A feature, called "Average CD (ACD)," measures multiple targets within the field of view (FOV). ACD allows not only measurements of a single data point representing one discrete feature, but also sampling of the mean and variance of the process. These two applications, automatic recipe creation and ACD, are combined in the second version of the DesignGauge software, which is available for the latest-generation Hitachi S-9380II CD-SEMs. DesignGauge V2 is not only capable of offline recipe creation and CD-SEM control, but it also has the ability to directly transfer design-based recipes into standard CD-SEM recipes. These recipes can be used for OPC model-building and verification as with previous DesignGauge applications. The software also provides design template-based recipe setup for production layer recipes, which yields much needed improvement to production tool utilization, as production recipes can thus be written offline for new products, improving first silicon cycle time, reducing engineering time required to generate recipes, and improving CD-SEM utilization

  6. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  7. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  8. Characterization of pyrotechnic reaction residue particles by SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Ken L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie

    2003-05-01

    Today the method commonly used for detecting gunshot residue is through the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). In recent years, this same methodology began to find use in detecting and characterizing pyrotechnic reaction residue (PRR) particles whether produced by explosion or burning. This is accomplished by collecting particulate samples from a surface in the immediate area of the pyrotechnic reaction. Suspect PRR particles are identified by their morphology (typically 1 to 20 microm spheroidal particles) using an SEM; then they are analyzed for the elements they contain using X-ray EDS. This can help to identify the general type of pyrotechnic composition involved. PMID:12762523

  9. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-01

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  10. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  11. Evolution of the Mobile Information SysTem (MIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Thompson, Shelby; Archer, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    The Mobile Information SysTem (MIST) had its origins in the need to determine whether commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies could improve intervehicular activities (IVA) on International Space Station (ISS) crew maintenance productivity. It began with an exploration of head mounted displays (HMDs), but quickly evolved to include voice recognition, mobile personal computing, and data collection. The unique characteristic of the MIST lies within its mobility, in which a vest is worn that contains a mini-computer and supporting equipment, and a headband with attachments for a HMD, lipstick camera, and microphone. Data is then captured directly by the computer running Morae(TM) or similar software for analysis. To date, the MIST system has been tested in numerous environments such as two parabolic flights on NASA's C-9 microgravity aircraft and several mockup facilities ranging from ISS to the Altair Lunar Sortie Lander. Functional capabilities have included its lightweight and compact design, commonality across systems and environments, and usefulness in remote collaboration. Human Factors evaluations of the system have proven the MIST's ability to be worn for long durations of time (approximately four continuous hours) with no adverse physical deficits, moderate operator compensation, and low workload being reported as measured by Corlett Bishop Discomfort Scale, Cooper-Harper Ratings, and the NASA Total Workload Index (TLX), respectively. Additionally, through development of the system, it has spawned several new applications useful in research. For example, by only employing the lipstick camera, microphone, and a compact digital video recorder (DVR), we created a portable, lightweight data collection device. Video is recorded from the participants point of view (POV) through the use of the camera mounted on the side of the head. Both the video and audio is recorded directly into the DVR located on a belt around the waist. This data is then transferred to

  12. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes. PMID:21446752

  13. Characterization of single 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle attachments on AFM tips for single sub-4-nm object pickup

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the attachment of a 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle (Au-NP) to the tip of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe through the application of a current-limited bias voltage. The resulting probe is capable of picking up individual objects at the sub-4-nm scale. We also discuss the mechanisms involved in the attachment of the Au-NP to the very apex of an AFM probe tip. The Au-NP-modified AFM tips were used to pick up individual 4-nm quantum dots (QDs) using a chemically functionalized method. Single QD blinking was reduced considerably on the Au-NP-modified AFM tip. The resulting AFM tips present an excellent platform for the manipulation of single protein molecules in the study of single protein-protein interactions. PMID:24237663

  14. Do SE(II) electrons really degrade SEM image quality?

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gary H; Carter, Andrew D; Joy, David C

    2013-01-01

    Generally, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, it is desirable that a high-resolution image be composed mainly of those secondary electrons (SEs) generated by the primary electron beam, denoted SE(I) . However, in conventional SEM imaging, other, often unwanted, signal components consisting of backscattered electrons (BSEs), and their associated SEs, denoted SE(II) , are present; these signal components contribute a random background signal that degrades contrast, and therefore signal-to-noise ratio and resolution. Ideally, the highest resolution SEM image would consist only of the SE(I) component. In SEMs that use conventional pinhole lenses and their associated Everhart-Thornley detectors, the image is composed of several components, including SE(I) , SE(II) , and some BSE, depending on the geometry of the detector. Modern snorkel lens systems eliminate the BSEs, but not the SE(II) s. We present a microfabricated diaphragm for minimizing the unwanted SE(II) signal components. We present evidence of improved imaging using a microlithographically generated pattern of Au, about 500 nm thick, that blocks most of the undesired signal components, leaving an image composed mostly of SE(I) s. We refer to this structure as a "spatial backscatter diaphragm." PMID:22589040

  15. Some Reflections on SEM Structures and Strategies. Part One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a pre-conference paper prepared for participants at AACRAO's Fifteenth Annual Strategic Enrollment Management Conference (SEM XV), held November 13-16, 2005, in Chicago, Illinois. This is the first of a three-part series. In this series of papers, David Kalsbeek introduces a four-fold construct for differentiating and comparing…

  16. CD SEM metrology macro CD technology: beyond the average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin D.; Michelson, Di K.; Allgair, John A.; Tam, Aviram; Chase-Colin, David; Dajczman, Asaf; Adan, Ofer; Har-Zvi, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Downscaling of semiconductor fabrication technology requires an ever-tighter control of the production process. CD-SEM, being the major image-based critical dimension metrology tool, is constantly being improved in order to fulfill these requirements. One of the methods used for increasing precision is averaging over several or many (ideally identical) features, usually referred to as "Macro CD". In this paper, we show that there is much more to Macro CD technology- metrics characterizing an arbitrary array of similar features within a single SEM image-than just the average. A large amount of data is accumulated from a single scan of a SEM image, providing informative and statistically valid local process characterization. As opposed to other technologies, Macro CD not only provides extremely precise average metrics, but also allows for the reporting of full information on each of the measured features and of various statistics (such as the variability) on all currently reported CD SEM metrics. We present the mathematical background behind Macro CD technology and the opportunity for reducing number of sites for SPC, along with providing enhanced-sensitivity CD metrics.

  17. Novel CD-SEM measurement methodology for complex OPCed patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung-Joo; Park, Won Joo; Choi, Seuk Hwan; Chung, Dong Hoon; Shin, Inkyun; Kim, Byung-Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Fukaya, Hiroshi; Ogiso, Yoshiaki; Shida, Soichi; Nakamura, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    As design rules of lithography shrink: accuracy and precision of Critical Dimension (CD) and controllability of hard OPCed patterns are required in semiconductor production. Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscopes (CD SEM) are essential tools to confirm the quality of a mask such as CD control; CD uniformity and CD mean to target (MTT). Basically, Repeatability and Reproducibility (R and R) performance depends on the length of Region of Interest (ROI). Therefore, the measured CD can easily fluctuate in cases of extremely narrow regions of OPCed patterns. With that premise, it is very difficult to define MTT and uniformity of complex OPCed masks using the conventional SEM measurement approach. To overcome these difficulties, we evaluated Design Based Metrology (DBM) using Large Field Of View (LFOV) of CD-SEM. DBM can standardize measurement points and positions within LFOV based on the inflection/jog of OPCed patterns. Thus, DBM has realized several thousand multi ROI measurements with average CD. This new measurement technique can remove local CD errors and improved statistical methodology of the entire mask to enhance the representativeness of global CD uniformity. With this study we confirmed this new technique as a more reliable methodology in complex OPCed patterns compared to conventional technology. This paper summarizes the experiments of DBM with LFOV using various types of the patterns and compares them with current CD SEM methods.

  18. Nanoscopic polypyrrole AFM-SECM probes enabling force measurements under potential control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, P.; Higgins, M. J.; Kranz, C.

    2014-01-01

    Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well-defined geometry. Furthermore, such probes may be reversibly switched from an insulating to a conductive state. In addition, the hydrophilicity of such polymer tips is dependent on the dopant, and hence, on the oxidation state. Force studies applying different tip potentials were performed at plasma-treated glass surfaces providing localized information on the associated force interactions, which are dependent on the applied potential and the dopant.Conductive polymers, and in particular polypyrrole, are frequently used as biomimetic interfaces facilitating growth and/or differentiation of cells and tissues. Hence, studying forces and local interactions between such polymer interfaces and cells at the nanoscale is of particular interest. Frequently, such force interactions are not directly accessible with high spatial resolution. Consequently, we have developed nanoscopic polypyrrole electrodes, which are integrated in AFM-SECM probes. Bifunctional AFM-SECM probes were modified via ion beam-induced deposition resulting in pyramidal conductive Pt-C composite electrodes. These nanoscopic electrodes then enabled localized polypyrrole deposition, thus resulting in polymer-modified AFM probes with a well

  19. Exploring the potential reservoirs of non specific TEM beta lactamase (blaTEM) gene in the Indo-Gangetic region: A risk assessment approach to predict health hazards.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Rani, Neetika; Amoah, Isaac Dennis; Stenström, Thor Axel; Shanker, Rishi

    2016-08-15

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistant bacteria is an important public health and environmental contamination issue. Antimicrobials of β-lactam group accounts for approximately two thirds, by weight, of all antimicrobials administered to humans due to high clinical efficacy and low toxicity. This study explores β-lactam resistance determinant gene (blaTEM) as emerging contaminant in Indo-Gangetic region using qPCR in molecular beacon format. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) approach was adopted to predict risk to human health associated with consumption/exposure of surface water, potable water and street foods contaminated with bacteria having blaTEM gene. It was observed that surface water and sediments of the river Ganga and Gomti showed high numbers of blaTEM gene copies and varied significantly (p<0.05) among the sampling locations. The potable water collected from drinking water facility and clinical settings exhibit significant number of blaTEM gene copies (13±0.44-10200±316 gene copies/100mL). It was observed that E.crassipes among aquatic flora encountered in both the rivers had high load of blaTEM gene copies. The information on prevalence of environmental reservoirs of blaTEM gene containing bacteria in Indo-Gangetic region and risk associated will be useful for formulating strategies to protect public from menace of clinical risks linked with antimicrobial resistant bacteria. PMID:27111425

  20. Retrofit implementation of Zernike phase plate imaging for cryo-TEM

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Leith, ArDean; Hsieh, Chyongere; Danev, Radostin

    2011-01-01

    In-focus phase-plate imaging is particularly beneficial for cryo-TEM because it offers a substantial overall increase in image contrast, without an electron dose penalty, and it simplifies image interpretation. We show how phase-plate cryo-TEM can be implemented with an appropriate existing TEM, and provide a basic practical introduction to use of thin-film (carbon) phase plates. We point out potential pitfalls of phase-plate operation, and discuss solutions. We provide information on evaluating a particular TEM for its suitability. PMID:21272647

  1. Compositional and Microstructural Evolution of Olivine During Pulsed Laser Irradiation: Insights Based on a FIB/Field-Emission TEM Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of pulsed laser irradiation to simulate the short duration, high-energy conditions characteristic of micrometeorite impacts is now an established approach in experimental space weathering studies. The laser generates both melt and vapor deposits that contain nanophase metallic Fe (npFe(sup 0)) grains with size distributions and optical properties similar to those in natural impact-generated melt and vapor deposits. There remains uncertainty, however, about how well lasers simulate the mechanical work and internal (thermal) energy partitioning that occurs in actual impacts. We are currently engaged in making a direct comparison between the products of laser irradiation and experimental/natural hypervelocity impacts. An initial step reported here is to use analytical TEM is to attain a better understanding of how the microstructure and composition of laser deposits evolve over multiple cycles of pulsed laser irradiation. Experimental Methods: We irradiated pressed-powder pellets of San Carlos olivine (Fo(sub 90)) with up to 99 rastered pulses of a GAM ArF excimer laser. The irradiated surface of the sample were characterized by SEM imaging and areas were selected for FIB cross sectioning for TEM study using an FEI Quanta dual-beam electron/focused ion beam instrument. FIB sections were characterized using a JEOL2500SE analytical field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM) optimized for quantitative element mapping at less than 10 nm spatial resolutions. Results: In the SEM the 99 pulse pressed pellet sample shows a complex, inhomogeneous, distribution of laser-generated material, largely concentrated in narrow gaps and larger depressions between grains. Local concentrations of npFe0 spherules 0.1 to 1 micrometers in size are visible within these deposits in SEM back-scatter images. Fig. 1 shows bright-field STEM images of a FIB cross-section of a one of these deposits that continuously covers the top and sloping side of an

  2. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced. PMID:19167824

  3. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  4. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  5. Cell mechanics as a marker for diseases: Biomedical applications of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases are related to changes in cell mechanics. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is one of the most suitable techniques allowing the investigation of both topography and mechanical properties of adherent cells with high spatial resolution under physiological conditions. Over the years the use of this technique in medical and clinical applications has largely increased, resulting in the notion of cell mechanics as a biomarker to discriminate between different physiological and pathological states of cells. Cell mechanics has proven to be a biophysical fingerprint able discerning between cell phenotypes, unraveling processes in aging or diseases, or even detecting and diagnosing cellular pathologies. We will review in this report some of the works on cell mechanics investigated by AFM with clinical and medical relevance in order to clarify the state of research in this field and to highlight the role of cell mechanics in the study of pathologies, focusing on cancer, blood and cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Mapping real-time images of high-speed AFM using multitouch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carberry, D. M.; Picco, L.; Dunton, P. G.; Miles, M. J.

    2009-10-01

    Conventional AFM is highly restricted by its scan rate, a problem that has been overcome by the development of high-speed AFM systems. As the technology to produce higher scan rates has developed it has pushed forward the design of control software. However, the user interface has not evolved at the same rate, limiting the user to sequential control steps. In this paper we demonstrate the integration of HSAFM with a multitouch interface to produce a highly intuitive and responsive control environment. This enables nanometre resolution to be maintained whilst scanning the sample over tens of microns, and arbitrary paths to be traversed. We illustrate this by scanning around two chromosomes in water, before scanning on top of the chromosome, showing the surface structure.

  7. AFM method to detect differences in adhesion of silica bids to cancer and normal epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Gaikwad, Ravi; Woodworth, Craig

    2009-03-01

    To date, the methods of detection of cancer cells have been mostly based on traditional techniques used in biology, such as visual identification of malignant changes, cell growth analysis, specific ligand-receptor labeling, or genetic tests. Despite being well developed, these methods are either insufficiently accurate or require a lengthy complicated analysis. A search for alternative methods for the detection of cancer cells may be a fruitful approach. Here we describe an AFM study that may result in a new method for detection of cancer cells in vitro. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study adhesion of single silica beads to malignant and normal cells cultured from human cervix. We found that adhesion depends on the time of contact, and can be statistically different for malignant and normal cells. Using these data, one could develop an optical method of cancer detection based on adhesion of various silica beads.

  8. Mode coupling in a hanging-fiber AFM used as a rheological probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devailly, C.; Laurent, J.; Steinberger, A.; Bellon, L.; Ciliberto, S.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze the advantages and drawbacks of a method which measures the viscosity of liquids at microscales, using a thin glass fiber fixed on the tip of a cantilever of an ultra-low-noise Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When the fiber is dipped into a liquid, the dissipation of the cantilever-fiber system, which is linked to the liquid viscosity, can be computed from the power spectral density of the thermal fluctuations of the cantilever deflection. The high sensitivity of the AFM allows us to show the existence and to develop a model of the coupling between the dynamics of the fiber and that of the cantilever. This model, which accurately fits the experimental data, gives also more insights into the dynamics of coupled microdevices in a viscous environment.

  9. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  10. Temperature Dependence Study of Noncontact Afm Images Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Meghdari, Ali

    The effect of temperature on the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) surface imaging is investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) analysis based on the Sutton-Chen (SC) interatomic potential. Particular attention is devoted to the tip and sample flexibility at different temperatures. When a gold coated probe is brought close to the Au (001) surface at high temperatures, the tip and surface atoms are pulled together and their distance becomes smaller. The tip and sample atoms displacement varies in the different environment temperatures and this leads to the different interaction forces. Along this line, to study the effect of temperature on the resulting images, we have employed the well-known NC-AFM model and carried out realistic non-equilibrium MD 3D simulations of atomic scale imaging at different close approach positions to the surface.

  11. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPM8 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew P.; Egressy, Kinga; Lim, Annabel; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-04-02

    Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily have been shown to assemble as tetramers. Here we have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) channel using atomic force microscopy (AFM). TRPM8 channels were isolated from transfected cells, and complexes were formed between the channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The complexes were then subjected to AFM imaging. A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of antibody decorated channels had a peak at 1305 nm{sup 3}, close to the expected size of a TRPM8 tetramer. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 93{sup o} and 172{sup o}, confirming that the channel assembles as a tetramer. We suggest that this assembly pattern is common to all members of the TRP channel superfamily.

  12. Controlled nanodot fabrication by rippling polycarbonate surface using an AFM diamond tip

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The single scratching test of polymer polycarbonate (PC) sample surface using an atomic force microscope (AFM) diamond tip for fabricating ripple patterns has been studied with the focus on the evaluation of the effect of the tip scratching angle on the pattern formation. The experimental results indicated that the different oriented ripples can be easily machined by controlling the scratching angles of the AFM. And, the effects of the normal load and the feed on the ripples formation and their periods were also studied. Based on the ripple pattern formation, we firstly proposed a two-step scratching method to fabricate controllable and oriented complex three-dimensional (3D) nanodot arrays. These typical ripple formations can be described via a stick-slip and crack formation process. PMID:25114660

  13. AFM Imaging of Mercaptobenzoic Acid on Au(110): Submolecular Contrast with Metal Tips.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Nadine; Robles, Roberto; Abufager, Paula; Lorente, Nicolas; Berndt, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A self-assembled monolayer of mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) on Au(110) is investigated with scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy (STM and AFM) and density functional calculations. High-resolution AFM images obtained with metallic tips show clear contrasts between oxygen atoms and phenyl moieties. The contrast above the oxygen atoms is due to attractive covalent interactions, which is different than previously reported high-resolution images, where Pauli repulsion dominated the image contrast. We show that the bonding of MBA to the substrate occurs mainly through dispersion interactions, whereas the thiol-Au bond contributes only a quarter of the adsorption energy. No indication of Au adatoms mediating the thiol-Au interaction was found in contrast to other thiol-bonded systems. However, MBA lifts the Au(110)-(2 × 1) reconstruction. PMID:27183144

  14. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  15. Conservative and dissipative tip-sample interaction forces probed with dynamic AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsmann, B.; Seidel, C.; Anczykowski, B.; Fuchs, H.

    1999-10-01

    The conservative and dissipative forces between tip and sample of a dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) were investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experimental AFM data obtained by the frequency modulation technique. In this way it became possible to reconstruct complete force versus distance curves and damping coefficient versus distance curves from experimental data without using fit parameters for the interaction force and without using analytical interaction models. A comparison with analytical approaches is given and a way to determine a damping coefficient curve from experimental data is proposed. The results include the determination of the first point of repulsive contact of a vibrating tip when approaching a sample. The capability of quantifying the tip-sample interaction is demonstrated using experimental data obtained with a silicon tip and a mica sample in UHV.

  16. Force-controlled manipulation of single cells: from AFM to FluidFM.

    PubMed

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Franz, Clemens M; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A

    2014-07-01

    The ability to perturb individual cells and to obtain information at the single-cell level is of central importance for addressing numerous biological questions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers great potential for this prospering field. Traditionally used as an imaging tool, more recent developments have extended the variety of cell-manipulation protocols. Fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) combines AFM with microfluidics via microchanneled cantilevers with nano-sized apertures. The crucial element of the technology is the connection of the hollow cantilevers to a pressure controller, allowing their operation in liquid as force-controlled nanopipettes under optical control. Proof-of-concept studies demonstrated a broad spectrum of single-cell applications including isolation, deposition, adhesion and injection in a range of biological systems. PMID:24856959

  17. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-2 Upper Air Network Standard Pressure Level Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters interpolated at 0.5 kiloPascal increments of atmospheric pressure from data collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  18. Probing of local dissolution of Al-alloys in chloride solutions by AFM and SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, A.; Pan, J.; Leygraf, C.; Norgren, S.

    2006-05-01

    Local dissolution of Al alloys was probed in situ in chloride solutions by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Preferential dissolution in the boundary region between some intermetallic particles (IMPs) and alloy matrix, and trench formation around large IMPs during free immersion and under electrochemical anodic polarization were observed, which indicate different dissolution behavior associated to different types of IMPs. Moreover, by using an integrated AFM/SECM system with a dual mode cantilever/microelectrode probe, simultaneous probing of electrochemical active sites and topographic changes over the same area was performed with sub-micron resolution. This allowed the ongoing localized corrosion processes related to the IMP to be revealed.

  19. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ferat; Yablon, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization. PMID:26665072

  20. AFM characterization of nanobubble formation and slip condition in oxygenated and electrokinetically altered fluids.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Pan, Yunlu; Daniels, Stephanie

    2013-02-15

    Nanobubbles are gas-filled features that spontaneously form at the interface of hydrophobic surfaces and aqueous solutions. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to characterize the morphology of nanobubbles formed on hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) films immersed in DI water, saline, saline with oxygen and an electrokinetically altered saline solution produced with Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow under elevated oxygen pressure. AFM force spectroscopy was used to evaluate hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces and boundary slip condition in various fluids. The effect of solution, electric field and surface charge on shape, size and density of nanobubbles as well as slip length was quantified and the results and underlying mechanisms are presented in this paper. PMID:23123096

  1. Expanding the Conversation about SEM: Advancing SEM Efforts to Improve Student Learning and Persistence--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yale, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The first article in this two-part series focused on the need for enrollment management conceptual and organizational models to focus more intentionally and purposefully on efforts related to improving student learning, success, and persistence. Time and again, SEM is viewed from a conventional lens comprising marketing, recruitment and …

  2. Expanding the Conversation about SEM: Advancing SEM Efforts to Improve Student Learning and Persistence--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yale, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    It's now nearly ten years since the author started participating in and presenting at national conferences related to strategic enrollment management (SEM). Having entered this profession with nearly 20 years of experience in transitional initiatives related to the first-year experience and academic advisement services, she has perceived an…

  3. Aflatoxin M1 Concentration in Various Dairy Products: Evidence for Biologically Reduced Amount of AFM1 in Yoghurt

    PubMed Central

    RAHIMIRAD, Amir; MAALEKINEJAD, Hassan; OSTADI, Araz; YEGANEH, Samal; FAHIMI, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a carcinogenic substance is found in milk and dairy products. The effect of season and type of dairy products on AFMi level in northern Iran was investigated in this study. Methods Three hundred samples (each season 75 samples) including raw and pasteurized milk, yoghurt, cheese, and cream samples were collected from three distinct milk producing farms. The samples were subjected to chemical and solid phase extractions and were analyzed by using HPLC technique. Recovery percentages, limit of detection and limit of quantification values were determined. Results Seventy percent and 98% were the minimum and maximum recoveries for cheese and raw milk, respectively and 0.021 and 0.063 ppb were the limit of detection and limit of quantification values for AFM1. We found that in autumn and winter the highest level (0.121 ppb) of AFM1 in cheese and cream samples and failed to detect any AFM1 in spring samples. Interestingly, our data showed that the yoghurt samples had the lowest level of AFM1 in all seasons. Conclusion There are significant differences between the AFM1 levels in dairy products in various seasons and also various types of products, suggesting spring and summer yoghurt samples as the safest products from AFM1 level point of view. PMID:25927044

  4. Liquid solution delivery through the pulled nanopipette combined with QTF-AFM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sangmin; Stambaugh, Corey; Kim, Gunn; Lee, Manhee; Kim, Yonghee; Lee, Kunyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2012-02-01

    Nanopipette is a versatile fluidic tool for biochemical analysis, controlled liquid delivery in bio-nanotechnology. However, most of the researches have been performed in solution based system, thus it is challenge to study nanofluidic properties of the liquid solution delivery through the nanopipette in ambient conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the liquid ejection, dispersion, and subsequent deposition of the nanoparticles via a 30 nm aperture pipette based on the quartz tuning fork -- atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) combined nanopipette system.

  5. Characterization of the structure of the coating of multilayers using AFM and Interferometric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerez A, Martha I.; O, Laura Lara; Morantes M, Luz D.; Plata G, Arturo; Torres, Yezid; Tsygankov, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Ti / TiN films were deposited on H13 steel and silicon substrates with different deposition voltage, by means of the cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) technique, this process was carried out by nanolayers deposition, requiring a detailed survey on growth films, for the properties characterization such as grain size, thickness and roughness of the film was used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and Interferometric Microscopy. Obtaining a the films growth when varying the deposition voltage.

  6. Crystallization of Probucol in Nanoparticles Revealed by AFM Analysis in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Egami, Kiichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-08-01

    The crystallization behavior of a pharmaceutical drug in nanoparticles was directly evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curve measurements in aqueous solution. A ternary spray-dried sample (SPD) was prepared by spray drying the organic solvent containing probucol (PBC), hypromellose (HPMC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The amorphization of PBC in the ternary SPD was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and solid-state 13C NMR measurements. A nanosuspension containing quite small particles of 25 nm in size was successfully prepared immediately after dispersion of the ternary SPD into water. Furthermore, solution-state 1H NMR measurements revealed that a portion of HPMC coexisted with PBC as a mixed state in the freshly prepared nanosuspension particles. After storing the nanosuspension at 25 °C, a gradual increase in the size of the nanoparticles was observed, and the particle size changed to 93.9 nm after 7 days. AFM enabled the direct observation of the morphology and agglomeration behavior of the nanoparticles in water. Moreover, AFM force-distance curves were changed from (I) to (IV), depending on the storage period, as follows: (I) complete indentation within an applied force of 1 nN, (II) complete indentation with an applied force of 1-5 nN, (III) partial indentation with an applied force of 5 nN, and (IV) nearly no indentation with an applied force of 5 nN. This stiffness increase of the nanoparticles was attributed to gradual changes in the molecular state of PBC from the amorphous to the crystal state. Solid-state 13C NMR measurements of the freeze-dried samples demonstrated the presence of metastable PBC Form II crystals in the stored nanosuspension, strongly supporting the AFM results. PMID:26106951

  7. Morphological analysis of stainless steel scale like surface morphology using STM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Vignal, V.; Olive, J.M.; Desjardins, D.; Roux, J.C.; Genton, V.

    1997-12-19

    A combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation of stainless steel like surface morphology formed either in electropolishing bath or in HNO{sub 3} medium is reported. A new numerical technique using the Nanoscope III software is proposed. The dimension, slope and orientation of scales can be easily determined. Moreover, grain boundaries structure and probable oxides present in the upper part of the film can be deduced.

  8. Time-dependent surface adhesive force and morphology of RBC measured by AFM.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yangzhe; Hu, Yi; Cai, Jiye; Ma, Shuyuan; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Yong; Pan, Yunlong

    2009-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a rapidly developing tool recently introduced into the evaluation of the age of bloodstains, potentially providing legal medical experts useful information for forensic investigation. In this study, the time-dependent, morphological changes of red blood cells (RBC) under three different conditions (including controlled, room-temperature condition, uncontrolled, outdoor-environmental condition, and controlled, low-temperature condition) were observed by AFM, as well as the cellular viscoelasticity via force-vs-distance curve measurements. Firstly, the data indicate that substrate types have different effects on cellular morphology of RBC. RBC presented the typical biconcave shape on mica, whereas either the biconcave shape or flattened shape was evident on glass. The mean volume of RBCs on mica was significantly larger than that of cells on glass. Surprisingly, the adhesive property of RBC membrane surfaces was substrate type-independent (the adhesive forces were statistically similar on glass and mica). With time lapse, the changes in cell volume and adhesive force of RBC under the controlled room-temperature condition were similar to those under the uncontrolled outdoor-environmental condition. Under the controlled low-temperature condition, however, the changes in cell volume occurred mainly due to the collapse of RBCs, and the curves of adhesive force showed the dramatic alternations in viscoelasticity of RBC. Taken together, the AFM detections on the time-dependent, substrate type-dependent, environment (temperature/humidity)-dependent changes in morphology and surface viscoelasticity of RBC imply a potential application of AFM in forensic medicine or investigations, e.g., estimating age of bloodstain or death time. PMID:19019689

  9. Pericellular Brush and Mechanics of Guinea Pig Fibroblast Cells Studied with AFM.

    PubMed

    Dokukin, Maxim; Ablaeva, Yulija; Kalaparthi, Vivekanand; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Sokolov, Igor

    2016-07-12

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation method combined with the brush model can be used to separate the mechanical response of the cell body from deformation of the pericellular layer surrounding biological cells. Although self-consistency of the brush model to derive the elastic modulus of the cell body has been demonstrated, the model ability to characterize the pericellular layer has not been explicitly verified. Here we demonstrate it by using enzymatic removal of hyaluronic content of the pericellular brush for guinea pig fibroblast cells. The effect of this removal is clearly seen in the AFM force-separation curves associated with the pericellular brush layer. We further extend the brush model for brushes larger than the height of the AFM probe, which seems to be the case for fibroblast cells. In addition, we demonstrate that an extension of the brush model (i.e., double-brush model) is capable of detecting the hierarchical structure of the pericellular brush, which, for example, may consist of the pericellular coat and the membrane corrugation (microridges and microvilli). It allows us to quantitatively segregate the large soft polysaccharide pericellular coat from a relatively rigid and dense membrane corrugation layer. This was verified by comparison of the parameters of the membrane corrugation layer derived from the force curves collected on untreated cells (when this corrugation membrane part is hidden inside the pericellular brush layer) and on treated cells after the enzymatic removal of the pericellular coat part (when the corrugations are exposed to the AFM probe). We conclude that the brush model is capable of not only measuring the mechanics of the cell body but also the parameters of the pericellular brush layer, including quantitative characterization of the pericellular layer structure. PMID:27410750

  10. Recent CD AFM probe developments for sub-45 nm technology nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Chih; Osborne, Jason R.; Dahlen, Gregory A.; Greschner, Johann; Bayer, Thomas; Kalt, Samuel; Fritz, Georg

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on new developments of advanced CD AFM probes after the prior introduction of "trident probes" in SPIE Advanced Lithography 2007 [1]. Trident probes, having sharpened extensions in the tip apex region, make possible bottom CD measurements within a few nanometers of the feature bottom corner; an area where other CD probes have difficulties due to tip shape limitations. Moreover, new metrology applications of trident probes have been developed for novel devices such as FinFET and vertical read/write hard disk heads. For ever smaller technology nodes, new probes evolved from the design of the trident probe. For example, the number of sharpened tip flares was reduced from three (trident) to two (bi-pod) to prevent possible interference of the third leg in the slow scan direction, as shown in Figure 3. Maintaining tip lateral stiffness as the tip size shrinks to less than 30 nm is vital for successful scanning. Consequently, a significant recent improvement is the change of probe shank cross-sectional geometry in order to maintain tip vertical aspect ratio of 1:5 (and lateral stiffness > 1 N/m). Finally, modifications of probe substrate are proposed and evaluated for current and new CD AFM systems. Hydrophobic, self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings were applied on CD probes to reduced tip "pull-away" distance1 during CD AFM scanning. Test results show that the pull away distance can be reduced more than 5 times on average (in some cases, by a factor of 15). Consequently, use of hydrophobic SAM coatings on CD probes mitigates pull-away distance thus allowing narrow trench CD measurements. We discuss limitations of prior CD AFM probes and design considerations of new CD probes. The characterization of first prototypes and evaluation of scan performance are presented in this work.

  11. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3-4 and 8-9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26052271

  12. FIB/SEM technology and high-throughput 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines and synapses in GFP-labeled adult-generated neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Martínez, Albert; Masachs, Nuria; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Ulloa, Fausto; Pérez-Martínez, Esther; Lois, Carlos; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The fine analysis of synaptic contacts is usually performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and its combination with neuronal labeling techniques. However, the complex 3D architecture of neuronal samples calls for their reconstruction from serial sections. Here we show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) allows efficient, complete, and automatic 3D reconstruction of identified dendrites, including their spines and synapses, from GFP/DAB-labeled neurons, with a resolution comparable to that of TEM. We applied this technology to analyze the synaptogenesis of labeled adult-generated granule cells (GCs) in mice. 3D reconstruction of dendritic spines in GCs aged 3–4 and 8–9 weeks revealed two different stages of dendritic spine development and unexpected features of synapse formation, including vacant and branched dendritic spines and presynaptic terminals establishing synapses with up to 10 dendritic spines. Given the reliability, efficiency, and high resolution of FIB/SEM technology and the wide use of DAB in conventional EM, we consider FIB/SEM fundamental for the detailed characterization of identified synaptic contacts in neurons in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26052271

  13. Structure and permeability of ion-channels by integrated AFM and waveguide TIRF microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Patel, Nirav R; Quist, Arjan P; Cohen, Daniel A; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Membrane ion channels regulate key cellular functions and their activity is dependent on their 3D structure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images 3D structure of membrane channels placed on a solid substrate. Solid substrate prevents molecular transport through ion channels thus hindering any direct structure-function relationship analysis. Here we designed a ~70 nm nanopore to suspend a membrane, allowing fluidic access to both sides. We used these nanopores with AFM and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) for high resolution imaging and molecular transport measurement. Significantly, membranes over the nanopore were stable for repeated AFM imaging. We studied structure-activity relationship of gap junction hemichannels reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Individual hemichannels in the membrane overlying the nanopore were resolved and transport of hemichannel-permeant LY dye was visualized when the hemichannel was opened by lowering calcium in the medium. This integrated technique will allow direct structure-permeability relationship of many ion channels and receptors. PMID:24651823

  14. Rational fabrication of a gold-coated AFM TERS tip by pulsed electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Kun; Huang, Teng-Xiang; Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Li, Mao-Hua; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Fang-Zu; Ren, Bin

    2015-11-21

    Reproducible fabrication of sharp gold- or silver-coated tips has become the bottleneck issue in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, especially for atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based TERS. Herein, we developed a novel method based on pulsed electrodeposition to coat a thin gold layer over atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to produce plasmonic TERS tips with high reproducibility. We systematically investigated the influence of the deposition potential and step time on the surface roughness and sharpness. This method allows the rational control of the radii of gold-coated TERS tips from a few to hundreds of nanometers, which allows us to systematically study the dependence of the TERS enhancement on the radius of the gold-coated AFM tip. The maximum TERS enhancement was achieved for the tip radius in the range of 60-75 nm in the gap mode. The coated gold layer has a strong adhesion with the silicon tip surface, which is highly stable in water, showing the great potential for application in the aqueous environment. PMID:26482226

  15. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  16. Fracture Growth Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Martinez, Jonathan; McLean, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant in orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent flaws will not cause failure during the design life. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environmentally-assisted cracking (K (sub EAC)) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched specimens SE(B) representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to the monopropellant at 50 degrees Centigrade for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant was found to be at least 22.0 kilopounds per square inch. The stress intensity factor of the weld material was at least 31.3 kilopounds per square inch.

  17. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  18. Fabrication of nanochannels with ladder nanostructure at the bottom using AFM nanoscratching method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Geng, Yanquan; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen; Yu, Bowen; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    This letter presents a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanomanufacturing method combining the tip scanning with the high-precision stage movement to fabricate nanochannels with ladder nanostructure at the bottom by continuous scanning with a fixed scan size. Different structures can be obtained according to the matching relation of the tip feeding velocity and the precision stage moving velocity. This relationship was first studied in detail to achieve nanochannels with different ladder nanostructures at the bottom. Machining experiments were then performed to fabricate nanochannels on an aluminum alloy surface to demonstrate the capability of this AFM-based fabrication method presented in this study. Results show that the feed value and the tip orientation in the removing action play important roles in this method which has a significant effect on the machined surfaces. Finally, the capacity of this method to fabricate a large-scale nanochannel was also demonstrated. This method has the potential to advance the existing AFM tip-based nanomanufacturing technique of the formation these complex structures by increasing the removal speed, simplifying the processing procedure and achieving the large-scale nanofabrication. PMID:24940171

  19. AFM volumetric methods for the characterization of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Dillingham, Mark S; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The atomic force microscope overestimates lateral dimensions and underestimates heights of nanometer size objects such as proteins and nucleic acids. This has made researchers cautious of AFM measurements, even though there is no other technique capable of measuring topography with sub-nanometer precision. Nevertheless, several approaches for determining the stoichiometry of protein and protein-DNA complexes have been developed which show that, although the absolute values may be incorrect, the AFM volume is essentially proportional to the mass. This has allowed the determination of the mass of protein complexes with the help of a calibration curve. Here we review the main techniques for AFM volume measurements and detail a methodology that significantly reduces the associated errors. This method uses a fragment of DNA as a fiducial marker by which the volume of a protein is normalized. The use of fiducial markers co-adsorbed together with the protein of interest minimizes the contribution of tip-induced artifacts as they affect both the object of interest and the marker. Finally, we apply this method to the measurement of the length of single-stranded DNA. A linear relationship between length and volume was obtained, opening the door to studies of ssDNA intermediates formed during complex DNA transactions such as replication, recombination and repair. PMID:23454289

  20. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  1. AFM and pulsed laser ablation methods for Cultural Heritage: application to archeometric analysis of stone artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Veltri, S.; Stranges, F.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F.; Antici, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) and of the pulsed laser ablation as methods for morphological diagnostic with nanoscale precision of archeological artifacts and corrosive patina removal from stone artifacts. We test our methodology on stone artifacts extracted from the Church of Sotterra (located in Calabria, South Italy). The AFM microscopy was compared with different petrographic, chemical, optical and morphological analysis methods for identifying the textural characteristics, evaluating the state of preservation and formulating some hypotheses about the provenance and composition of the impurity patina located on the artifact surfaces. We demonstrate that with the nanometric precision obtained with AFM microscopy, it is possible to distinguish the different states of preservation, much better than using conventional petrographic methods. The surface's roughness is evaluated from very small artifact's fragments, reducing the coring at micrometric scale with a minimal damage to the artworks. After the diagnosis, we performed restoration tests using the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) method and compared it with the more common micro-sandblasting under dry conditions. We find that the PLA is highly effective for the removal of the surficial patina, with a control of a few hundreds of nanometers in the cleaning of surface, without introducing chemical or morphological damages to the artifacts. Moreover, PLA can be easily implemented in underwater conditions; this has the great advantage that stone and pottery artifacts for marine archeological sites do not need to be removed from the site.

  2. Immunological Identification of Fibrinogen in Dual-Component Protein Films by AFM Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Rice, Zachary; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The success of long-term blood-contacting implanted devices is largely dependent upon the interaction of the blood components with the device biomaterial surface. The ability to study these interactions has been hindered by a lack of methods to measure single-molecule interactions in complex multi-protein environments similar to the environment found in-vivo. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with gold nanolabels to detect the protein fibrinogen under aqueous conditions without the topographical clues usually necessary for high resolution visualization. BSA was patterned onto both muscovite mica and plasma-treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and these test substrates were subsequently backfilled with fibrinogen to yield a featureless protein layer. The fibrinogen in this dual protein layer was detected using high resolution AFM imaging following infusion of anti-fibrinogen conjugated with nanogold particles. This AFM immuno-detection technique will potentially be applicable to complex multi-component protein films adsorbed on clinically-relevant polymers used in medical devices. PMID:18294855

  3. AFM-porosimetry: density and pore volume measurements of particulate materials.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Malin H; Valle-Delgado, Juan J; Corkery, Robert W; Rutland, Mark W; Alberius, Peter C

    2008-06-01

    We introduced the novel technique of AFM-porosimetry and applied it to measure the total pore volume of porous particles with a spherical geometry. The methodology is based on using an atomic force microscope as a balance to measure masses of individual particles. Several particles within the same batch were measured, and by plotting particle mass versus particle volume, the bulk density of the sample can be extracted from the slope of the linear fit. The pore volume is then calculated from the densities of the bulk and matrix materials, respectively. In contrast to nitrogen sorption and mercury porosimetry, this method is capable of measuring the total pore volume regardless of pore size distribution and pore connectivity. In this study, three porous samples were investigated by AFM-porosimetry: one ordered mesoporous sample and two disordered foam structures. All samples were based on a matrix of amorphous silica templated by a block copolymer, Pluronic F127, swollen to various degrees with poly(propylene glycol). In addition, the density of silica spheres without a template was measured by two independent techniques: AFM and the Archimedes principle. PMID:18503284

  4. Single-cycle-PLL detection for real-time FM-AFM applications.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Benedikt; Dukic, Maja; Erickson, Blake; Ortmanns, Maurits; Fantner, Georg; Anders, Jens

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present a novel architecture for phase-locked loop (PLL) based high-speed demodulation of frequency-modulated (FM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) signals. In our approach, we use single-sideband (SSB) frequency upconversion to translate the AFM signal from the position sensitive detector to a fixed intermediate frequency (IF) of 10 MHz. In this way, we fully benefit from the excellent noise performance of PLL-based FM demodulators still avoiding the intrinsic bandwidth limitation of such systems. In addition, the upconversion to a fixed IF renders the PLL demodulator independent of the cantilever's resonance frequency, allowing the system to work with a large range of cantilever frequencies. To investigate if the additional noise introduced by the SSB upconverter degrades the system noise figure we present a model of the AM-to-FM noise conversion in PLLs incorporating a phase-frequency detector. Using this model, we can predict an upper corner frequency for the demodulation bandwidth above which the converted noise from the single-sideband upconverter becomes the dominant noise source and therefore begins to deteriorate the overall system performance. The approach is validated by both electrical and AFM measurements obtained with a PCB-based prototype implementing the proposed demodulator architecture. PMID:24760947

  5. Nano-scale Topographical Studies on the Growth Cones of Nerve Cells using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Nerve cells are the fundamental units which are responsible for intercommunication within the nervous system. The neurites, fibrous cable-like extensions for information delivery, of nerve cells are tipped by highly motile sensory structures known as the growth cones which execute important functions; neural construction, decision making and navigation during development and regeneration of the nervous system. The highly dynamic subcomponents of the growth cones are important in neural activity. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the most powerful microscopy technique which is capable of imaging without conductivity constraint and in liquid media. AFM providing nano-scale topographical information on biological structures is also informative on the physical properties such as: elasticity, adhesion, and softness. This contribution focuses on AFM analysis of the growth cones of the nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis. The results of nano-scale topography and softness analysis on growth cone central domain, filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) are presented. The subcomponents of the growth cones of different nerve cells are compared to each other. The results of the analysis are linked to the mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution of the growth cones.

  6. Measuring protein isoelectric points by AFM-based force spectroscopy using trace amounts of sample.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoying; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lee, Serina Siew Chen; He, Tao; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Vancso, G Julius

    2016-09-01

    Protein charge at various pH and isoelectric point (pI) values is important in understanding protein function. However, often only trace amounts of unknown proteins are available and pI measurements cannot be obtained using conventional methods. Here, we show a method based on the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine pI using minute quantities of proteins. The protein of interest is immobilized on AFM colloidal probes and the adhesion force of the protein is measured against a positively and a negatively charged substrate made by layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes. From the AFM force-distance curves, pI values with an estimated accuracy of ±0.25 were obtained for bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, fibrinogen and ribonuclease A over a range of 4.7-9.8. Using this method, we show that the pI of the 'footprint' of the temporary adhesive proteins secreted by the barnacle cyprid larvae of Amphibalanus amphitrite is in the range 9.6-9.7. PMID:27454881

  7. A study of water droplet between an AFM tip and a substrate using dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Souvik; Lan, Chuanjin; Li, Zhen; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Ma, Yanbao

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a water droplet between a sharp AFM tip and a substrate due to capillary condensation affects the tip-substrate interaction. As a consequence, AFM measurements lose precision and often produce incorrect sample topology. Understanding the physics of liquid bridges is also important in the field of Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). Significant research is being carried out to understand the mechanics of the formation of the liquid bridge and its dependence of surface properties, ambient conditions etc. The in-between length scale, i.e., mesoscale (~100 nm) associated with this phenomenon presents a steep challenge for experimental measurements. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) can be computationally prohibitive to model the entire system, especially over microseconds to seconds. Theoretical analysis using Young Laplace equation has so far provided some qualitative insights only. We study this system using Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) which is a simulation technique suitable for describing mesoscopic hydrodynamic behavior of fluids. In this work, we carry out simulations to improve understanding of the process of formation of the meniscus, the mechanics of manipulation and control of its shape, and better estimation of capillary forces. The knowledge gained through our study will help in correcting the AFM measurements affected by capillary condensation. Moreover, it will improve understanding of more accurate droplet manipulation in DPN.

  8. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  9. Fabrication of nanochannels with ladder nanostructure at the bottom using AFM nanoscratching method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This letter presents a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanomanufacturing method combining the tip scanning with the high-precision stage movement to fabricate nanochannels with ladder nanostructure at the bottom by continuous scanning with a fixed scan size. Different structures can be obtained according to the matching relation of the tip feeding velocity and the precision stage moving velocity. This relationship was first studied in detail to achieve nanochannels with different ladder nanostructures at the bottom. Machining experiments were then performed to fabricate nanochannels on an aluminum alloy surface to demonstrate the capability of this AFM-based fabrication method presented in this study. Results show that the feed value and the tip orientation in the removing action play important roles in this method which has a significant effect on the machined surfaces. Finally, the capacity of this method to fabricate a large-scale nanochannel was also demonstrated. This method has the potential to advance the existing AFM tip-based nanomanufacturing technique of the formation these complex structures by increasing the removal speed, simplifying the processing procedure and achieving the large-scale nanofabrication. PMID:24940171

  10. Graphene Nanopore Support System for Simultaneous High-Resolution AFM Imaging and Conductance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurately defining the nanoporous structure and sensing the ionic flow across nanoscale pores in thin films and membranes has a wide range of applications, including characterization of biological ion channels and receptors, DNA sequencing, molecule separation by nanoparticle films, sensing by block co-polymers films, and catalysis through metal–organic frameworks. Ionic conductance through nanopores is often regulated by their 3D structures, a relationship that can be accurately determined only by their simultaneous measurements. However, defining their structure–function relationships directly by any existing techniques is still not possible. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can image the structures of these pores at high resolution in an aqueous environment, and electrophysiological techniques can measure ion flow through individual nanoscale pores. Combining these techniques is limited by the lack of nanoscale interfaces. We have designed a graphene-based single-nanopore support (∼5 nm thick with ∼20 nm pore diameter) and have integrated AFM imaging and ionic conductance recording using our newly designed double-chamber recording system to study an overlaid thin film. The functionality of this integrated system is demonstrated by electrical recording (<10 pS conductance) of suspended lipid bilayers spanning a nanopore and simultaneous AFM imaging of the bilayer. PMID:24581087

  11. Ultrasharp high-aspect-ratio probe array for SECM and AFM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Fasching, Rainer J.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2004-07-01

    A powerful experimental tool, ultra-sharp nano-electrode array is designed, fabricated and characterized. The application on a combination of Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) and the Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) is demonstrated. It can measure sample electrochemically initiated by SECM changes of topography while detecting topography using AFM. In order to realize this, a specialized probe system that is composed of a micro-mechanical bending structure necessary for the AFM mode and an electrochemical UME-tip required for a high performance SECM is crucial. The probe array is a row of silicon transducers embedded in silicon nitride cantilever array. The sharp high-aspect ratio (20:1) silicon tips are shaped and a thin layer of silicon nitride is deposited, which embeds the silicon tips in a silicon nitride layer so that they protrude through the nitride. Thus, the embedded silicon tips with a diameter less than 600 nm, the top radius less than 20 nm, and the aspect ratio as high as 20 can be achieved. A metal layer and an insulator layer are deposited on these tip structures to make each probe selectively conductive. Finally, cantilever structures are shaped and released by etching the silicon substrate from the backside. Electrochemical and impedance spectroscopic characterization show electrochemical functionality of the transducer system.

  12. Rational fabrication of a gold-coated AFM TERS tip by pulsed electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Kun; Huang, Teng-Xiang; Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Li, Mao-Hua; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Fang-Zu; Ren, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Reproducible fabrication of sharp gold- or silver-coated tips has become the bottleneck issue in tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, especially for atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based TERS. Herein, we developed a novel method based on pulsed electrodeposition to coat a thin gold layer over atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to produce plasmonic TERS tips with high reproducibility. We systematically investigated the influence of the deposition potential and step time on the surface roughness and sharpness. This method allows the rational control of the radii of gold-coated TERS tips from a few to hundreds of nanometers, which allows us to systematically study the dependence of the TERS enhancement on the radius of the gold-coated AFM tip. The maximum TERS enhancement was achieved for the tip radius in the range of 60-75 nm in the gap mode. The coated gold layer has a strong adhesion with the silicon tip surface, which is highly stable in water, showing the great potential for application in the aqueous environment.

  13. Quantitative analysis of mouse pancreatic islet architecture by serial block-face SEM

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, M.A.; Zhang, G.; Cai, T.; Xu, H.; Notkins, A.L.; Leapman, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) to measure parameters that describe the architecture of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, microscopic endocrine organs that secrete insulin and glucagon for control of blood glucose. By analyzing entire mouse islets, we show that it is possible to determine (1) the distributions of alpha and beta cells, (2) the organization of blood vessels and pericapillary spaces, and (3) the ultrastructure of the individual secretory cells. Our results show that the average volume of a beta cell is nearly twice that of an alpha cell, and the total mitochondrial volume is about four times larger. In contrast, nuclear volumes in the two cell types are found to be approximately equal. Although the cores of alpha and beta secretory granules have similar diameters, the beta granules have prominent halos resulting in overall diameters that are twice those of alpha granules. Visualization of the blood vessels revealed that every secretory cell in the islet is in contact with the pericapillary space, with an average contact area of 9 ± 5% of the cell surface area. Our data show that consistent results can be obtained by analyzing small numbers of islets. Due to the complicated architecture of pancreatic islets, such precision cannot easily be achieved by using TEM of thin sections. PMID:25448885

  14. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Miyake, Mikio; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell's. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  15. Rapid Evaluation of Particle Properties using Inverse SEM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Kursat B.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the final deliverable of a 3 year project whose purpose was to investigate the possibility of using simulations of X-ray spectra generated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a means to perform quantitative analysis of the sample imaged in the SEM via an inverse analysis methodology. Using the nine point Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) typically used by the US Department of Defense (DOD) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), this concept is now at a TRL of 3. In other words, this work has proven the feasibility of this concept and is ready to be further investigated to address some of the issues highlighted by this initial proof of concept.

  16. Potassium determinations using SEM, FAAS and XRF: some experimental notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liritzis, I.; et al.

    The calibration of Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X- Rays Spec-trometry (SEM-EDS) for elemental quantitative analysis is an important task for characterization, provenance and absolute dating purposes. In particular the potassium determination is an im-portant contributor to dose rate assessments in luminescence and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating. Here a SEM-EDX is calibrated on different archaeological and geoarchaeological materials against standard laboratory samples as well as measured by micro X-Rays Fluorescence (μXRF) and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) techniques. A common linear relationship is obtained for most elements and certain rock types used and two clear linear regressions for two types of rocks; one for granite, diorite, microgranite and sediments and another ceramic sherds, soils, marble schists, breccia. Such linear regressions become readily available for a future fast, efficient and accu-rate way of potassium determination.

  17. Bringing SEM-contour based OPC to production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, François; Koh, Kar Kit; Jantzen, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Calibrating an accurate OPC model usually requires a lot of one-dimensional CD-SEM measurements. A promising alternative is to use a SEM image contour approach but many challenges remain to implement this technique for production. In this work a specific flow is presented to get good and reliable contours well matched with traditional CDSEM measurements. Furthermore this work investigates the importance of site selection (number, type, image space coverage) for a successful contour-based OPC model. Finally the comparison of conventional and contour based models takes into account the calibration and verification performances of both models with a possible cross verification between model data sets. Specific advantages of contour based model are also discussed.

  18. SEM-contour shape analysis method for advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke; Hibino, Daisuke; Sakai, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    The new measuring method that we developed executes a contour shape analysis that is based on the pattern edge information from a SEM image. This analysis helps to create a highly precise quantification of every circuit pattern shape by comparing the contour extracted from the SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and the ideal circuit pattern. The developed method, in the next phase, can generate four shape indices by using the analysis mass measurement data. When the shape index measured using the developed method is compared the CD, the difference of the shape index and the CD is negligibly small for the quantification of the circuit pattern shape. In addition, when the 2D patterns on a FEM wafer are measured using the developed method, the tendency for shape deformations is precisely caught by the four shape indices. This new method and the evaluation results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  19. Alternative method for monitoring an in-line CD SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Pedro P.; Dick, Susan A.; Allgair, John A.

    1997-07-01

    Semiconductor manufacturers must ensure that their in-line critical dimension scanning electron microscopes (CD-SEMs) are providing precise and reliable data on a daily basis. As with other process equipment, tool stability and production worthiness is determined by a daily qualification procedure that involves measuring a reference, etched wafer's linewidth and comparing those results to a set target mean. However, repeated exposure to a SEM creates an unacceptable increase in the measured feature's CD. This increase can be disruptive to tool qualification, requires the introduction of new reference wafers, and ultimately limits the tool's availability to production. A new method for daily qualification using a rotating daily job scheme has been developed and employed for monitoring multiple systems at Motorola MOS-13/APRDL. This new procedure allows for better statistical process control, increase the reference wafer's useful life, and provides an easier method of monitoring the tool throughout its lifetime.

  20. Interface characterization using an SEM-based micro-indentor

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.H.; Cain, M.G.; Daniel, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    The design and performance of an SEM-based microindentor, for interfacial property measurements in CMCs, is described. It enables high resolution imaging and simultaneous load/displacement monitoring with capacity and resolution of 20 N {+-} 1 mN (load) and 100 {mu}m {+-} 10 nm (displacement). Its application to measurement of interface debond and shear stresses for a wide range of fibers and monofilaments is described.

  1. Surface wave sensitivity: mode summation versus adjoint SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Liu, Qinya; Tromp, Jeroen

    2011-12-01

    We compare finite-frequency phase and amplitude sensitivity kernels calculated based on frequency-domain surface wave mode summation and a time-domain adjoint method. The adjoint calculations involve a forward wavefield generated by an earthquake and an adjoint wavefield generated at a seismic receiver. We determine adjoint sources corresponding to frequency-dependent phase and amplitude measurements made using a multitaper technique, which may be applied to any single-taper measurement, including box car windowing. We calculate phase and amplitude sensitivity kernels using an adjoint method based on wave propagation simulations using a spectral element method (SEM). Sensitivity kernels calculated using the adjoint SEM are in good agreement with kernels calculated based on mode summation. In general, the adjoint SEM is more computationally expensive than mode summation in global studies. The advantage of the adjoint SEM lies in the calculation of sensitivity kernels in 3-D earth models. We compare surface wave sensitivity kernels computed in 1-D and 3-D reference earth models and show that (1) lateral wave speed heterogeneities may affect the geometry and amplitude of surface wave sensitivity; (2) sensitivity kernels of long-period surface waves calculated in 1-D model PREM and 3-D models S20RTS+CRUST2.0 and FFSW1+CRUST2.0 do not show significant differences, indicating that the use of a 1-D reference model is adequate in global inversions of long-period surface waves (periods of 50 s and longer); and (3) the differences become significant for short-period Love waves when mode coupling is sensitive to large differences in reference crustal structure. Finally, we show that sensitivity kernels in anelastic earth models may be calculated in purely elastic earth models provided physical dispersion is properly accounted for.

  2. Linking of sensor molecules with amino groups to amino-functionalized AFM tips.

    PubMed

    Wildling, Linda; Unterauer, Barbara; Zhu, Rong; Rupprecht, Anne; Haselgrübler, Thomas; Rankl, Christian; Ebner, Andreas; Vater, Doris; Pollheimer, Philipp; Pohl, Elena E; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J

    2011-06-15

    The measuring tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be upgraded to a specific biosensor by attaching one or a few biomolecules to the apex of the tip. The biofunctionalized tip is then used to map cognate target molecules on a sample surface or to study biophysical parameters of interaction with the target molecules. The functionality of tip-bound sensor molecules is greatly enhanced if they are linked via a thin, flexible polymer chain. In a typical scheme of tip functionalization, reactive groups are first generated on the tip surface, a bifunctional cross-linker is then attached with one of its two reactive ends, and finally the probe molecule of interest is coupled to the free end of the cross-linker. Unfortunately, the most popular functional group generated on the tip surface is the amino group, while at the same time, the only useful coupling functions of many biomolecules (such as antibodies) are also NH(2) groups. In the past, various tricks or detours were applied to minimize the undesired bivalent reaction of bifunctional linkers with adjacent NH(2) groups on the tip surface. In the present study, an uncompromising solution to this problem was found with the help of a new cross-linker ("acetal-PEG-NHS") which possesses one activated carboxyl group and one acetal-protected benzaldehyde function. The activated carboxyl ensures rapid unilateral attachment to the amino-functionalized tip, and only then is the terminal acetal group converted into the amino-reactive benzaldehyde function by mild treatment (1% citric acid, 1-10 min) which does not harm the AFM tip. As an exception, AFM tips with magnetic coating become demagnetized in 1% citric acid. This problem was solved by deprotecting the acetal group before coupling the PEG linker to the AFM tip. Bivalent binding of the corresponding linker ("aldehyde-PEG-NHS") to adjacent NH(2) groups on the tip was largely suppressed by high linker concentrations. In this way, magnetic AFM tips could be

  3. Surface characteristics of isopod digestive gland epithelium studied by SEM.

    PubMed

    Millaku, Agron; Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Godec, Matjaz; Torkar, Matjaz; Jenko, Monika; Milani, Marziale; Tatti, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The structure of the digestive gland epithelium of a terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber has been investigated by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and light microscopy in order to provide evidence on morphology of the gland epithelial surface in animals from a stock culture. We investigated the shape of cells, extrusion of lipid droplets, shape and distribution of microvilli, and the presence of bacteria on the cell surface. A total of 22 animals were investigated and we found some variability in the appearance of the gland epithelial surface. Seventeen of the animals had dome-shaped digestive gland "normal" epithelial cells, which were densely and homogeneously covered by microvilli and varying proportions of which extruded lipid droplets. On the surface of microvilli we routinely observed sparsely distributed bacteria of different shapes. Five of the 22 animals had "abnormal" epithelial cells with a significantly altered shape. In three of these animals, the cells were much smaller, partly or completely flat or sometimes pyramid-like. A thick layer of bacteria was detected on the microvillous border, and in places, the shape and size of microvilli were altered. In two animals, hypertrophic cells containing large vacuoles were observed indicating a characteristic intracellular infection. The potential of SEM in morphological investigations of epithelial surfaces is discussed. PMID:20155290

  4. Analysis of microtraces in invasive traumas using SEM/EDS.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, E J; Zoon, P D; Chang, S B C G; Keereweer, I; Pieterman, R; Gerretsen, R R R

    2012-01-10

    Scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) is a proven forensic tool and has been used to analyze several kinds of trace evidence. A forensic application of SEM/EDS is the examination of morphological characteristics of tool marks that tools and instruments leave on bone. The microtraces that are left behind by these tools and instruments on the bone are, however, often ignored or not noticed at all. In this paper we will describe the use of SEM/EDS for the analysis of microtraces in invasive sharp-force, blunt-force and bone-hacking traumas in bone. This research is part of a larger multi-disciplinary approach in which pathologists, forensic anthropologists, toolmark and microtrace experts work together to link observed injuries to a suspected weapon or, in case of an unknown weapon, to indicate a group of objects that could have been used as a weapon. Although there are a few difficulties one have to consider, the method itself is rather simple and straightforward to apply. A sample of dry and clean bone is placed into the SEM sample chamber and brightness and contrast are set such that bone appears grey, metal appears white and organic material appears black. The sample is then searched manually to find relevant features. Once features are found their elemental composition is measured by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). This method is illustrated using several cases. It is shown that SEM/EDS analysis of microtraces in bone is a valuable tool to get clues about an unknown weapon and can associate a specific weapon with injuries on the basis of appearance and elemental composition. In particular the separate results from the various disciplines are complementary and may be combined to reach a conclusion with a stronger probative value. This is not only useful in the courtroom but above all in criminal investigations when one have to know for what weapon or object to look for. PMID:21871744

  5. Chemical bioimaging for the subcellular localization of trace elements by high contrast TEM, TEM/X-EDS, and NanoSIMS.

    PubMed

    Penen, Florent; Malherbe, Julien; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Bertalan, Ivo; Gontier, Etienne; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    Chemical bioimaging offers an important contribution to the investigation of biochemical functions, biosorption and bioaccumulation processes of trace elements via their localization at the cellular and even at the subcellular level. This paper describes the combined use of high contrast transmission electron microscopy (HC-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (X-EDS), and nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) applied to a model organism, the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. HC-TEM providing a lateral resolution of 1nm was used for imaging the ultrastructure of algae cells which have diameters of 5-10μm. TEM coupled to X-EDS (TEM/X-EDS) combined textural (morphology and size) analysis with detection of Ca, P, K, Mg, Fe, and Zn in selected subcellular granules using an X-EDS probe size of approx. 1μm. However, instrumental sensitivity was at the limit for trace element detection. NanoSIMS allowed chemical imaging of macro and trace elements with subcellular resolution (element mapping). Ca, Mg, and P as well as the trace elements Fe, Cu, and Zn present at basal levels were detected in pyrenoids, contractile vacuoles, and granules. Some metals were even localized in small vesicles of about 200nm size. Sensitive subcellular localization of trace metals was possible by the application of a recently developed RF plasma oxygen primary ion source on NanoSIMS which has shown good improvements in terms of lateral resolution (below 50nm), sensitivity, and stability. Furthermore correlative single cell imaging was developed combining the advantages of TEM and NanoSIMS. An advanced sample preparation protocol provided adjacent ultramicrotome sections for parallel TEM and NanoSIMS analyses of the same cell. Thus, the C. reinhardtii cellular ultrastructure could be directly related to the spatial distribution of metals in different cell organelles such as vacuoles and chloroplast. PMID:27288221

  6. 30 CFR 250.1900 - Must I have a SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Must I have a SEMS program? 250.1900 Section... Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1900 Must I have a SEMS program? You must develop, implement, and maintain a... provisions of this subpart and have your SEMS program in effect on or before November 15, 2011, except...

  7. 30 CFR 250.1900 - Must I have a SEMS program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Environmental Management Systems (SEMS) § 250.1900 Must I have a SEMS program? You must develop, implement, and maintain a safety and environmental management system (SEMS) program. Your SEMS program must address the... Safety and Environmental Management Program for Offshore Operations and Facilities (API RP...

  8. Electroless deposition of metallic silver from a choline chloride-based ionic liquid: a study using acoustic impedance spectroscopy, SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Nandhra, Satvinder; Postlethwaite, Stella; Smith, Emma L; Ryder, Karl S

    2007-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the first example of a sustained galvanic coating deposited on a surface from a non-aqueous liquid. We present the surface characterization of electroless silver deposits on copper substrates from a solution of Ag(+) ions in an ionic liquid based on a choline chloride (ChCl) eutectic. Through a study of these deposits and the mechanism of formation using acoustic impedance spectroscopy (QCM), probe microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), we demonstrate that sustained growth of the silver deposit is facilitated by the porous nature of the silver. This is in contrast to the dip-coating reaction of silver ions in aqueous media, where the reaction stops when surface coverage is reached. Electroless silver deposits of up to several microns have been obtained by dip coating in ionic liquids without the use of catalysts of strong inorganic acids. PMID:17622408

  9. Novel tip shape reconstruction method for restoration of AFM topography images using nano-structures with given shapes.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of more accurate imaging of surface microstructures is needed. The most significant distortion in atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is induced by the probe tip shape, whenever the sample surface contains features whose dimensions are comparable to the probe tip size. The acquired AFM image is the dilation between the tip shape and the sample topography. To restore the original topographical profile, a numerical erosion procedure using a precise probe shape function is required. Here, a new technique for reconstruction of probe shape function using a well-defined nanostructure is proposed. First, AFM topography images of the given-shape nanostructure dispersed on flat substrates are taken. Then, a probe shape function is determined by a numerical calculation procedure. By using the experimentally determined probe shape function, the most probable surface morphologies from the observed AFM topography images of unknown samples can be extracted. PMID:21321438

  10. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  11. Contrast inversion in nc-AFM on Si(111)7×7 due to short-range electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Pfeiffer, O.; Schär, S.; Barwich, V.; Bammerlin, M.; Loppacher, C.; Bennewitz, R.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    Contrast inversion in nc-AFM on Si(111)7×7 is observed at positive sample bias. Corner holes appear as protrusions and adatoms as holes. The application of negative bias voltages causes drastic changes in the atomic constrast. Frequency shift vs distance curves show evidence of short-range, voltage-dependent forces. These observations indicate that short-range electrostatic forces are important for atomic-scale contrast in nc-AFM.

  12. Localized electrografting of vinylic monomers on a conducting substrate by means of an integrated electrochemical AFM probe.

    PubMed

    Ghorbal, Achraf; Grisotto, Federico; Charlier, Julienne; Palacin, Serge; Goyer, Cédric; Demaille, Christophe

    2009-05-11

    Combinations of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with other scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), show great promise for directing localized modification, which is of great interest for chemical, biochemical and technical applications. Herein, an atomic force scanning electrochemical microscope is used as a new electrochemical lithographic tool (L-AFM-SECM) to locally electrograft, with submicrometer resolution, a non-conducting organic coating on a conducting substrate. PMID:19308970

  13. Geoelectrical characterization by joint inversion of VES/TEM in Paraná basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozo, C. A.; Couto, M. A.; Almeida, E. R.; Porsani, J. L.; Santos, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    For many years electrical (DC) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings have been used in a great number of environmental, hydrological and mining exploration studies. The data of both methods are interpreted usually by individual 1D models resulting in many cases in ambiguous models. This can be explained by how the two different methodologies sample the subsurface. The vertical electrical sounding (VES) is good on marking very resistive structures, while the transient electromagnetic sounding (TEM) is very sensitive to map conductive structures. Another characteristic is that VES is more sensitive to shallow structures, while TEM soundings can reach deeper structures. A Matlab program for joint inversion of VES and TEM soundings, by using CRS algorithm was developed aiming explore the best of the both methods. Initially, the algorithm was tested with synthetic data and after it was used to invert experimental data from Paraná sedimentary basin. We present the results of a re-interpretation of 46 VES/TEM soundings data set acquired in Bebedouro region in São Paulo State - Brazil. The previous interpretation was based in geoelectrical models obtained by single inversion of the VES and TEM soundings. In this work we present the results with single inversion of VES and TEM sounding inverted by the Curupira Program and a new interpretation based in the joint inversion of both methodologies. The goal is increase the accuracy in determining the underground structures. As a result a new geoelectrical model of the region is obtained.

  14. FIB-NanoSIMS-TEM Coordinated Study of a Wark-Lovering Rim in a Vigarano Type A CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, A.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Ross, D. K.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2010-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multi layered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Unaltered WL rims are composed of the same primary high temperature minerals as CAIs, such as melilite, spinel, pyroxene, hibonite, perovskite, anorthite and olivine. It is still unclear whether the rim minerals represent a different generation formed by a separate event from their associated CAIs or are a byproduct of CAI formation. Several models have been proposed for the origins of WL rims including condensation, flashheating, reaction of a CAI with a Mg-Si-rich reservoir (nebular gas or solid); on the basis of mineralogy, abundances of trace elements, O and Mg isotopic studies. Detailed mineralogical characterizations of WL rims at micrometer to nanometer scales have been obtained by TEM observations, but so far no coordinated isotopic - mineralogical studies have been performed. Thus, we have applied an O isotopic imaging technique by NanoSIMS 50L to investigate heterogeneous distributions of O isotopic ratios in minerals within a cross section of a WL rim prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. After the isotopic measurements, we determine the detailed mineralogy and microstructure of the same WL FIB section to gain insight into its petrogenesis. Here we present preliminary results from O isotopic and elemental maps by NanoSIMS and mineralogical analysis by FE-SEM of a FIB section of a WL rim in the Vigarano reduced CV3 chondrite.

  15. The formation of chlorine-induced alterations in daguerreotype image particles: a high resolution SEM-EDS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Silvia A.; Schulte, Franziska; Kennedy, Nora W.; Schrott, Alejandro G.

    2011-10-01

    The daguerreotype image, composed of nanosized silver-mercury or silver-mercury-gold amalgam particles formed on a polished silver substrate, is particularly sensitive to deterioration by chlorine-containing compounds resulting in the formation of AgCl that generates redeposited silver upon exposure to UV and visible lights. In the present study, alterations caused by chlorides on daguerreotype test samples prepared following 19th century recipes were studied. The dependence of variations in the production steps of daguerreotypes, such as multiple sensitization and gilding, on the impact of the exposure to chlorine were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), complemented by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that AgCl nucleates on the image particles and in the substrate defects, regardless of the particle density or the sensitization process. In gilded samples, Au was observed over the image particles and the polished silver substrate as a tightly packed grainy layer, which conformably follows the polishing irregularities. For the first time it is shown that Au preferentially accumulates on top of the image particles. This gold layer does not protect the image from chlorine-induced deterioration.

  16. Thermal Analysis of SRF Cavity Couplers Using Parallel Multiphysics Tool TEM3P

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V; Lee, L.-Q.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.-K.; Ko, K.; Cheng, G.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-05-20

    SLAC has developed a multi-physics simulation code TEM3P for simulating integrated effects of electromagnetic, thermal and structural loads. TEM3P shares the same software infrastructure with SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic codes, thus enabling all physics simulations within a single framework. The finite-element approach allows high-fidelity, high-accuracy simulations and the parallel implementation facilitates large-scale computation with fast turnaround times. In this paper, TEM3P is used to analyze thermal loading at coupler end of the JLAB SRF cavity.

  17. Thermal Analysis of SRF Cavity Couplers Using Parallel Multiphysics Tool TEM3P

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V, Lee, L.-Q., Li, Z., Ng, C.-K., Ko, K.,Cheng, G., Rimmer, R., Wang, H.

    2009-05-01

    SLAC has developed a multi-physics simulation code TEM3P for simulating integrated effects of electromagnetic, thermal and structural loads. TEM3P shares the same software infrastructure with SLAC’s paralell finite element electromagnetic codes, thus enabling all physics simulations within a single framework. The finite-element approach allows high fidelity, high-accuracy simulations and the parallel implementation facilitates large-scale computation with fast turnaround times. In this paper, TEM3P is used to analyze thermal loading at coupler end of the JLAB SRF cavity.

  18. SEM analysis of rock varnish chemistry: A geomorphic age discriminator

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.D.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1989-07-01

    Rock varnish, a manganese- and iron-rich coating commonly found on rock surfaces in arid and semiarid regions, has long been of interest as a potential age indicator. Rock varnish has been shown to be an effective medium for dating of geomorphic surfaces over a time range of several thousand to over a million years, utilizing a ratio among minor cations ((K + Ca)/Ti) for the total volume of rock varnish. We have recently, developed a technique using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer (EDAX) to analyze the chemistry of rock varnish. This technique has several advantages over the earlier cation ratio technique.

  19. Methodologies for evaluating CD-matching of CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ke, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Ya-Chun; Wang, Yu-His

    2009-03-01

    As CD-SEM's precision is severely controlled by sub-nanometer level, we have to evaluate not only repeatability of tools but also CD-matching between the individual tools. However, it is not easy to measure the CD-matching precisely +/- 0.1nm due to repeatability error, stability change, carryover effect, statistical fluctuation of sampling, etc. varying in the individual tools. In this work uncertainty of ABBA test is experimentally estimated with self-ABBA test. Sample's carryover trend that dominates uncertainty of the test can be checked. Mathematical consideration implements precise calculation of the ABBA test.

  20. Line Edge Detection and Characterization in SEM Images using Wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W; Romagnoli, J A; Tringe, J W; L?tant, S E; Stroeve, P; Palazoglu, A

    2008-10-07

    Edge characterization has become increasingly important in nanotechnology due to the growing demand for precise nanoscale structure fabrication and assembly. Edge detection is often performed by thresholding the spatial information of a top-down image obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or other surface characterization techniques. Results are highly dependent on an arbitrary threshold value, which makes it difficult to reveal the nature of the real surface and to compare results among images. In this paper, we present an alternative edge boundary detection technique based on the wavelet framework. Our results indicate that the method facilitates nano-scale edge detection and characterization, by providing a systematic threshold determination step.

  1. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  2. Cell visco-elasticity measured with AFM and optical trapping at sub-micrometer deformations.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Sánchez, Paula; Bodensiek, Kai; Li, Sai; Simons, Mikael; Schaap, Iwan A T

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the elastic properties of cells is widely used as an indicator for cellular changes during differentiation, upon drug treatment, or resulting from the interaction with the supporting matrix. Elasticity is routinely quantified by indenting the cell with a probe of an AFM while applying nano-Newton forces. Because the resulting deformations are in the micrometer range, the measurements will be affected by the finite thickness of the cell, viscous effects and even cell damage induced by the experiment itself. Here, we have analyzed the response of single 3T3 fibroblasts that were indented with a micrometer-sized bead attached to an AFM cantilever at forces from 30-600 pN, resulting in indentations ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 micrometer. To investigate the cellular response at lower forces up to 10 pN, we developed an optical trap to indent the cell in vertical direction, normal to the plane of the coverslip. Deformations of up to two hundred nanometers achieved at forces of up to 30 pN showed a reversible, thus truly elastic response that was independent on the rate of deformation. We found that at such small deformations, the elastic modulus of 100 Pa is largely determined by the presence of the actin cortex. At higher indentations, viscous effects led to an increase of the apparent elastic modulus. This viscous contribution that followed a weak power law, increased at larger cell indentations. Both AFM and optical trapping indentation experiments give consistent results for the cell elasticity. Optical trapping has the benefit of a lower force noise, which allows a more accurate determination of the absolute indentation. The combination of both techniques allows the investigation of single cells at small and large indentations and enables the separation of their viscous and elastic components. PMID:23028915

  3. In situ Stiffness Adjustment of AFM Probes by Two Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    de Laat, Marcel Lambertus Cornelis; Pérez Garza, Héctor Hugo; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The choice on which type of cantilever to use for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) depends on the type of the experiment being done. Typically, the cantilever has to be exchanged when a different stiffness is required and the entire alignment has to be repeated. In the present work, a method to adjust the stiffness in situ of a commercial AFM cantilever is developed. The adjustment is achieved by changing the effective length of the cantilever by electrostatic pull-in. By applying a voltage between the cantilever and an electrode (with an insulating layer at the point of contact), the cantilever snaps to the electrode, reducing the cantilever’s effective length. An analytical model was developed to find the pull-in voltage of the system. Subsequently, a finite element model was developed to study the pull-in behavior. The working principle of this concept is demonstrated with a proof-of-concept experiment. The electrode was positioned close to the cantilever by using a robotic nanomanipulator. To confirm the change in stiffness, the fundamental resonance frequency of the cantilever was measured for varying electrode positions. The results match with the theoretical expectations. The stiffness was adjusted in situ in the range of 0.2 N/m to 27 N/m, covering two orders of magnitude in one single cantilever. This proof-of-concept is the first step towards a micro fabricated prototype, that integrates the electrode positioning system and cantilever that can be used for actual AFM experiments. PMID:27077863

  4. Lateral tip control effects in CD-AFM metrology: the large tip limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Goldband, Ryan S.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.

    2015-10-01

    Critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) use flared tips and two-dimensional sensing and control of the tip-sample interaction to enable scanning of features with near-vertical or even reentrant sidewalls. Sidewall sensing in CD-AFM usually involves lateral dither of the tip, which was the case in the first two generations of instruments. Current, third generation instruments also utilize a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. We have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To further validate our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm/V is the baseline response due to the induced motion of the cantilever base.

  5. Resveratrol Protects Chondrocytes from Apoptosis via Altering the Ultrastructural and Biomechanical Properties: An AFM Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tongsheng; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease with high prevalence among older people, occurs from molecular or nanometer level and extends gradually to higher degrees of the ultrastructure of cartilage, finally resulting in irreversible structural and functional damages. This report aims to use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the protective effects of resveratrol (RV), a drug with good anti-inflammatory properties, on cellular morphology, membrane architecture, cytoskeleton, cell surface adhesion and stiffness at nanometer level in sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptotic chondrocytes, a typical cellular OA model. CCK-8 assay showed that 100 μM RV significantly prevented SNP-induced cytotoxicity. AFM imaging and quantitative analysis showed that SNP potently induced chondrocytes changes including shrunk, round, lamellipodia contraction and decrease in adherent junctions among cells, as well as the destruction of biomechanics: 90% decrease in elasticity and 30% decrease in adhesion. In addition, confocal imaging analysis showed that SNP induced aggregation of the cytoskeleton and decrease in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins. More importantly, these SNP-induced damages to chondrocytes could be potently prevented by RV pretreatment. Interestingly, the biomechanical changes occurred before morphological changes could be clearly observed during SNP-induced apoptosis, indicating that the biomechanics of cellular membrane may be a more robust indicator of cell function. Collectively, our data demonstrate that RV prevents SNP-induced apoptosis of chondrocytes by regulating actin organization, and that AFM-based technology can be developed into a powerful and sensitive method to study the interaction mechanisms between chondrocytes and drugs. PMID:24632762

  6. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of dAFM in the transient and steady state motions.

    PubMed

    Payam, Amir Farokh

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, based on the slow time varying function theory, dynamical equations for the amplitude and phase of the dynamic atomic force microscope are derived. Then, the sensitivity of the amplitude and phase to the dissipative and conservative parts of interaction force is investigated. The most advantage of this dynamical model is the ability to simulate and analysis the dynamics behavior of amplitude and phase of the AFM tip motion not only in the steady state but also in the transient regime. Using numerical analysis the transient and steady state behavior of amplitude and phase is studied and the sensitivity of amplitude and phase to the interaction force is analyzed. PMID:27448201

  7. Crystal structures of Boro-AFm and sBoro-AFt phases

    SciTech Connect

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Cau Dit Coumes, Celine; Leroux, Fabrice; Mercier, Cyrille; Revel, Bertrand; Damidot, Denis

    2012-10-15

    Crystal structures of boron-containing AFm (B-AFm) and AFt (B-AFt) phases have been solved ab-initio and refined from X-ray powder diffraction. {sup 11}B NMR and Raman spectroscopies confirm the boron local environment in both compounds: three-fold coordinated in B-AFm corresponding to HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} species, and four-fold coordinated in B-AFt corresponding to B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} species. B-AFm crystallizes in the rhombohedral R3{sup Macron }c space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaHBO{sub 3}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O (4CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}1/2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}12.5H{sub 2}O, C{sub 4}AB{sub 1/2}H{sub 12.5}) general formulae with planar trigonal HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anions weakly bonded at the centre of the interlayer region. One HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anion is statistically distributed with two weakly bonded water molecules on the same crystallographic site. B-AFt crystallizes in the trigonal P3cl space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}2Ca(B (OH){sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O (6CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}33H{sub 2}O, C{sub 6}AB{sub 2}H{sub 33}) general formulae with tetrahedral B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} anions located in the channel region of the structure. All tetrahedral anions are oriented in a unique direction, leading to a hexagonal c lattice parameter about half that of ettringite.

  8. BOREAS AFM-3 NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Shanot, Al; Oncley, Steven P.; Cooper, Al; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-3 team used the NCAR Electra aircraft data to make measurements of the fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide, and ozone over the entire BOREAS region to tie together measurements made in both the SSA and the NSA in 1994. These data were also used to study the planetary boundary layer using both in situ and remote sensing measurements. This data set contains both the aircraft flux and the moving window data. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. Investigation of the resistive switching in AgxAsS2 layer by conductive AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Kutalek, Petr; Knotek, Petr; Hromadko, Ludek; Macak, Jan M.; Wagner, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a study of resistive switching in AgxAsS2 layer, based on a utilization of conductive atomic force microscope (AFM), is reported. As the result of biasing, two distinct regions were created on the surface (the conductive region and non-conductive region). Both were analysed from the spread current maps. The volume change, corresponding to the growth of Ag particles, was derived from the topological maps, recorded simultaneously with the current maps. Based on the results, a model explaining the mechanism of the Ag particle and Ag filament formation was proposed from the distribution of charge carriers and Ag ions.

  10. AFM imaging reveals the tetrameric structure of the TRPC1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Nelson P.; Shaifta, Yasin; McFadzean, Ian; Ward, Jeremy P.T.; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-07-13

    We have determined the subunit stoichiometry of the transient receptor potential C1 (TRPC1) channel by imaging isolated channels using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A frequency distribution of the molecular volumes of individual channel particles had two peaks, at 170 and 720 nm{sup 3}, corresponding with the expected sizes of TRPC1 monomers and tetramers, respectively. Complexes were formed between TRPC1 channels and antibodies against a V5 epitope tag present on each subunit. The frequency distribution of angles between pairs of bound antibodies had two peaks, at 88{sup o} and 178{sup o}. This result again indicates that the channel assembles as a tetramer.

  11. Designer cantilevers for even more accurate quantitative measurements of biological systems with multifrequency AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contera, S.

    2016-04-01

    Multifrequency excitation/monitoring of cantilevers has made it possible both to achieve fast, relatively simple, nanometre-resolution quantitative mapping of mechanical of biological systems in solution using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single molecule resolution detection by nanomechanical biosensors. A recent paper by Penedo et al [2015 Nanotechnology 26 485706] has made a significant contribution by developing simple methods to improve the signal to noise ratio in liquid environments, by selectively enhancing cantilever modes, which will lead to even more accurate quantitative measurements.

  12. High-Speed AFM Images of Thermal Motion Provide Stiffness Map of Interfacial Membrane Protein Moieties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels (AqpZ, GlpF) revealed the spatial and temporal organization of loop-stabilizing intraproteinaceous H-bonds and salt bridges. PMID:25516527

  13. High-fidelity AFM scanning stage based on multilayer ceramic capacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lian Sheng; Feng, Zhi Hua

    2016-05-01

    A kind of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) has been verified to have good micro-actuating properties, thus making them good candidates for nano-positioning. In this paper, we successfully employed the MLCCs as lateral scanners for a tripod scanning stage. The MLCC-based lateral scanners display hysteresis under 1.5% and a nonlinearity less than 2% even with the simplest open-loop voltage drive. The developed scanning stage was integrated into a commercial AFM to evaluate its imaging performance. Experimental results showed that sample images with high fidelities were obtained. SCANNING 38:184-190, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26367125

  14. Lateral Tip Control Effects in CD-AFM Metrology: The Large Tip Limit

    PubMed Central

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Goldband, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    Sidewall sensing in critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) usually involves continuous lateral dithering of the tip or the use of a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. Understanding the influence and dependence of the effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip can improve the measurement accuracy and uncertainty estimation for CD-AFM measurements. Since CD-AFM typically uses tips that range from 15 nm to 850 nm in geometrical width, the behavior of effective tip width throughout this range should be understood. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. For tip widths of 130 nm and lower, which also have lower lateral stiffness, the response of the effective tip width to lateral dither is greater than for larger tips. However, we have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To validate that our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness are valid for large CD-tips, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm

  15. Endobacterial morphotypes in nudibranch cerata tips: a SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuett, Christian; Doepke, Hilke

    2013-06-01

    The SEM investigation of nudibranch cerata material exhibits endobacterial morphotypes found in 12 out of 13 species tested: Aeolidia papillosa, Berghia caerulescens, Coryphella brownii, Coryphella lineata, Coryphella verrucosa, Cuthona amoena, Facelina coronata, Flabellina pedata, Dendronotus frondosus, Doto coronata, Tritonia plebeia and Janolus cristatus. Endobacteria could not be detected inside Tritonia hombergi. Endobacterial morphology found inside nudibranch species was compared to bacterial morphotypes detected earlier in tentacles of cnidarian species. SEM micrographs show endobacterial analogy among nudibranch species, but also similarity to cnidarian endobacteria investigated earlier. Of course, morphological data of microbes do not allow their identification. However, since most of these nudibranch species prey on cnidaria, it cannot be excluded that many of the endobacteria detected inside nudibranch species may originate from their cnidarian prey. Our previous data describing genetic affiliation of endobacteria from nudibranchian and cnidarian species support this assumption. Dominant coccoid endobacteria mostly exhibit smooth surface and are tightly packed as aggregates and/or wrapped in envelopes. Such bacterial aggregate type has been described previously in tentacles of the cnidarian species Sagartia elegans. Similar coccoid bacteria, lacking envelopes were also found in other nudibranch species. A different type of coccoid bacteria, characterized by a rough surface, was detected inside cerata of the nudibranch species Berghia caerulescens, and surprisingly, inside tentacles of the cnidarian species Tubularia indivisa. In contrast to cnidarian endobacteria, rod-shaped microorganisms are largely absent in nudibranch cerata.

  16. Automatic defect classification using topography map from SEM photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serulnik, Sergio D.; Cohen, Jacob; Sherman, Boris; Ben-Porath, Ariel

    2004-04-01

    As the industry moves to smaller design rules, shrinking process windows and shorter product lifecycles, the need for enhanced yield management methodology is increasing. Defect classification is required for identification and isolation of yield loss sources. Practice demonstrates that an operator relies on 3D information heavily while classifying defects. Therefore, Defect Topographic Map (DTM) information can enhance Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) capabilities dramatically. In the present article, we describe the manner in which reliable and rapid SEM measurements of defect topography characteristics increase the classifier ability to achieve fast identification of the exact process step at which a given defect was introduced. Special multiple perspective SEM imaging allows efficient application of the photometric stereo methods. Physical properties of a defect can be derived from the 3D by using straightforward computer vision algorithms. We will show several examples, from both production fabs and R&D lines, of instances where the depth map is essential in correctly partitioning the defects, thus reducing time to source and overall fab expenses due to defect excursions.

  17. SEM analysis as a diagnostic tool for photovoltaic cell degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osayemwenre, Gilbert; Meyer, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    The importance of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis as a diagnostic tool for analyzing the degradation of a polycrystalline Photovoltaic cell has been studied. The main aim of this study is to characterize the surface morphology of hot spot regions (degraded) cells in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, production of hetero and multi-junction solar cells has experience tremendous growth as compared to conventional silicon (Si) solar cells. Thin film photovoltaic solar cells generally are more prone to exhibiting defects and associated degradation modes. To improve the lifetime of these cells and modules, it is imperative to fully understand the cause and effect of defects and degradation modes. The objective of this paper is to diagnose the observed degradation in polycrystalline silicon cells, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this study poly-Si cells were characterize before and after reverse biasing, the reverse biasing was done to evaluate the cells' susceptibility to leakage currents and hotspots formation. After reverse biasing, some cells were found to exhibit hotspots as confirmed by infrared thermography. The surface morphology of these hotspots re

  18. Automated SEM metrology of wafers printed using a SCAA mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Sunil; Ebihara, Takeaki; Levenson, David; White, Sylvia

    2002-07-01

    The massive amount of data necessary to qualify a new 100nm generation technology can be efficiency collected using a CD-SEM and analyzed using Klarity ProData. By comparing the linewidths, space widths, and pitches printed in resists with different focus, exposure does, and numerical aperture with the measured reticle parameters, one can be determine optimal processing conditions and the required biasing rules for the new technology. The Sidewall Chrome Alternating Aperture Mask, a next generation alternating phase shift mask structure, is especially suitable for this as all relevant mask features are visible from the top surface which, however, is not planar and thus can confuse optical mask inspection tools. Resist patterns with line-space pitches from 220nm to 800nm and isolated lines - as well as the reticle - were measured sing a KLA-Tencor 8250 CD-SEM and analyzed with ProData. At the isofocal dose, the 70nm line - 150nm space reticle pattern printed with equal 110 nm lines and spaces at NA equals 0.63 on a Canon FPA-5000 ES3 248 nm step and scan tool, with a process window that overlapped those of less dense approximately 100 nm features.

  19. TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser by side-pumping a grooved rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vistas, Cláudia R.; Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Guillot, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    A simple TEM00 mode solar laser system with a grooved Nd:YAG rod pumped through a heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. The radiation coupling capacity of a fused silica tube lens was combined with the multipass pumping ability of a 2 V-shaped cavity to provide efficient side-pumping along a 4.0 mm diameter grooved Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. TEM00 mode solar laser power of 3.4 W was measured by adopting an asymmetric large-mode laser resonant cavity. Record TEM00 mode solar laser collection efficiency of 3.4 W/m2and slope efficiency of 1.9% was achieved, which corresponds to 1.8 and 2.4 times more than the previous TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser using the PROMES-CNRS heliostat-parabolic mirror system, respectively.

  20. METHOD FOR CALCULATING ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN TEM CELLS AT ELF (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is presented whereby the electric and magnetic field distributions within rectangular strip transmission lines (TEM cells) can be calculated. Quasi-static approximations are employed, thereby restricting the validity of the results to operational frequencies well below t...