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Sample records for afm tapping mode

  1. In-plane information from tapping mode AFM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Matthew

    2003-03-01

    Phase contrast in intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy is shown to reveal in-plane structural and mechanical properties of poly(diacetylene) monolayer films. This is surprising because measurements of in-plane properties typically require a contact mode of microscopy. Such measurements are possible because the tilt in the oscillating cantilever provides components of motion not just perpendicular to the surface, but also parallel to the sample surface. Lateral tip displacement is virtually universal in AFM, implying that any oscillating tip-AFM technique is sensitive to in-plane material properties. Although the tilt in the cantilever is small ( 10^o) it produces a component of motion that is 20% of the total tip displacement, and this motion accounts for 5-10% of dissipated energy through the tip-sample interaction[1]. The data is used in conjunction with a numerical model to extract in-plane material parameters. The effect of the cantilever tilt on phase measurements is directly verified through measurements on silicon samples tilted at a variety of angles with respect to the cantilever. The lateral tip displacement we make use of allows measurements of in-plane properties of soft samples such as polymer and biological samples. This work was done in collaboration with M. D'Amato, R.W. Carpick, and M.A. Eriksson, and was supported by the NSF CAREER and MRSEC programs and the Research Corporation. 1. M.S. Marcus, R.W. Carpick, D.Y. Sasaki, M.A. Eriksson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 226103 (2002)

  2. Hydrodynamic effects of the tip movement on surface nanobubbles: a combined tapping mode, lift mode and force volume mode AFM study.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Hain, Nicole; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-08-28

    We report on an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of AFM tip-nanobubble interactions in experiments conducted on argon surface nanobubbles on HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in water in tapping mode, lift mode and Force Volume (FV) mode AFM. By subsequent data acquisition on the same nanobubbles in these three different AFM modes, we could directly compare the effect of different tip-sample interactions. The tip-bubble interaction strength was found to depend on the vertical and horizontal position of the tip on the bubble with respect to the bubble center. The interaction forces measured experimentally were in good agreement with the forces calculated using the dynamic interaction model. The strength of the hydrodynamic effect was also found to depend on the direction of the tip movement. It was more pronounced in the FV mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the top, than in the lift mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the side. This result suggests that the direction of tip movement influences the bubble deformation. The effect should be taken into account when nanobubbles are analysed by AFM in various scanning modes.

  3. Study on effects of scan parameters on the image quality and tip wear in AFM tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bo; Yan, Yongda; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2014-01-01

    Due to the tip-sample interaction which is the measurement principle of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), tip wear constantly occurs during scanning. The blunt tip caused by the wear process makes more tip geometry information involved in the image, and correspondingly it increases the measurement error. In the present study, the scan parameters of AFM in tapping mode which affect the wear of single crystal silicon tips, such as the approaching rate, the scan rate, the scan amplitude, and the integral gain are investigated. By proposing a parameter reflecting the imaging quality, the tip state tracing the sample surface is evaluated quantitatively. The influences of scan parameters on this imaging quality parameter are obtained by experiments. Finally, in order to achieve the perfect images with little tip wear influence, tip wear experiments are carried out and then the optimal parameter settings which can lighten the tip wear are obtained.

  4. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  5. Dip-pen nanolithography in tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Sowards, Laura A; Naik, Rajesh R; Stone, Morley O

    2003-01-15

    Dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is becoming a popular nano-patterning technique for depositing materials onto a substrate using the probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Here, we demonstrate the deposition of a short synthetic peptide by DPN using the Tapping Mode of AFM rather than the commonly used contact mode. DPN in Tapping Mode requires drive amplitude modifications for deposition, yet allows for gentle imaging of the deposited material and enables deposition on soft surfaces.

  6. Tapping mode microwave impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, K.

    2010-02-24

    We report tapping mode microwave impedance imaging based on atomic force microscope platforms. The shielded cantilever probe is critical to localize the tip-sample interaction near the tip apex. The modulated tip-sample impedance can be accurately simulated by the finite-element analysis and the result agrees quantitatively to the experimental data on a series of thin-film dielectric samples. The tapping mode microwave imaging is also superior to the contact mode in that the thermal drift in a long time scale is totally eliminated and an absolute measurement on the dielectric properties is possible. We demonstrated tapping images on working nanodevices, and the data are consistent with the transport results.

  7. Cantilever's behavior in the AC mode of an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, V.B.; Zanette, S.I.; Caride, A.O.; Prioli, R.; Rivas, A.M.F

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, a model with a small number of parameters is used to simulate the motion of a cantilever in the AC mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results elucidate the transition dependence-from noncontact to tapping operating mode-on the height of the contamination layer and on the stiffness of the sample.

  8. Formation of hierarchical molecular assemblies from poly(oxypropylene)-segmented amido acids under AFM tapping.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Chi-He

    2007-04-10

    Molecular self-aligning of amphiphilic molecules into bundles with a constant width of 7-13 nm was observed under tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The requisite amphiphile, a poly(oxypropylene)-trimellitic amido acid sodium salt, is constituted of a symmetric amido acid structure with potential noncovalent forces of ionic charges, hydrogen bonds, pi-pi aromatic stacking, and hydrophobic interactions for intermolecular interaction. The amphiphiles are able to self-align into orderly hierarchical assemblies after simply being dissolved in water and dried under spin-coated evaporation. Under the TM-AFM tapping process, the bundles increased their length from an initial 20 to 600 nm. A sequential TM-AFM scanning and interval heating process was designed to probe the morphological transformations from the molecular bundles to lengthy strips (nearly micrometer scale) and to columns (with 5-7 nm spacing between the parallel strips). The formation of hierarchical arrays via molecular stretching, aligning, and connecting to each other was simultaneously observed and accelerated under the TM-AFM vibration energy. The molecular self-alignment caused by vibrations is envisioned to be a potential methodology for manipulating molecules into assembled templates, sensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  10. Characterization and optimization of scan speed for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulchek, T.; Yaralioglu, G. G.; Quate, C. F.; Minne, S. C.

    2002-08-01

    Increasing the imaging speed of tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has important practical and scientific applications. The scan speed of tapping-mode AFMs is limited by the speed of the feedback loop that maintains a constant tapping amplitude. This article seeks to illuminate these limits to scanning speed. The limits to the feedback loop are: (1) slow transient response of probe; (2) instability limitations of high-quality factor (Q) systems; (3) feedback actuator bandwidth; (4) error signal saturation; and the (5) rms-to-dc converter. The article will also suggest solutions to mitigate these limitations. These limitations can be addressed through integrating a faster feedback actuator as well as active control of the dynamics of the cantilever.

  11. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  12. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  13. The role of adhesion in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, D.; Hunt, J. P.; Workman, R. K.; Yao, X.; Peterson, C. A.

    The equation of motion of the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in the tapping mode in the presence of tip-sample adhesion modeled by the JKR theory is solved self-consistently. The vibration of the cantilever is discussed in terms of the parameters characterizing the properties of the cantilever, tip, and sample. A comparison with the experimental phase-shifts as a function of the setpoint reported by Magonov et al. is presented and sample indentation and tip-sample force and pressure are analyzed.

  14. Accurate force spectroscopy in tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Existing force spectroscopy methods in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as higher harmonic inversion [M. Stark, R. W. Stark, W. M. Heckl, and R. Guckenberger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8473 (2002)] or scanning probe acceleration microscopy [J. Legleiter, M. Park, B. Cusick, and T. Kowalewski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 4813 (2006)] or integral relations [M. Lee and W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 036104 (2006); S. Hu and A. Raman, Nanotechnology 19, 375704 (2008); H. Hölscher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 123109 (2006); A. J. Katan, Nanotechnology 20, 165703 (2009)] require and assume as an observable the tip dynamics in a single eigenmode of the oscillating microcantilever. We demonstrate that this assumption can distort significantly the extracted tip-sample interaction forces when applied to tapping mode AFM with soft cantilevers in liquid environments. This exception is due to the fact that under these conditions the second eigenmode is momentarily excited and the observed tip dynamics clearly contains contributions from the fundamental and second eigenmodes. To alleviate this problem, a simple experimental method is proposed to screen the second eigenmode contributions in the observed tip deflection signal to allow accurate tip-sample force reconstruction in liquids. The method is implemented experimentally to reconstruct interaction forces on polymer, bacteriorhodopsin membrane, and mica samples in buffer solutions.

  15. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, M.; Satır, S.; Torello, D.; Değertekin, F. L.

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  16. Unifying theory of tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Álvaro San; García, Ricardo

    2002-07-01

    We propose a general method for describing tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy. The combined participation of attractive and repulsive interactions determines the multivalued nature of the resonance curve. This, in turn, implies the coexistence of two different stable oscillations for some excitation frequencies. The coexistence of two stable oscillations depends on the driving force and tip-surface separation. Increasing the driving force inhibits the low-amplitude oscillation state. Because resolution depends on the oscillation state, we propose that the absence of the low amplitude solution is responsible for the inconsistencies observed in high-resolution imaging of biomolecules.

  17. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payam, Amir F.; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  18. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  19. The nanoscale phase distinguishing of PCL-PB-PCL blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the bulk phase distinguishing of the poly(ε-caprolactone)-polybutadiene-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PB-PCL) triblock copolymer blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). We found that at a set-point amplitude ratio (rsp) less than or equal to 0.85, a clear phase contrast could be obtained using a probe with a force constant of 40 N/m. When rsp was decreased to 0.1 or less, the measured size of the PB-rich domain relatively shrank; however, the height images of the PB-rich domain would take reverse (translating from the original light to dark) at rsp = 0.85. Force-probe measurements were carried out on the phase-separated regions by TM-AFM. According to the phase shift angle vs. rsp curve, it could be concluded that the different force exerting on the epoxy matrix or on the PB-rich domain might result in the height and phase image reversion. Furthermore, the indentation depth vs. rsp plot showed that with large tapping force (lower rsp), the indentation depth for the PB-rich domain was nearly identical for the epoxy resin matrix. PMID:22360980

  20. The formation of liquid bridge in different operating modes of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Ding, WenXuan; Wang, ZaiRan

    2016-09-01

    The liquid bridge is one of the principal factors that cause artifacts in ambient-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) images. Additionally, it is the main component of the adhesion force in ambient conditions. To understand the AFM imaging mechanism and the sample characteristics, it is essential to study the liquid bridge. This study interprets the physical mechanism involved in liquid bridge formation, which is composed of three different physical processes: the squeezing process, capillary condensation, and liquid film flow. We discuss the contributions of these three mechanisms to the volume and the capillary force of the liquid bridge in different AFM operation modes.

  1. Individually injected current pulses with conducting-tip, tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Asa; Zhao, Yanming; Peterson, Charles A.; Jabbour, Ghassan E.; Sarid, Dror

    2001-12-01

    Individually injected current pulses during the operation of a conducting-tip tapping-mode atomic force microscope have been measured under a range of experimental conditions. The bias pulses, applied during the tip-sample contact time, did not perturb the tapping operations, and eliminated artifacts associated with displacement currents. The reproducible injection of current density pulses on the order of 10 μA/nm2 per tap can be applied to spreading resistance measurements and to storage applications employing, for example, phase change by Joule heating and magnetic switching by spin-polarized current.

  2. Differentiating inclusion complexes from host molecules by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Botella, S; Martin, M A; del Castillo, B; Vázquez, L

    1996-01-01

    Tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging under different cantilever vibration amplitudes has been used to differentiate the host beta-cyclodextrin nanotubes from retinal/beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complex nanotubes. It was observed that both compounds were deformed differently by the applied probe force because of their different local rigidity. This change in the elasticity properties can be explained as a consequence of the inclusion process. This method shows that tapping-mode atomic force microscopy is an useful tool to map soft sample elasticity properties and to distinguish inclusion complexes from their host molecules on the basis of their different mechanical response. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8804591

  3. Topographical and electrical study of contact and intermittent contact mode InP AFM lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranvouez, E.; Budau, P.; Bremond, G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to fabricate nanoscale oxide patterns on an InP(001) surface, local anodization by atomic force microscopy (AFM) contact and intermittent contact modes has been performed. Contact mode results are similar to those obtained with the local anodization of silicon, and mainly limited by the effect of space charge that occurs during the oxide growth. The existence of this space charge associated with the poor dielectric quality of the obtained oxide has been verified by performing scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) measurements. Results for oxidation using intermittent AFM contact mode associated with a modulated voltage are more specific. For a more than two decade variation of probe velocity (0.01-5 µm s-1), the AFM oxidation introduces no significant changes in the oxide pattern. Experiments on the influence of oxidation time give rise to two regimes. First, for times shorter than 100 ms, a high growth rate is found. Second, for oxidation times longer than 100 ms, we observe an oxide height saturation and a significant decrease of lateral growth rate. These results provide a way to easily control the oxide shape. The space charge neutralization in this mode has also been investigated by SCM. The interesting results for intermittent contact oxidation confirm the capability of this technique to modify a nanoscale InP surface.

  4. Improvement of tapping-mode scanning near-field optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Wenjiang; Li, Qin; Sun, Jialin; Xu, Jianhua; Zhao, Jun; Guo, Jihua

    2000-10-01

    The commercial crystal tuning fork glued with an optical fiber probe is used as the sensitive detecting element for the tapping-mode scanning near-field optical microscopy. Firstly, the single-mode optical fiber is etched down to a small diameter to decrease the burden of the tuning fork. Secondary, the fiber is etched for the second time to form the sharp tip with large cone angle. Thirdly, the fiber probe, with nanometric tip and high light throughput, is glued to tuning fork by Cyanoacrylate Adhesive. The measured quality factor, Q, of the tuning fork/optical fiber probe assembly prepared in this way is higher than 300. The optical signal is modulated to the frequency of the tuning fork by optical fiber probe as it is detecting the topography of sample. The high-resolution of the tapping- mode detector is proved by imaging the topography of the grating and biological cell.

  5. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  6. APOBEC3G Interacts with ssDNA by Two Modes: AFM Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Dutta, Samrat; Banga, Jaspreet; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2015-10-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) protein has antiviral activity against HIV and other pathogenic retroviruses. A3G has two domains: a catalytic C-terminal domain (CTD) that deaminates cytidine, and a N-terminal domain (NTD) that binds to ssDNA. Although abundant information exists about the biological activities of A3G protein, the interplay between sequence specific deaminase activity and A3G binding to ssDNA remains controversial. We used the topographic imaging and force spectroscopy modalities of Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFM) to characterize the interaction of A3G protein with deaminase specific and nonspecific ssDNA substrates. AFM imaging demonstrated that A3G has elevated affinity for deaminase specific ssDNA than for nonspecific ssDNA. AFM force spectroscopy revealed two distinct binding modes by which A3G interacts with ssDNA. One mode requires sequence specificity, as demonstrated by stronger and more stable complexes with deaminase specific ssDNA than with nonspecific ssDNA. Overall these observations enforce prior studies suggesting that both domains of A3G contribute to the sequence specific binding of ssDNA.

  7. High speed tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid using an insulated piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, B.; Sulchek, T.; Murray, K.; York, D.; Jones, M.; Manning, L.; Malekos, S.; Beneschott, B.; Adams, J. D.; Cavazos, H.; Minne, S. C.

    2003-11-01

    Quicker imaging times for tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid could provide a real-time imaging tool for studying dynamic phenomena in physiological conditions. We demonstrate faster imaging speed using microcantilevers with integrated piezoelectric actuators. The exposed electric components of the cantilever necessitate an insulation scheme for use in liquid; three coating schemes have been tested. Preliminary tapping mode images have been taken using the insulated microactuator to simultaneously vibrate and actuate the cantilever over topographical features in liquid, including a high speed image of steps on a mica surface in water and an image of two e coli bacteria taken in saline solution at 75.5 μm/s, a threefold improvement in bandwidth versus conventional piezotube actuators.

  8. Anomalies in nanostructure size measurements by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechler, Ádám; Kopniczky, Judit; Kokavecz, János; Hoel, Anders; Granqvist, Claes-Göran; Heszler, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Anomalies in atomic force microscopy (AFM) based size determination of nanoparticles were studied via comparative analysis of experiments and numerical calculations. Single tungsten oxide nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 3nm were deposited on mica and graphite substrates and were characterised by AFM. The size (height) of the nanoparticles, measured by tapping mode AFM, was found to be sensitive to the free amplitude of the oscillating tip, thus indicating that the images were not purely topographical. By comparing the experimental results to model calculations, we demonstrate that the dependence of the nanoparticle size on the oscillation amplitude of the tip is an inherent characteristic of the tapping mode AFM; it is also a function of physical properties such as elasticity and surface energy of the nanoparticle and the sample surface, and it depends on the radius of curvature of the tip. We show that good approximation of the real size can easily be obtained from plots of particle height vs free amplitude of the oscillating tip, although errors might persist for individual experiments. The results are valid for size (height) determination of any nanometer-sized objects imaged by tapping mode AFM.

  9. Nano-scale simulative measuring model for tapping mode atomic force microscopy and analysis for measuring a nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zone-Ching; Chou, Ming-Ho

    2010-07-01

    This study proposes to construct a nano-scale simulative measuring model of Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM), compare with the edge effect of simulative and measurement results. It combines with the Morse potential and vibration theory to calculate the tip-sample atomic interaction force between probe and sample. Used Silicon atoms (Si) arrange the shape of the rectangular cantilever probe and the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample atomic model. The simulative measurements are compared with the results for the simulative measurements and experimental measurement. It is found that the scan rate and the probe tip's bevel angle are the two reasons to cause the surface error and edge effect of measuring the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample by TM-AFM. And the bevel angle is about equal to the probe tip's bevel angle from the results of simulated and experimented on the vertical section of the sample edge. To compare with the edge effect between the simulation and experimental measurement, its error is small. It could be verified that the constructed simulative measuring model for TM-AFM in this article is reasonable.

  10. Analyzing the vibrational response of an AFM cantilever in liquid with the consideration of tip mass by comparing the hydrodynamic and contact repulsive force models in higher modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Nahavandi, Amir

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the vibration of a tapping-mode Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever covered with two whole piezoelectric layers in a liquid medium. The authors of this article have already modeled the vibration of a cantilever immersed in liquid over rough surfaces. Five new ideas have been considered for improving the results of the previous work. Mass and damping of a cantilever probe tip have been considered. Since the probe tip of an AFM cantilever has a mass, which can itself affect the natural frequency of vibration, the significance of this mass has been explored. Also, two hydrodynamic force models for analyzing the mass and damping added to a cantilever in liquid medium have been evaluated. In modeling the vibration of a cantilever in liquid, simplifications are made to the theoretical equations used in the modeling, which may make the obtained results different from those in the real case. So, two hydrodynamic force models are introduced and compared with each other. In addition to the already introduced DMT model, the JKR model has been proposed. The forces acting on a probe tip have attractive and repulsive effects. The attractive Van der Waals force can vary depending on the surface smoothness or roughness, and the repulsive contact force, which is independent of the type of surface roughness and usually varies with the hardness or softness of a surface. When the first mode is used in the vibration of an AFM cantilever, the changes of the existing physical parameters in the simulation do not usually produce a significant difference in the response. Thus, three cantilever vibration modes have been investigated. Finally, an analytical approach for obtaining the response of equations is presented which solves the resulting motion equation by the Laplace method and, thus, a time function is obtained for cantilever deflection is determined. Also, using the COMSOL software to model a cantilever in a liquid medium, the computed natural

  11. Tip-surface forces, amplitude, and energy dissipation in amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Álvaro San; García, Ricardo

    2001-11-01

    Amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) atomic force microscopy is a technique for high resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces in air and liquid environments. Here by using the virial theorem and energy conservation principles we have derived analytical relationships between the oscillation amplitude, phase shift, and average tip-surface forces. We find that the average value of the interaction force and oscillation and the average power dissipated by the tip-surface interaction are the quantities that control the amplitude reduction. The agreement obtained between analytical and numerical results supports the analytical method.

  12. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  13. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; ...

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  14. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  15. Analyzing the Effect of Capillary Force on Vibrational Performance of the Cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope in Tapping Mode with Double Piezoelectric Layers in an Air Environment.

    PubMed

    Nahavandi, Amir; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the effects of forces exerted on the cantilever probe tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). These forces vary according to the separation distance between the probe tip and the surface of the sample being examined. Hence, at a distance away from the surface (farther than d(on)), these forces have an attractive nature and are of Van der Waals type, and when the probe tip is situated in the range of a₀≤ d(ts) ≤ d(on), the capillary force is added to the Van der Waals force. At a distance of d(ts) ≤ a₀, the Van der Waals and capillary forces remain constant at intermolecular distances, and the contact repulsive force repels the probe tip from the surface of sample. The capillary force emerges due to the contact of thin water films with a thickness of h(c) which have accumulated on the sample and probe. Under environmental conditions a layer of water or hydrocarbon often forms between the probe tip and sample. The capillary meniscus can grow until the rate of evaporation equals the rate of condensation. For each of the above forces, different models are presented. The smoothness or roughness of the surfaces and the geometry of the cantilever tip have a significant effect on the modeling of forces applied on the probe tip. Van der Waals and the repulsive forces are considered to be the same in all the simulations, and only the capillary force is altered in order to evaluate the role of this force in the AFM-based modeling. Therefore, in view of the remarkable advantages of the piezoelectric microcantilever and also the extensive applications of the tapping mode, we investigate vibrational motion of the piezoelectric microcantilever in the tapping mode. The cantilever mentioned is entirely covered by two piezoelectric layers that carry out both the actuation of the probe tip and the measuringof its position.

  16. Harnessing bifurcations in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy to calibrate time-varying tip-sample force measurements.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2007-10-01

    Torsional harmonic cantilevers allow measurement of time-varying tip-sample forces in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. Accuracy of these force measurements is important for quantitative nanomechanical measurements. Here we demonstrate a method to convert the torsional deflection signals into a calibrated force wave form with the use of nonlinear dynamical response of the tapping cantilever. Specifically the transitions between steady oscillation regimes are used to calibrate the torsional deflection signals.

  17. Intrinsically High-Q Dynamic AFM Imaging in Liquid with a Significantly Extended Needle Tip

    PubMed Central

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially-available tapping mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operation frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic materials properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments. PMID:22595833

  18. Tapping-mode atomic force microscopy produces faithful high-resolution images of protein surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Möller, C; Allen, M; Elings, V; Engel, A; Müller, D J

    1999-01-01

    Compared to contact-mode atomic force microscopy (CMAFM), tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) has the advantage of allowing imaging surfaces of macromolecules, even when they are only weakly attached to the support. In this study, TMAFM is applied to two different regular protein layers whose structures are known to great detail, the purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarum and the hexagonally packed intermediate (HPI) layer from Deinococcus radiodurans, to assess the faithfulness of high-resolution TMAFM images. Topographs exhibited a lateral resolution between 1.1 and 1. 5 nm and a vertical resolution of approximately 0.1 nm. For all protein surfaces, TMAFM and CMAFM topographs were in excellent agreement. TMAFM was capable of imaging the fragile polypeptide loop connecting the transmembrane alpha-helices E and F of bacteriorhodopsin in its native extended conformation. The standard deviation (SD) of averages calculated from TMAFM topographs exhibited an enhanced minimum (between 0.1 and 0.9 nm) that can be assigned to the higher noise of the raw data. However, the SD difference, indicating the flexibility of protein subunits, exhibited an excellent agreement between the two imaging modes. This demonstrates that the recently invented imaging-mode TMAFM has the ability to faithfully record high-resolution images and has sufficient sensitivity to contour individual peptide loops without detectable deformations. PMID:10423460

  19. Reduced Sampling Size with Nanopipette for Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kohigashi, Tsuyoshi; Otsuka, Yoichi; Shimazu, Ryo; Matsumoto, Takuya; Iwata, Futoshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with ambient sampling and ionization can rapidly and easily capture the distribution of chemical components in a solid sample. Because the spatial resolution of MSI is limited by the size of the sampling area, reducing sampling size is an important goal for high resolution MSI. Here, we report the first use of a nanopipette for sampling and ionization by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization (t-SPESI). The spot size of the sampling area of a dye molecular film on a glass substrate was decreased to 6 μm on average by using a nanopipette. On the other hand, ionization efficiency increased with decreasing solvent flow rate. Our results indicate the compatibility between a reduced sampling area and the ionization efficiency using a nanopipette. MSI of micropatterns of ink on a glass and a polymer substrate were also demonstrated. PMID:28101441

  20. From images to interactions: high-resolution phase imaging in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, M; Möller, C; Müller, D J; Guckenberger, R

    2001-01-01

    In tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, the phase shift between excitation and response of the cantilever is used as a material-dependent signal complementary to topography. The localization of information in the phase signal is demonstrated with 1.4-nm lateral resolution on purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum in buffer solution. In a first-order approximation, the phase signal is found to correlate with modulations of the tip oscillation amplitude, induced by topography. Extending the analysis to contributions of the tip-sample interaction area as a second-order approximation, a method is proposed to extract information about the interaction from the phase signal for surfaces with a roughness in the order of the tip radius. PMID:11371473

  1. A novel self-sensing technique for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2013-12-15

    This work proposes a novel self-sensing tapping-mode atomic force microscopy operation utilizing charge measurement. A microcantilever coated with a single piezoelectric layer is simultaneously used for actuation and deflection sensing. The cantilever can be batch fabricated with existing micro electro mechanical system processes. The setup enables the omission of the optical beam deflection technique which is commonly used to measure the cantilever oscillation amplitude. Due to the high amount of capacitive feedthrough in the measured charge signal, a feedforward control technique is employed to increase the dynamic range from less than 1 dB to approximately 35 dB. Experiments show that the conditioned charge signal achieves excellent signal-to-noise ratio and can therefore be used as a feedback signal for atomic force microscopy imaging.

  2. AFM in mode Peak Force applied to the study of un-worn contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Burgués, J; Sanz, F

    2014-09-01

    Contact lenses (CLs) are of common use and the biocompatibility, topography and mechanical properties of the used materials are of major importance. The objective of this contribution is to apply the AFM in mode Peak Force to obtain surface topography and mechanical characteristics of un-worn CLs of different materials. One material of hydrogel, two of siloxane-hydrogel and one of rigid gas-permeable were used in the study. The results obtained with different materials have been compared, at a nanoscopic level, and the conclusions are diverse. There is no significant influence of the two environments used to measure the characteristics of the CLs, either water or saline solution. The pHEMA hydrogel CL (Polymacon of Soflens) shows the highest values of roughness, adhesion and elastic modulus. The siloxane-hydrogel CL named Asmofilcon A of PremiO presents the lowest values of mean roughness (Ra), root-mean-square roughness (RMS or Rq), adhesion (Adh) and elastic modulus (Ym), meanwhile the siloxane-hydrogel CL named Lotrafilcon B of Air Optix presents the lowest value of skewness (Rsk) and the rigid gas-permeable CL, named RXD, presents the lowest values of kurtosis (Rku) and maximum roughness (Rmax).

  3. Parameter sensitivity analysis of nonlinear piezoelectric probe in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for measurement improvement

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Rachael; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-02-21

    The equations of motion for a piezoelectric microcantilever are derived for a nonlinear contact force. The analytical expressions for natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, the method of multiple scales is used to analyze the analytical frequency response of the piezoelectric probe. The effects of nonlinear excitation force on the microcantilever beam's frequency and amplitude are analytically studied. The results show a frequency shift in the response resulting from the force nonlinearities. This frequency shift during contact mode is an important consideration in the modeling of AFM mechanics for generation of more accurate imaging. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the system parameters on the nonlinearity effect is performed. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that it is possible to choose parameters such that the frequency shift minimizes. Certain parameters such as tip radius, microcantilever beam dimensions, and modulus of elasticity have more influence on the nonlinearity of the system than other parameters. By changing only three parameters—tip radius, thickness, and modulus of elasticity of the microbeam—a more than 70% reduction in nonlinearity effect was achieved.

  4. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  5. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society. PMID:24699375

  6. Molecular dynamic simulation of tip-polymer interaction in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, N.; Venturini, G. N.; Strachan, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamic study of the interaction between an amorphous silica tip (SiO2) and an amorphous poly-(methyl-methacrylate) substrate under conditions relevant for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. To capture the actual dynamics of the tip, we use the dynamic contact simulation method [Kim et al., J. Appl. Phys. 112, 094325 (2012)]. We obtain force-displacement relationships both for neat polymer substrates and a sample with a sub-surface nanotube and extract the local stiffness and energy dissipation per cycle. The simulations capture non-trivial aspects of the interaction that originate from the viscoelastic nature of the polymer including an increase in repulsive interaction force during approach with tip velocity and an increase in adhesion during retraction with decreasing tip velocity. Scans of local stiffness and dissipation over the samples reveal intrinsic variability in the amorphous polymer but also the effect of local surface topography on the extracted properties as well as the ability of the method to detect a sub-surface nanotube. This insight and quantitative data should be valuable to interpret the results of atomic force microscopy studies.

  7. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  8. Personal electronics printing via tapping mode composite liquid metal ink delivery and adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; He, Zhi-Zhu; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jing

    2014-04-04

    Printed electronics is becoming increasingly important in a variety of newly emerging areas. However, restricted to the rather limited conductive inks and available printing strategies, the current electronics manufacture is usually confined to industry level. Here, we show a highly cost-effective and entirely automatic printing way towards personal electronics making, through introducing a tapping-mode composite fluid delivery system. Fundamental mechanisms regarding the reliable printing, transfer and adhesion of the liquid metal inks on the substrate were disclosed through systematic theoretical interpretation and experimental measurements. With this liquid metal printer, a series of representative electronic patterns spanning from single wires to desired complex configurations such as integrated circuit (IC), printed-circuits-on-board (PCB), electronic paintings, or more do-it-yourself (DIY) devices, were demonstrated to be printed out with high precision in a moment. And the total machine cost already reached personally affordable price. This is hard to achieve by a conventional PCB technology which generally takes long time and is material, water and energy consuming, while the existing printed electronics is still far away from the real direct printing goal. The present work opens the way for large scale personal electronics manufacture and is expected to generate important value for the coming society.

  9. Atomic force microscope nanolithography: dip-pen, nanoshaving, nanografting, tapping mode, electrochemical and thermal nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Luis G; Liang, Jian

    2009-12-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely employed as a nanoscopic lithography technique. In this review, we summarize the current state of research in this field. We introduce the various forms of the technique, such as nanoshaving, nanografting and dip-pen nanolithography, which we classify according to the different interactions between the AFM probe and the substrate during the nanolithography fabrication process. Mechanical force, applied by the tip to the substrate, is the variable that can be controlled with good precision in AFM and it has been utilized in patterning self-assembled monolayers. In such applications, the AFM tip can break some relatively weak chemical bonds inside the monolayer. In general, the state of the art for AFM nanolithography demonstrates the power, resolution and versatility of the technique.

  10. Haitian Tap-Taps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Joan

    2011-01-01

    In the small island country of Haiti, colorful taxis transport the natives to the market. Although the taxis may be crowded with people, goods, and even livestock, it is considered a luxury to ride rather than go on foot. The children's picture book, "Tap-Tap," is a wonderful introduction to the culture of this land. The name…

  11. Low tip damage AFM technique development for nano structures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biao; Wang, Charles C.; Huang, Po-Fu; Uritsky, Yuri

    2010-06-01

    Ambient dynamic mode (tapping mode or intermittent-contact mode) AFM imaging has been used extensively for the characterization of the topography of nano structures. However, the results are beset with artifacts, because hard tapping of the AFM tip on sample surface usually causes premature tip damage. Through careful study of the cantilever amplitude and phase signals as functions of tip-to-sample distance, principle of non-contact AFM operation was discovered to enable high resolution and low tip damage AFM image acquisition [1, 2]. However, current study discovers that the conventional way of acquiring amplitude and phase versus distance curves gives erroneous non-contact operating range, because the tip gets damaged during the data acquisition process. A new technique is developed to reliably map the operating parameters of an intact tip that ensures the AFM be operated with the correct non-contact settings. Two examples are given to illustrate the successful applications of this new technique. The first example involves the size characterization of polystyrene latex (PSL) nano particles used for light scattering tool calibration. The second example is the development of robust recipes for the measurement of the depth of phase-shift mask trenches.

  12. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  13. Importance of the indentation depth in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy study of compliant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, G.; Delineau, L.; Brandsch, R.; Bruch, M.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    1999-12-27

    We studied the response of a cantilever tapping on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of different crosslink density. It is shown experimentally that the tip deeply penetrates into the compliant PDMS samples. A more compliant material leads to a larger indentation such that at a given set-point ratio the indentation force is nearly constant on samples of different elastic moduli. This confirms the simulations by J. Tamayo and R. Garcia [Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 2394 (1997)] that phase contrast acquired at constant set point does not depend on the sample's modulus if other contrast relevant parameters remain identical. PDMS samples of different crosslink density are distinguished in terms of amplitude and phase versus distance measurements if the tip-sample interaction is made substantially large and indentation is taken into account. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  14. AFM in peak force mode applied to worn siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Abadías, Clara; Serés, Carme; Torrent-Burgués, Juan

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work is to apply Atomic Force Microscopy in Peak Force mode to obtain topographic characteristics (mean roughness, root-mean-square roughness, skewness and kurtosis) and mechanical characteristics (adhesion, elastic modulus) of Siloxane-Hydrogel Soft Contact Lenses (CLs) of two different materials, Lotrafilcon B of Air Optix (AO) and Asmofilcon A of PremiO (P), after use (worn CLs). Thus, the results obtained with both materials will be compared, as well as the changes produced by the wear at a nanoscopic level. The results show significant changes in the topographic and mechanical characteristics of the CLs, at a nanoscopic level, due to wear. The AO CL show values of the topographic parameters lower than those of the P CL after wear, which correlates with a better comfort qualification given to the former by the wearers. A significant correlation has also been obtained between the adhesion values found after the use of the CLs with tear quality tests, both break-up-time and Schirmer.

  15. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip-sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip-sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip-sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided.

  16. High-speed AFM for 1x node metrology and inspection: Does it damage the features?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian, Hamed; van den Dool, Teun C.; Uziel, Yoram; Bar Or, Ron

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at unraveling the mystery of damage in high speed AFMs for 1X node and below. With the device dimensions moving towards the 1X node and below, the semiconductor industry is rapidly approaching the point where existing metrology, inspection and review tools face huge challenges in terms of resolution, the ability to resolve 3D, and throughput. In this paper, we critically asses the important issue of damage in high speed AFM for metrology and inspection of semiconductor wafers. The issues of damage in four major scanning modes (contact mode, tapping mode, non-contact mode, and peak force tapping mode) are described to show which modes are suitable for which applications and which conditions are damaging. The effects of all important scanning parameters on resulting damage are taken into account for materials such as silicon, photoresists and low K materials. Finally, we recommend appropriate scanning parameters and conditions for several use cases (FinFET, patterned photoresist, HAR structures) that avoid exceeding a critical contact stress such that sample damage is minimized. In conclusion, we show using our theoretical analysis that selecting parameters that exceed the target contact stress, indeed leads to significant damage. This method provides AFM users for metrology with a better understanding of contact stresses and enables selection of AFM cantilevers and experimental parameters that prevent sample damage.

  17. Measurement of Young's modulus variation with layer pair and interplanar spacing in gold–nickel nanolaminates using nanoindentation and the tapping mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, H. S. Tanvir; Jankowski, Alan F.

    2015-03-28

    The features of grain size and interface separation strengthen the mechanical behavior of metallic nanolaminates. In addition, the presence of interlayer lattice strains can lead to a superlattice structure within the nanolaminate. The superlattice affects intrinsic properties of technological interest including electronic, magnetic, and elastic. The complex elastic and plastic behaviors of gold–nickel nanolaminate superlattice coatings as studied using nanoindentation are revisited with the tapping mode of a force microscope. Young's modulus is determined with nanoindentation during the initial elastic unloading after plastic deformation at depths up to one-fifth the coating thickness. The tapping mode provides a measurement during the initial elastic deformation at depths of only a few nanometers. The tapping mode utilizes the shift in the resonant frequency of the probe-cantilever system as contact is made with the sample surface. Both of these nanoprobe test methods produce results for measurements conducted with loading normal to the surface plane. A softening in the Young's modulus of gold–nickel nanolaminate coatings occurs for samples with layer pair spacing between 1 and 9 nm. The magnitude of softening corresponds with a progressive increase in the tensile state as measured with the change of interplanar spacing along the growth direction.

  18. Measurement of Young's modulus variation with layer pair and interplanar spacing in gold-nickel nanolaminates using nanoindentation and the tapping mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H. S. Tanvir; Jankowski, Alan F.

    2015-03-01

    The features of grain size and interface separation strengthen the mechanical behavior of metallic nanolaminates. In addition, the presence of interlayer lattice strains can lead to a superlattice structure within the nanolaminate. The superlattice affects intrinsic properties of technological interest including electronic, magnetic, and elastic. The complex elastic and plastic behaviors of gold-nickel nanolaminate superlattice coatings as studied using nanoindentation are revisited with the tapping mode of a force microscope. Young's modulus is determined with nanoindentation during the initial elastic unloading after plastic deformation at depths up to one-fifth the coating thickness. The tapping mode provides a measurement during the initial elastic deformation at depths of only a few nanometers. The tapping mode utilizes the shift in the resonant frequency of the probe-cantilever system as contact is made with the sample surface. Both of these nanoprobe test methods produce results for measurements conducted with loading normal to the surface plane. A softening in the Young's modulus of gold-nickel nanolaminate coatings occurs for samples with layer pair spacing between 1 and 9 nm. The magnitude of softening corresponds with a progressive increase in the tensile state as measured with the change of interplanar spacing along the growth direction.

  19. Visualization of cancer-related chemical components in mouse pancreas tissue by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yoichi; Satoh, Shuya; Naito, Junpei; Kyogaku, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is an informative approach for the comprehensive analysis of multiple components inside biological specimens. We used novel tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method to visualize cancer-related chemical components in the mouse pancreas tissue section at a sampling pitch of 100 µm. Positive ion mode measurements from m/z 100 to 1500 resulted in the visualization of multiple components that are tentatively assigned as polyamines, lipids and proteins. Their signal intensities inside the cancerous and the non-cancerous regions were found to be significantly different by the two-sample t-test.

  20. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  1. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2015-11-26

    This study introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretationmore » of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tappingmode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Lastly, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.« less

  2. Tunable negative-tap photonic microwave filter based on a cladding-mode coupler and an optically injected laser of large detuning.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sze-Chun; Liu, Qing; Wang, Zhu; Chiang, Kin Seng

    2011-06-20

    A tunable negative-tap photonic microwave filter using a cladding-mode coupler together with optical injection locking of large wavelength detuning is demonstrated. Continuous and precise tunability of the filter is realized by physically sliding a pair of bare fibers inside the cladding-mode coupler. Signal inversion for the negative tap is achieved by optical injection locking of a single-mode semiconductor laser. To couple light into and out of the cladding-mode coupler, a pair of matching long-period fiber gratings is employed. The large bandwidth of the gratings requires injection locking of an exceptionally large wavelength detuning that has never been demonstrated before. Experimentally, injection locking with wavelength detuning as large as 27 nm was achieved, which corresponded to locking the 36-th side mode. Microwave filtering with a free-spectral range tunable from 88.6 MHz to 1.57 GHz and a notch depth larger than 35 dB was obtained.

  3. Study of the sensitivity and resonant frequency of the torsional modes of an AFM cantilever with a sidewall probe based on a nonlocal elasticity theory.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mohammad; Karami Mohammadi, Ardeshir

    2015-05-01

    A relationship based on a nonlocal elasticity theory is developed to investigate the torsional sensitivity and resonant frequency of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with assembled cantilever probe (ACP). This ACP comprises a horizontal cantilever and a vertical extension, and a tip located at the free end of the extension, which makes the AFM capable of topography at sidewalls of microstructures. First, the governing differential equations of motion and boundary conditions for dynamic analysis are obtained by a combination of the basic equations of nonlocal elasticity theory and Hamilton's principle. Afterward, a closed-form expression for the sensitivity of vibration modes has been obtained using the relationship between the resonant frequency and contact stiffness of cantilever and sample. These analysis accounts for a better representation of the torsional behavior of an AFM with sidewall probe where the small-scale effect are significant. The results of the proposed model are compared with those of classical beam theory. The results show that the sensitivities and resonant frequencies of ACP predicted by the nonlocal elasticity theory are smaller than those obtained by the classical beam theory.

  4. Vibrational analysis of single-layered piezoelectric AFM microcantilever in amplitude mode by considering the capillary force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibnejad Korayem, Alireza; Habibnejad Korayem, Moharam; Ghaderi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the vibrational behavior of a microcantilever (MC) with an extended piezoelectric layer in the air ambient undergoes examination. To model the vibrational motion of this type of cantilever, the Hamilton's principle has been used. For this purpose, the MC vibrational equation has been derived by the assumption of the continuous beam based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. By adopting the finite element method (FEM), the MC differential equation has been solved. In the present simulation not only van der Waals and contact forces but also the capillary forces resulting from the condensation of the water vapors in air on MC tip have been considered. The results illustrate that the force between the sample surface and the probe affects the MC amplitude; furthermore, it causes the reduction in the resonance frequency. In addition, to reduce the time delay during topography from the surface roughness, it is better to select MCs with larger width and length and smaller thickness. Furthermore, the results indicate that the best imaging takes place when the vibration is in its second vibrational mode. Finally, the effects of MC geometric parameters on the time delay between the starting moment of surface roughness and the moment of variation in the MC amplitude (surface roughness topography) have been analyzed.

  5. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  6. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)−1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  7. Manipulation of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silicon wafer in the peak force tapping mode in water: pH-dependent friction and adhesion force

    SciTech Connect

    Schiwek, Simon; Stark, Robert W. E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Dietz, Christian E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Heim, Lars-Oliver

    2015-03-14

    The friction force between nanoparticles and a silicon wafer is a crucial parameter for cleaning processes in the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about the pH-dependency of the friction forces and the shear strength at the interface. Here, we push polystyrene nanoparticles, 100 nm in diameter, with the tip of an atomic force microscope and measure the pH-dependency of the friction, adhesion, and normal forces on a silicon substrate covered with a native silicon dioxide layer. The peak force tapping mode was applied to control the vertical force on these particles. We successively increased the applied load until the particles started to move. The main advantage of this technique over single manipulation processes is the achievement of a large number of manipulation events in short time and in a straightforward manner. Geometrical considerations of the interaction forces at the tip-particle interface allowed us to calculate the friction force and shear strength from the applied normal force depending on the pH of an aqueous solution. The results clearly demonstrated that particle removal should be performed with a basic solution at pH 9 because of the low interaction forces between particle and substrate.

  8. TAP Service Federation Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, A. C.; Krause, A.; Holliman, M.; Mann, R. G.; Noddle, K.; Voutsinas, S.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes a prototype federation service for multiple TAP endpoints. Users can create a new TAP resource that allows them to query the federation as if all tables were in a single database.

  9. NASA/UK TAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Technology Applications Program (TAP) is to provide problem solving information and assistance to both the public and private sectors in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, with emphasis primarily in the public sector. The TAP accesses over 1200 online computer databases, including files from the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Australia. During the 1985 to 1986 contract period, TAP responded to 645 inquiries which resulted in an increase of 16 percent over the 1984 to 1985 contract period. The activities of TAP for the 1985 to 1986 contract period are summarized.

  10. AFM-based quantification of conformational changes in DNA caused by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Berg, Florian; Wilken, Janine; Helm, Christiane A; Block, Stephan

    2015-01-08

    Radical induced modification of DNA plays an important role in many pathological pathways like cancer development, aging, etc. In this work, we quantify radical-induced DNA damage that causes transitions from double to single stranded DNA using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasmid pBR322 is attacked by free hydroxyl radicals that are produced by Fenton's reaction; the strength of the radical attack is controlled via the ratio of hydroxyl radical molecules to DNA base pairs. The extent of DNA modification is assessed by AFM tapping mode (TM) imaging of the plasmids (after adsorption onto PAH-functionalized mica) in air. As single stranded DNA chains (height ∼2 Å) are much smaller than intact DNA strands (∼5 Å), their fraction can be quantified based on the height distribution, which allows a simplified data analysis in comparison to similar AFM-based approaches. It is found that the amount of damaged DNA strands increases with increasing strength of radical attack, and decreases if ROS scavengers like sodium acetate are added. Competition curves are calculated for the interaction of hydroxyl radicals with DNA and sodium acetate, which finally allows calculation of relative rate constants for the respective reactions.

  11. Investigation of surface changes of nanoparticles using TM-AFM phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rong; Yu, Liya E

    2003-06-15

    Tapping-mode AFM (TM-AFM) phase imaging was utilized to characterize the surface changes of nanosize particles, in regard to the effects of different amounts of condensed water and organic coatings on particle surfaces. Model nanoparticles were continuously examined under various relative humidity (RH) levels by concurrently obtaining both topographic and phase images. The condensed water appeared to soften particle surfaces and to increase tip-sample attractive interaction over relatively stiff surfaces, which were shown with dark phase contrasts and negative phase shift values in phase images. Under high RH, a massive amount of water gave the particles a droplet-like surface, which reversed the original negative phase shifts to positive values with bright contrasts. Glutaric-acid coatings provided a compliant surface with high viscosity resulting in a dark phase contrast, whereas water droplets containing relatively low viscosity gave a bright phase contrast and positive phase shift. Overall, our results show that it is essential to describe the physical properties of a sample surface as solid, soft, or droplet-like material in order to derive a meaningful understanding of the surface changes of nanosize particles based on TM-AFM phase images. In contrast to other phase imaging studies, this work clearly correlates continuous surface changes with phase images, demonstrating a promising approach to characterize environmental nanoparticles.

  12. Brain activity during bilateral rapid alternate finger tapping measured with magnetoencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi; Odagaki, Masato; Hiwaki, Osamu; Kodabashi, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Toshiro

    2009-04-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), brain regions involved in an alternate bimanual tapping task by index fingers triggered with spontaneous timing were investigated. The tapping mode in which both index fingers moved simultaneously was interlaced during the task. The groups of the alternate tapping (AL mode) and the simultaneous tapping (SI mode) were extracted from the successive alternating taps with a histogram of intervals between the right and left index fingers. MEG signals in each mode were averaged separately before and after the tapping initiation of the dominant index finger. The activities of the contralateral sensorimotor cortex before and after the tapping initiation in the AL mode were larger than that in the SI mode. The result indicates that the activity of the contralateral sensorimotor cortex depends on the degree of achievement in the difficult motor task such as the voluntary alternate tapping movements.

  13. Examination of Humidity Effects on Measured Thickness and Interfacial Phenomena of Exfoliated Graphene on SiO2 via AC-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinkins, Katherine; Camacho, Jorge; Farina, Lee; Wu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Tapping (AC) mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of graphene samples. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as adsorbed water, in turn dependent on relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AC-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO2) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. Loss tangent is an AFM imaging technique that interprets the phase information as a relationship between the stored and dissipated energy in the tip-sample interaction. This study demonstrates the loss tangent of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO2. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO2 substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AC-AFM.

  14. Dynamic simulation and modeling of the motion modes produced during the 3D controlled manipulation of biological micro/nanoparticles based on the AFM.

    PubMed

    Saraee, Mahdieh B; Korayem, Moharam H

    2015-08-07

    Determining the motion modes and the exact position of a particle displaced during the manipulation process is of special importance. This issue becomes even more important when the studied particles are biological micro/nanoparticles and the goals of manipulation are the transfer of these particles within body cells, repair of cancerous cells and the delivery of medication to damaged cells. However, due to the delicate nature of biological nanoparticles and their higher vulnerability, by obtaining the necessary force of manipulation for the considered motion mode, we can prevent the sample from interlocking with or sticking to the substrate because of applying a weak force or avoid damaging the sample due to the exertion of excessive force. In this paper, the dynamic behaviors and the motion modes of biological micro/nanoparticles such as DNA, yeast, platelet and bacteria due to the 3D manipulation effect have been investigated. Since the above nanoparticles generally have a cylindrical shape, the cylindrical contact models have been employed in an attempt to more precisely model the forces exerted on the nanoparticle during the manipulation process. Also, this investigation has performed a comprehensive modeling and simulation of all the possible motion modes in 3D manipulation by taking into account the eccentricity of the applied load on the biological nanoparticle. The obtained results indicate that unlike the macroscopic scale, the sliding of nanoparticle on substrate in nano-scale takes place sooner than the other motion modes and that the spinning about the vertical and transverse axes and the rolling of nanoparticle occur later than the other motion modes. The simulation results also indicate that the applied force necessary for the onset of nanoparticle movement and the resulting motion mode depend on the size and aspect ratio of the nanoparticle.

  15. Increased imaging speed and force sensitivity for bio-applications with small cantilevers using a conventional AFM setup

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.; Fantner, Ernest J.; Ivanova, Katerina; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Rangelow, Ivo; Ebner, Andreas; Rangl, Martina; Tang, Jilin; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the increased performance in speed and sensitivity achieved by the use of small AFM cantilevers on a standard AFM system. For this, small rectangular silicon oxynitride cantilevers were utilized to arrive at faster atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging times and more sensitive molecular recognition force spectroscopy (MRFS) experiments. The cantilevers we used had lengths between 13 and 46 μm, a width of about 11 μm, and a thickness between 150 and 600 nm. They were coated with chromium and gold on the backside for a better laser reflection. We characterized these small cantilevers through their frequency spectrum and with electron microscopy. Due to their small size and high resonance frequency we were able to increase the imaging speed by a factor of 10 without any loss in resolution for images from several μm scansize down to the nanometer scale. This was shown on bacterial surface layers (s-layer) with tapping mode under aqueous, near physiological conditions and on nuclear membranes in contact mode in ambient environment. In addition, we showed that single molecular forces can be measured with an up to 5 times higher force sensitivity in comparison to conventional cantilevers with similar spring constants. PMID:22721963

  16. Tuning the instability in static mode atomic force spectroscopy as obtained in an AFM by applying an electric field between the tip and the substrate.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soma; Raychaudhuri, A K; Sreeram, P A; Dietzel, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated experimentally the role of cantilever instabilities in determination of the static mode force-distance curves in presence of a dc electric field. The electric field has been applied between the tip and the sample in an atomic force microscope working in ultra-high vacuum. We have shown how an electric field modifies the observed force (or cantilever deflection)-vs-distance curves, commonly referred to as the static mode force spectroscopy curves, taken using an atomic force microscope. The electric field induced instabilities shift the jump-into-contact and jump-off-contact points and also the deflection at these instability points. We explained the experimental results using a model of the tip-sample interaction and quantitatively established a relation between the observed static mode force spectroscopy curves and the applied electric field which modifies the effective tip-sample interaction in a controlled manner. The investigation establishes a way to quantitatively evaluate the electrostatic force in an atomic force microscope using the static mode force spectroscopy curves.

  17. [AFM study on microtopography of NOM and newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide adsorbed on mica].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin; Ma, Jun; Shi, Xue-hua

    2006-05-01

    With the methods of mica adsorbing, the microtopography of the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide was perfectly captured. The tapping mode AFM study results revealed that the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide possesses a perforated sheet (with a thickness of 0-1.75 nm) as well as some spheric particle structures compared with the hydrous manganese dioxide with 2 h aging time, which demonstrated that the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide have a large surface area and adsorption capacity. When 1 mmol/L newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide was added, the microtopography of NOM molecules shifted from loosely dispersed pancake shape (with adsorption height of 5-8.5 nm) to densely dispersed and uniform spheric structure. NOM was prone to adsorb on the surface of the newly formed hydrous manganese dioxide, which provided a valid proof for the coagulation-aid mechanism of permanganate preoxidation.

  18. Technical Assistance Plan (TAP)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A Technical Assistance Plan (TAP) enables community groups to retain the services of an independent technical advisor and to provide resources for a community group to help inform other community members about site decisions.

  19. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  20. High-speed AFM of human chromosomes in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picco, L. M.; Dunton, P. G.; Ulcinas, A.; Engledew, D. J.; Hoshi, O.; Ushiki, T.; Miles, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Further developments of the previously reported high-speed contact-mode AFM are described. The technique is applied to the imaging of human chromosomes at video rate both in air and in water. These are the largest structures to have been imaged with high-speed AFM and the first imaging in liquid to be reported. A possible mechanism that allows such high-speed contact-mode imaging without significant damage to the sample is discussed in the context of the velocity dependence of the measured lateral force on the AFM tip.

  1. Physics on Tap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Andrew P. S.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to describe how to visualize surface tension effects in liquid jets. A simple experiment is proposed using the liquid jet flow from a mains water tap/faucet. Using a modern digital camera with a high shutter speed, it is possible to visualize the instabilities (capillary waves) that form within the jet due to the action of…

  2. 3D simulation of AFM non-uniform piezoelectric micro-cantilever with various geometries subjected to the tip-sample forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Alireza Habibnejad; Abdi, Moein

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful instrument for investigation of surface topography at different workspaces. It is important to understand the dynamic behavior of AFM to improve its performance. 3D numerical method is suitable in order to simulate experimental conditions. This paper has investigated modeling and dynamic simulation of rectangular, Dagger and V-shaped geometries of AFM piezoelectric micro-cantilever (MC) with two electrode layers in the air environment. For a better understanding of the system dynamic, multi-layer MC dynamic equation has been derived. Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been used for modeling the AFM cantilever. Hamilton's principle has been used for the MC modeling and the finite element method (FEM) has been applied for its discretization. In 3D, with respect to the tip-sample forces piezoelectric MC has been simulated via the COMSOL software. The frequency and time responses have been also investigated. The topographies have been performed on different surfaces with various roughness's types in the tapping and non-contact mode. The results of these two methods have been compared with experimental results. Moreover, the effects of MC geometrical parameters on surfaces topography and frequency responses have been studied and optimal dimensions of topographies have been obtained for each of the beam geometries. Simulations of various tip geometries have been performed in order to examine the effects of tip dimensions on the frequency and time responses. Furthermore, the effect of tip displacement on the frequency response has been investigated for different MC lengths.

  3. Tapé Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Djien, Ko Swan

    1972-01-01

    Microorganisms isolated from ragi, originally obtained from Indonesia, were selected for their ability to convert steamed glutinous rice into tapé, an Indonesian fermented food. A mixture of Chlamydomucor oryzae and Endomycopsis fibuliger had good fermentation characteristics. Prepared starters, produced by growing pure cultures on rice and drying them, were as active as pure cultures grown for 4 days on Difco mycological agar slants at 30 C. PMID:16349926

  4. Combined quantitative ultrasonic and time-resolved interaction force AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Z.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a method where quantitative ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) is achieved during time-resolved interaction force (TRIF) imaging in intermittent contact mode. The method uses a calibration procedure for quantitative UAFM. It improves elasticity measurements of stiff regions of surfaces while retaining the capabilities of the TRIF mode for topography, adhesion, dissipation, and elasticity measurements on soft regions of sample surfaces. This combination is especially advantageous when measuring and imaging samples with broad stiffness range in a nondestructive manner. The experiments utilize an active AFM probe with high bandwidth and the UAFM calibration is performed by measuring the magnitude of the time-resolved UAFM signal at a judiciously chosen frequency for different contact stiffness values during individual taps. Improved sensitivity to stiff surface elasticity is demonstrated on a special sample. The results show that combining UAFM with TRIF provides 2.5 GPa (5%) standard deviation on the silicon surface reduced Young's modulus, representing 5× improvement over using only TRIF mode imaging.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Antigenic Peptides in Complex with TAP

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Elisa; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) selectively translocates antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum. Loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and proofreading of these bound epitopes are orchestrated within the macromolecular peptide-loading complex, which assembles on TAP. This heterodimeric ABC-binding cassette (ABC) transport complex is therefore a major component in the adaptive immune response against virally or malignantly transformed cells. Its pivotal role predestines TAP as a target for infectious diseases and malignant disorders. The development of therapies or drugs therefore requires a detailed comprehension of structure and function of this ABC transporter, but our knowledge about various aspects is still insufficient. This review highlights recent achievements on the structure and dynamics of antigenic peptides in complex with TAP. Understanding the binding mode of antigenic peptides in the TAP complex will crucially impact rational design of inhibitors, drug development, or vaccination strategies. PMID:28194151

  6. Target Acquisition and Positioning Study (TAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Scientific Instruments for the Large Space Telescope (LST) require a high degree of accuracy for positioning targets within their respective entrance apertures. The acquisition, verification of position, and guidance during an experiment must be accomplished with a minimum loss of observing time for the maximum effectiveness of the total mission. This study evaluates several viable concepts and modes of operation that are applicable for a Target Acquisition and Positioning System (TAPS) that is responsive to the LST instrument requirements.

  7. Comparison of the ability of quantitative parameters to differentiate surface texture of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Bethany; Caragianis Broadbridge, Christine; DaPonte, John S.; Gherasimova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of several texture analysis parameters to differentiate textured samples from a smooth control on images obtained with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Surface roughness plays a major role in the realm of material science, especially in integrated electronic devices. As these devices become smaller and smaller, new materials with better electrical properties are needed. New materials with smoother surface morphology have been found to have superior electrical properties than their rougher counterparts. Therefore, in many cases surface texture is indicative of the electrical properties that material will have. Physical vapor deposition techniques such as Jet Vapor Deposition and Molecular Beam Epitaxy are being utilized to synthesize these materials as they have been found to create pure and uniform thin layers. For the current study, growth parameters were varied to produce a spectrum of textured samples. The focus of this study was the image processing techniques associated with quantifying surface texture. As a result of the limited sample size, there was no attempt to draw conclusions about specimen processing methods. The samples were imaged using an AFM in tapping mode. In the process of collecting images, it was discovered that roughness data was much better depicted in the microscope's "height" mode as opposed to "equal area" mode. The AFM quantified the surface texture of each image by returning RMS roughness and the first order histogram statistics of mean roughness, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis. Color images from the AFM were then processed on an off line computer running NIH ImageJ with an image texture plug in. This plug in produced another set of first order statistics computed from each images' histogram as well as second order statistics computed from each images' cooccurrence matrix. The second order statistics, which were originally proposed by Haralick, include contrast, angular

  8. Optical waveguide taps on silicon CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Vincent E.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2000-11-01

    As silicon CMOS circuit technology is scaled beyond the GHz range, both chipmakers and board makers face increasingly difficult challenges in implementing high speed metal interconnects. Metal traces are limited in density-speed performance due to the skin effect, electrical conductivity, and cross talk. Optical based interconnects have higher available bandwidth by virtue of the extremely high carrier frequencies of optical signals (> 100 THz). For this work, an effort has been made to determine an optimal optical tap receiver design for integration with commercial CMOS processes. Candidate waveguide tap technologies were considered in terms of optical loss, bandwidth, economy, and CMOS process compatibility. A new device, which is based on a variation of the multimode interference effect, has been found to be especially promising. BeamProp simulation results show nearly zero excess optical loss for the design, and up to 70% coupling into a 25 micrometer traveling wave CMOS photodetector device. Single-mode waveguides make the design readily compatible with wavelength multiplexing/demultiplexing elements. Polymer waveguide materials are targeted for fabrication due to planarization properties, low cost, broad index control, and poling abilities for modulation/tuning functions. Low cost, silicon CMOS based processing makes the new tap technology especially suitable for computer chip and board level interconnects, as well as metro fiber-to-the- home/desk telecommunications applications.

  9. GaN nanowire tip for high aspect ratio nano-scale AFM metrology (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzadirad, Mahmoud; Dawson, Noel; Nami, Mohsen; Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin K.; Feezell, Daniel F.; Busani, Tito L.

    2016-09-01

    In this study we introduce Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowire (NW) as high aspect ratio tip with excellent durability for nano-scale metrology. GaN NWs have superior mechanical property and young modulus compare to commercial Si and Carbon tips which results in having less bending issue during measurement. The GaN NWs are prepared via two different methods: i) Catalyst-free selected area growth, using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD), ii) top-down approach by employing Au nanoparticles as the mask material in dry-etch process. To achieve small diameter tips, the semipolar planes of the NWs grown by MOCVD are etched using AZ400k. The diameter of the NWs fabricated using the top down process is controlled by using different size of nanoparticles and by Inductively Coupled Plasma etching. NWs with various diameters were manipulated on Si cantilevers using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) to make tips for AFM measurement. A Si (110) substrate containing nano-scale grooves with vertical 900 walls were used as a sample for inspection. AFM measurements were carried out in tapping modes for both types of nanowires (top-down and bottom-up grown nanowires) and results are compared with conventional Si and carbon nanotube tips. It is shown our fabricated tips are robust and have improved edge resolution over conventional Si tips. GaN tips made with NW's fabricated using our top down method are also shown to retain the gold nanoparticle at tip, which showed enhanced field effects in Raman spectroscopy.

  10. Physics of beer tapping.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; Casado-Chacón, Almudena; Fuster, Daniel

    2014-11-21

    The popular bar prank known in colloquial English as beer tapping consists in hitting the top of a beer bottle with a solid object, usually another bottle, to trigger the foaming over of the former within a few seconds. Despite the trick being known for a long time, to the best of our knowledge, the phenomenon still lacks scientific explanation. Although it seems natural to think that shock-induced cavitation enhances the diffusion of CO2 from the supersaturated bulk liquid into the bubbles by breaking them up, the subtle mechanism by which this happens remains unknown. Here, we show that the overall foaming-over process can be divided into three stages where different physical phenomena take place in different time scales: namely, the bubble-collapse (or cavitation) stage, the diffusion-driven stage, and the buoyancy-driven stage. In the bubble-collapse stage, the impact generates a train of expansion-compression waves in the liquid that leads to the fragmentation of preexisting gas cavities. Upon bubble fragmentation, the sudden increase of the interface-area-to-volume ratio enhances mass transfer significantly, which makes the bubble volume grow by a large factor until CO2 is locally depleted. At that point buoyancy takes over, making the bubble clouds rise and eventually form buoyant vortex rings whose volume grows fast due to the feedback between the buoyancy-induced rising speed and the advection-enhanced CO2 transport from the bulk liquid to the bubble. The physics behind this explosive process sheds insight into the dynamics of geological phenomena such as limnic eruptions.

  11. Physics of Beer Tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; Casado-Chacón, Almudena; Fuster, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The popular bar prank known in colloquial English as beer tapping consists in hitting the top of a beer bottle with a solid object, usually another bottle, to trigger the foaming over of the former within a few seconds. Despite the trick being known for a long time, to the best of our knowledge, the phenomenon still lacks scientific explanation. Although it seems natural to think that shock-induced cavitation enhances the diffusion of CO2 from the supersaturated bulk liquid into the bubbles by breaking them up, the subtle mechanism by which this happens remains unknown. Here, we show that the overall foaming-over process can be divided into three stages where different physical phenomena take place in different time scales: namely, the bubble-collapse (or cavitation) stage, the diffusion-driven stage, and the buoyancy-driven stage. In the bubble-collapse stage, the impact generates a train of expansion-compression waves in the liquid that leads to the fragmentation of preexisting gas cavities. Upon bubble fragmentation, the sudden increase of the interface-area-to-volume ratio enhances mass transfer significantly, which makes the bubble volume grow by a large factor until CO2 is locally depleted. At that point buoyancy takes over, making the bubble clouds rise and eventually form buoyant vortex rings whose volume grows fast due to the feedback between the buoyancy-induced rising speed and the advection-enhanced CO2 transport from the bulk liquid to the bubble. The physics behind this explosive process sheds insight into the dynamics of geological phenomena such as limnic eruptions.

  12. New insights into morphology of high performance BHJ photovoltaics revealed by high resolution AFM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Feng; Yagihashi, Noritoshi; Nakaya, Masafumi; Ferdous, Sunzida; Liang, Xiaobin; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Nakajima, Ken; Russell, Thomas P

    2014-10-08

    Direct imaging of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin film morphology in polymer-based solar cells is essential to understand device function and optimize efficiency. The morphology of the BHJ active layer consists of bicontinuous domains of the donor and acceptor materials, having characteristic length scales of several tens of nanometers, that reduces charge recombination, enhances charge separation, and enables electron and hole transport to their respective electrodes. Direct imaging of the morphology from the molecular to macroscopic level, though, is lacking. Though transmission electron tomography provides a 3D, real-space image of the morphology, quantifying the structure is not possible. Here we used high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping and nanomechanical modes to investigate the BHJ active layer morphology that, when combined with Ar(+) etching, provided unique insights with unparalleled spatial resolution. PCBM was seen to form a network that interpenetrated into the fibrillar network of the hole-conducting polymer, both being imbedded in a mixture of the two components. The free surface was found to be enriched with polymer crystals having a "face-on" orientation and the morphology at the anode interface was markedly different.

  13. Cryogenic AFM-STM for mesoscopic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sueur, H.

    Electronic spectroscopy based on electron tunneling gives access to the electronic density of states (DOS) in conductive materials, and thus provides detailed information about their electronic properties. During this thesis work, we have developed a microscope in order to perform spatially resolved (10 nm) tunneling spectroscopy, with an unprecedented energy resolution (10 μeV), on individual nanocircuits. This machine combines an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM mode) together with a Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope (STS mode) and functions at very low temperatures (30 mK). In the AFM mode, the sample topography is recorded using a piezoelectric quartz tuning fork, which allows us to locate and image nanocircuits. Tunneling can then be performed on conductive areas of the circuit. With this microscope, we have measured the local DOS in a hybrid Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor (S-N-S) structure. In such circuit, the electronic properties of N and S are modified by the superconducting proximity effect. In particular, for short N wires, we have observed a minigap independent of position in the DOS of the N wire, as was previously predicted. Moreover, when varying the superconducting phase difference between the S electrodes, we have measured the modification of the minigap and its disappearance when the phase difference equals π. Our experimental results for the DOS, and its dependences (on phase, position, N length), are quantitatively accounted for by the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity. Some predictions of this theory are observed for the first time. La spectroscopie électronique basée sur l'effet tunnel donne accès à la densité d'états des électrons (DOS) dans les matériaux conducteurs, et renseigne ainsi en détail sur leurs propriétés électroniques. Au cours de cette thèse, nous avons développé un microscope permettant d'effectuer la spectroscopie tunnel résolue spatialement (10 nm) de nanocircuits individuels, avec une r

  14. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  15. Biophysical properties of cardiomyocyte surface explored by multiparametric AFM.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, Georges; Cauquil, Marie; Severac, Childerick; Lachaize, Véronique; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline; Dague, Etienne

    2017-03-02

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PeakForce QNM) multiparametric AFM mode was adapted to qualitative and quantitative study of the lateral membrane of cardiomyocytes (CMs), extending this powerful mode to the study of soft cells. On living CM, PeakForce QNM depicted the crests and hollows periodic alternation of cell surface architecture previously described using AFM Force Volume (FV) mode. PeakForce QNM analysis provided better resolution in terms of pixel number compared to FV mode and reduced acquisition time, thus limiting the consequences of spontaneous living adult CM dedifferentiation once isolated from the cardiac tissue. PeakForce QNM mode on fixed CMs clearly visualized subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and their loss following formamide treatment, concomitant with the interfibrillar mitochondria climbing up and forming heaps at the cell surface. Interestingly, formamide-promoted SSM loss allowed visualization of the sarcomeric apparatus ultrastructure below the plasma membrane. High PeakForce QNM resolution led to better contrasted mechanical maps than FV mode and provided correlation between adhesion, dissipation, mechanical and topographical maps. Modified hydrophobic AFM tip enhanced contrast on adhesion and dissipation maps and suggested that CM surface crests and hollows exhibit distinct chemical properties. Finally, two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to objectively quantify AFM maps allowed characterization of periodicity of both sarcomeric Z-line and M-band. Overall, this study validated PeakForce QNM as a valuable and innovative mode for the exploration of living and fixed CMs. In the future, it could be applied to depict cell membrane architectural, mechanical and chemical defects as well as sarcomeric abnormalities associated with cardiac diseases.

  16. Fractal properties of macrophage membrane studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Bitler, A; Dover, R; Shai, Y

    2012-12-01

    Complexity of cell membrane poses difficulties to quantify corresponding morphology changes during cell proliferation and damage. We suggest using fractal dimension of the cell membrane to quantify its complexity and track changes produced by various treatments. Glutaraldehyde fixed mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage membranes were chosen as model system and imaged in PeakForce QNM (quantitative nanomechanics) mode of AFM (atomic force microscope). The morphology of the membranes was characterized by fractal dimension. The parameter was calculated for set of AFM images by three different methods. The same calculations were done for the AFM images of macrophages treated with colchicine, an inhibitor of the microtubule polymerization, and microtubule stabilizing agent taxol. We conclude that fractal dimension can be additional and useful parameter to characterize the cell membrane complexity and track the morphology changes produced by different treatments.

  17. Temporal control mechanism in equaled interval tapping.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M

    1996-05-01

    Subjects who were at intermediate levels of musical performance made equaled interval tapping in several tempos. The temporal fluctuation for the tapping was observed and analysed. The power spectrum of the fluctuation showed a critical phenomenon at around a frequency which corresponds to the period of 20 taps, for all tempos and all subjects, i.e., the slope of the spectrum was flat or had a positive value in the high frequency region above the critical frequency but it increased as the frequency decreased in the low frequency region below the critical frequency. Moreover, auto-regressive models and Akaike's information criterion were introduced to determine the critical tap number. The order of the best auto-regressive model for the temporal fluctuation data was distributed around 20 taps. These results show that the memory capacity of 20 taps governs the control of equaled interval tapping. To interpret the critical phenomenon of 20 taps with the memory capacity of the short term memory, the so called magic number seven, a simple chunking assumption was introduced; subjects might have unconsciously chunked every three taps during the tapping. If the chunking assumption is true, when subjects consciously chunk every seven taps, the memory capacity of taps should shift to about 50 taps. To test if the assumption is true or not, subjects made a three-beat rhythm tapping and a seven-beat rhythm tapping with equaled intervals. As a result, the memory capacity for these accented tappings were also estimated as 20 taps. This suggests that the critical phenomenon cannot be explained by the chunking assumption and the magic number seven, rather this finding suggests that there exists a memory capacity of 20 taps and this is used for equaled interval tapping.

  18. Radioactive substances in tap water.

    PubMed

    Atsuumi, Ryo; Endo, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Akihiko; Kannotou, Yasumitu; Nakada, Masahiro; Yabuuchi, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    A 9.0 magnitude (M) earthquake with an epicenter off the Sanriku coast occurred at 14: 46 on March 11, 2011. TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F-1 NPP) was struck by the earthquake and its resulting tsunami. Consequently a critical nuclear disaster developed, as a large quantity of radioactive materials was released due to a hydrogen blast. On March 16(th), 2011, radioiodine and radioactive cesium were detected at levels of 177 Bq/kg and 58 Bq/kg, respectively, in tap water in Fukushima city (about 62km northwest of TEPCO F-1 NPP). On March 20th, radioiodine was detected in tap water at a level of 965 Bq/kg, which is over the value-index of restrictions on food and drink intake (radioiodine 300 Bq/kg (infant intake 100 Bq/kg)) designated by the Nuclear Safety Commission. Therefore, intake restriction measures were taken regarding drinking water. After that, although the all intake restrictions were lifted, in order to confirm the safety of tap water, an inspection system was established to monitor all tap water in the prefecture. This system has confirmed that there has been no detection of radioiodine or radioactive cesium in tap water in the prefecture since May 5(th), 2011. Furthermore, radioactive strontium ((89) Sr, (90)Sr) and plutonium ((238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu) in tap water and the raw water supply were measured. As a result, (89) Sr, (238)Pu, (239)Pu+(240)Pu were undetectable and although (90)Sr was detected, its committed effective dose of 0.00017 mSv was much lower than the yearly 0.1 mSv of the World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality. In addition, the results did not show any deviations from past inspection results.

  19. High-speed atomic force microscopy and peak force tapping control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuiqing; Mininni, Lars; Hu, Yan; Erina, Natalia; Kindt, Johannes; Su, Chanmin

    2012-03-01

    ITRS Roadmap requires defect size measurement below 10 nanometers and challenging classifications for both blank and patterned wafers and masks. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is capable of providing metrology measurement in 3D at sub-nanometer accuracy but has long suffered from drawbacks in throughput and limitation of slow topography imaging without chemical information. This presentation focus on two disruptive technology developments, namely high speed AFM and quantitative nanomechanical mapping, which enables high throughput measurement with capability of identifying components through concurrent physical property imaging. The high speed AFM technology has allowed the imaging speed increase by 10-100 times without loss of the data quality. Such improvement enables the speed of defect review on a wafer to increase from a few defects per hour to nearly 100 defects an hour, approaching the requirements of ITRS Roadmap. Another technology development, Peak Force Tapping, substantially simplified the close loop system response, leading to self-optimization of most challenging samples groups to generate expert quality data. More importantly, AFM also simultaneously provides a series of mechanical property maps with a nanometer spatial resolution during defect review. These nanomechanical maps (including elastic modulus, hardness, and surface adhesion) provide complementary information for elemental analysis, differentiate defect materials by their physical properties, and assist defect classification beyond topographic measurements. This paper will explain the key enabling technologies, namely high speed tip-scanning AFM using innovative flexure design and control algorithm. Another critical element is AFM control using Peak Force Tapping, in which the instantaneous tip-sample interaction force is measured and used to derive a full suite of physical properties at each imaging pixel. We will provide examples of defect review data on different wafers and media disks

  20. Underwater cold tap machine tested

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Tests are complete on a strategic cold tap machine for underwater lines. The system was designed around Total's Norway-UK Frigg gas line. It provides a permanent, easily mobilized, mechanical insurance against damage to the Frigg line but also provides a proven, workable principle for the repair or modification of other lines. The design of the system is discussed.

  1. Geothermal Energy: Tapping the Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Ground source geothermal energy enables one to tap into the earth's stored renewable energy for heating and cooling facilities. Proper application of ground-source geothermal technology can have a dramatic impact on the efficiency and financial performance of building energy utilization (30%+). At the same time, using this alternative energy…

  2. Formation of sensor array on the AFM chip surface by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumov, I. D.; Kanashenko, S. L.; Ziborov, V. S.; Ivanov, Yu D.; Archakov, A. I.; Pleshakova, T. O.

    2017-01-01

    Development of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanotechnological approaches to highly sensitive detection of proteins is a perspective direction in biomedical research. These approaches use AFM chips to concentrate the target proteins from the test solution volume (buffer solution, diluted biological fluid) onto the chip surface for their subsequent registration on the chip surface by AFM. Atomic force microscope is a molecular detector that enables protein detection at ultra-low (subfemtomolar) concentrations in single-molecule counting mode. Due to extremely high sensitivity of AFM, its application for multiplexed protein detection is of great interest for use in proteomics and diagnostic applications. In this study, AFM chips containing an array of sensor areas have been fabricated. Magnetron sputtering of chromium and tungsten nanolayers has been used to form optically visible metallic marks on the AFM chip surface to provide necessary precision of AFM probe positioning against each sensor area for scanning. It has been demonstrated that the marks formed by magnetron sputtering of Cr and W are stable on the surface of the AFM chips during the following activation and intensive washing of this surface. The results obtained in our present study allow application of the developed chips for multiplexed protein analysis by AFM.

  3. Use of functional polymorphisms to elucidate the peptide binding site of TAP complexes

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jie; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Raghavan, Malini

    2015-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen to enable immune surveillance by CD8+ T cells. Peptide transport is preceded by peptide binding to a cytosol-accessible surface of TAP1/TAP2 complexes, but the location of the TAP peptide-binding pocket remains unknown. Guided by the known contributions of polymorphic TAP variants to peptide selection, we combined homology modeling of TAP with experimental measurements to identify several TAP residues that interact with peptides. Models for peptide-TAP complexes were generated, which indicate bent conformation for peptides. The peptide-binding site of TAP is located at the hydrophobic boundary of the cytosolic membrane leaflet, with striking parallels to the glutathione binding site of NaAtm1, a transporter that functions in bacterial heavy metal detoxification. These studies illustrate the conservation of the ligand recognition modes of bacterial and mammalians transporters involved in peptide-guided cellular surveillance. PMID:26324772

  4. AFM-Based Mechanical Nanomanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolsi, Fakhreddine

    2011-12-01

    Advances in several research areas increase the need for more sophisticated fabrication techniques and better performing materials. Tackling this problem from a bottom-up perspective is currently an active field of research. The bottom-up fabrication procedure offers sub-nanometer accurate manipulation. At this time, candidates to achieve nanomanipulation include chemical (self-assembly), biotechnology methods (DNA-based), or using controllable physical forces (e.g. electrokinetic forces, mechanical forces). In this thesis, new methods and techniques for mechanical nanomanipulation using probe force interaction are developed. The considered probes are commonly used in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) for high resolution imaging. AFM-based mechanical nanomanipulation will enable arranging nanoscale entities such as nanotubes and molecules in a precise and controlled manner to assemble and produce novel devices and systems at the nanoscale. The novelty of this research stems from the development of new modeling of the physics and mechanics of the tip interaction with nanoscale entities, coupled with the development of new smart cantilevers with multiple degrees of freedom. The gained knowledge from the conducted simulations and analysis is expected to enable true precision and repeatability of nanomanipulation tasks which is not feasible with existing methods and technologies.

  5. New polymorphisms within the human TAP1 and TAP2 coding regions

    SciTech Connect

    Moins-Teisserenc, H.; Bobrynina, V.; Loiseau, P.; Charron, D.

    1994-12-31

    Two genes, TAP1 and TAP2, both located in the HLS class II region, have been identified as genes coding for membrane transporters belonging to the ABC (ATP Binding Cassette) superfamily. The products of the TAP1 and TAP2 genes form an heterodimeric complex which delivers cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum prior to the assembly of class I molecules. Previous studies in homozygous cell lines have revealed a limited degree of allelic variation in humans: only two TAP1 and four TAP2 polymorphic sites. In addition to these TAP1 polymorphisms, three others were identified, two of which were found in diabetic patients. For the TAP2 gene, four additional mutations have been reported. In the present study, polymorphism within TAP1 and TAP2 cDNA was analyzed by the single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method in 32 HLA homozygous cell lines from the Tenth International Histocompatibility Workshop. Since previous studies had suggested that polymorphisms of the TAP genes were localized in the C-terminal half of the molecules, we concentrated our investigation on the 3` half of TAP1 and TAP2 coding sequences. In summary, our study has revealed two new substitutions in TAP2 cDNA. One, located in the ATP binding site, is a coding substitution exchanging an Arginine to a Cysteine. This mutation may increase the potential combinations of dimorphisms and thus the number of TAP2 alleles, and may be functionally relevant. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. LP(01)-LP(02) interferometric fiber-optic sensing using phase-dependent loss in a light tap.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Posey, R; Phillips, L; Diggs, D

    1996-07-15

    The intensity of light radiated from a fiber-optic light tap is observed to depend sensitively on the phase difference between LP(01) and LP(02) modes in a few-mode fiber. This observation is used to design a novel dual-mode interferometer in which light loss through the light tap is monitored, eliminating the need for a bulky spatial filter at the exit end of the fiber. Application of the device as an interferometric temperature sensor is described.

  7. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  8. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; ...

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  9. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  10. TAP 3: Training Program Support Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Training Accreditation Program (TAP) establishes objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine readiness for accreditation. TAP 3 has been developed to assist the contractor in preparing the initial Self-Evaluation Report, Training Program Accreditation Plan, and the CSER (contractor self-evaluation report).

  11. Self-Advancing Step-Tap Drills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R.; Camarda, Charles J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Franklin, Larry D.

    2007-01-01

    Self-advancing tool bits that are hybrids of drills and stepped taps make it possible to form threaded holes wider than about 1/2 in. (about 13 mm) without applying any more axial force than is necessary for forming narrower pilot holes. These self-advancing stepped-tap drills were invented for use by space-suited astronauts performing repairs on reinforced carbon/carbon space-shuttle leading edges during space walks, in which the ability to apply axial drilling forces is severely limited. Self-advancing stepped-tap drills could also be used on Earth for making wide holes without applying large axial forces. A self-advancing stepped-tap drill (see figure) includes several sections having progressively larger diameters, typically in increments between 0.030 and 0.060 in. (between about 0.8 and about 1.5 mm). The tip section, which is the narrowest, is a pilot drill bit that typically has a diameter between 1/8 and 3/16 in. (between about 3.2 and about 4.8 mm). The length of the pilot-drill section is chosen, according to the thickness of the object to be drilled and tapped, so that the pilot hole is completed before engagement of the first tap section. Provided that the cutting-edge geometry of the drill bit is optimized for the material to be drilled, only a relatively small axial force [typically of the order of a few pounds (of the order of 10 newtons)] must be applied during drilling of the pilot hole. Once the first tap section engages the pilot hole, it is no longer necessary for the drill operator to apply axial force: the thread engagement between the tap and the workpiece provides the axial force to advance the tool bit. Like the pilot-drill section, each tap section must be long enough to complete its hole before engagement of the next, slightly wider tap section. The precise values of the increments in diameter, the thread pitch, the rake angle of the tap cutting edge, and other geometric parameters of the tap sections must be chosen, in consideration of

  12. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  13. Lower extremity kinetics in tap dance.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Lester; Bronner, Shaw; Agraharasamakulam, Sujani; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi

    2010-01-01

    Tap dance is a unique performing art utilizing the lower extremities as percussion instruments. In a previous study these authors reported decreased injury prevalence among tap dancers compared to other dance and sports participants. No biomechanical analyses of tap dance exist to explain this finding. The purpose of the current pilot study was to provide a preliminary overview of normative peak kinetic and kinematic data, based on the hypothesis that tap dance generates relatively low ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments. Six professional tap dancers performed four common tap dance sequences that produced data captured by the use of a force platform and a five-camera motion analysis system. The mean vertical ground reaction force for all sequences was found to be 2.06+/-0.55 BW. Mean peak sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane joint moments (hip, knee, and ankle) ranged from 0.07 to 2.62 N.m/kg. These small ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments support our hypothesis, and may explain the relatively low injury incidence in tap dancers. Nevertheless, the analysis is highly complex, and other factors remain to be studied and clarified.

  14. Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) Flight Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maris, John M.; Haynes, Mark A.; Wing, David J.; Burke, Kelly A.; Henderson, Jeff; Woods, Sharon E.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) is a cockpit decision support tool that has the potential to achieve significant fuel and time savings when it is embedded in the data-rich Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) airspace. To address a key step towards the operational deployment of TAP and the NASA concept of Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests (TASAR), a system evaluation was conducted in a representative flight environment in November, 2013. Numerous challenges were overcome to achieve this goal, including the porting of the foundational Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) software from its original simulation-based, avionics-embedded environment to an Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) platform. A flight-test aircraft was modified to host the EFB, the TAP application, an Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) processor, and a satellite broadband datalink. Nine Evaluation Pilots conducted 26 hours of TAP assessments using four route profiles in the complex eastern and north-eastern United States airspace. Extensive avionics and video data were collected, supplemented by comprehensive inflight and post-flight questionnaires. TAP was verified to function properly in the live avionics and ADS-B environment, characterized by recorded data dropouts, latency, and ADS-B message fluctuations. Twelve TAP-generated optimization requests were submitted to ATC, of which nine were approved, and all of which resulted in fuel and/or time savings. Analysis of subjective workload data indicated that pilot interaction with TAP during flight operations did not induce additional cognitive loading. Additionally, analyses of post-flight questionnaire data showed that the pilots perceived TAP to be useful, understandable, intuitive, and easy to use. All program objectives were met, and the next phase of TAP development and evaluations with partner airlines is in planning for 2015.

  15. Finger tapping in musicians and nonmusicians.

    PubMed

    Franĕk, M; Mates, J; Radil, T; Beck, K; Pöppel, E

    1991-12-01

    Timing plays an important role in perceiving and performing music. Finger tapping has been successfully used for analyzing timing processes (Fraisse, 1966, Franĕk et al., 1987, 1988). The aim of this study is to determine differences between musically trained and untrained subjects in their ability to follow repetitive rhythmic tonal patterns by finger tapping. It has been found previously (Povel, 1981; Smith, 1983) that time estimation differs among musicians and nonmusicians under certain conditions. The results presented here show that motor timing revealed by tapping is more accurate in musicians than in nonmusicians.

  16. Arching in tapped deposits of hard disks.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Valluzzi, Marcos G; Valluzzi, Lucas G

    2006-05-01

    We simulate the tapping of a bed of hard disks in a rectangular box by using a pseudodynamic algorithm. In these simulations, arches are unambiguously defined and we can analyze their properties as a function of the tapping amplitude. We find that an order-disorder transition occurs within a narrow range of tapping amplitudes as has been seen by others. Arches are always present in the system although they exhibit regular shapes in the ordered regime. Interestingly, an increase in the number of arches does not always correspond to a reduction in the packing fraction. This is in contrast with what is found in three-dimensional systems.

  17. TAP1 and TAP2 polymorphisms analysis in northwestern Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Correa, P; Molina, J; Pinto, L; Arcos-Burgos, M; Herrera, M; Anaya, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Unselected patients with SLE (n=140) and controls (n=120) matched for sex, age, and ethnicity were analysed. Clinical manifestations, clinical activity, and severity of disease were recorded. Autoantibodies were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). TAP1 and TAP2 polymorphisms were determined by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. A Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test, microdifferentiation analysis, linkage disequilibrium analysis, and haplotype and allele frequency comparisons were performed. Results: The TAP2 variant Val379/Ala565/Ala665 (allele TAP2*0201) was associated with SLE (56% v 39%; odds ratio=2, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 3.30, pc=0.03). There was no stratification between patient and control samples. Linkage disequilibrium between TAP1 and TAP2 loci was found in controls but not in patients. An excess in the number of heterozygotes in the TAP2 locus was found in patients. No association between TAP1 and TAP2 variants and the presence of autoantibodies, clinical expression, or severity of disease was found. Conclusions: The TAP2 locus influences susceptibility to SLE in our patient group; however, it has no significant effect on the immune response or on the clinical course of the disease. PMID:12634240

  18. Energy-Saving RAM-Power Tap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Alan Roy

    1987-01-01

    Reverse-flow HEXFET(R) minimizes voltage drop and power dissipation. HEXFET(R) scheme reduces voltage drop by approximately 80 percent. Design for power tap for random-access memory (RAM) has potential application in digital systems.

  19. 49 CFR 192.151 - Tapping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... need for the use of outside-sealing service connections, tapping saddles, or other fixtures must...

  20. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  1. Graphene MEMS: AFM probe performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Rasool, Haider Imad; Weiller, Bruce H; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-05-28

    We explore the feasibility of growing a continuous layer of graphene in prepatterned substrates, like an engineered silicon wafer, and we apply this as a mold for the fabrication of AFM probes. This fabrication method proves the fabrication of SU-8 devices coated with graphene in a full-wafer parallel technology and with high yield. It also demonstrates that graphene coating enhances the functionality of SU-8 probes, turning them conductive and more resistant to wear. Furthermore, it opens new experimental possibilities such as studying graphene-graphene interaction at the nanoscale with the precision of an AFM or the exploration of properties in nonplanar graphene layers.

  2. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.

  3. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  4. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  5. Gaining Momentum, Losing Ground. Tapping America's Potential (TAP) Progress Report, 2008. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapping America's Potential, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In July 2005, Business Roundtable and fifteen of America's most prominent business organizations--Tapping America's Potential, the TAP coalition--issued a report stating that "one of the pillars of American economic prosperity--U.S. scientific and technological superiority--is beginning to atrophy even as other nations are developing their own…

  6. Reflex Augmentation of a Tap-Elicited Eyeblink: The Effects of Tone Frequency and Tap Intensity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Michelle E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes two experiments that examined whether the amplitude of the human eyeblink by a mild tap between the eyebrows can be increased if a brief tone is presented simultaneously with the tap and how these effects change from newborn infants to adults. (HOD)

  7. Age-related changes in the bimanual advantage and in brain oscillatory activity during tapping movements suggest a decline in processing sensory reafference.

    PubMed

    Sallard, Etienne; Spierer, Lucas; Ludwig, Catherine; Deiber, Marie-Pierre; Barral, Jérôme

    2014-02-01

    Deficits in the processing of sensory reafferences have been suggested as accounting for age-related decline in motor coordination. Whether sensory reafferences are accurately processed can be assessed based on the bimanual advantage in tapping: because of tapping with an additional hand increases kinesthetic reafferences, bimanual tapping is characterized by a reduced inter-tap interval variability than unimanual tapping. A suppression of the bimanual advantage would thus indicate a deficit in sensory reafference. We tested whether elderly indeed show a reduced bimanual advantage by measuring unimanual (UM) and bimanual (BM) self-paced tapping performance in groups of young (n = 29) and old (n = 27) healthy adults. Electroencephalogram was recorded to assess the underlying patterns of oscillatory activity, a neurophysiological mechanism advanced to support the integration of sensory reafferences. Behaviorally, there was a significant interaction between the factors tapping condition and age group at the level of the inter-tap interval variability, driven by a lower variability in BM than UM tapping in the young, but not in the elderly group. This result indicates that in self-paced tapping, the bimanual advantage is absent in elderly. Electrophysiological results revealed an interaction between tapping condition and age group on low beta band (14-20 Hz) activity. Beta activity varied depending on the tapping condition in the elderly but not in the young group. Source estimations localized this effect within left superior parietal and left occipital areas. We interpret our results in terms of engagement of different mechanisms in the elderly depending on the tapping mode: a 'kinesthetic' mechanism for UM and a 'visual imagery' mechanism for BM tapping movement.

  8. Self-advancing step-tap tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R. (Inventor); Penner, Ronald K. (Inventor); Franklin, Larry D. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and tool for simultaneously forming a bore in a work piece and forming a series of threads in said bore. In an embodiment, the tool has a predetermined axial length, a proximal end, and a distal end, said tool comprising: a shank located at said proximal end; a pilot drill portion located at said distal end; and a mill portion intermediately disposed between said shank and said pilot drill portion. The mill portion is comprised of at least two drill-tap sections of predetermined axial lengths and at least one transition section of predetermined axial length, wherein each of said at least one transition section is sandwiched between a distinct set of two of said at least two drill-tap sections. The at least two drill-tap sections are formed of one or more drill-tap cutting teeth spirally increasing along said at least two drill-tap sections, wherein said tool is self-advanced in said work piece along said formed threads, and wherein said tool simultaneously forms said bore and said series of threads along a substantially similar longitudinal axis.

  9. Development of a 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Häßler-Grohne, Wolfgang; Hüser, Dorothee; Wolff, Helmut; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Koenders, Ludger; Bosse, Harald

    2011-09-01

    The development of advanced lithography requires highly accurate 3D metrology methods for small line structures of both wafers and photomasks. Development of a new 3D atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM) with vertical and torsional oscillation modes is introduced in this paper. In its configuration, the AFM probe is oscillated using two piezo actuators driven at vertical and torsional resonance frequencies of the cantilever. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. In addition, a so-called vector approach probing (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point-by-point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Compared to conventional AFMs, where the tip is kept continuously in interaction with the surface, the tip-sample interaction time using the VAP method is greatly reduced and consequently the tip wear is reduced. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. A measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip could be performed with a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A line structure of a Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt photomask with a nominal width of 300 nm has been measured using a flared tip AFM probe. The repeatability of the middle CD values reaches 0.28 nm (1σ). A long-term stability investigation shows that the 3D-AFM has a high stability of better than 1 nm within 197 measurements taken over 30 h, which also confirms the very low tip wear.

  10. Fractal analysis of AFM images of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Sueiras, Vivian; Ziebarth, Noël Marysa

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the ultrastructural details of the surface of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. One representative image acquired of Bowman's membrane of a human cornea was investigated. The three-dimensional (3-D) surface of the sample was imaged using AFM in contact mode, while the sample was completely submerged in optisol solution. Height and deflection images were acquired at multiple scan lengths using the MFP-3D AFM system software (Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA), based in IGOR Pro (WaveMetrics, Lake Oswego, OR). A novel approach, based on computational algorithms for fractal analysis of surfaces applied for AFM data, was utilized to analyze the surface structure. The surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension, D, provided quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry. Detailed characterization of the surface topography was obtained using statistical parameters, in accordance with ISO 25178-2: 2012. Results obtained by fractal analysis confirm the relationship between the value of the fractal dimension and the statistical surface roughness parameters. The surface structure of Bowman's membrane of the human cornea is complex. The analyzed AFM images confirm a fractal nature of the surface, which is not taken into account by classical surface statistical parameters. Surface fractal dimension could be useful in ophthalmology to quantify corneal architectural changes associated with different disease states to further our understanding of disease evolution.

  11. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-05

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits.

  12. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  13. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  14. Vibration signature analysis of AFM images

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, G.A.; Fu, J.; Pandit, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Vibration signature analysis has been commonly used for the machine condition monitoring and the control of errors. However, it has been rarely employed for the analysis of the precision instruments such as an atomic force microscope (AFM). In this work, an AFM was used to collect vibration data from a sample positioning stage under different suspension and support conditions. Certain structural characteristics of the sample positioning stage show up as a result of the vibration signature analysis of the surface height images measured using an AFM. It is important to understand these vibration characteristics in order to reduce vibrational uncertainty, improve the damping and structural design, and to eliminate the imaging imperfections. The choice of method applied for vibration analysis may affect the results. Two methods, the data dependent systems (DDS) analysis and the Welch`s periodogram averaging method were investigated for application to this problem. Both techniques provide smooth spectrum plots from the data. Welch`s periodogram provides a coarse resolution as limited by the number of samples and requires a choice of window to be decided subjectively by the user. The DDS analysis provides sharper spectral peaks at a much higher resolution and a much lower noise floor. A decomposition of the signal variance in terms of the frequencies is provided as well. The technique is based on an objective model adequacy criterion.

  15. Nanomechanics of Yeast Surfaces Revealed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dague, Etienne; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David

    Despite the large and well-documented characterization of the microbial cell wall in terms of chemical composition, the determination of the mechanical properties of surface molecules in relation to their function remains a key challenge in cell biology.The emergence of powerful tools allowing molecular manipulations has already revolutionized our understanding of the surface properties of fungal cells. At the frontier between nanophysics and molecular biology, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and more specifically single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), has strongly contributed to our current knowledge of the cell wall organization and nanomechanical properties. However, due to the complexity of the technique, measurements on live cells are still at their infancy.In this chapter, we describe the cell wall composition and recapitulate the principles of AFM as well as the main current methodologies used to perform AFM measurements on live cells, including sample immobilization and tip functionalization.The current status of the progress in probing nanomechanics of the yeast surface is illustrated through three recent breakthrough studies. Determination of the cell wall nanostructure and elasticity is presented through two examples: the mechanical response of mannoproteins from brewing yeasts and elasticity measurements on lacking polysaccharide mutant strains. Additionally, an elegant study on force-induced unfolding and clustering of adhesion proteins located at the cell surface is also presented.

  16. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate

  17. Literacy Activities that Tap Kids' Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson-Nelson, Kristen

    1998-01-01

    Presents suggestions for helping students learn to read and appreciate literature by tapping into their multiple intelligences (spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, mathematical-logical, interpersonal, verbal-linguistic, and intrapersonal). The paper describes the eight intelligences. A teacher reproducible sheet presents a multiple intelligences…

  18. TAP into Learning, Fall-Winter 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary; Dimock, Vicki; Martinez, Danny

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of the final three issues of "TAP into Learning" (Technology Assistance Program). The double fall issue focuses on knowledge construction and on using multimedia applications in the classroom. Contents include: "Knowledge Under Construction"; "Hegel and the Dialectic"; "Implications for…

  19. 49 CFR 192.151 - Tapping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... determined by service conditions. (c) Where a threaded tap is made in cast iron or ductile iron pipe, the... (102 millimeters) cast iron or ductile iron pipe, without reinforcement. However, in areas where climate, soil, and service conditions may create unusual external stresses on cast iron pipe,...

  20. Program sizes flange-tap orifice plate

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, J.E.

    1981-03-23

    A program developed for the TI-59 programmable calculator computes the differential pressure across an orifice, the gas flow through an orifice, or the orifice-plate bore for orifice plates with flange taps. Based on equations and data from L.K. Spinks, the program saves time in extracting from charts, tables, and graphs the values required to perform the calculations.

  1. Transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.): molecular cloning and characterization of TAP1 and TAP2.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rute D; Pereira, Pedro J B; dos Santos, Nuno M S

    2011-11-01

    The transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP), play an important role in the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. In this work, sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) TAP1 and TAP2 genes and transcripts were isolated and characterized. Only the TAP2 gene is structurally similar to its human orthologue. As other TAP molecules, sea bass TAP1 and TAP2 are formed by one N-terminal accessory domain, one core membrane-spanning domain and one canonical C-terminal nucleotide-binding domain. Homology modelling of the sea bass TAP dimer predicts that its quaternary structure is in accordance with that of other ABC transporters. Phylogenetic analysis segregates sea bass TAP1 and TAP2 into each subfamily cluster of transporters, placing them in the fish class and suggesting that the basic structure of these transport-associated proteins is evolutionarily conserved. Furthermore, the present data provides information that will enable more studies on the class I antigen presentation pathway in this important fish species.

  2. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  3. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-04

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (<100 nm) oscillations are readily measured with AFM. Resonance oscillation frequencies were measured for drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops.

  4. Combined visual illusion effects on the perceived index of difficulty and movement outcomes in discrete and continuous fitts' tapping.

    PubMed

    Alphonsa, Sushma; Dai, Boyi; Benham-Deal, Tami; Zhu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The speed-accuracy trade-off is a fundamental movement problem that has been extensively investigated. It has been established that the speed at which one can move to tap targets depends on how large the targets are and how far they are apart. These spatial properties of the targets can be quantified by the index of difficulty (ID). Two visual illusions are known to affect the perception of target size and movement amplitude: the Ebbinghaus illusion and Muller-Lyer illusion. We created visual images that combined these two visual illusions to manipulate the perceived ID, and then examined people's visual perception of the targets in illusory context as well as their performance in tapping those targets in both discrete and continuous manners. The findings revealed that the combined visual illusions affected the perceived ID similarly in both discrete and continuous judgment conditions. However, the movement outcomes were affected by the combined visual illusions according to the tapping mode. In discrete tapping, the combined visual illusions affected both movement accuracy and movement amplitude such that the effective ID resembled the perceived ID. In continuous tapping, none of the movement outcomes were affected by the combined visual illusions. Participants tapped the targets with higher speed and accuracy in all visual conditions. Based on these findings, we concluded that distinct visual-motor control mechanisms were responsible for execution of discrete and continuous Fitts' tapping. Although discrete tapping relies on allocentric information (object-centered) to plan for action, continuous tapping relies on egocentric information (self-centered) to control for action. The planning-control model for rapid aiming movements is supported.

  5. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  6. TAP CBRN preparedness: knowledge, training and networks.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Irene; de Cock, Johan S; Bierens, Joost J L M; Christiaanse, Jan C

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of this targeted agenda program (TAP) was the establishment of an international network that would be able to advise on how to improve education and training for chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN)) responders. By combining the members of the TAP group, the CBRN Task Force of the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) and the European network of the Hesculaep Group, an enthusiastic and determined group has been established to achieve the defined goal. It was acknowledged that the bottlenecks for education and training for CBRN responders are mainly awareness and preparedness. For this reason, even basic education and training on CBRN is lacking. It was advised that the focus for the future should be on the development of internationally standardized protocols and standards. The face-to-face discussions of the TAP will be continued at future Hesculaep expert meetings. The intention is that during the 16WCDEM, the achievements of the established network will be presented.

  7. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    light scattering. Likewise, SEM cannot be used effectively for post-inspection defect review and classification of these very shallow types of defects. To verify and obtain accurate shape and three-dimensional information of those defects, automatic defect review AFM (ADR AFM) is utilized for accurate locating and imaging of DOI. In ADR AFM, non-contact mode imaging is used for non-destructive characterization and preserving tip sharpness for data repeatability and reproducibility. Locating DOI and imaging are performed automatically with a throughput of many defects per hour. Topography images of DOI has been collected and compared with SEM images. The ADR AFM has been shown as a non-destructive metrology tool for defect review and obtaining three-dimensional topography information.

  8. What's Wrong with the Tap? Examining Perceptions of Tap Water and Bottled Water at Purdue University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Amber; Prokopy, Linda Stalker; Amberg, Shannon

    2011-09-01

    The environmental impacts of bottled water prompted us to explore drinking water choices at Purdue University, located in West Lafayette, IN. A random sample of 2,045 Purdue University students, staff, and faculty was invited to participate in an online survey. The survey assessed current behaviors as well as perceived barriers and benefits to drinking tap water versus bottled water. 677 surveys were completed for a response rate of 33.1%. We then conducted qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of university undergraduates ( n = 21) to obtain contextual insights into the survey results and the beliefs of individuals with a variety of drinking water preferences. This study revealed that women drink disproportionately more bottled water then men while undergraduate students drink more than graduate students, staff and faculty. The study also uncovered a widespread belief that recycling eliminates the environmental impacts of bottled water. Important barriers to drinking tap water at Purdue include: perceived risks from tap water and the perceived safety of bottled water, preferring the taste of bottled water, and the convenience of drinking bottled water. The qualitative interviews revealed that drinking water choices can be influenced by several factors—especially whether individuals trust tap water to be clean—but involve varying levels of complexity. The implications of these results for social marketing strategies to promote tap water are discussed.

  9. What's wrong with the tap? Examining perceptions of tap water and bottled water at Purdue University.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Amber; Prokopy, Linda Stalker; Amberg, Shannon

    2011-09-01

    The environmental impacts of bottled water prompted us to explore drinking water choices at Purdue University, located in West Lafayette, IN. A random sample of 2,045 Purdue University students, staff, and faculty was invited to participate in an online survey. The survey assessed current behaviors as well as perceived barriers and benefits to drinking tap water versus bottled water. 677 surveys were completed for a response rate of 33.1%. We then conducted qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of university undergraduates (n = 21) to obtain contextual insights into the survey results and the beliefs of individuals with a variety of drinking water preferences. This study revealed that women drink disproportionately more bottled water then men while undergraduate students drink more than graduate students, staff and faculty. The study also uncovered a widespread belief that recycling eliminates the environmental impacts of bottled water. Important barriers to drinking tap water at Purdue include: perceived risks from tap water and the perceived safety of bottled water, preferring the taste of bottled water, and the convenience of drinking bottled water. The qualitative interviews revealed that drinking water choices can be influenced by several factors-especially whether individuals trust tap water to be clean-but involve varying levels of complexity. The implications of these results for social marketing strategies to promote tap water are discussed.

  10. Single-Molecule Studies of Integrins by AFM-Based Force Spectroscopy on Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Robert H.

    The characterization of cell adhesion between two living cells at the single-molecule level, i.e., between one adhesion receptor and its counter-receptor, appears to be an experimental challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used in its force spectroscopy mode to determine unbinding forces of a single pair of adhesion receptors, even with a living cell as a probe. This chapter provides an overview of AFM force measurements of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors and their ligands. A focus is given to major integrins expressed on leukocytes, such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4). These receptors are crucial for leukocyte trafficking in health and disease. LFA-1 and VLA-1 can be activated within the bloodstream from a low-affinity to a high-affinity receptor by chemokines in order to adhere strongly to the vessel wall before the receptor-bearing leukocytes extravasate. The experimental considerations needed to provide near-physiological conditions for a living cell and to be able to measure adequate forces at the single-molecule level are discussed in detail. AFM technology has been developed into a modern and extremely sensitive tool in biomedical research. It appears now that AFM force spectroscopy could enter, within a few years, medical applications in diagnosis and therapy of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  11. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Segregation in Fluidized versus Tapped Packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarzia, Marco; Fierro, Annalisa; Nicodemi, Mario; Coniglio, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    We compare the predictions of two different statistical mechanics approaches, corresponding to different physical measurements, proposed to describe binary granular mixtures subjected to some external driving (continuous shaking or tap dynamics). In particular we analytically solve at a mean field level the partition function of a simple hard sphere lattice model under gravity and focus on the phenomenon of size segregation. We find that the two approaches lead to similar results and seem to coincide in the limit of very low shaking amplitude. However, they give different predictions of the crossovers from Brazil nut effect to reverse Brazil nut effect with respect to the shaking amplitude, which could be detected experimentally.

  15. TAP 2: Performance-Based Training Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Cornerstone of safe operation of DOE nuclear facilities is personnel performing day-to-day functions which accomplish the facility mission. Performance-based training is fundamental to the safe operation. This manual has been developed to support the Training Accreditation Program (TAP) and assist contractors in efforts to develop performance-based training programs. It provides contractors with narrative procedures on performance-based training that can be modified and incorporated for facility-specific application. It is divided into sections dealing with analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  16. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  17. PREDICTIVE MODELING OF ACOUSTIC SIGNALS FROM THERMOACOUSTIC POWER SENSORS (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dumm, Christopher M.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-30

    Thermoacoustic Power Sensor (TAPS) technology offers the potential for self-powered, wireless measurement of nuclear reactor core operating conditions. TAPS are based on thermoacoustic engines, which harness thermal energy from fission reactions to generate acoustic waves by virtue of gas motion through a porous stack of thermally nonconductive material. TAPS can be placed in the core, where they generate acoustic waves whose frequency and amplitude are proportional to the local temperature and radiation flux, respectively. TAPS acoustic signals are not measured directly at the TAPS; rather, they propagate wirelessly from an individual TAPS through the reactor, and ultimately to a low-power receiver network on the vessel’s exterior. In order to rely on TAPS as primary instrumentation, reactor-specific models which account for geometric/acoustic complexities in the signal propagation environment must be used to predict the amplitude and frequency of TAPS signals at receiver locations. The reactor state may then be derived by comparing receiver signals to the reference levels established by predictive modeling. In this paper, we develop and experimentally benchmark a methodology for predictive modeling of the signals generated by a TAPS system, with the intent of subsequently extending these efforts to modeling of TAPS in a liquid sodium environmen

  18. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  19. AFM studies of the crystallization and habit modification of an excipient material, adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Keel, T R; Thompson, C; Davies, M C; Tendler, S J B; Roberts, C J

    2004-08-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the (1 0 0) face of crystalline adipic acid, both in air and liquid environments. In air, surface reorganization occurred during scanning of the AFM probe, which has been investigated using single point force-distance analysis under a controlled relative humidity (RH) environment. We suggest such reorganization can be attributed to the influence of a network of water molecules bound to the hydrophilic (1 0 0) surface permitting local AFM tip-enhanced dissolution and reorganization of the solute. In situ imaging was also carried out on the crystals, revealing etch-pit formation during dissolution, and rapid growth at higher levels of supersaturation (sigma), both of which are direct consequences of the hydrophilic nature of the (1 0 0) face. Also presented here are nanoscale observations of the effect of octanoic acid, a structurally-related habit modifier, on crystalline adipic acid. Using AFM, we have been able to show that the presence of octanoic acid at low concentration has little observable affect on the development of the (1 0 0) face; however, as this concentration is increased, there are clear changes in step morphology and growth mode on the (1 0 0) face of the crystal. At a concentration of 1.26 mmol dm(-3) (a concentration corresponding to a molar ratio of approximately 1:175 octanoic acid:adipic acid), growth on the (1 0 0) face is inhibited, with in situ AFM imaging indicating this is a direct consequence of octanoic acid binding to the surface, and pinning the monomolecular growth steps.

  20. A Wide Dynamic Range Tapped Linear Array Image Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washkurak, William D.; Chamberlain, Savvas G.; Prince, N. Daryl

    1988-08-01

    Detectors for acousto-optic signal processing applications require fast transient response as well as wide dynamic range. There are two major choices of detectors: conductive or integration mode. Conductive mode detectors have an initial transient period before they reach then' i equilibrium state. The duration of 1 his period is dependent on light level as well as detector capacitance. At low light levels a conductive mode detector is very slow; response time is typically on the order of milliseconds. Generally. to obtain fast transient response an integrating mode detector is preferred. With integrating mode detectors. the dynamic range is determined by the charge storage capability of the tran-sport shift registers and the noise level of the image sensor. The conventional net hod used to improve dynamic range is to increase the shift register charge storage capability. To achieve a dynamic range of fifty thousand assuming two hundred noise equivalent electrons, a charge storage capability of ten million electrons would be required. In order to accommodate this amount of charge. unrealistic shift registers widths would be required. Therefore, with an integrating mode detector it is difficult to achieve a dynamic range of over four orders of magnitude of input light intensity. Another alternative is to solve the problem at the photodetector aml not the shift, register. DALSA's wide dynamic range detector utilizes an optimized, ion implant doped, profiled MOSFET photodetector specifically designed for wide dynamic range. When this new detector operates at high speed and at low light levels the photons are collected and stored in an integrating fashion. However. at bright light levels where transient periods are short, the detector switches into a conductive mode. The light intensity is logarithmically compressed into small charge packets, easily carried by the CCD shift register. As a result of the logarithmic conversion, dynamic ranges of over six orders of

  1. Simulating transformer taps for remote cranking operations

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Milanicz, D.P.; Volkmann, T.L.

    1996-07-01

    A considerable portion of the electric energy is supplied by base-loaded steam electric stations (SES), which generally require off-site power for start-ups. Installed black-start combustion-turbine (CT) generators, which are primarily used as cycling units to meet the daily peak demands, provide an economical and very attractive options for remote cracking of SES under partial or total power system collapse. Remote cranking is complicated by the fact that unit and auxiliary transformers at the CT plants are equipped with no-load (fixed) taps for which optimum positions must be determined by simulation prior to a remote cranking test or operation. Today`s analytical tools (power flow and optimal power flow programs) used for simulation do not adequately represent the actual reactive capability of the generator to ensure safe operation; and addresses only a single state of the power system, whereas the remote cranking operation requires over two dozen discrete events representing the various large motor starting and running states. This article describes an attempt at simulating a remote cranking operation for the black start of two coal-fired drum-type units at Northern States Power Company. The simulation system uses power flow and generator reactive capability programs in an iterative process to determine the appropriate tap positions for the CT unit and auxiliary transformers, the various transformers installed in the CT-SES path, and for controlling a proper voltage level for the generator system bus at the CT plant.

  2. AFM study of mineral wettability with reservoir oils.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K; Dao, E; Mohanty, K K

    2005-09-01

    Wettability plays a key role in determining fluid distributions and consequently the multiphase flow and transport in petroleum reservoirs. Many crude oils have polar organic components that collect at oil-water interfaces and can adsorb onto the mineral surface if the brine film breaks, rendering the medium oil-wet or mixed-wet. Mica and silica surfaces have been aged with brine and crude oils to induce oil component adsorption. Bulk oil is eventually replaced by water in these experiments by washing with common solvents without ever drying the mineral surface. The organic deposit on the mineral surface is studied by atomic force microscopy in the tapping mode under water. Drying the surface during the removal of bulk oil induces artifacts; it is essential to keep the surface wet at all times before atomic force microscopy or contact angle measurement. As the mean thickness of the organic deposit increases, the oil-water contact angle increases. The organic deposits left behind after extraction of oil by common aromatic solvents used in core studies, such as toluene and decalin, are thinner than those left behind by non-aromatic solvents, such as cyclohexane. The force of adhesion with a probe sphere for minerals aged with just the asphaltene fraction is similar to that of the whole oil. The force of adhesion for the minerals aged with just the resin fraction is the highest of all SARA (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes) fractions.

  3. Study of relaxation and transport processes by means of AFM based dielectric spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.

    2014-05-15

    Since its birth a few years ago, dielectric spectroscopy studies based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) have gained a growing interest. Not only the frequency and temperature ranges have become broader since then but also the kind of processes that can be studied by means of this approach. In this work we analyze the most adequate experimental setup for the study of several dielectric processes with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers by using force mode AFM based dielectric spectroscopy. Proof of concept experiments were performed on PS/PVAc blends and PMMA homopolymer films, for temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K. Charge transport processes were also studied by this approach. The obtained results were analyzed in terms of cantilever stray contribution, film thickness and relaxation strength. We found that the method sensitivity is strongly coupled with the film thickness and the relaxation strength, and that it is possible to control it by using an adequate experimental setup.

  4. Influence of Fluid Cell Design on the Frequency Response of AFM Microcantilevers in Liquid Media

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Ramin; Wood-Adams, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the frequency response of AFM microcantilevers in liquid media contained in a commercial fluid cell is presented. Such systems exhibit complicated dynamics which are often not well described by available theories. Their dynamic behavior has a direct effect on the use of the AFM in dynamic mode while imaging in liquid or while extracting the rheological properties of the fluid. We explore the issues related to the design of the cantilever holder/fluid cell and propose an approach for evaluating, minimizing and recognizing the ultimate limitations of commercial cantilever holders. A technique for estimating the frequency response spectrum of the fluid cell itself from experimental data is presented. This spectrum can then be used to evaluate whether or not the fluid cell is suited for the desired purpose. PMID:27873849

  5. Preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein samples for AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    Sample preparation techniques allowing reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA with various structures, topologies and complexes with proteins are reviewed. The major emphasis is given to methods utilizing chemical functionalization of mica, enabling preparation of the surfaces with required characteristics. The methods are illustrated by examples of imaging of different DNA structures. Special attention is given to the possibility of AFM to image the dynamics of DNA at the nanoscale. The capabilities of time-lapse AFM in aqueous solutions are illustrated by imaging of dynamic processes as transitions of local alternative structures (transition of DNA between H and B forms). The application of AFM to studies of protein-DNA complexes is illustrated by a few examples of imaging site-specific complexes, as well as such systems as chromatin. The time-lapse AFM studies of protein-DNA complexes including very recent advances with the use of high-speed AFM are reviewed. PMID:20864349

  6. Integration of small taps into (existing) HVDC links

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrman, M.; Baker, M.; Bowles, J.

    1995-07-01

    Tapping of HVDC lines to serve intermediate loads or to pick up dispersed generation has always presented formidable technical and economic challenges to transmission planners and to system designers. These challenges have been particularly daunting when the power rating of the tap is small compared to that of the main terminals. This document provides transmission planners with various factors which need to be considered in evaluating the feasibility of tapping existing HVDC transmission lines or in developing alternatives for potential new transmission schemes.

  7. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  8. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. Graphite, graphene on SiC, and graphene nanoribbons: Calculated images with a numerical FM-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Castanié, Fabien; Nony, Laurent; Gauthier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Characterization at the atomic scale is becoming an achievable task for FM-AFM users equipped, for example, with a qPlus sensor. Nevertheless, calculations are necessary to fully interpret experimental images in some specific cases. In this context, we developed a numerical AFM (n-AFM) able to be used in different modes and under different usage conditions. Results: Here, we tackled FM-AFM image calculations of three types of graphitic structures, namely a graphite surface, a graphene sheet on a silicon carbide substrate with a Si-terminated surface, and finally, a graphene nanoribbon. We compared static structures, meaning that all the tip and sample atoms are kept frozen in their equilibrium position, with dynamic systems, obtained with a molecular dynamics module allowing all the atoms to move freely during the probe oscillations. Conclusion: We found a very good agreement with experimental graphite and graphene images. The imaging process for the deposited nanoribbon demonstrates the stability of our n-AFM to image a non-perfectly planar substrate exhibiting a geometrical step as well as a material step. PMID:22497004

  10. Calibration Testing of Network Tap Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Popovsky, Barbara; Chee, Brian; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2007-11-14

    Abstract: Understanding the behavior of network forensic devices is important to support prosecutions of malicious conduct on computer networks as well as legal remedies for false accusations of network management negligence. Individuals who seek to establish the credibility of network forensic data must speak competently about how the data was gathered and the potential for data loss. Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information about the performance of low-layer network devices at a level that will survive legal challenges. This paper proposes a first step toward an independent calibration standard by establishing a validation testing methodology for evaluating forensic taps against manufacturer specifications. The methodology and the theoretical analysis that led to its development are offered as a conceptual framework for developing a standard and to "operationalize" network forensic readiness. This paper also provides details of an exemplar test, testing environment, procedures and results.

  11. The Expanding Universe of Astronomy on Tap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.; Morris, Brett; Narayan, Gautham; Morrison, Sarah J.; Schneider, Evan; Bozek, Brandon; Rice, Emily L.; Hummels, Cameron B.; Garofali, Kristen; Martinez, Raquel; Li, Yuan; Green, Joel D.; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Silvia, Devin W.; Schwamb, Megan E.; Arcavi, Iair; Silverman, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Astronomy on Tap (AoT) is a constellation of free public outreach presentations held in bars. AoT events aim to engage audiences who might not choose to attend public lectures in a university setting by creating an informal atmosphere and combining scientific talks with music, games, and prizes. The events have a flexible format, typically consisting of between one and three astronomy-related presentations, sometimes with additional games and trivia, and some locations also produce merchandise. The flexible structure means that the format can be adapted to the resources available in the location and the time commitment the local organizers are willing to make. Some events are broadcast online through live streaming, with some others being posted to YouTube. In conjunction with an active social media presence, this ensures engagement beyond those able to attend events in person. Astronomy on Tap events have now been held in 20 cities around the world and are typically organised by postdocs and graduate students, with some involvement from faculty and outreach or education staff. Holding these events under the global AoT constellation facilitates knowledge transfer, sharing of resources, and networking opportunities for scientists interested in outreach/communication. The events have been highly successful, with some locations regularly attracting more than 200 people per month. In this poster we describe the goals and characteristics of AoT events, the different adaptations by various locations, the resources we have developed, and provide information for those interested in starting a new event in their location.

  12. AFM imaging of fenestrated liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Braet, F; Wisse, E

    2012-12-01

    Each microscope with its dedicated sample preparation technique provides the investigator with a specific set of data giving an instrument-determined (or restricted) insight into the structure and function of a tissue, a cell or parts thereof. Stepwise improvements in existing techniques, both instrumental and preparative, can sometimes cross barriers in resolution and image quality. Of course, investigators get really excited when completely new principles of microscopy and imaging are offered in promising new instruments, such as the AFM. The present paper summarizes a first phase of studies on the thin endothelial cells of the liver. It describes the preparation-dependent differences in AFM imaging of these cells after isolation. Special point of interest concerned the dynamics of the fenestrae, thought to filter lipid-carrying particles during their transport from the blood to the liver cells. It also describes the attempts to image the details of these cells when alive in cell cultures. It explains what physical conditions, mainly contributed to the scanning stylus, are thought to play a part in the limitations in imaging these cells. The AFM also offers promising specifications to those interested in cell surface details, such as membrane-associated structures, receptors, coated pits, cellular junctions and molecular aggregations or domains. The AFM also offers nano-manipulation possibilities, strengths and elasticity measurements, force interactions, affinity measurements, stiffness and other physical aspects of membranes and cytoskeleton. The potential for molecular approaches is there. New developments in cantilever construction and computer software promise to bring real time video imaging to the AFM. Home made accessories for the first generation of AFM are now commodities in commercial instruments and make the life of the AFM microscopist easier. Also, the combination of different microscopies, such as AFM and TEM, or AFM and SEM find their way to the

  13. [Application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Milka, Michał; Mróz, Iwona; Jastrzebska, Maria; Wrzalik, Roman; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Roszkowska, Anna M; Moćko, Lucyna; Wylegała, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows to examine surface of different biological objects in the nearly physiological conditions at the nanoscale. The purpose of this work is to present the history of introduction and the potential applications of the AFM in ophthalmology research and clinical practice. In 1986 Binnig built the AFM as a next generation of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The functional principle of AFM is based on the measurement of the forces between atoms on the sample surface and the probe. As a result, the three-dimensional image of the surface with the resolution on the order of nanometres can be obtained. Yamamoto used as the first the AFM on a wide scale in ophthalmology. The first investigations used the AFM method to study structure of collagen fibres of the cornea and of the sclera. Our research involves the analysis of artificial intraocular lenses (IOLs). According to earlier investigations, e.g. Lombardo et al., the AFM was used to study only native IOLs. Contrary to the earlier investigations, we focused our measurements on lenses explanted from human eyes. The surface of such lenses is exposed to the influence of the intraocular aqueous environment, and to the related impacts of biochemical processes. We hereby present the preliminary results of our work in the form of AFM images depicting IOL surface at the nanoscale. The images allowed us to observe early stages of the dye deposit formation as well as local calcinosis. We believe that AFM is a very promising tool for studying the structure of IOL surface and that further observations will make it possible to explain the pathomechanism of artificial intraocular lens opacity formation.

  14. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  15. Healthy and Creative Tap Dance: Teaching a Lifetime Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Barbara L. Michiels; Ozmun, Michelle; Keeton, Gladys

    2013-01-01

    As a result of competitive dance television shows, interest in tap dance seems to have increased in the past few years. Tap dance is a challenging and fun lifetime physical activity that is appropriate for people of all ages. It is an excellent activity for K-12 physical education programs, higher education, parks and recreation facilities,…

  16. Hot tap water legislation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael; Brewer, Ann Chang; Pressman, Melissa; Blank, Elizabeth; Mickalide, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Excessively hot tap water results in an estimated 1500 hospital admissions and up to 50 deaths in the United States every year. This study reviewed the current state of tap water temperature regulation in the United States, including the model plumbing code standards on which state legislation in this area is based; assessed the level of public awareness regarding the risk, prevalence, and severity of such injuries; and identified specific prevention measures. Relevant information was obtained from state legislative codes, model code development organizations, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, and a survey of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tap water temperature safety. Model building and plumbing codes related to tap water temperature regulation and their subsequent adoption by state legislatures vary widely across the United States. The states also vary with respect to the authority provided to lower levels of government (counties or municipalities) to modify and enforce code provisions. Public awareness of hot tap water hazards and implementation of preventive measures are limited. A broader and more uniform application of codes for regulating tap water temperature in both institutional and residential settings can be achieved through input from affected users, government agencies, legislators, advocacy organizations, and the general public. Safer hot water temperatures and a reduction in scald injuries can be achieved through regulating hot water temperature level at the thermostat, installing temperature-regulating valves at the tap, and raising public awareness of hot tap water hazards.

  17. Tapping the Sugar Maple--Learning and Appreciating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Charles

    1976-01-01

    The article discusses how to tap a maple tree. Tapping a maple tree to produce maple syrup can: (1) lead to better understanding in many subject areas, (2) develop skills through participation in a rewarding activity, and (3) help students appreciate the many important roles that trees play in our environment and daily lives. (NQ)

  18. 49 CFR 192.627 - Tapping pipelines under pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tapping pipelines under pressure. 192.627 Section 192.627 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... under pressure. Each tap made on a pipeline under pressure must be performed by a crew qualified to...

  19. 49 CFR 192.627 - Tapping pipelines under pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tapping pipelines under pressure. 192.627 Section 192.627 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... under pressure. Each tap made on a pipeline under pressure must be performed by a crew qualified to...

  20. 49 CFR 192.627 - Tapping pipelines under pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tapping pipelines under pressure. 192.627 Section 192.627 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... under pressure. Each tap made on a pipeline under pressure must be performed by a crew qualified to...

  1. 49 CFR 192.627 - Tapping pipelines under pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tapping pipelines under pressure. 192.627 Section 192.627 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... under pressure. Each tap made on a pipeline under pressure must be performed by a crew qualified to...

  2. Tap Testing Hammer using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs)

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, JaMein DeShon; Ayorinde, Emmanuel Temiloluwa; Mascarenas, David Dennis; Moreu, Fernando

    2016-08-11

    This is the final poster for a Student Symposium at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research describes the development, validation, and testing of a remote concrete tapping mechanism enabled by UAS. The conclusion is the following: The results quantify for the first time concrete tapping data collected remotely with UAS, enabling cost-effective, safer and sustainable upgrade prioritization of railroad bridges inventories.

  3. The mineral content of tap water in United States households

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The composition of tap water contributes to dietary intake of minerals. The USDA’s Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) conducted a study of the mineral content of residential tap water, to generate current data for the USDA National Nutrient Database. Sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, copper...

  4. Water use and time analysis in ablution from taps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaied, Roubi A.

    2016-04-01

    There is a lack of water resources and an extreme use of potable water in our Arab region. Ablution from taps was studied since it is a repeated daily activity that consumes more water. Five different tap types are investigated for water consumption fashions including traditional mixing tap and automatic tap. Analyzing 100 experimental observations revealed that 22.7-28.8 % of ablution water is used for washing of feet and the largest water waste occurs during washing of face portions. Moreover, 30-47 % amount of water consumed in ablution from taps is wasted which can be saved if tap releases water only at moments of need. The push-type tap is being spread recently especially in airports. If it is intended for use in ablution facilities, batch duration and volume must be tuned. When each batch is 0.25 L of water and lasts for 3 s, 3 L are sufficient for one complete ablution in average which means considerable saving. A cost-benefit model is proposed for using different tap types and an economic feasibility study is performed on a case study. This analysis can help us to design better ablution systems.

  5. TAP High School Symposium: Lessons Learned from Principals and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Joshua H.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1999-2000 school year, TAP: The System for Teacher and Student Advancement (TAP) has been implemented in hundreds of schools across the nation and demonstrated an ability to raise student achievement, improve the quality of instruction and increase the ability of high-need schools to recruit, retain and support effective teachers. The…

  6. Astronomy on Tap: Public Outreach Events in Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, E. L.; Levine, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    Astronomy on Tap public outreach events are as easy to organise or as elaborate as you would like them to be. In addition to communicating cutting-edge research and fundamental concepts to the public, Astronomy on Tap events showcase the passion, creativity and diversity of scientists, facilitate personal and meaningful interactions between scientists and the general public, and offer networking and professional development opportunities for scientists. Astronomy on Tap organisers provide a growing cadre of resources for starting similar events, which have so far taken place in twenty locations around the world, mainly in the United States but also in Canada, Chile, and Taiwan, reaching a total of almost 15 000 people. Through this reflection on the Astronomy on Tap project we invite you to consider whether you could adopt aspects of the Astronomy on Tap model for existing outreach programmes, or even organise a new satellite event in your location.

  7. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  8. EEMD based pitch evaluation method for accurate grating measurement by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Shuming; Wang, Chenying; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2016-09-01

    The pitch measurement and AFM calibration precision are significantly influenced by the grating pitch evaluation method. This paper presents the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) based pitch evaluation method to relieve the accuracy deterioration caused by high and low frequency components of scanning profile during pitch evaluation. The simulation analysis shows that the application of EEMD can improve the pitch accuracy of the FFT-FT algorithm. The pitch error is small when the iteration number of the FFT-FT algorithms was 8. The AFM measurement of the 500 nm-pitch one-dimensional grating shows that the EEMD based pitch evaluation method could improve the pitch precision, especially the grating line position precision, and greatly expand the applicability of the gravity center algorithm when particles and impression marks were distributed on the sample surface. The measurement indicates that the nonlinearity was stable, and the nonlinearity of x axis and forward scanning was much smaller than their counterpart. Finally, a detailed pitch measurement uncertainty evaluation model suitable for commercial AFMs was demonstrated and a pitch uncertainty in the sub-nanometer range was achieved. The pitch uncertainty was reduced about 10% by EEMD.

  9. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    . Measuring these units was not attempted before and most studies have assumed that the growth unit consisted of individual protein molecules. The linescan mode of AFM instruments allows the crystal surface to be scanned along a single line. By scanning across a growth step an image showing the motion of the step is obtained. Normally such an image shows a straight line for continuous and constant step velocity. In this study by increasing the scan rate and by decreasing the step velocity (by decreasing the supersaturation), we were able to capture images of individual growth events, shown by jump discontinuities in the step line. By suitable integration of the image the growth unit dimension in the scanned direction can be obtained. Since multiple units can be involved in the growth process it is necessary to collect a statistically relevant sample before drawing conclusions about the growth mechanism. This technique was successfully employed to obtain the dimensions of growth units for the (110) face, showing that they consisted of various aggregates corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal structure.

  10. Frankincense tapping reduces the carbohydrate storage of Boswellia trees.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Tefera; Sterck, Frank J; Fetene, Masresha; Bongers, Frans

    2013-06-01

    Carbohydrates fixed by photosynthesis are stored in plant organs in the form of starch or sugars. Starch and sugars sum to the total non-structural carbohydrate pool (TNC) and may serve as intermediate pools between assimilation and utilization. We examined the impact of tapping on TNC concentrations in stem-wood, bark and root tissues of the frankincense tree (Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst) in two natural woodlands of Ethiopia. Two tapping treatments, one without tapping (control) and the other with tapping at 12 incisions, are applied on experimental trees. Trees are tapped in the leafless dry period, diminishing their carbon storage pools. If storage pools are not refilled by assimilation during the wet season, when crowns are in full leaf, tapping may deplete the carbon pool and weaken Boswellia trees. The highest soluble sugar concentrations were in the bark and the highest starch concentrations in the stem-wood. The stem-wood contains 12 times higher starch than soluble sugar concentrations. Hence, the highest TNC concentrations occurred in the stem-wood. Moreover, wood volume was larger than root or bark volumes and, as a result, more TNC was stored in the stem-wood. As predicted, tapping reduced the TNC concentrations and pool sizes in frankincense trees during the dry season. During the wet season, these carbon pools were gradually filled in tapped trees, but never to the size of non-tapped trees. We conclude that TNC is dynamic on a seasonal time scale and offers resilience against stress, highlighting its importance for tree carbon balance. But current resin tapping practices are intensive and may weaken Boswellia populations, jeopardizing future frankincense production.

  11. Introduction to atomic force microscopy (AFM) in biology.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire S; Scheuring, Simon; Kreplak, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nanoscale to the microscale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described.

  12. Cell volume increase in murine MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts attaching onto biocompatible tantalum observed by magnetic AC mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Andersen, L Klembt; Contera, S Antoranz; Justesen, J; Duch, M; Hansen, O; Chevallier, J; Foss, M; Pedersen, F S; Besenbacher, F

    2005-12-02

    Magnetic AC mode (MACmode) atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study murine (mouse) MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells attached to biocompatible tantalum substrates. Cell volumes of attached cells derived from AFM images were compared to volumes of detached cells in suspension measured by the Coulter sizing technique. An increase of approximately 50% in cell volume was observed when the cells attached to planar tantalum substrates and developed a flattened structure including lamellipodia. We address thoroughly the issues general to the AFM determination of absolute cell volumes, and compare our magnetic AC mode AFM measurements to hitherto reported cell volume determinations by contact mode AFM.

  13. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Wen W.; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we propose ``single-image analysis'', as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis.

  14. Advanced Analysis of Finger-Tapping Performance: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Çağatay; Kızıltan, Erhan; Gelir, Ethem; Köktürk, Fürüzan

    2013-01-01

    Background: The finger-tapping test is a commonly employed quantitative assessment tool used to measure motor performance in the upper extremities. This task is a complex motion that is affected by external stimuli, mood and health status. The complexity of this task is difficult to explain with a single average intertap-interval value (time difference between successive tappings) which only provides general information and neglects the temporal effects of the aforementioned factors. Aims: This study evaluated the time course of average intertap-interval values and the patterns of variation in both the right and left hands of right-handed subjects using a computer-based finger-tapping system. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: Thirty eight male individuals aged between 20 and 28 years (Mean±SD = 22.24±1.65) participated in the study. Participants were asked to perform single-finger-tapping test for 10 seconds of test period. Only the results of right-handed (RH) 35 participants were considered in this study. The test records the time of tapping and saves data as the time difference between successive tappings for further analysis. The average number of tappings and the temporal fluctuation patterns of the intertap-intervals were calculated and compared. The variations in the intertap-interval were evaluated with the best curve fit method. Results: An average tapping speed or tapping rate can reliably be defined for a single-finger tapping test by analysing the graphically presented data of the number of tappings within the test period. However, a different presentation of the same data, namely the intertap-interval values, shows temporal variation as the number of tapping increases. Curve fitting applications indicate that the variation has a biphasic nature. Conclusion: The measures obtained in this study reflect the complex nature of the finger-tapping task and are suggested to provide reliable information regarding hand performance. Moreover, the

  15. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Gresham, Garold Linn

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  16. Performance evaluation of conventional and water saving taps.

    PubMed

    Fidar, A M; Memon, F A; Butler, D

    2016-01-15

    The rapid pace of urbanisation comes with considerable environmental implications including pressures on already stressed limited water resources. In urban areas, most of the water use is associated with water consumption in buildings. The second largest use of water is via taps. It is often assumed that water taps with low flow rates can contribute to reduced per capita water consumption. However, this is based on very little evidence. This paper presents the synthesis of a 13,000 high resolution observations made to investigate the actual water consumption of innovative (water saving) electronic taps and conventional mixer taps. High resolution flow-meters and data loggers were fitted into two washrooms in two different buildings of a higher education institution to record the water use through the basin taps. The recorded data provided information on duration, frequency of use and volume of water consumption per use. The data was helpful in identifying trends in hot and cold water use and therefore can be useful in estimating energy for producing hot water and associated greenhouse gas emissions. Analysis of the observed data suggests that the low flow taps have greater mean water consumption per event than the conventional taps and water consumption is more influenced by user behaviour rather than the technology.

  17. Mode of bindings of zinc oxide nanoparticles to myoglobin and horseradish peroxidase: A spectroscopic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gopa; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Ganguly, Tapan

    2011-07-01

    The interactions between two heme proteins myoglobin (HMb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are investigated by using UV-vis absorption, steady state fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, FT-IR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques under physiological condition of pH˜7.4. The presence of mainly static mode in fluorescence quenching mechanism of HMb and HRP by ZnO nanoparticle indicates the possibility of formation of ground state complex. The processes of bindings of ZnO nanoparticles with the two proteins are spontaneous molecular interaction procedures. In both cases hydrogen bonding plays a major role. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that a helicity of the proteins is reduced by increasing ZnO nanoparticle concentration although the α-helical structures of HMb and HRP retain their identity. On binding to the ZnO nanoparticles the secondary structure of HRP molecules (or HMb molecules) remains unchanged while there is a substantial change in the environment of the tyrosin active site in case of HRP molecules and tryptophan active site in case of HMb molecules. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied for the investigation the structure of HRP adsorbed in the environment of nanoparticles on the silicon and on the bare silicon. HRP molecules adsorb and aggregate on the mica with ZnO nanoparticle. The aggregation indicates an attractive interaction among the adsorbed molecules. The molecules are randomly distributed on the bare silicon wafer. The adsorption of HRP in the environment of ZnO nanoparticle changes drastically the domains due to a strong interaction between HRP and ZnO nanoparticles. Similar situation is observed in case of HMb molecules. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of biomedical applications of ZnO nanoparticles as well as in elucidating their mechanisms of action as drugs in both human and plant systems.

  18. Fixture For Drilling And Tapping A Curved Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, P. S.; Lockyer, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    Simple fixture guides drilling and tapping of holes in prescribed locations and orientations on workpiece having curved surface. Tool conceived for use in reworking complexly curved helicopter blades made of composite materials. Fixture is block of rigid foam with epoxy filler, custom-fitted to surface contour, containing bushings and sleeves at drilling and tapping sites. Bushings changed, so taps and drills of various sizes accommodated. In use, fixture secured to surface by hold-down bolts extending through sleeves and into threads in substrate.

  19. Beer tapping: dynamics of bubbles after impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantič-Lugo, V.; Cayron, A.; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, F.

    2015-12-01

    Beer tapping is a well known prank where a bottle of beer is impacted from the top by a solid object, usually another bottle, leading to a sudden foam overflow. A description of the shock-driven bubble dynamics leading to foaming is presented based on an experimental and numerical study evoking the following physical picture. First, the solid impact produces a sudden downwards acceleration of the bottle creating a strong depression in the liquid bulk. The existing bubbles undergo a strong expansion and a sudden contraction ending in their collapse and fragmentation into a large amount of small bubbles. Second, the bubble clouds present a large surface area to volume ratio, enhancing the CO2 diffusion from the supersaturated liquid, hence growing rapidly and depleting the CO2. The clouds of bubbles migrate upwards in the form of plumes pulling the surrounding liquid with them and eventually resulting in the foam overflow. The sudden pressure drop that triggers the bubble dynamics with a collapse and oscillations is modelled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. The bubble dynamics from impact to collapse occurs over a time (tb ≃ 800 μs) much larger than the acoustic time scale of the liquid bulk (tac = 2H/c ≃ 80 μs), for the experimental container of height H = 6 cm and a speed of sound around c ≃ 1500 m/s. This scale separation, together with the comparison of numerical and experimental results, suggests that the pressure drop is controlled by two parameters: the acceleration of the container and the distance from the bubble to the free surface.

  20. Parametric effects in nanobeams and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Claeyssen, J. C. R.; Tonetto, L.; Carvalho, J. B.; Copetti, R. D.

    2014-12-10

    Vibration dynamics of forced cantilever beams that are used in nanotechnology such as atomic force microscope modeling and carbon nanotubes is considered in terms of a fundamental response within a matrix framework. The modeling equations are written as a matrix differential equation subject to tip-sample general boundary conditions. At the junctions, where there are discontinuities due to different material or beam thickness, compatibility conditions are prescribed. Forced responses are given by convolution of the input load with the time domain Green matrix function. The corresponding matrix transfer function and modes of a multispan cantilever beam are determined in terms of solution basis of the same shape generated by a fundamental solution. Simulations were performed for a three stepped beam with a piezoelectric patch subject to pulse forcing terms and with surface effects.

  1. Astronomy on Tap: science engagement in the pub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.; Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy on Tap is a series of free lectures by astronomers in the pub, aimed at disseminating the latest research to the public in an informal setting. Started in New York City in 2013, Astronomy on Tap has now expanded to seven cities across North and South America. Organized by local astronomers, each event features talks by astronomers from local institutions or visitors, or others whose professions or hobbies intersect with astronomy, along with games and opportunities for the public to interact with professional astronomers. The largest Astronomy on Tap events are in Austin, Texas, attracting over 150 people each month, which consists of populations outside of the self-selected groups that might be reached by more formal EPO activities. The organisers of Astronomy on Tap in Austin (AoTATX) will discuss the impact of and feedback from all of the locations, and present information on setting up new satellite locations.

  2. The Danger of Using Tap Water with Contact Lenses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Acanthamoeba is a microbe that is very common in tap water. It has two forms: the trophozoite and the cyst. These trophozoites and cysts can stick to the surface of your contact lenses and then infect your eye.

  3. 38. Tap room fireplace, showing massive open timber trusses, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Tap room fireplace, showing massive open timber trusses, view looking to southeast. (fixtures and mantle removed 1999). - Fort Ord, Soldiers' Club, California State Highway 1 near Eighth Street, Seaside, Monterey County, CA

  4. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G.

    2013-11-01

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  5. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G

    2013-11-29

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  6. Magnetoelectric versus thermal actuation characteristics of shear force AFM probes with piezoresistive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Kopiec, Daniel; Majstrzyk, Wojciech; Kunicki, Piotr; Janus, Paweł; Dobrowolski, Rafał; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2017-03-01

    In this paper the authors compare methods used for piezoresistive microcantilevers actuation for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in the dynamic shear force mode. The piezoresistive detection is an attractive technique comparing the optical beam detection of deflection. The principal advantage is that no external alignment of optical source and detector are needed. When the microcantilever is deflected, the stress is transferred into a change of resistivity of piezoresistors. The integration of piezoresistive read-out provides a promising solution in realizing a compact non-contact AFM. Resolution of piezoresistive read-out is limited by three main noise sources: Johnson, 1/f and thermomechanical noise. In the dynamic shear force mode measurement the method used for cantilever actuation will also affect the recorded noise in the piezoresistive detection circuit. This is the result of a crosstalk between an aluminium path (current loop used for actuation) and piezoresistors located near the base of the beam. In this paper authors described an elaborated in ITE (Institute of Electron Technology) technology of fabrication cantilevers with piezoresistive detection of deflection and compared efficiency of two methods used for cantilever actuation.

  7. A Posterior TAP Block Provides More Effective Analgesia Than a Lateral TAP Block in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Sakatoshi; Ueshima, Hironobu; Sakai, Ryomi; Otake, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are a few papers that compared the lateral transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with the posterior TAP block. Our study aimed to compare retrospectively the quality of analgesia after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery using the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia versus the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia. Method. Sixty-seven adult female patients were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, thirty-four patients received the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia (lat. TAP group), and the rest of thirty-three patients received the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia (pos. TAP group). Pain scores both at rest and at movement and the use of additional analgesic drugs were recorded in the postoperative care unit within twenty-four hours after the operation. Postoperative complications were noted. Results. Patients who received pos. TAP reported lower visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores in all points, within twenty-four hours after the operation, than patients who received lat. TAP. Moreover, with the use of additional analgesic drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting during the first twenty-four hours after surgery was lower in the pos. TAP group than in the lat. TAP group. Conclusion. The posterior TAP block provided more effective analgesia than the lateral TAP block in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:26941794

  8. Tip in-light on: Advantages, challenges, and applications of combining AFM and Raman microscopy on biological samples.

    PubMed

    Prats-Mateu, Batirtze; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2017-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopies and spectroscopies, especially AFM and Confocal Raman microscopy are powerful tools to characterize biological materials. They are both non-destructive methods and reveal mechanical and chemical properties on the micro and nano-scale. In the last years the interest for increasing the lateral resolution of optical and spectral images has driven the development of new technologies that overcome the diffraction limit of light. The combination of AFM and Raman reaches resolutions of about 50-150 nm in near-field Raman and 1.7-50 nm in tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and both give a molecular information of the sample and the topography of the scanned surface. In this review, the mentioned approaches are introduced, the main advantages and problems for application on biological samples discussed and some examples for successful experiments given. Finally the potential of colocated AFM and Raman measurements is shown on a case study of cellulose-lignin films: the topography structures revealed by AFM can be related to a certain chemistry by the colocated Raman scan and additionally the mechanical properties be revealed by using the digital pulsed force mode. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:30-40, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Understanding the TERS Effect with On-line Tunneling and Force Feedback Using Multiprobe AFM/NSOM with Raman Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Dekhter, Rimma; Hamra, Patricia; Bar-David, Yossi; Taha, Hesham

    Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has evolved in several directions over the past years. The data from this variety of methodologies has now accumulated to the point that there is a reasonable possibility of evolving an understanding of the underlying cause of the resulting effects that could be the origin of the various TERS enhancement processes. The objective of this presentation is to use the results thus far with atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes with noble metal coating, etching, transparent gold nanoparticles with and without a second nanoparticle [Wang and Schultz, ANALYST 138, 3150 (2013)] and tunneling feedback probes [R. Zhang et. al., NATURE 4 9 8, 8 2 (2013)]. We attempt at understanding this complex of results with AFM/NSOM multiprobe techniques. Results indicate that TERS is dominated by complex quantum interactions. This produces a highly confined and broadband plasmon field with all k vectors for effective excitation. Normal force tuning fork feedback with exposed tip probes provides an excellent means to investigate these effects with TERS probes that we have shown can circumvent the vexing problem of jump to contact prevalent in conventional AFM methodology and permit on-line switching between tunneling and AFM feedback modes of operation.

  10. Tip in–light on: Advantages, challenges, and applications of combining AFM and Raman microscopy on biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Gierlinger, Notburga

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Scanning probe microscopies and spectroscopies, especially AFM and Confocal Raman microscopy are powerful tools to characterize biological materials. They are both non‐destructive methods and reveal mechanical and chemical properties on the micro and nano‐scale. In the last years the interest for increasing the lateral resolution of optical and spectral images has driven the development of new technologies that overcome the diffraction limit of light. The combination of AFM and Raman reaches resolutions of about 50–150 nm in near‐field Raman and 1.7–50 nm in tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and both give a molecular information of the sample and the topography of the scanned surface. In this review, the mentioned approaches are introduced, the main advantages and problems for application on biological samples discussed and some examples for successful experiments given. Finally the potential of colocated AFM and Raman measurements is shown on a case study of cellulose‐lignin films: the topography structures revealed by AFM can be related to a certain chemistry by the colocated Raman scan and additionally the mechanical properties be revealed by using the digital pulsed force mode. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:30–40, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27514318

  11. Derivation of stretched exponential tap density equations of granular powders.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2015-04-21

    The tap density of granular powders was found to be better fitted with the stretched exponential law. In our previous work, the stretched exponential tap density equations were derived with the rate process theory and free volume concept, under the assumption that the particle packing rate during the tapping process obeys the stretched Arrhenius equation, which, however, has an empirical origin. In this article, the above assumption is eliminated and attempts are made to obtain the stretched exponential tap density equations from very fundamental bases. In a vertical tapping process, the probability of particles attaining certain energy states is assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution and particles traveling from one site to another are assumed to follow a very common memoryless random exponential law. The stretched exponential tap density equations are thus derived and all parameters acquire clear physical meanings. The most important parameter, the stretched exponential, is demonstrated to correlate with the interparticle forces: a small value may indicate a strong adhesive or cohesive interaction. Therefore, the stretched exponential could be a better indicator for powder flowability correlated with particle interactions as well.

  12. Quantification of Finger-Tapping Angle Based on Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Djurić-Jovičić, Milica; Jovičić, Nenad S.; Roby-Brami, Agnes; Popović, Mirjana B.; Kostić, Vladimir S.; Djordjević, Antonije R.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel simple method for quantitative and qualitative finger-tapping assessment based on miniature inertial sensors (3D gyroscopes) placed on the thumb and index-finger. We propose a simplified description of the finger tapping by using a single angle, describing rotation around a dominant axis. The method was verified on twelve subjects, who performed various tapping tasks, mimicking impaired patterns. The obtained tapping angles were compared with results of a motion capture camera system, demonstrating excellent accuracy. The root-mean-square (RMS) error between the two sets of data is, on average, below 4°, and the intraclass correlation coefficient is, on average, greater than 0.972. Data obtained by the proposed method may be used together with scores from clinical tests to enable a better diagnostic. Along with hardware simplicity, this makes the proposed method a promising candidate for use in clinical practice. Furthermore, our definition of the tapping angle can be applied to all tapping assessment systems. PMID:28125051

  13. Quantification of Finger-Tapping Angle Based on Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Djurić-Jovičić, Milica; Jovičić, Nenad S; Roby-Brami, Agnes; Popović, Mirjana B; Kostić, Vladimir S; Djordjević, Antonije R

    2017-01-25

    We propose a novel simple method for quantitative and qualitative finger-tapping assessment based on miniature inertial sensors (3D gyroscopes) placed on the thumb and index-finger. We propose a simplified description of the finger tapping by using a single angle, describing rotation around a dominant axis. The method was verified on twelve subjects, who performed various tapping tasks, mimicking impaired patterns. The obtained tapping angles were compared with results of a motion capture camera system, demonstrating excellent accuracy. The root-mean-square (RMS) error between the two sets of data is, on average, below 4°, and the intraclass correlation coefficient is, on average, greater than 0.972. Data obtained by the proposed method may be used together with scores from clinical tests to enable a better diagnostic. Along with hardware simplicity, this makes the proposed method a promising candidate for use in clinical practice. Furthermore, our definition of the tapping angle can be applied to all tapping assessment systems.

  14. Characterization of human ovarian teratoma hair by using AFM, FT-IR, and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Jinwoo; Jung, Min-Hyung; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-12-01

    The structural, physical, and chemical properties of hair taken from an ovarian teratoma (teratoma hair) was first examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopy. The similarities and differences between the teratoma hair and scalp hair were also investigated. Teratoma hair showed a similar morphology and chemical composition to scalp hair. Teratoma hair was covered with a cuticle in the same manner as scalp hair and showed the same amide bonding modes as scalp hair according to FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. On the other hand, teratoma hair showed different physical properties and cysteic acid bands from scalp hair: the surface was rougher and the adhesive force was lower than the scalp hair. The cystine oxides modes did not change with the position unlike scalp hair. These differences can be understood by environmental effects not by the intrinsic properties of the teratoma hair.

  15. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  16. Sub-diffraction nano manipulation using STED AFM.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Canale, Claudio; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, nano manipulation has been recognized as a potential tool of scientific interest especially in nanotechnology and nano-robotics. Contemporary optical microscopy (super resolution) techniques have also reached the nanometer scale resolution to visualize this and hence a combination of super resolution aided nano manipulation ineluctably gives a new perspective to the scenario. Here we demonstrate how specificity and rapid determination of structures provided by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope can aid another microscopic tool with capability of mechanical manoeuvring, like an atomic force microscope (AFM) to get topological information or to target nano scaled materials. We also give proof of principle on how high-resolution real time visualization can improve nano manipulation capability within a dense sample, and how STED-AFM is an optimal combination for this job. With these evidences, this article points to future precise nano dissections and maybe even to a nano-snooker game with an AFM tip and fluorospheres.

  17. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  18. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  19. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. Determining surface properties with bimodal and multimodal AFM.

    PubMed

    Forchheimer, D; Borysov, Stanislav S; Platz, D; Haviland, David B

    2014-12-05

    Conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be extended to bimodal and multimodal AFM in which the cantilever is simultaneously excited at two or more resonance frequencies. Such excitation schemes result in one additional amplitude and phase images for each driven resonance, and potentially convey more information about the surface under investigation. Here we present a theoretical basis for using this information to approximate the parameters of a tip-surface interaction model. The theory is verified by simulations with added noise corresponding to room-temperature measurements.

  1. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  2. Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

  3. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  4. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  6. Probing the Double Layer: Effect of Image Forces on AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Force probes such as AFM tips or laser trap latex beads have a dielectric constant much less than that of the water that they displace. Thus when a probe approaches a charged surface under water it will be repelled simply based upon the image forces, and these can be of nN magnitude. PMID:16714346

  7. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  8. Quantum amplification and quantum optical tapping with squeezed states and correlated quantum states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Z. Y.; Pereira, S. F.; Kimble, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in a nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) are investigated experimentally with a squeezed state coupled into the internal idler mode of the NOPA. Reductions of the inherent quantum noise of the amplifier are observed with a minimum noise level 0.7 dB below the usual noise level of the amplifier with its idler mode in a vacuum state. With two correlated quantum fields as the amplifier's inputs and proper adjustment of the gain of the amplifier, it is shown that the amplifier's intrinsic quantum noise can be completely suppressed so that noise-free amplification is achieved. It is also shown that the NOPA, when coupled to either a squeezed state or a nonclassically correlated state, can realize quantum tapping of optical information.

  9. Neural Tube Defects In Mice Exposed To Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Murali K; Werre, Stephen R; Hrubec, Terry C

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2006 we suddenly began to observe neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice. We hypothesized the mice were being exposed unknowingly to a teratogenic agent and investigated the cause. Our results suggested that NTDs were not resulting from bedding material, feed, strain or source of the mice. Additionally, mice were negative for routine and comprehensive screens of pathogens. To further test whether the NTDs resulted from infectious or genetic cause localized to our facility, we obtained three strains of timed pregnant mice from commercial suppliers located in 4 different states. All strains and sources of mice arrived in our laboratory with NTDs, implying that commercially available mice were possibly exposed to a teratogen prior to purchase. Our investigation eventually concluded that exposure to tap water was causing the NTDs. The incidence of NTDs was greatest in purchased mice provided tap water and lowest in purchased mice provided distilled deionized water (DDI). Providing mice DDI water for two generations (F2-DDI) eliminated the NTDs. When F2-DDI mice were provided tap water from three different urban areas prior to breeding, their offspring again developed NTDs. Increased length of exposure to tap water significantly increased the incidence of NTDs. These results indicate that a contaminant in municipal tap water is likely causing NTDs in mice. The unknown teratogen appears to have a wide geographic distribution but has not yet been identified. Water analysis is currently underway to identify candidate contaminants that might be responsible for the malformations. PMID:20549630

  10. Multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in unsterilized tap water.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, R B; Wadowsky, R M

    1982-01-01

    Naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila, an environmental isolate which had not been grown on artificial medium, was tested for the ability to multiply in tap water. A showerhead containing L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria was immersed in nonsterile tap water supplying this fixture. Also L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria were sedimented from tap water from a surgical intensive care unit. This bacterial suspension was inoculated into tap water from our laboratory. The legionellae in both suspensions multiplied in the tap water at 32, 37, and 42 degrees C. The non-Legionellaceae bacteria multiplied at 25, 32, and 37 degrees C. A water sample which was collected from the bottom of a hot water tank was found to contain L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria. These legionellae also multiplied when the water sample was incubated at 37 degrees C. These results indicate that L. pneumophila may multiply in warm water environments such as hot water plumbing fixtures, hot water tanks, and cooling towers. PMID:7103487

  11. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  12. Non-reciprocal directional dichroism in the AFM phase of BiFeO3 at THz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Urmas; Rõõm, T.; Farkas, D.; Szaller, D.; Bordács, S.; Kézsmárki, I.; Engelkamp, H.; Ozaki, Y.; Tomiaki, Y.; Ito, T.; Fishman, Randy S.

    We did THz absorption spectroscopy of BiFeO3 single crystals in the AFM phase, where the spin cycloid is destroyed in magnetic fields between 18 T and 32 T in Voigt geometry at 1.6 K. If B0 ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , we see strong directional dichroism (DD) of absorption of the magnon mode with light propagating along the direction of the ferroelectric polarization k ∥ P ∥ [ 111 ] and eω ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , bω ∥ [ 1 1 2 ] . The sign of DD can be reversed (i) by reversing the direction of B0 or (ii) by flipping the sample, thus reversing the propagation direction of light. The observed effect is caused by the strong magneto-electric coupling in the collinear AFM phase. Research sponsored by the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research (IUT23-3).

  13. Structural Evolution of a Granular Pack under Manual Tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iikawa, Naoki; Bandi, Mahesh M.; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally study a two-dimensional (2D) granular pack of photoelastic disks subject to vertical manual tapping. Using bright- and dark-field images, we employ gradient-based image analysis methods to analyze various structural quantities. These include the packing fraction (ϕ), force per disk (Fd), and force chain segment length (l) as functions of the tapping number (τ). The increase in the packing fraction with the tapping number is found to exponentially approach an asymptotic value. An exponential distribution is observed for the cumulative numbers of both the force per disk Fd:Ncum(Fd) = AFexp ( - Fd/F0), and the force chain segment length l:Ncum(l) = Alexp ( - l/l0). Whereas the coefficient AF varies with τ for Fd, l shows no dependence on τ. The τ dependences of Fd and ϕ allow us to posit a linear relationship between the total force of the granular pack Ftot*(τ ) and ϕ(τ).

  14. Program sizes flange or pipe-tap orifice plates

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, J.E.

    1984-03-12

    A program has been developed for the HP-41CV programmable calculator that is designed to compute differential pressure across an orifice, gas flow through an orifice, or the orifice-plate bore for orifice plates with flange or pipe taps. It is designed to save time in extracting values from charts, tables, and graphs which are required to perform the calculations. It is based on equations and data from Spink. The program is run by inputing appropriate data via execution of a program entitled ''DATA IN,'' calculating differential pressure via program ''dH20,'' gas flow via program ''FLOW,'' and via program ''BORE.'' Flange-tap calculations are performed with FLAG 01 not set, while pipe-tap calculations are selected by setting FLAG 01.

  15. TAP equation for non-negative Boltzmann machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Mean-field methods for spin systems are frequently used in not only statistical physics but also information sciences. We focus on the Plefka expansion method for spin systems with two-body interactions. The Plefka expansion is a useful perturbative expansion of the Gibbs free energy, and it can systematically provide the naive mean-field approximation, the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) equation and higher-order approximations. In the first part of this paper, using the linear response relation, we derive a recurrence formula for perturbative coefficients in the Plefka expansion. Our recurrence formula enables us to systematically derive general order coefficients. In the latter part of the paper, we apply our recurrence formula to the non-negative Boltzmann machine in which all spin variables are constrained to have non-negative real values, and we obtain the TAP equation for this model. We verify the performance of our TAP equation by conducting some numerical experiments.

  16. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  17. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels. PMID:24663394

  18. AFM characterization of solid-supported lipid multilayers prepared by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, G; Girasole, M; Cricenti, A; Cattaruzza, F; Flamini, A; Prosperi, T; Generosi, J; Castellano, A Congiu

    2005-06-15

    Lipids are the principal components of biologically relevant structures as cellular membranes. They have been the subject of many studies due to their biological relevance and their potential applications. Different techniques, such as Langmuir-Blodgett and vesicle-fusion deposition, are available to deposit ordered lipid films on etched surfaces. Recently, a new technique of lipid film deposition has been proposed in which stacks of a small and well-controlled number of bilayers are prepared on a suitable substrate using a spin-coater. We studied the morphological properties of multi-layers made of cationic and neutral lipids (DOTAP and DOPC) and mixtures of them using dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). After adapting and optimizing, the spin-coating technique to deposit lipids on a chemically etched Silicon (1,0,0) substrate, a morphological nanometer-scale characterization of the aforementioned samples has been provided. The AFM study showed that an initial layer of ordered vesicles is formed and, afterward, depending on details of the spin-coating preparation protocol and to the dimension of the silicon substrate, vesicle fusion and structural rearrangements of the lipid layers may occur. The present data disclose the possibility to control the lipid's structures by acting on spin-coating parameters with promising perspectives for novel applications of lipid films.

  19. Paired Synchronous Rhythmic Finger Tapping without an External Timing Cue Shows Greater Speed Increases Relative to Those for Solo Tapping

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Masahiro; Shinya, Masahiro; Kudo, Kazutoshi

    2017-01-01

    In solo synchronization-continuation (SC) tasks, intertap intervals (ITI) are known to drift from the initial tempo. It has been demonstrated that people in paired and group contexts modulate their action timing unconsciously in various situations such as choice reaction tasks, rhythmic body sway, and hand clapping in concerts, which suggests the possibility that ITI drift is also affected by paired context. We conducted solo and paired SC tapping experiments with three tempos (75, 120, and 200 bpm) and examined whether tempo-keeping performance changed according to tempo and/or the number of players. Results indicated that those tapping in the paired conditions were faster, relative to those observed in the solo conditions, for all tempos. For the faster participants, the degree of ITI drift in the solo conditions was strongly correlated with that in the paired conditions. Regression analyses suggested that both faster and slower participants adapted their tap timing to that of their partners. A possible explanation for these results is that the participants reset the phase of their internal clocks according to the faster beat between their own tap and the partners’ tap. Our results indicated that paired context could bias the direction of ITI drift toward decreasing. PMID:28276461

  20. Degradation of isoxaflutole (balance) herbicide by hypochlorite in tap water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Ho; Lerch, Robert N; Garrett, Harold E; George, Milon F

    2003-12-31

    Chlorine has been widely employed for the disinfection of drinking water. Additionally, it has the capacity to oxidize many organic compounds in water. Isoxaflutole (Balance; IXF) belongs to a new class of isoxazole herbicides. Isoxaflutole has a very short soil half-life and rapidly degrades to a stable and phytotoxic metabolite, diketonitrile (DKN). Further degradation of DKN produces a nonbiologically active benzoic acid (BA) metabolite. In experiments using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV spectroscopy (HPLC-UV) and HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), DKN was found to rapidly react with hypochlorite in tap water, yielding the BA metabolite as the major end product. One milligram per liter (19 microM) of hypochlorite residue in tap water was able to completely oxidize up to 1600 microg/L (4.45 micromol/L) of DKN. In tap water, the disappearance of IXF was much more rapid than in DI water. As soon as the IXF is hydrolyzed to DKN, the DKN quickly reacts with the OCl(-) to form nonphytotoxic BA. As a result, the herbicide solutions prepared with tap water at 500 microg/L will no longer possess any herbicidal activity after 48 h of storage. However, in agronomic settings, highly concentrated tank solutions (600-800 mg/L) may be prepared with tap water since the conversion of IXF to BA would represent <5% of the herbicide; therefore, any impact on the herbicide efficacy would be negligible. Results of this study show that current chlorination disinfection protocols in municipal water systems would completely eliminate the phytotoxic form of this new herbicide, DKN, from drinking water supplies; yet, farmers can use chlorinated tap water without significant loss of efficacy.

  1. Repeatability Evaluation of Finger Tapping Device with Magnetic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuko; Kandori, Akihiko; Shima, Keisuke; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Toshio; Noda, Masafumi; Higashikawa, Fumiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    We tested the repeatability of a finger tapping device with magnetic sensors to determine its reliability. This device, which was developed to assist in the diagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and strokes, measures the distance between the first and index fingers during finger tapping movements (opening and closing the fingers repeatedly). We evaluated three types of repeatability based on ICC (interclass correlation coefficient) and Welch's test (test for equal means in a oneway layout): repeatability when measured at different times, when using different devices, and when using different measurers. We calculated these three types for three finger tapping tasks on both hands for 21 characteristics calculated from finger tapping waveforms. Results demonstrated that the repeatability when using different devices is high regardless of the task or hand. The repeatability when measuring at different times and when using different measurers is high at some tasks, but not all. One of the finger tapping tasks (finger tapping movement with the largest amplitude and highest velocity), which is used in a conventional PD diagnosis method (UPDRS), does not have enough repeatability, while other tasks show high repeatability. Results also showed that five characteristics have the highest repeatability (ICC ≥ 0.5 or significance probability of Welch's test ≥ 5% in all tasks): “total moving distance,” “average of local minimum acceleration in opening motion,” “average of local minimum acceleration in closing motion,” “average of local maximum distance” and “average of local minimum velocity”. These results clearly demonstrate the strong repeatability of this device and lead to more precise diagnosis of movement disorders.

  2. Occurrence of chlorinated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, H.; Pilkington, N.H.; Otsuki, A.; Fuwa, K.

    1985-07-01

    Organic compounds in tap waters were extracted by a modified continuous liquid-liquid extractor and analyzed by computerized gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a fused silica capillary column. The results indicate the presence of monochlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, fluorenone, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene and dichlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene. The parent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives such as fluorenone and anthraquinone were also found. It was demonstrated that chlorinated PAHs (Cl-PAHs) were really present in tap waters at 10/sup -1/-10/sup -2/ ng/L levels.

  3. AFM visualization of sub-50nm polyplex disposition to the nuclear pore complex without compromising the integrity of the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helene; Parhamifar, Ladan; Hunter, A Christy; Shahin, Victor; Moghimi, S Moein

    2016-12-28

    It has been questioned as to whether polyplexes in the cytoplasm can reach the nuclear compartment and if so in what form. By applying atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the nuclear envelope and the nuclear pore complexes, we demonstrate that disposition of polyethylenimine (PEI)/DNA polyplexes that were microinjected into the oocytes of Xenopus laevis, as an example of a non-dividing cell, is exclusive to the nuclear pore complex (NPC). AFM images show NPCs clogged only with sub-50nm polyplexes. This mode of disposition neither altered the morphology/integrity of the nuclear membrane nor the NPC. AFM images further show polyplexes on the nucleoplasmic side of the envelope, presumably indicating species in transit. Transmission electron microscopy studies of ruptured nuclei from transfected human cell lines demonstrate the presence of sub-50nm particles resembling polyplexes in morphology compared with control preparations.

  4. Femtosecond laser inscription of asymmetric directional couplers for in-fiber optical taps and fiber cladding photonics.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Jason R; Fernandes, Luís A; Herman, Peter R

    2015-06-29

    Precise alignment of femtosecond laser tracks in standard single mode optical fiber is shown to enable controllable optical tapping of the fiber core waveguide light with fiber cladding photonic circuits. Asymmetric directional couplers are presented with tunable coupling ratios up to 62% and bandwidths up to 300 nm at telecommunication wavelengths. Real-time fiber monitoring during laser writing permitted a means of controlling the coupler length to compensate for micron-scale alignment errors and to facilitate tailored design of coupling ratio, spectral bandwidth and polarization properties. Laser induced waveguide birefringence was harnessed for polarization dependent coupling that led to the formation of in-fiber polarization-selective taps with 32 dB extinction ratio. This technology enables the interconnection of light propagating in pre-existing waveguides with laser-formed devices, thereby opening a new practical direction for the three-dimensional integration of optical devices in the cladding of optical fibers and planar lightwave circuits.

  5. AFM Manipulation of Viruses: Substrate Interactions and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.; Finch, M.; Taylor, R. M.; Chi, V.; Brooks, F. P.; Ferrari, F.; Samulski, R.

    1996-03-01

    Using an AFM tip as a manipulation tool, we have translated, rotated, and dissected individual Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Adenovirus particles. We have implemented a teleoperation system which allows manual control of the relative tip-sample position while also allowing conventional AFM operation for imaging resulting structure. Using simple tip trajectories to bend the rod-shaped TMV, we observed a variety of resulting structures and mechanical failures. The distributed adhesive interaction between the virus and the sample surface, as well as the local tip-virus interaction affect the distortion in the shape of the virus. Experiments were performed in air as well as in liquid on graphite and Si substrates. The in-liquid experiments allow tuning of the environmental conditions, including osmolarity and pH, which are known to profoundly affect the virus structure. A continuum mechanical model relating mechanical properties to observations provides insight into the constraints for successful nondestructive manipulation.

  6. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  7. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  8. Automated assembly of holder chips to AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Gunther; Jacob, Dirk; Fouchier, Marc

    2001-10-01

    At the Belgian institute IMEC techniques for the production of electrically conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are developed. To facilitate handling of the fragile probes, holder chips are required. The assembly of such holder chips, which can be split up into the application of solder paste, the positioning of the holder chip and the soldering of the chip, is a crucial manufacturing step, that, until now, was performed manually for economic reasons. With the help of a modular micro assembly tool, developed by the Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management (iwb) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen, an economical automated assembly of the holder chips was developed. Thanks to our integrated sensor technology, even the automated assembly onto the extremely fragile membranes of moulded AFM probes was possible. In particular, the dispensing process of the solder paste onto the membranes was improved by the integration of a non-contact sensor for the needle clearance.

  9. AFM review study on pox viruses and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, F M; Hörber, J K; Häberle, W; Czerny, C P; Smith, D P; Binnig, G

    1997-10-01

    Single living cells were studied in growth medium by atomic force microscopy at a high--down to one image frame per second--imaging rate over time periods of many hours, stably producing hundreds of consecutive scans with a lateral resolution of approximately 30-40 nm. The cell was held by a micropipette mounted onto the scanner-piezo as shown in Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, and G. Binnig. 1991. Force microscopy on living cells. J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B9:1210-0000. To initiate specific processes on the cell surface the cells had been infected with pox viruses as reported earlier and, most likely, the liberation of a progeny virion by the still-living cell was observed, hence confirming and supporting earlier results (Häberle, W., J. K. H. Hörber, F. Ohnesorge, D. P. E. Smith, and G. Binnig. 1992. In situ investigations of single living cells infected by viruses. Ultramicroscopy. 42-44:1161-0000; Hörber, J. K. H., W. Häberle, F. Ohnesorge, G. Binnig, H. G. Liebich, C. P. Czerny, H. Mahnel, and A. Mayr. 1992. Investigation of living cells in the nanometer regime with the atomic force microscope. Scanning Microscopy. 6:919-930). Furthermore, the pox viruses used were characterized separately by AFM in an aqueous environment down to the molecular level. Quasi-ordered structural details were resolved on a scale of a few nm where, however, image distortions and artifacts due to multiple tip effects are probably involved--just as in very high resolution (<15-20 nm) images on the cells. Although in a very preliminary manner, initial studies on the mechanical resonance properties of a single living (noninfected) cell, held by the micropipette, have been performed. In particular, frequency response spectra were recorded that indicate elastic properties and enough stiffness of these cells to make the demonstrated rapid scanning of the imaging tip plausible. Measurements of this kind, especially if they can be proven to be cell-type specific, may perhaps have a large

  10. Leading Change: Transitioning the AFMS into a High Reliability Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-16

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY LEADING CHANGE: TRANSITIONING THE AFMS INTO A HIGH RELIABILTY ORGANIZATION by Robert K. Bogart...academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the US government, the Department of Defense, or Air ...University. In accordance with Air Force Instruction 51-303, it is not copyrighted, but is the property of the United States government. iii

  11. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  12. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  13. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    the development of green rocket propellants . The Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) monopropellant, AF-M315E, has been selected for...art rocket fuels and propellants . A known quantity of liquid propellant is placed in a metal U-tube and held isothermally in a preheated mixture of... Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) program. As the propulsion system developed by Aerojet- Rocketdyne for this propellant advances in maturity, studies

  14. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  15. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  16. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  17. Experimental verification of tapping sound analysis for the inspection of laminated composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Joon S.; Kim, Seung J.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, an experimental study was performed to investigate the possibility of a new NDE system - Tapping Sound Analysis (TSA). The tapping sound and contact force of healthy laminated composite structure and defective laminated composite structure were measured using tapping device. The feature extraction method based on the wavelet packet transform was used to extract features from the tapping sound. Comparing the feature of the tapping sound of healthy structure and defective structure, a feature index could be derived, which indicates the existence of defect inside the laminated composite structure. Using the feature index, the difference between the tapping sound data of the present specimens could be expressed as a single value.

  18. MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED OUT OF THE CUPOLA UNTIL IT NEEDED BY POURERS ON THE CONVEYOR LINES WHO FILL MOBILE LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAIL SYSTEMS AS THE BULL LADLE TIPS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Divergence of stable isotopes in tap water across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sihan; Hu, Hongchang; Tian, Fuqiang; Tie, Qiang; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Yaling; Shi, Chunxiang

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotopes in water (e.g., δ2H and δ18O) are important indicators of hydrological and ecological patterns and processes. Tap water can reflect integrated features of regional hydrological processes and human activities. China is a large country with significant meteorological and geographical variations. This report presents the first national-scale survey of Stable Isotopes in Tap Water (SITW) across China. 780 tap water samples have been collected from 95 cities across China from December 2014 to December 2015. (1) Results yielded the Tap Water Line in China is δ2H = 7.72 δ18O + 6.57 (r2 = 0.95). (2) SITW spatial distribution presents typical “continental effect”. (3) SITW seasonal variations indicate clearly regional patterns but no trends at the national level. (4) SITW can be correlated in some parts with geographic or meteorological factors. This work presents the first SITW map in China, which sets up a benchmark for further stable isotopes research across China. This is a critical step toward monitoring and investigating water resources in climate-sensitive regions, so the human-hydrological system. These findings could be used in the future to establish water management strategies at a national or regional scale.

  20. Continuous bilateral TAP block in patient with prior abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lima, Isabel Flor de; Linda, Filipe; dos Santos, Ângela; Lages, Neusa; Correia, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We present as an option for epidural analgesia and intravenous opioid infusion a clinical case of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, with bilateral placement of catheter for postoperative analgesia after exploratory laparotomy performed in a patient with previous abdominal surgery and heart, kidney and liver failure.

  1. Modeling of Manganese Ferroalloy Slag Properties and Flow During Tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jacques; Zietsman, Johannes Hendrik; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan

    2015-12-01

    Stable operation of submerged-arc furnaces producing high-carbon ferromanganese (HCFeMn) and silicomanganese (SiMn) requires tapping of consistent amounts of liquid slag and metal. Minimal effort to initiate and sustain tapping at reasonable rates is desired, accommodating fluctuations in especially slag chemical composition and temperature. An analytical model is presented that estimates the tapping rate of the liquid slag-metal mixture as a function of taphole dimensions, coke bed particulate properties, and slag and metal physicochemical properties with dependencies on chemical composition and temperature. This model may be used to evaluate the sensitivity to fluctuations in these parameters, and to determine the influence of converting between HCFeMn and SiMn production. The model was applied to typical HCFeMn and SiMn process conditions, using modeled slag viscosities and densities. Tapping flow rates estimated were comparable to operational data and found to be dependent mostly on slag viscosity. Slag viscosities were generally lower for typical SiMn slags due to the higher temperature used for calculating viscosity. It was predicted that flow through the taphole would mostly develop into laminar flow, with the pressure drop predominantly over the coke bed. Flow rates were found to be more dependent on the taphole diameter than on the taphole length.

  2. 37. Tap room with bar, looking from east to west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Tap room with bar, looking from east to west showing part of the mural (on north wall) depicting nautical and whaling themes. (mural and bar were removed 1998 - 99 respectively.) - Fort Ord, Soldiers' Club, California State Highway 1 near Eighth Street, Seaside, Monterey County, CA

  3. "Bottled or Tap?" A Controversy for Science, Economics, and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapham, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    Every year, Americans spend billions of dollars on bottled water. They purchase a bottle from the vending machine or buy a case at the grocery, no longer considering the water that's freely available from their taps. As consumers and as citizens, however, Americans should pause to study the personal and public consequences of this choice. In this…

  4. Guide to Implementing TAP. Teens for AIDS Prevention Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    Teens for AIDS Prevention (TAP) is a model peer intervention program designed by the Center for Population Options to increase knowledge and change attitudes and behaviors among youth to reduce their risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The program utilizes peer pressure in a positive sense: to encourage youth to protect…

  5. Divergence of stable isotopes in tap water across China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sihan; Hu, Hongchang; Tian, Fuqiang; Tie, Qiang; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Yaling; Shi, Chunxiang

    2017-03-02

    Stable isotopes in water (e.g., δ(2)H and δ(18)O) are important indicators of hydrological and ecological patterns and processes. Tap water can reflect integrated features of regional hydrological processes and human activities. China is a large country with significant meteorological and geographical variations. This report presents the first national-scale survey of Stable Isotopes in Tap Water (SITW) across China. 780 tap water samples have been collected from 95 cities across China from December 2014 to December 2015. (1) Results yielded the Tap Water Line in China is δ(2)H = 7.72 δ(18)O + 6.57 (r(2) = 0.95). (2) SITW spatial distribution presents typical "continental effect". (3) SITW seasonal variations indicate clearly regional patterns but no trends at the national level. (4) SITW can be correlated in some parts with geographic or meteorological factors. This work presents the first SITW map in China, which sets up a benchmark for further stable isotopes research across China. This is a critical step toward monitoring and investigating water resources in climate-sensitive regions, so the human-hydrological system. These findings could be used in the future to establish water management strategies at a national or regional scale.

  6. Media Leader Tapped to Head New York City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    When Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg sought a leader for the New York City schools in 2002, his outside-the-box choice was Joel I. Klein, a former assistant U.S. attorney general who had no experience as a school administrator. Eight years later, in seeking a replacement for Mr. Klein, Mr. Bloomberg has tapped yet another person from outside education:…

  7. Divergence of stable isotopes in tap water across China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sihan; Hu, Hongchang; Tian, Fuqiang; Tie, Qiang; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Yaling; Shi, Chunxiang

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotopes in water (e.g., δ2H and δ18O) are important indicators of hydrological and ecological patterns and processes. Tap water can reflect integrated features of regional hydrological processes and human activities. China is a large country with significant meteorological and geographical variations. This report presents the first national-scale survey of Stable Isotopes in Tap Water (SITW) across China. 780 tap water samples have been collected from 95 cities across China from December 2014 to December 2015. (1) Results yielded the Tap Water Line in China is δ2H = 7.72 δ18O + 6.57 (r2 = 0.95). (2) SITW spatial distribution presents typical “continental effect”. (3) SITW seasonal variations indicate clearly regional patterns but no trends at the national level. (4) SITW can be correlated in some parts with geographic or meteorological factors. This work presents the first SITW map in China, which sets up a benchmark for further stable isotopes research across China. This is a critical step toward monitoring and investigating water resources in climate-sensitive regions, so the human-hydrological system. These findings could be used in the future to establish water management strategies at a national or regional scale. PMID:28252670

  8. 20. Detail, Furnace A, shows the drill used to tap ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail, Furnace A, shows the drill used to tap the furnace (at center left) and the 'mud gun' used to close it up with a clay plug (at lower right). Metal chute at center (next to drill) was used to clean out furnace prior to its abandonment. - Central Furnaces, 2650 Broadway, east bank of Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  9. 49 CFR 192.627 - Tapping pipelines under pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tapping pipelines under pressure. 192.627 Section 192.627 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  10. Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) attitude acquisition, determination, and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzolini, John D.; Mcglew, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) is a 2 axis gimbal system designed to provide fine pointing of Space Transportation System (STS) borne instruments. It features center-of-mass instrument mounting and will accommodate instruments of up to 1134 kg (2500 pounds) which fit within a 1.0 by 1.0 by 4.2 meter (40 by 40 by 166 inch) envelope. The TAPS system is controlled by a microcomputer based Control Electronics Assembly (CEA), a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), and a Servo Control Unit (SCU). A DRIRU-II inertial reference unit is used to provide incremental angles for attitude propagation. A Ball Brothers STRAP star tracker is used for attitude acquisition and update. The theory of the TAPS attitude determination and error computation for the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT) are described. The attitude acquisition is based upon a 2 star geometric solution. The acquisition theory and quaternion algebra are presented. The attitude control combines classical position, integral and derivative (PID) control with techniques to compensate for coulomb friction (bias torque) and the cable harness crossing the gimbals (spring torque). Also presented is a technique for an adaptive bias torque compensation which adjusts to an ever changing frictional torque environment. The control stability margins are detailed, with the predicted pointing performance, based upon simulation studies. The TAPS user interface, which provides high level operations commands to facilitate science observations, is outlined.

  11. TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN HOME TAP WATER AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trihalomethane Levels in Home Tap Water and Semen Quality
    Laura Fenster, 1 Kirsten Waller, 2 Gayle Windham, 1 Tanya Henneman, 2 Meredith Anderson, 2 Pauline Mendola, 3 James W. Overstreet, 4 Shanna H. Swan5

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environm...

  12. Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) attitude acquisition, determination, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzolini, John D.; McGlew, David E.

    1990-12-01

    The Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) is a 2 axis gimbal system designed to provide fine pointing of Space Transportation System (STS) borne instruments. It features center-of-mass instrument mounting and will accommodate instruments of up to 1134 kg (2500 pounds) which fit within a 1.0 by 1.0 by 4.2 meter (40 by 40 by 166 inch) envelope. The TAPS system is controlled by a microcomputer based Control Electronics Assembly (CEA), a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), and a Servo Control Unit (SCU). A DRIRU-II inertial reference unit is used to provide incremental angles for attitude propagation. A Ball Brothers STRAP star tracker is used for attitude acquisition and update. The theory of the TAPS attitude determination and error computation for the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT) are described. The attitude acquisition is based upon a 2 star geometric solution. The acquisition theory and quaternion algebra are presented. The attitude control combines classical position, integral and derivative (PID) control with techniques to compensate for coulomb friction (bias torque) and the cable harness crossing the gimbals (spring torque). Also presented is a technique for an adaptive bias torque compensation which adjusts to an ever changing frictional torque environment. The control stability margins are detailed, with the predicted pointing performance, based upon simulation studies. The TAPS user interface, which provides high level operations commands to facilitate science observations, is outlined.

  13. 17. SOUTHEAST VIEW OF THE TAPPING SIDE OF BASIC OXYGEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. SOUTHEAST VIEW OF THE TAPPING SIDE OF BASIC OXYGEN FURNACE No. 2 ON THE OPERATING FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE IN THE BOP SHOP. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  14. Tapping a Potential for the Good of All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabo, Annika

    Historically, the spread of universal formal mass education in the West is closely linked to emergence of nation-states. This is also true of the Third World. The salient feature of education today is that it reflects a model of society in which citizens, including children, are seen as a potential to be tapped for development of the nation, as…

  15. Complexity Matching Effects in Bimanual and Interpersonal Syncopated Finger Tapping

    PubMed Central

    Coey, Charles A.; Washburn, Auriel; Hassebrock, Justin; Richardson, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate complexity matching during syncopated behavioral coordination. Participants either tapped in (bimanual) syncopation using their two hands, or tapped in (interpersonal) syncopation with a partner, with each participant using one of their hands. The time series of inter-tap intervals (ITI) from each hand were submitted to fractal analysis, as well as to short-term and multi-timescale cross-correlation analyses. The results demonstrated that the fractal scaling of one hand’s ITI was strongly correlated to that of the other hand, and this complexity matching effect was stronger in the bimanual condition than in the interpersonal condition. Moreover, the degree of complexity matching was predicted by the strength of short-term cross-correlation and the stability of the asynchrony between the two tapping series. These results suggest that complexity matching is not specific to the inphase synchronization tasks used in past research, but is a general result of coordination between complex systems. PMID:26840612

  16. Design Approaches and Comparison of TAPS Packages for Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, S. Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper's purpose is to promote the use of modern technologies such as multimedia packages to engineering students. The aim is to help them to learning in their learning, visualization, problem solving and understanding engineering concepts such as in mechanics dynamics. Design/methodology/approach: TAPS packages are developed to help…

  17. Multiplication of Legionella spp. in tap water containing Hartmannella vermiformis.

    PubMed

    Wadowsky, R M; Wilson, T M; Kapp, N J; West, A J; Kuchta, J M; States, S J; Dowling, J N; Yee, R B

    1991-07-01

    A model was developed to study the multiplication of various Legionella spp. in tap water containing Hartmannella vermiformis. Tap water cultures prepared with the following components were suitable for the multiplication studies: Legionella spp., 10(3) CFU/ml; H. vermiformis, 10(4.4) cysts per ml; and killed Pseudomonas paucimobilis, 10(9) cells per ml. Cocultures were incubated at 37 degrees C for at least 1 week. The following legionellae multiplied in tap water cocultures in each replicate experiment: L. bozemanii (WIGA strain), L. dumoffii (NY-23 and TX-KL strains), L. micdadei (two environmental strains), and L. pneumophila (six environmental strains and one clinical isolate). Growth yield values for these strains were 0.6 to 3.5 log CFU/ml. Legionellae which did not multiply in replicate cocultures included L. anisa (one strain), L. bozemanii (MI-15 strain), L. micdadei (a clinical isolate), L. longbeachae, (one strain), and L. pneumophila (Philadelphia 1 strain). L. gormanii and an environmental isolate of L. pneumophila multiplied in only one of three experiments. None of the legionellae multiplied in tap water containing only killed P. paucimobilis. The mean growth yield (+/- standard deviation) of H. vermiformis in the cocultures was 1.2 +/- 0.1 log units/ml. H. vermiformis supports multiplication of only particular strains of legionellae, some of which are from diverse origins.

  18. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  19. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  20. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers.

  1. Nanoscale Nucleosome Dynamics Assessed with Time-lapse AFM

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental challenge associated with chromosomal gene regulation is accessibility of DNA within nucleosomes. Recent studies performed by various techniques, including single-molecule approaches, led to the realization that nucleosomes are dynamic structures rather than static systems, as it was once believed. Direct data is required in order to understand the dynamics of nucleosomes more clearly and answer fundamental questions, including: What is the range of nucleosome dynamics? Does a non-ATP dependent unwrapping process of nucleosomes exist? What are the factors facilitating the large scale opening and unwrapping of nucleosomes? This review summarizes the results of nucleosome dynamics obtained with time-lapse AFM, including a high-speed version (HS-AFM) capable of visualizing molecular dynamics on the millisecond time scale. With HS-AFM, the dynamics of nucleosomes at a sub-second time scale was observed allowing one to visualize various pathways of nucleosome dynamics, such as sliding and unwrapping, including complete dissociation. Overall, these findings reveal new insights into the dynamics of nucleosomes and the novel mechanisms controlling spontaneous chromatin dynamics. PMID:24839467

  2. Phthalate occurrence in rivers and tap water from central Spain.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Morueco, N; González-Alonso, S; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the presence and concentrations of the main phthalates in water from the Jarama and Manzanares rivers in the region of Madrid (RM, Central Spain), the most densely populated region of Spain, and to determine the possible oestrogenic activity based on found phthalate concentration. The presence of phthalates in major supply drinking water areas of the RM was also analysed, thus allowing a preliminary assessment of the health risks resulting from the concentrations obtained. The results of this study show the presence of the three (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP) di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)) of five phthalates studied (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), benzyl-butyl phthalate (BBP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)). The DBP was found in both river and tap water samplers, whereas DMP and DEP were found in only drinking water samples. The DBP was found to make the highest average contribution to pollution in both river and tap water. The DEHP was not found in both the river and tap water because it is one of the most regulated phthalates. The highest phthalate contamination was found in the Manzanares river and in those areas that receive treated water from the Tagus river. The phthalates found in river and tap water in the RM do not represent a potential oestrogenic risk for the aquatic environment or humans. A preliminary risk assessment suggested that the risk of exposure to phthalates from tap water in this study is acceptable, although continuous monitoring of the presence of these substances in both drinking and river water should be undertaken to detect possible increases in their concentrations. This is the first study to analyse the presence of phthalates in both rivers and drinking water of the centre of Spain.

  3. AFM and SEM study of the effects of etching on IPS-Empress 2 TM dental ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.-P.; Silikas, N.; Allaf, M.; Wilson, N. H. F.; Watts, D. C.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing etching time on the surface of the new dental material, IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic. Twenty one IPS-Empress 2 TM glass ceramic samples were made from IPS-Empress 2 TM ingots through lost-wax, hot-pressed ceramic fabrication technology. All samples were highly polished and cleaned ultrasonically for 5 min in acetone before and after etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid gel. The etching times were 0, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 s respectively. Microstructure was analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the surface roughness and topography. Observations with SEM showed that etching with hydrofluoric acid resulted in preferential dissolution of glass matrix, and that partially supported crystals within the glass matrix were lost with increasing etching time. AFM measurements indicated that etching increased the surface roughness of the glass-ceramic. A simple least-squares linear regression was used to establish a relationship between surface roughness parameters ( Ra, RMS), and etching time, for which r2>0.94. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining two microscopic methods for a better understanding of the surface. SEM showed the mode of action of hydrofluoric acid on the ceramic and AFM provided valuable data regarding the extent of surface degradation relative to etching time.

  4. Differential regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by phytosphingosine derivatives, NAPS and TAPS, and its role in the NAPS or TAPS-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jung; Shin, Weonhye; Park, Chang Seo; Kim, Hyung-Ok; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the effect of novel phytosphingosine derivatives, N-acetyl phytosphingosine (NAPS) and tetra-acetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS), on induction of apoptosis in HaCaT cells in comparison with C2-ceramide. NAPS/TAPS effectively decreased cell viability in a dose dependent manner mainly due to apoptosis. An apoptosis expression array analysis showed that in the TAPS treated cells 13 genes including COX-2 encoding cyclooxygenase-2, the most induced by TAPS, were up-regulated while 23 others down-regulated. Therefore, we examined the mechanism underlying the altered expression of COX-2. Assays with inhibitors and antibodies against proteins involved in signal transduction demonstrated that NAPS and TAPS elevated COX-2 expression via tyrosine kinase, src, PI-3 kinase and PKC, followed by ERK activation. However, P38 was not involved in the NAPS-mediated COX-2 expression but in the TAPS-mediated. We further demonstrated by FACS analyses that NAPS- or TAPS-mediated apoptosis was greatly increased in cells treated with celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Inhibition of the ERK pathway apparently involved in the NAPS/TAPS-mediated COX-2 expression enhanced the NAPS/TAPS-mediated apoptosis, whereas inhibition of the P38 pathway did not. These results suggest that expression of COX-2 in the TAPS- or NAPS-treated cells may be increased to counteract the effect of those compounds on apoptosis.

  5. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields.

  6. Spatial dependence of polycrystalline FTO’s conductance analyzed by conductive atomic force microscope (C-AFM)

    SciTech Connect

    Peixoto, Alexandre Pessoa; Costa, J. C. da

    2014-05-15

    Fluorine-doped Tin oxide (FTO) is a highly transparent, electrically conductive polycrystalline material frequently used as an electrode in organic solar cells and optical-electronic devices [1–2]. In this work a spatial analysis of the conductive behavior of FTO was carried out by Conductive-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM). Rare highly oriented grains sample give us an opportunity to analyze the top portion of polycrystalline FTO and compare with the border one. It is shown that the current flow essentially takes place through the polycrystalline edge at grain boundaries.

  7. TAPS: an automated tool for identification of skills, knowledges, and abilities using natural language task description

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, C.C.; Carter, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype, computer-based tool (TAPS) has been developed to aid training system developers in identifying skills, knowledges, and abilities (SKAs) during task analysis. TAPS uses concepts of flexible pattern matching to evaluate English descriptions of job behaviors and to recode them as SKA lists. This paper addresses the rationale for TAPS and describes its design including SKA definitions and task analysis logic. It also presents examples of TAPS's application.

  8. Estimation method of finger tapping dynamics using simple magnetic detection system.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Akihiko; Sano, Yuko; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yoshihisa; Irokawa, Masataka; Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    2010-05-01

    We have developed the simple estimation method of a finger tapping dynamics model for investigating muscle resistance and stiffness during tapping movement in normal subjects. We measured finger tapping movements of 207 normal subjects using a magnetic finger tapping detection system. Each subject tapped two fingers in time with a metronome at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Hz. The velocity and acceleration values for both the closing and opening tapping data were used to estimate a finger tapping dynamics model. Using the frequency response of the ratio of acceleration to velocity of the mechanical impedance parameters, we estimated the resistance (friction coefficient) and compliance (stiffness). We found two dynamics models for the maximum open position and tap position. In the maximum open position, the extensor muscle resistance was twice as high as the flexor muscle resistance and males had a higher spring constant. In the tap position, the flexor muscle resistance was much higher than the extensor muscle resistance. This indicates that the tapping dynamics in the maximum open position are controlled by the balance of extensor and flexor muscle friction resistances and the flexor stiffness, and the flexor friction resistance is the main component in the tap position. It can be concluded that our estimation method makes it possible to understand the tapping dynamics.

  9. Estimation method of finger tapping dynamics using simple magnetic detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Sano, Yuko; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Okada, Yoshihisa; Irokawa, Masataka; Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    2010-05-01

    We have developed the simple estimation method of a finger tapping dynamics model for investigating muscle resistance and stiffness during tapping movement in normal subjects. We measured finger tapping movements of 207 normal subjects using a magnetic finger tapping detection system. Each subject tapped two fingers in time with a metronome at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Hz. The velocity and acceleration values for both the closing and opening tapping data were used to estimate a finger tapping dynamics model. Using the frequency response of the ratio of acceleration to velocity of the mechanical impedance parameters, we estimated the resistance (friction coefficient) and compliance (stiffness). We found two dynamics models for the maximum open position and tap position. In the maximum open position, the extensor muscle resistance was twice as high as the flexor muscle resistance and males had a higher spring constant. In the tap position, the flexor muscle resistance was much higher than the extensor muscle resistance. This indicates that the tapping dynamics in the maximum open position are controlled by the balance of extensor and flexor muscle friction resistances and the flexor stiffness, and the flexor friction resistance is the main component in the tap position. It can be concluded that our estimation method makes it possible to understand the tapping dynamics.

  10. Oropharyngeal Tularemia Outbreak Associated with Drinking Contaminated Tap Water, Turkey, July–September 2013

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Bekir; Isik, Mehmet Emirhan; Tutus, Celal; Ozturk, Huseyin; Temel, Fehminaz; Kizilaslan, Mecit; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, an oropharyngeal tularemia outbreak in Turkey affected 55 persons. Drinking tap water during the likely exposure period was significantly associated with illness (attack rate 27% vs. 11% among non–tap water drinkers). Findings showed the tap water source had been contaminated by surface water, and the chlorination device malfunctioned. PMID:26584074

  11. The Ability to Tap to a Beat Relates to Cognitive, Linguistic, and Perceptual Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Adam T.; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Reading-impaired children have difficulty tapping to a beat. Here we tested whether this relationship between reading ability and synchronized tapping holds in typically-developing adolescents. We also hypothesized that tapping relates to two other abilities. First, since auditory-motor synchronization requires monitoring of the relationship…

  12. Nanoscale thermal AFM of polymers: transient heat flow effects.

    PubMed

    Duvigneau, Joost; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G Julius

    2010-11-23

    Thermal transport around the nanoscale contact area between the heated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and the specimen under investigation is a central issue in scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Polarized light microscopy and AFM imaging of the temperature-induced crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films in the region near the tip were used in this study to unveil the lateral heat transport. The radius of the observed lateral surface isotherm at 133 °C ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 18.7 ± 0.5 μm for tip-polymer interface temperatures between 200 and 300 °C with contact times varying from 20 to 120 s, respectively. In addition, the heat transport into polymer films was assessed by measurements of the thermal expansion of poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) films with variable thickness on silicon supports. Our data showed that heat transport in the specimen normal (z) direction occurred to depths exceeding 1000 μm using representative non-steady-state SThM conditions (i.e., heating from 40 to 180 °C at a rate of 10 °C s(-1)). On the basis of the experimental results, a 1D steady-state model for heat transport was developed, which shows the temperature profile close to the tip-polymer contact. The model also indicates that ≤1% of the total power generated in the heater area, which is embedded in the cantilever end, is transported into the polymer through the tip-polymer contact interface. Our results complement recent efforts in the evaluation and improvement of existing theoretical models for thermal AFM, as well as advance further developments of SThM for nanoscale thermal materials characterization and/or manipulation via scanning thermal lithography (SThL).

  13. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  14. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  15. Measurement and evaluation of finger tapping movements using magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Kan, Eriko; Kandori, Akihiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a quantitative measurement and evaluation method of finger tapping movements for diagnosis support and assessment of motor function. In this method, a magnetic sensor consisting of two coils is used to measure movement. The coil voltage induced by the electromagnetic induction law changes depending on the distance between the two coils; this enables estimation of the distance between two coil-bearing fingertips from the voltage measured by the nonlinear modeling relationships between the voltages and distances. Further, the finger movements measured are evaluated by computing ten indices such as the finger tapping interval, and radar charts of the evaluation indices and phase-plane trajectories of the finger movements are then displayed in real time on a monitor. Evaluation experiments were performed on finger movement in 16 Parkinson's disease patients and 32 normal elderly subjects, with the results showing that all evaluation indices differ significantly for each subject (p < 0.05).

  16. Spontaneous synchronized tapping to an auditory rhythm in a chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Humans actively use behavioral synchrony such as dancing and singing when they intend to make affiliative relationships. Such advanced synchronous movement occurs even unconsciously when we hear rhythmically complex music. A foundation for this tendency may be an evolutionary adaptation for group living but evolutionary origins of human synchronous activity is unclear. Here we show the first evidence that a member of our closest living relatives, a chimpanzee, spontaneously synchronizes her movement with an auditory rhythm: After a training to tap illuminated keys on an electric keyboard, one chimpanzee spontaneously aligned her tapping with the sound when she heard an isochronous distractor sound. This result indicates that sensitivity to, and tendency toward synchronous movement with an auditory rhythm exist in chimpanzees, although humans may have expanded it to unique forms of auditory and visual communication during the course of human evolution.

  17. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  18. High-speed AFM probe with micromachined membrane tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungki; Kwak, Byung Hyung; Jamil, Faize

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a micromachined silicon membrane type AFM tip designed to move nearly 1µm by electrostatic force. Since the tip can be vibrated in small amplitude with AC voltage input and can be displaced up to 1μm by DC voltage input, an additional piezo actuator is not required for scanning of submicron features. The micromachined membrane tips are designed to have 100 kHz ~ 1 MHz resonant frequency. Displacement of the membrane tip is measured by an optical interferometer using a micromachined diffraction grating on a quartz wafer which is positioned behind the membrane tip.

  19. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  20. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  1. Barometric fluctuations in wells tapping deep unconfined aquifers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Barometric effects on water levels in unconfined aquifers can be computed by solution of the differential equation governing the flow of gas in the unsaturated zone subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. Solutions to this equation for two sets of boundary conditions were applied to compute water level response in a well tapping the Ogallala Formation near Lubbock, Texas from simultaneous microbarograph records. -from Author

  2. Improving the Lateral Resolution of Quartz Tuning Fork-Based Sensors in Liquid by Integrating Commercial AFM Tips into the Fiber End

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Laura; Martínez-Martín, David; Otero, Jorge; de Pablo, Pedro José; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The use of quartz tuning fork sensors as probes for scanning probe microscopy is growing in popularity. Working in shear mode, some methods achieve a lateral resolution comparable with that obtained with standard cantilevered probes, but only in experiments conducted in air or vacuum. Here, we report a method to produce and use commercial AFM tips in electrically driven quartz tuning fork sensors operating in shear mode in a liquid environment. The process is based on attaching a standard AFM tip to the end of a fiber probe which has previously been sharpened. Only the end of the probe is immersed in the buffer solution during imaging. The lateral resolution achieved is about 6 times higher than that of the etched microfiber on its own. PMID:25594596

  3. Improving the lateral resolution of quartz tuning fork-based sensors in liquid by integrating commercial AFM tips into the fiber end.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Laura; Martínez-Martín, David; Otero, Jorge; de Pablo, Pedro José; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2015-01-14

    The use of quartz tuning fork sensors as probes for scanning probe microscopy is growing in popularity. Working in shear mode, some methods achieve a lateral resolution comparable with that obtained with standard cantilevered probes, but only in experiments conducted in air or vacuum. Here, we report a method to produce and use commercial AFM tips in electrically driven quartz tuning fork sensors operating in shear mode in a liquid environment. The process is based on attaching a standard AFM tip to the end of a fiber probe which has previously been sharpened. Only the end of the probe is immersed in the buffer solution during imaging. The lateral resolution achieved is about 6 times higher than that of the etched microfiber on its own.

  4. Transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) and repetition priming.

    PubMed

    Franks, J J; Bilbrey, C W; Lien, K G; McNamara, T P

    2000-10-01

    Transfer-appropriate processing (TAP), as applied to implicit memory, has tended to emphasize general forms of processing (e.g., perceptual or conceptual processing). In the present studies, the TAP principle was employed in a more specific manner in order to more precisely assess the relations between the processing engaged during first exposure and that engaged during second exposure to items. Thirteen experiments used a two-phase, cross-task design in which participants engaged in different combinations of seven specific intentional tasks between Phase 1 and Phase 2. Maximum repetition priming was found when tasks were the same in Phases 1 and 2. When Phase 1 and Phase 2 tasks differed, there were lesser, or no, repetition priming effects, depending on the particular combination of tasks. The results demonstrate the importance of the specific intentional processes engaged during repetition priming and the potential heuristic value of TAP, as a principle and methodology, for exploring the organization of memory and related process models.

  5. Silicon CMOS-based vertical multimode interference optical taps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Vincent E.; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2001-12-01

    A compact, low loss, optical tap technology is critical for the incorporation of optical interconnects into mainstream CMOS processes. A recently introduced multimode interference effect based device has the potential for very high speed performance in a compact geometry and in a CMOS compatible process. For this work, 2-D and 3-D device simulations confirm a low excess optical loss on order of 0.1 dB, and a nominal 40% (2.2 dB) optical coupling into the CMOS circuitry over a wide range of guide to substrate distances. Simulated devices are on the order of 25micrometers in length and as narrow as 1 um. High temperature, hybrid polymer materials used for commercial CMOS inter-metal dielectric layers are targeted for tap fabrication and are incorporated into the models. Low cost, silicon CMOS based processing makes the new tap technology especially suitable for computer multi-chip module and board level interconnects, as well as for metro fiber to the home and desk telecommunications applications.

  6. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  7. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  8. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  9. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  10. Measuring the viscoelastic creep of soft samples by step response AFM.

    PubMed

    Yango, Achu; Schäpe, Jens; Rianna, Carmela; Doschke, Holger; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-10-12

    We have measured the creep response of soft gels and cells after applying a step in loading force with atomic force microscopy (AFM). By analysing the creep response data using the standard linear solid model, we can quantify the viscous and elastic properties of these soft samples independently. Cells, in comparison with gels of similar softness, are much more viscous, as has been qualitatively observed in conventional force curve data before. Here, we quantify the spring constant and the viscous damping coefficient from the creep response data. We propose two different modes for applying a force step: (1) indirectly by increasing the sample height or (2) directly by employing magnetic cantilevers. Both lead to similar results, whereas the latter seems to be better defined since it resembles closely a constant strain mode. The former is easier to implement in most instruments, and thus may be preferable from a practical point of view. Creep analysis by step response is much more appropriate to analyse the viscoelastic response of soft samples like cells than the usually used force curve analysis.

  11. Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 contributes to TAp73 transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasim, Vivi; Huang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Huizhen; Wang, Yunxia; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shourong

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • MDM2 is a novel positive regulator of TAp73 transcriptional activity. • MDM2 colocalizes together and physically interacts with E2F1. • Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 is crucial for TAp73 transcription. • MDM2 regulates TAp73 transcriptional activity in a p53-independent manner. - Abstract: TAp73, a structural homologue of p53, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. E2F1 had been reported as a transcriptional regulator of TAp73, however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we reported that MDM2-silencing reduced the activities of the TAp73 promoters and the endogenous TAp73 expression level significantly; while MDM2 overexpression upregulated them. We further revealed that the regulation of TAp73 transcriptional activity occurs as a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1, most probably through their physical interaction in the nuclei. Furthermore, we also suggested that MDM2 might be involved in DNA damage-induced TAp73 transcriptional activity. Finally, we elucidated that MDM2-silencing reduced the proliferation rate of colon carcinoma cells regardless of the p53 status. Our data show a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1 on TAp73 transcriptional activity, suggesting a novel regulation pathway of TAp73.

  12. Sensing Thumb-to-Finger Taps for Symbolic Input in VR/AR Environments.

    PubMed

    Pratorius, Manuel; Burgbacher, Ulrich; Valkov, Dimitar; Hinrichs, Klaus

    2015-11-11

    In this paper we demonstrate how thumb-to-finger tap interaction can be employed to perform eyes-free discrete symbolic input in virtual and augmented reality environments. Our DigiTap device is worn on the wrist to keep the hand free from any instrumentation such that tactile sense and dexterity are not impaired. DigiTap senses the jerk that is caused by a tap and takes an image sequence to detect the tap location. The device is able to recognize taps at twelve different locations on the fingers, and at some positions it can even distinguish between different tap strengths. We have conducted an extended user study to evaluate users' ability to interact with the device and to perform symbolic input.

  13. Sensing Thumb-to-Finger Taps for Symbolic Input in VR/AR Environments.

    PubMed

    Prätorius, Manuel; Burgbacher, Ulrich; Valkov, Dimitar; Hinrichs, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Thumb-to-finger tap interaction can be employed to perform eyes-free, discrete, symbolic input in virtual and augmented reality environments. The DigiTap device is worn on the wrist to keep the hand free from any instrumentation so as not to impair tactile sense and dexterity. DigiTap senses the jerk that is caused by a tap and takes an image sequence to detect the tap location. The device can recognize taps at 12 different locations on the fingers, and at some positions, it can even distinguish between different tap strengths. The authors conducted an extended user study to evaluate users' abilities to interact with the device and perform symbolic input.

  14. Investigation of microwave photonic filter based on multiple longitudinal modes fiber laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Feng; Feng, Xinhuan; Lu, Chao; Guan, Bai-ou; Wai, P. K. A.

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically study the transfer function of a finite impulse response microwave photonic filter (FIR-MPF) system using a multi-wavelength fiber laser source by considering multiple longitudinal modes in each wavelength. The full response function with the response from longitudinal mode taps is obtained. We also discussed the influence of the longitudinal mode envelope and mode spacing on the performance of FIR-MPF. The response function of the longitudinal mode taps is fully discussed and the contribution is compared with the response of the carrier suppression factor for double sideband (DSB) modulation. The multiple longitudinal modes structure in the wavelength taps can be utilized to engineer the response of the FIR-MPF such that desirable features such as high side lode suppression ratio can be realized. The analysis provides a guideline for designing incoherent FIR-MPF systems.

  15. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-02

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions.

  16. Minimizing Modes for Smart Selection in Sketching/Drawing Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saund, Eric; Lank, Edward

    User interface modes are ubiquitous in both mouse-keyboard and pen-based user interfaces, but the requirement for prior setting of a user interface mode before performing an action imposes a persistent drag on system usability. This chapter reviews our research in approaches to avoiding prior deliberate mode setting while still allowing overloading of fundamental tap and gesture operations. We analyze the human-machine dynamics of UI protocols through a graphical notation called the Interaction Flow Diagram. Our framework offers a pyramid of methods ranging from simple UI design techniques, through recognition of gestures and canvas content, to modeling of user knowledge and goals. These are represented in four methods: Overloaded Loop Selection to infer rectangle versus lasso selection mode; the Inferred Mode Protocol for Inferring Draw/Select Mode; the Sloppy Selection method for inferring intended content of an ambiguous selection; and the Cycle Tap Selection Method for exploiting structure recognition.

  17. An AFM study of calcite dissolution in concentrated electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2009-04-01

    Calcite-solution interactions are of a paramount importance in a range of processes such as the removal of heavy metals, carbon dioxide sequestration, landscape modeling, weathering of building stone and biomineralization. Water in contact with minerals often carries significant amounts of solutes; additionally, their concentration may vary due to evaporation and condensation. It is well known that calcite dissolution is affected dramatically by the presence of such solutes. Here we present investigations on the dissolution of calcite in the presence of different electrolytes. Both bulk (batch reactors) experiments and nanoscale (in situ AFM) techniques are used to study the dissolution of calcite in a range of solutions containing alkaly cations balanced by halide anions. Previous works have indicated that the ionic strength has little influence in calcite dissolution rates measured from bulk experiments (Pokrovsky et al. 2005; Glendhill and Morse, 2004). Contrary to these results, our quantitative analyses of AFM observations show an enhancement of the calcite dissolution rate with increasing electrolyte concentration. Such an effect is concentration-dependent and it is most evident in concentrated solutions. AFM experiments have been carried out in a fluid cell using calcite cleavage surfaces in contact with solutions of simple salts of the alkaly metals and halides at different undersaturations with respect to calcite to try to specify the effect of the ionic strength on etch pit spreading rate and calcite dissolution rate. These results show that the presence of soluble salts may critically affect the weathering of carbonate rocks in nature as well as the decay of carbonate stone in built cultural heritage. References: Pokrosky, O.S.; Golubev, S.V.; Schott, J. Dissolution kinetics of calcite, dolomite and magnesite at 25°C and 0 to 50 atm pCO2. Chemical Geology, 2005, 217 (3-4) 239-255. Glendhill, D.K.; Morse, J.W. Dissolution kinetics of calcite in Na

  18. Dispersion and Fixation of Adeno-Associated Virus with Glutaraldehyde for Afm Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Xinyan; Yang, Haijun; Lü, Junhong

    Sample preparation is an important procedure for atomic force microscope (AFM) studies. However, flexible virus particles have a tendency to aggregate together and are easily compressed during sample preparation or by AFM tip that subsequently hamper studying of virus by AFM. Herein, low concentration chemical reagent of glutaraldehyde (2%, v/v) is pre-mixed in virus suspension that facilitates the dispersion and observation of recombinant serotype 2 adeno-associated virus particles deposited on mica surface with little deformation.

  19. Acquisition of a Modular, Multi-laser, Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-28

    vapor deposition on copper foils. The four lasers range from the blue to 785 nm and provides a unique handle to determine excitation dependence of...Acquisition of a Modular, Multi- laser , Raman- AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research A four- laser , confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning... laser , Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research Report Title A four- laser , confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning microscope (Raman-AFM

  20. Bubble colloidal AFM probes formed from ultrasonically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Lee, Judy; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a simple and effective experimental approach to measuring the interaction forces between two small bubbles (approximately 80-140 microm) in aqueous solution during controlled collisions on the scale of micrometers to nanometers. The colloidal probe technique using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was extended to measure interaction forces between a cantilever-attached bubble and surface-attached bubbles of various sizes. By using an ultrasonic source, we generated numerous small bubbles on a mildly hydrophobic surface of a glass slide. A single bubble picked up with a strongly hydrophobized V-shaped cantilever was used as the colloidal probe. Sample force measurements were used to evaluate the pure water bubble cleanliness and the general consistency of the measurements.

  1. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  2. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure. PMID:20672104

  3. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuan Yuan; Ding, Gu Qiao; Ding, Jian Ning; Yuan, Ning Yi

    2010-04-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure.

  4. SPR and AFM study of engineered biomolecule immobilisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ian; McLaughlin, James A

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study into two novel and diverse schemes designed to improve immobilization of biomolecules for biosensing purposes is presented. In the first method a silicon rich matrix is created using PECVD. The second method involves creating nano-patterns on the sensor surface to create a large number of surface discontinuities to which the proteins will bind preferentially. The basic theory of SPR is provided to show the importance of the surface sensitive nature of this optical transduction technique. The present work suggests that both may prove both for SPR and other biosensing applications. Of the two schemes proposed, the results for nano-patterning seem to suggest that it is promoting better surface attachment of biomolecules. The results of SPR and AFM studies are presented that have shown that each of these schemes promotes improved binding of various proteins.

  5. Formation of Tap/NXT1 Heterodimers Activates Tap-Dependent Nuclear mRNA Export by Enhancing Recruitment to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Heather L.; Coburn, Glen A.; Zeng, Yan; Kang, Yibin; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2002-01-01

    The Tap protein has been shown to activate the nuclear export of mRNA species bearing retroviral constitutive transport elements and is also believed to play an essential role in the sequence nonspecific export of cellular mRNAs. However, it has remained unclear how Tap activity is regulated in vivo. Here, we report that the small NXT1/p15-1 protein functions as a critical cofactor for Tap-mediated mRNA export in both human and invertebrate cells. In the absence of NXT1 binding, the Tap protein is unable to effectively interact with components of the nuclear pore complex and both Tap nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and the nuclear export of mRNA molecules tethered to Tap are therefore severely attenuated. Formation of a Tap/NXT1 heterodimer enhances nucleoporin binding both in vitro and in vivo and induces the formation of a Tap/NXT1/nucleoporin ternary complex that is likely to be a key intermediate in the process of nuclear mRNA export. The critical importance of NXT1 for the nuclear export of poly(A)+ RNA is emphasized by the finding that specific inhibition of the expression of the Drosophila homolog of human NXT1, by using RNA interference, results in the nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA in cultured insect cells. These data suggest that NXT1 may act as a molecular switch that regulates the ability of Tap to mediate nuclear mRNA export by controlling the interaction of Tap with components of the nuclear pore. PMID:11739738

  6. An improved measurement of dsDNA elasticity using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Lee, Sang-Myung; Na, Kyounghwan; Yang, Sungwook; Kim, Jinseok; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2010-02-01

    The mechanical properties of a small fragment (30 bp) of an individual double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) in water have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have stretched three systems including ssDNA, double-fixed dsDNA (one strand of the dsDNA molecules was biotinylated at the 3'-end and thiolated at the 5'-end, this was reversed for the other complementary strand) and single-fixed dsDNA (one strand of the dsDNA molecules was biotinylated at the 3'-end and thiolated at the 5'-end, whereas the other complementary strand was biotinylated at only the 5'-end). The achieved thiolation and biotinylation were to bind ds- or ssDNA to the gold surface and streptavidin-coated AFM tip, respectively. Analysis of the force versus displacement (F-D) curves from tip-DNA-substrate systems shows that the pull-off length (Lo) and stretch length (δ) from the double-fixed system were shorter than those observed in the ssDNA and the single-fixed system. The obtained stretch force (Fst) from the single-fixed dsDNA was much greater than that from the ssDNA even though it was about 10 pN greater than the one obtained in the double-fixed system. As a result, the Young's modulus of the double-fixed dsDNA was greater than that of the single-fixed dsDNA and the ssDNA. A more reliable stiffness of the dsDNA was observed via the double-fixed system, since there is no effect of the unpaired molecules during stretching, which always occurred in the single-fixed system. The unpaired molecules were also observed by comparing the stiffness of ssDNA and single-fixed dsDNA in which the end of one strand was left free.

  7. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions.

  8. Contamination of tap water on an ocean-going vessel.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gabriele; Neubauer, Birger; Schepers, Bernd-Fred

    2007-04-01

    The crew of a container vessel detected an aromatic odor of the tap water that was produced on board. As the origin of the contamination was not obvious, water was taken at different sampling sites of the water supply of the vessel. Samples were analyzed for occurrence of chemical substances by GC-MS. Thereby xylene and ethylbenzene were detected in nearly each sample. The highest xylene concentration was found in the sample from the fresh water tank. As xylene was used as solvent in the tank coating, it could be concluded that it was released by the coating. Consequently, the crew was advised to ventilate and clean the fresh water tanks.

  9. A dual inhibition mechanism of herpesviral ICP47 arresting a conformationally thermostable TAP complex

    PubMed Central

    Herbring, Valentina; Bäucker, Anja; Trowitzsch, Simon; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As a centerpiece of antigen processing, the ATP-binding cassette transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) became a main target for viral immune evasion. The herpesviral ICP47 inhibits TAP function, thereby suppressing an adaptive immune response. Here, we report on a thermostable ICP47-TAP complex, generated by fusion of different ICP47 fragments. These fusion complexes allowed us to determine the direction and positioning in the central cavity of TAP. ICP47-TAP fusion complexes are arrested in a stable conformation, as demonstrated by MHC I surface expression, melting temperature, and the mutual exclusion of herpesviral TAP inhibitors. We unveiled a conserved region next to the active domain of ICP47 as essential for the complete stabilization of the TAP complex. Binding of the active domain of ICP47 arrests TAP in an open inward facing conformation rendering the complex inaccessible for other viral factors. Based on our findings, we propose a dual interaction mechanism for ICP47. A per se destabilizing active domain inhibits the function of TAP, whereas a conserved C-terminal region additionally stabilizes the transporter. These new insights into the ICP47 inhibition mechanism can be applied for future structural analyses of the TAP complex. PMID:27845362

  10. Vertical Finger Displacement is Reduced in Index Finger Tapping During Repeated Bout Rate Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-12-21

    The present study tested 1) whether a recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement in finger tapping (i.e. a cumulating increase in freely chosen finger tapping frequency following submaximal muscle activation in form of externally unloaded voluntary tapping) could be replicated, and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip. Concurrently, peak force was unchanged. The present study points at separate control mechanisms governing kinematics and kinetics during finger tapping.

  11. Loss tangent imaging: Theory and simulations of repulsive-mode tapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, Roger; Yablon, Dalia G.

    2012-02-13

    An expression for loss tangent measurement of a surface in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is derived using only the cantilever phase and the normalized cantilever amplitude. This provides a direct measurement of substrate compositional information that only requires tuning of the cantilever resonance to provide quantitative information. Furthermore, the loss tangent expression incorporates both the lost and stored energy into one term that represents a fundamental interpretation of the phase signal in amplitude modulation imaging. Numerical solutions of a cantilever tip interacting with a simple Voigt modeled surface agree with the derived loss tangent to within a few percent.

  12. Three tapasin docking sites in TAP cooperate to facilitate transporter stabilization and heterodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Abrahimi, Parwiz; Mitchell, Susan M.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates peptide antigens into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for loading onto major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. MHC class I acquires its peptide cargo in the peptide loading complex (PLC), an oligomeric complex that the chaperone tapasin organizes by bridging TAP to MHC class I and recruiting accessory molecules such as ERp57 and calreticulin. Three tapasin binding sites on TAP have been described, two of which are located in the N-terminal domains (N domains) of TAP1 and TAP2. The third binding site is present in the core transmembrane domain (coreTMD) of TAP1 and is only used by the unassembled subunits. Tapasin is required to promote TAP stability, but through which binding site(s) it is acting is unknown. In particular the role of tapasin binding to the coreTMD of TAP1 single chains is mysterious as this interaction is lost upon TAP2 association. In this study, we map the respective binding site in TAP1 to the polar face of the amphipathic transmembrane helix TM9 and identify key residues that are essential to establish the interaction. We find that this interaction is dispensable for the peptide transport function but essential to achieve full stability of human TAP1. The interaction is also required for proper heterodimerization of the transporter. Based on similar results obtained using TAP mutants lacking tapasin binding to either N domain, we conclude that all three tapasin-binding sites in TAP cooperate to achieve high transporter stability and efficient heterodimerization. PMID:24501197

  13. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    formation allow the highly resolved measurement of a number of physical properties far beyond the determination of surface topography. The development of techniques allowing atomic resolution dynamic mode imaging in liquids pushes the door open for an atomic precision analysis of biological samples under physiological conditions. In each of these fields, the conference demonstrated cutting-edge results and also provided perspectives for the next steps on the roadmap of NC-AFM towards the development of its full extent. The conference in Bad Essen was made possible by the continuous dedication of the local management and we are most grateful to Frauke Riemann, Joachim Fontaine and the members of the supporting team for the smooth organization. We gratefully appreciate the financial support of the exhibitors, namely Anfatec, HALCYONICS, JEOL, LOT-Oriel, NanoMagnetics, NT-MDT, Omicron, Schaefer Technology, SURFACE, UNISOKU and the local sponsors which enabled us to provide free participation at the conference for ten promising young researchers who had submitted excellent contributions. It was a great pleasure for us to continue our most successful collaboration with Nanotechnology as our partner for the proceedings publication and we would like to thank Ian Forbes and the publishing team for the professional handling of the peer review and all production matters.

  14. A convenient and sensitive method for haloacetic acid analysis in tap water by on-line field-amplified sample-stacking CE-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sih-Hua; Her, Guor-Rong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we propose a simple strategy based on flow injection and field-amplified sample-stacking CE-ESI-MS/MS to analyze haloacetic acids (HAAs) in tap water. Tap water was passed through a desalination cartridge before field-amplified sample-stacking CE-ESI-MS/MS analysis to reduce sample salinity. With this treatment, the signals of the HAAs increased 300- to 1400-fold. The LODs for tap water analysis were in the range of 10 to 100 ng/L, except for the LOD of monochloroacetic acid (1 μg/L in selected-ion monitoring mode detection). The proposed method is fast, convenient, and sensitive enough to perform on-line analysis of five HAAs in the tap water of Taipei City. Four HAAs, including trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, and monobromoacetic acid, were detected at concentrations of approximately 1.74, 1.15, 0.16, and 0.15 ppb, respectively.

  15. Measurement of a CD and sidewall angle artifact with two-dimensional CD AFM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Sullivan, Neal T.; Schneir, Jason; McWaid, Thomas H.; Tsai, Vincent W.; Prochazka, Jerry; Young, Michael

    1996-05-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of SEM metrology in semiconductor manufacturing, there is no SEM CD standard currently available. Producing such a standard is challenging because SEM CD measurements are not only a function of the linewidth, but also dependent on the line material, sidewall roughness, sidewall angle, line height, substrate material, and the proximity of other objects. As the presence of AFM metrology in semiconductor manufacturing increases, the history of SEM CD metrology raises a number of questions about the prospect of AFM CD artifacts. Is an AFM CD artifact possible? What role would it play in the manufacturing environment? Although AFM has some important advantages over SEM, such as relative insensitivity to material differences, the throughput and reliability of most AFM instruments is not yet at the level necessary to support in-line CD metrology requirements. What, then, is the most useful relationship between AFM and SEM metrology? As a means of addressing some of these questions, we have measured the CD and sidewall angle of 1.2 micrometer oxy-nitride line on Si using three different techniques: optical microscopy (with modeling), AFM, and cross sectional TEM. Systematic errors in the AFM angle measurements were reduced by using a rotational averaging technique that we describe. We found good agreement with uncertainties below 30 nm (2 sigma) for the CD measurement and 1.0 degrees (2 sigma) for the sidewall angles. Based upon these results we suggest a measurement procedure which will yield useful AFM CD artifacts. We consider the possibility that AFMs, especially when used with suitable CD artifacts, can effectively support SEM CD metrology. This synergistic relationship between the AFM and SEM represents an emerging paradigm that has also been suggested by a number of others.

  16. Vibration Feedback Latency Affects Material Perception during Rod Tapping Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hachisu, Taku; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-15

    We investigated the effect of vibration feedback latency on material perception during a tapping interaction using a rod device. When a user taps a surface, the perception of the material can be modulated by providing a decaying sinusoidal vibration at the moment of contact. To achieve this haptic material augmentation on a touchscreen, a system that can measure the approach velocity and provide vibration with low latency is required. To this end, we developed a touchscreen system that is capable of measuring the approach velocity and providing vibration feedback via a rod device with latency of 0.1 ms. Using this system, we experimentally measured the human detection threshold of the vibration feedback latency adopting a psychophysical approach. We further investigated the effect of latency on the perception of the material using a subjective questionnaire. Results show that the threshold was around 5.5 ms and the latency made the user feel that the surface is soft. In addition, users reported bouncing and denting sensations induced by the latency.

  17. Quality assessment of Romanian bottled mineral water and tap water.

    PubMed

    M Carstea, Elfrida; Levei, Erika A; Hoaghia, Maria-Alexandra; Savastru, Roxana

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the evaluation of bottled mineral water characteristics using fluorescence spectroscopy (synchronous fluorescence scans and emission spectra) and physico-chemical analyses. Samples from 14 still mineral water brands were compared to 11 tap waters collected from two Romanian cities. Correlation and factor analyses were undertaken to understand the relationships between the individual components. The concentration of major and minor ions showed great variation between the bottled mineral water samples highlighting the diversity of the water intakes, while in the case of tap water the chemical composition was relatively similar for samples collected in the same city. Fluorescence data showed that the mineral water contained low quantities of organic matter. The humic fraction was dominant in all samples, while the microbial fraction was low in most samples. Synchronous fluorescence scans provided more information, regarding the composition of organic matter, compared to emission spectra. The study evidenced the correlation between fluorescence parameters and major elements and highlighted the potential of using fluorescence for qualitative evaluation of the bottled mineral water quality, as a screening method before undertaking complex analyses.

  18. Endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba isolated from domestic tap water in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seon Hee; Cho, Min Kyoung; Ahn, Soon Cheol; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Dong-Hee; Xuan, Ying-Hua; Hong, Yeon Chul; Kong, Hyun Hee; Chung, Dong Il; Yu, Hak Sun

    2009-12-01

    In a previous study, we reported our discovery of Acanthamoeba contamination in domestic tap water; in that study, we determined that some Acanthamoeba strains harbor endosymbiotic bacteria, via our molecular characterization by mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (Mt DNA RFLP). Five (29.4%) among 17 Acanthamoeba isolates contained endosymbionts in their cytoplasm, as demonstrated via orcein staining. In order to estimate their pathogenicity, we conducted a genetic characterization of the endosymbionts in Acanthamoeba isolated from domestic tap water via 16S rDNA sequencing. The endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba sp. KA/WP3 and KA/WP4 evidenced the highest level of similarity, at 97% of the recently published 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterium, Candidatus Amoebophilus asiaticus. The endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba sp. KA/WP8 and KA/WP12 shared a 97% sequence similarity with each other, and were also highly similar to Candidatus Odyssella thessalonicensis, a member of the alpha-proteobacteria. The endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. KA/WP9 exhibits a high degree of similarity (85-95%) with genus Methylophilus, which is not yet known to harbor any endosymbionts. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, to show that Methylophilus spp. can live in the cytoplasm of Acanthamoeba.

  19. A prototype tap test imaging system: Initial field test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hudelson, N. A.; Simpson, T. S.; Hsu, D. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a simple, field-worthy tap test imaging system that gives quantitative information about the size, shape, and severity of defects and damages. The system consists of an accelerometer, electronic circuits for conditioning the signal and measuring the impact duration, a laptop PC and data acquisition and processing software. The images are generated manually by tapping on a grid printed on a plastic sheet laid over the part's surface. A mechanized scanner is currently under development. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Images of the local contact stiffness, deduced from the impact duration using a spring model, revealed quantitatively the stiffness reduction due to flaws and damages, as well as the stiffness enhancement due to substructures. The system has been field tested on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades and engine decks on helicopters. Field test results will be shown and the operation of the system will be demonstrated.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order No. IA016 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  20. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-Dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)-the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces.

  1. Tap-Hole Life Cycle Design Criteria: A Case Study Based on Silicomanganese Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkamp, J. D.; Sutherland, J. J.; Hayman, D. A.; Muller, J.

    2016-06-01

    Managing the tapping of furnaces is a challenge to most furnace operators. As a hole is made in the refractory lining and re-filled with clay, several times a day, the tap-hole is one of the weak spots in the refractory lining. Tap-hole failures are high-risk events, and steps should be taken to minimize the risks. Designing for the life-cycle of the tap-hole is proposed and discussed as a way of minimizing the risks associated with tap-hole failure. Design criteria are proposed not only for a total reline and normal operation but also for emergency conditions, as well as maintenance, and repair of the tap-hole. The criteria are discussed in the context of silicomanganese production in South Africa.

  2. Gene encoding T-cell-activating protein TAP maps to the Ly-6 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Yeh, E T; Gramm, C F; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    Recently we described two murine T-cell membrane proteins, TAP (T-cell-activating protein) and TAPa (TAP-associated protein). Previous experiments suggested that TAP is involved in physiologic T-cell activation. The subject of this report is a genetic analysis of these molecules. TAP and TAPa map to the Ly-6 locus. The relationship of these molecules to other antigens encoded in this locus is examined. Based on tissue distribution, molecular structure, and functional properties, TAP is distinct from any previously described Ly-6 antigen, whereas TAPa is probably identical to the 34-11-3 antigen. TAP and TAPa are coexpressed on all cell types examined so far. Moreover, comparative studies demonstrate a complex developmentally regulated pattern in the expression of molecules encoded in this locus. Images PMID:3010324

  3. The ability to tap to a beat relates to cognitive, linguistic, and perceptual skills

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Adam T.; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Reading-impaired children have difficulty tapping to a beat. Here we tested whether this relationship between reading ability and synchronized tapping holds in typically-developing adolescents. We also hypothesized that tapping relates to two other abilities. First, since auditory-motor synchronization requires monitoring of the relationship between motor output and auditory input, we predicted that subjects better able to tap to the beat would perform better on attention tests. Second, since auditory-motor synchronization requires fine temporal precision within the auditory system for the extraction of a sound’s onset time, we predicted that subjects better able to tap to the beat would be less affected by backward masking, a measure of temporal precision within the auditory system. As predicted, tapping performance related to reading, attention, and backward masking. These results motivate future research investigating whether beat synchronization training can improve not only reading ability, but potentially executive function and basic auditory processing as well. PMID:23400117

  4. Adsorption of modified dextrins on molybdenite: AFM imaging, contact angle, and flotation studies.

    PubMed

    Beaussart, Audrey; Parkinson, Luke; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Beattie, David A

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of three dextrins (a regular wheat dextrin, Dextrin TY, carboxymethyl (CM) Dextrin, and hydroxypropyl (HP) Dextrin) on molybdenite has been investigated using adsorption isotherms, tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM), contact angle measurements, and dynamic bubble-surface collisions. In addition, the effect of the polymers on the flotation recovery of molybdenite has been determined. The isotherms revealed the importance of molecular weight in determining the adsorbed amounts of the polymers on molybdenite at plateau coverage. TMAFM revealed the morphology of the three polymers, which consisted of randomly dispersed domains with a higher area fraction of surface coverage for the substituted dextrins. The contact angle of polymer-treated molybdenite indicated that polymer layer coverage and hydration influenced the mineral surface hydrophobicity. Bubble-surface collisions indicated that the polymers affected thin film rupture and dewetting rate differently, correlating with differences in the adsorbed layer morphology. Direct correlations were found between the surface coverage of the adsorbed layers, their impact on thin film rupture time, and their impact on flotation recovery, highlighting the paramount role of the polymer morphology in the bubble/particle attachment process and subsequent flotation.

  5. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-25

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  6. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  7. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  8. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 5. Nursing Track: Abstracts and Presentations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    will include hematocrit, hemoglobin , mean corpuscle volume, iron , total iron binding capacity, Ferritin , and soluble transferring receptor. The...Iraq/Afghanistan ........ 2  Iron Status of Deployed Military Members...2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 5 Nursing 8 Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 5 Nursing 9 Iron

  9. Imaging modes of atomic force microscopy for application in molecular and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Dufrêne, Yves F; Ando, Toshio; Garcia, Ricardo; Alsteens, David; Martinez-Martin, David; Engel, Andreas; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-04-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful, multifunctional imaging platform that allows biological samples, from single molecules to living cells, to be visualized and manipulated. Soon after the instrument was invented, it was recognized that in order to maximize the opportunities of AFM imaging in biology, various technological developments would be required to address certain limitations of the method. This has led to the creation of a range of new imaging modes, which continue to push the capabilities of the technique today. Here, we review the basic principles, advantages and limitations of the most common AFM bioimaging modes, including the popular contact and dynamic modes, as well as recently developed modes such as multiparametric, molecular recognition, multifrequency and high-speed imaging. For each of these modes, we discuss recent experiments that highlight their unique capabilities.

  10. Tap or bottled water: drinking preferences among urban minority children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Saenz, Lina; Irigoyen, Matilde; Benavides, Jorge; Mendoza, Maria

    2012-02-01

    The last decade has seen an increasing trend in consumer preference of bottled water over tap water. Little is known what type of water children and adolescents prefer for drinking and what their parents think of their community tap water. The study objective was to assess drinking water preferences, perceptions of the qualities of tap water and bottled water, and fluoride knowledge in an urban pediatric population. We conducted an anonymous survey of a convenience sample of caretakers of children and adolescents at an urban clinic regarding their preferences for tap or bottled water, their perceptions of the quality of tap and bottled water and their knowledge of fluoride. Of the 208 participants (79% African American, 9% Latino), 59% drank tap water, 80% bottled water. Only 17% drank tap water exclusively, 38% drank bottled water exclusively, 42% drank both. We found no significant differences in water preferences across age groups, from infancy to adulthood, or among ethnic groups. Ratings for taste, clarity, purity and safety were significantly higher for bottled water than tap water (P < 0.001). Only 24% were aware of fluoride in drinking water. We conclude bottled water was preferred over tap water in an urban minority pediatric population. Perceptions of the qualities of water seemed to drive drinking preferences. Public health strategies are needed to increase public awareness of the impact of bottled water consumption on oral health, household budgets and the environment.

  11. Synchronized tapping facilitates learning sound sequences as indexed by the P300

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Keiko S.; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether and how single finger tapping in synchrony with sound sequences contributed to the auditory processing of them. The participants learned two unfamiliar sound sequences via different methods. In the tapping condition, they learned an auditory sequence while they tapped in synchrony with each sound onset. In the no tapping condition, they learned another sequence while they kept pressing a key until the sequence ended. After these learning sessions, we presented the two melodies again and recorded event-related potentials (ERPs). During the ERP recordings, 10% of the tones within each melody deviated from the original tones. An analysis of the grand average ERPs showed that deviant stimuli elicited a significant P300 in the tapping but not in the no-tapping condition. In addition, the significance of the P300 effect in the tapping condition increased as the participants showed highly synchronized tapping behavior during the learning sessions. These results indicated that single finger tapping promoted the conscious detection and evaluation of deviants within the learned sequences. The effect was related to individuals’ musical ability to coordinate their finger movements along with external auditory events. PMID:25400564

  12. On-line tool breakage monitoring of vibration tapping using spindle motor current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangjun; Lu, Huimin; Liu, Gang

    2008-10-01

    Input current of driving motor has been employed successfully as monitoring the cutting state in manufacturing processes for more than a decade. In vibration tapping, however, the method of on-line monitoring motor electric current has not been reported. In this paper, a tap failure prediction method is proposed to monitor the vibration tapping process using the electrical current signal of the spindle motor. The process of vibration tapping is firstly described. Then the relationship between the torque of vibration tapping and the electric current of motor is investigated by theoretic deducing and experimental measurement. According to those results, a monitoring method of tool's breakage is proposed through monitoring the ratio of the current amplitudes during adjacent vibration tapping periods. Finally, a low frequency vibration tapping system with motor current monitoring is built up using a servo motor B-106B and its driver CR06. The proposed method has been demonstrated with experiment data of vibration tapping in titanic alloys. The result of experiments shows that the method, which can avoid the tool breakage and giving a few error alarms when the threshold of amplitude ratio is 1.2 and there is at least 2 times overrun among 50 adjacent periods, is feasible for tool breakage monitoring in the process of vibration tapping small thread holes.

  13. Differential expression of porcine TAP1 gene in the populations of pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S P; Yin, X M; Sun, L; Sun, S Y; Bao, W B; Wu, S L

    2015-03-01

    Transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) transports peptides from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for subsequent loading onto the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. TAP is consisted of two subunits: TAP and TAP2. Using Real-time PCR technology, this study detected tissue expression profile and analyzed the differential expression of TAP1 gene in Sutai Escherichia coli-resistant group, Yorkshire and Meishan pigs. Tissue expression profile revealed that TAP1 gene expressed in all tissues we detected, and the expression levels were high in lung, immune tissues and intestines. Through the comparation of gene expression differention in different populations, TAP1 expression level of Sutai E. coli-resistant group was significantly higher than that of Yorkshire and Meishan populations in liver, spleen, lung, kidney, thymus, lymph, duodenum and jejunum (P<0.05). Meanwhile TAP1 gene was more highly expressed in Sutai E. coli-resistant group than that of Meishan population in stomach (P<0.05). In conclusion, the upregulation of TAP1 expression level in E. coli-resistant group could be related to E. coli F18 infection. In addition, Chinese local pigs may have special immune response and genetic mechanism in resisting E. coli F18 infection which is differing from MHC I moleculars.

  14. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  15. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  17. Channel erosion surveys along TAPS route, Alaska, 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, Joseph; Jones, Stanley H.

    1975-01-01

    Repeated site surveys and aerial photographs at 26 stream crossings along the trans-Alaska pipeline system (TAPS) route during the period 1969-74 provide chronologie records of channel changes that predate pipeline-related construction at the sites. The 1974 surveys and photographs show some of the channel changes wrought by construction of the haul road from the Yukon River to Prudhoe Bay and by construction of camps and working pads all along the pipeline route. No pipeline crossings were constructed before 1975. These records of channel changes together with flood and icing measurements are part of the United States Department of the lnterior's continuing surveillance program to document the hydrologic aspects of the trans-Alaska pipeline and its environmental impacts.

  18. Mineral water or tap water? An endless debate.

    PubMed

    De Giglio, O; Quaranta, A; Lovero, G; Caggiano, G; Montagna, M T

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of mineral water has been increasing because of the frequent and unjustified reports of the water supply contamination. However some authors have shown that bottled waters are not always better than tap water. Mineral waters are more palatable for organoleptic characteristic because, being pure at source, they do not undergo disinfection treatments and are sometimes enriched with CO2. In fact, they are characterized by their microbial facies subject to changes during the production cycle which can contribute to their contamination. It is necessary to provide people with the tools necessary to operate a critical choice of the type of water to be consumed not exclusively for their organoleptic characteristics or marketing strategies.

  19. Survey and significance of filamentous fungi from tap water.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana B; Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2006-05-01

    Fungi in drinking water are involved in the production of tastes and odours in water. Health problems are possible, originating from mycotoxins, animal pathogens and allergies. This report concerns the surveillance of mesophilic fungi in tap water and assessment of their potential for causing problems. The methods for the determination of the filamentous fungi (ff) were filtering, swabbing and baiting. Tap water, half-strength corn meal, neopeptone-glucose rose Bengal aureomycin (NGRBA) and oomycete selective agars for the enumeration of colony forming units (cfu) were used. Samples were taken consecutively over 16 months. Filtration and NGRBA gave the highest ff counts. A total of 340 taxa were isolated. There appeared to be a negative correlation between bacterial and yeast (b/y) and ff counts. Highest counts were found in winter months for ff and in the warmer months for b/y. Penicillium (40.6%) and Acremonium (38.8%) were the most frequently isolated ff. There was a difference in the pattern of isolation of the key taxa with season: penicillia predominated in early summer and Acremonium in winter. P. expansum was isolated in high numbers in May 2004. This species is associated with the production of the mycotoxin patulin and the odour secondary metabolite geosmin. P. brevicompactum was detected throughout the sampling period and is known to produce the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid. Acremonium is associated with ocentol production which is responsible for bad tastes and flavours. The remaining taxa were Phialophora sp. (4.1%), Cladosporium sp. (3.5%), Rhizopus stolonifer (2.9%), Chaetomium sp. (0.6%), Alternaria sp. (0.3%), Aspergillus sp. (0.3%), mycelia sterilia (2.6%) and unidentified (6.2%). It is emphasised that few Aspergillus and no Fusarium strains were isolated. Rhizopus stolonifer was obtained. However, none of the fungi isolated at mesophilic temperature used could be described as being involved with pathogenicity per se.

  20. Quantitative risk assessment of Cryptosporidium in tap water in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cummins, E; Kennedy, R; Cormican, M

    2010-01-15

    Cryptosporidium species are protozoan parasites associated with gastro-intestinal illness. Following a number of high profile outbreaks worldwide, it has emerged as a parasite of major public health concern. A quantitative Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to evaluate the annual risk of infection from Cryptosporidium in tap water in Ireland. The assessment considers the potential initial contamination levels in raw water, oocyst removal and decontamination events following various process stages, including coagulation/flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. A number of scenarios were analysed to represent potential risks from public water supplies, group water schemes and private wells. Where surface water is used additional physical and chemical water treatment is important in terms of reducing the risk to consumers. The simulated annual risk of illness for immunocompetent individuals was below 1 x 10(-4) per year (as set by the US EPA) except under extreme contamination events. The risk for immunocompromised individuals was 2-3 orders of magnitude greater for the scenarios analysed. The model indicates a reduced risk of infection from tap water that has undergone microfiltration, as this treatment is more robust in the event of high contamination loads. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the importance of watershed protection and the importance of adequate coagulation/flocculation in conventional treatment. The frequency of failure of the treatment process is the most important parameter influencing human risk in conventional treatment. The model developed in this study may be useful for local authorities, government agencies and other stakeholders to evaluate the likely risk of infection given some basic input data on source water and treatment processes used.

  1. Sensitive detection of atrazine in tap water using TELISA.

    PubMed

    Qie, Zhiwei; Bai, Jialei; Xie, Bin; Yuan, Lin; Song, Nan; Peng, Yuan; Fan, Xianjun; Zhou, Huanying; Chen, Fengchun; Li, Shuang; Ning, Baoan; Gao, Zhixian

    2015-08-07

    A highly sensitive flow injection analysis (FIA)-based thermal enzyme-linked immunoassay, TELISA, was developed for the rapid detection of atrazine (ATZ) in tap water. ATZ and β-lactamase-labeled ATZ were employed in a competitive immunoassay using a monoclonal antibody (mAb). After the off-column liquid-phase competition, the mAb was captured on the Protein G Sepharose™ 4 Fast Flow (PGSFF) column support material. Injected β-lactamase substrate ampicillin was degraded by the column-bound ATZ-β-lactamase, generating a detectable heat signal. Several assay parameters were optimized, including substrate concentration, flow rates and regeneration conditions, as well as the mAb and ATZ-β dilution ratios and concentrations. The assay linear range was 0.73-4.83 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.66 ng mL(-1). An entire heat signal requires 10 min for generation, and the cycle time is less than 40 min. The results were reproducible and stable. ATZ-spiked tap water samples exhibited a recovery rate of 103%-116%, which correlated with the UHPLC-MS/MS measurements. We attributed this significant increase in sensitivity over our previously published work to the following factors: (i) the capture of already-formed immune complexes on the column via immobilized Protein G, which eliminated chemical immobilization of the antibody; (ii) off-column preincubation allows the formation of immune complexes under nearly ideal conditions; and (iii) multiple buffers can be used to, in one case, enhance immune-complex formation and in the other to maximize enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the scheme creates a universal assay platform in which sensing is performed in the off-column incubation and detection after capture in the enzyme thermistor (ET) detector, which opens up the possibility of detecting any antigen for which antibodies were available.

  2. Expanding the Universe of "Astronomy on Tap" Public Outreach Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Levine, Brian; Livermore, Rachael C.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Tyndall, Amy; Muna, Demitri; Garofali, Kristen; Morris, Brett; Byler, Nell; Fyhrie, Adalyn; Rehnberg, Morgan; Hart, Quyen N.; Connelly, Jennifer L.; Silvia, Devin W.; Morrison, Sarah J.; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Tremblay, Grant; Schwamb, Megan E.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomy on Tap (AoT, astronomyontap.org) is free public outreach event featuring engaging science presentations in bars, often combined with music, games, and prizes, to encourage a fun, interactive atmosphere. AoT events feature several short astronomy-related presentations primarily by local professional scientists, but also by visiting scientists, students, educators, amatuer astronomers, writers, and artists. Events are held in social venues (bars, coffee shops, art galleries, etc.) in order to bring science directly to the public in a relaxed, informal atmosphere. With this we hope to engage a more diverse audience than typical lectures at academic and cultural institutions and to develop enthusiasm for science among voting, tax-paying adults. The flexible format and content of an AoT event is easy to adapt and expand based on the priorities, resources, and interests of local organizers. The social nature of AoT events provides important professional development and networking opportunities in science communication. Since the first New York City event in April 2013, Astronomy on Tap has expanded to more than ten cities globally, including monthly events in NYC, Austin, Seattle, and Tucson; semi-regular events in Columbus, New Haven, Santiago, Toronto, and Denver; occasional (so far) events in Rochester (NY), Baltimore, Lansing, and Washington, DC; and one-off events in Chicago and Taipei. Several venues regularly attract audiences of over 200 people. We have received media coverage online, in print, and occasionally even on radio and television. In this poster we describe the overarching goals and characteristics of AoT events, distinct adaptations of various locations, resources we have developed, and the methods we use to coordinate among the worldwide local organizers.

  3. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed Central

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G.; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)–the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces. PMID:26535910

  4. Analytical solutions of the first three frequency shifts of AFM non-uniform probe subjected to the Lennard-Jones force.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shueei-Muh; Liauh, Chihng-Tsung; Wang, Wen-Rong; Ho, Shing-Huei

    2006-04-01

    The role of higher cantilever modes is important to obtain some material contrast. The analysis of AFM subjected to a short-range force can improve greatly the studies of surface topography and interaction energies and interaction forces, especially for chemical and biological materials. When the tip-sample distance is in the order of inter-atomic spacing, the short-range tip-sample force is usually simulated by the Lennard-Jones model. In this study, the analytical method to determine the frequency shift of AFM subjected to the Lennard-Jones force is proposed. The closed-form solution of the partial differential equation with a nonlinear boundary condition is derived and then the corresponding frequency shifts of higher modes can be determined easily. Moreover, the conventional perturbation method is usually used to determine the frequency shift, but only for the first mode. This is because the original continuous beam system is transformed into a discrete lumped-masses model. Although the above disadvantages exist, the lumped-masses model is simple and intuitive. Using the principle of dynamic strain energy, the conventional perturbation method is revised successfully to determine the frequency shifts of higher modes. The assessment of the generalized perturbation method and the proposed method is made. Finally, the effects of several parameters on the first three frequency shifts are investigated.

  5. Hsp72 mediates TAp73α anti-apoptotic effects in small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Ulrika; Muppani, Naveen Reddy; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Joseph, Bertrand

    2011-08-01

    The transcription factor p73, a member of the p53 family of proteins, is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Due to alternative promoters and carboxy-terminal splicing, the P73 gene gives rise to a range of different isoforms. Interestingly, a particular increase in expression of the TAp73α isoform has been reported in various tumours. In addition, TAp73α has been shown to inhibit Bax activation and mitochondrial dysfunctions and thereby to confer small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cells resistance to drug-induced apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism by which TAp73α exerts its pro-survival effect is yet unclear. Here we report that TAp73α, but not TAp73β, regulates the expression of inducible Hsp72/HSPA1A. Hsp72 proved to be required for the survival effects of TAp73α as antisense knockdown of Hsp72 resulted in an abolishment of the anti-apoptotic effect of TAp73α in SCLC cells upon Etoposide treatment. Importantly, depletion of Hsp72 allowed activation of Bax, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and lysosomal membrane permeabilization in SCLC cells even in the presence of TAp73α. Finally, we revealed that TAp73β counteracts the anti-apoptotic effect of TAp73α by preventing Hsp72 induction. Our results thus provide additional evidence for the potential oncogenic role of TAp73α, and extend the understanding of the mechanism for its anti-apoptotic effect.

  6. Microbiological tap water profile of a medium-sized building and effect of water stagnation.

    PubMed

    Lipphaus, Patrick; Hammes, Frederik; Kötzsch, Stefan; Green, James; Gillespie, Simon; Nocker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Whereas microbiological quality of drinking water in water distribution systems is routinely monitored for reasons of legal compliance, microbial numbers in tap water are grossly understudied. Motivated by gross differences in water from private households, we applied in this study flow cytometry as a rapid analytical method to quantify microbial concentrations in water sampled at diverse taps in a medium size research building receiving chlorinated water. Taps differed considerably in frequency of usage and were located in laboratories, bathrooms, and a coffee kitchen. Substantial differences were observed between taps with concentrations (per mL) in the range from 6.29 x 10(3) to 7.74 x 10(5) for total cells and from 1.66 x 10(3) to 4.31 x 10(5) for intact cells. The percentage of intact cells varied between 7% and 96%. Water from taps with very infrequent use showed the highest bacterial numbers and the highest proportions of intact cells. Stagnation tended to increase microbial numbers in water from those taps which were otherwise frequently used. Microbial numbers in other taps that were rarely opened were not affected by stagnation as their water is probably mostly stagnant. For cold water taps, microbial numbers and the percentage of intact cells tended to decline with flushing with the greatest decline for taps used least frequently whereas microbial concentrations in water from hot water taps tended to be somewhat more stable. We conclude that microbiological water quality is mainly determined by building-specific parameters. Tap water profiling can provide valuable insight into plumbing system hygiene and maintenance.

  7. Negative feedback between TAp63 and Mir-133b mediates colorectal cancer suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gao, Kai; Hu, Gui; guo, Yihang; Lin, Changwei; Li, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Background TAp63 is known as the most potent transcription activator and tumor suppressor. microRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly recognized as essential components of the p63 pathway, mediating downstream post-transcriptional gene repression. The aim of present study was to investigate a negative feedback loop between TAp63 and miR-133b. Results Overexpression of TAp63 inhibited HCT-116 cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion via miR-133b. Accordingly, miR-133b inhibited TAp63 expression through RhoA and its downstream pathways. Moreover, we demonstrated that TAp63/miR-133b could inhibit colorectal cancer proliferation and metastasis in vivo and vitro. Materials and Methods We evaluated the correlation between TAp63 and miR-133b in HCT-116 cells and investigated the roles of the TAp63/miR-133b feedback loop in cell proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis via MTT, flow cytometry, Transwell, and nude mouse xenograft experiments. The expression of TAp63, miR-133b, RhoA, α-tubulin and Akt was assessed via qRT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. miR-133b target genes were identified through luciferase reporter assays. Conclusions miR-133b plays an important role in the anti-tumor effects of TAp63 in colorectal cancer. miR-133b may represent a tiemolecule between TAp63 and RhoA, forming a TAp63/miR-133b/RhoA negative feedback loop, which could significantly inhibit proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis. PMID:27894087

  8. Occurrence of antidepressant residues in the sewage-impacted Vistula and Utrata rivers and in tap water in Warsaw (Poland).

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Nałęcz-Jawecki, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressants, even at low concentrations, can reveal some adverse effects on aquatic life due to disturbing homeostasis throughout the central and peripheral nervous system both in vertebrates and invertebrates. To date there have not been any reports regarding the presence of these pharmaceuticals in surface and tap waters in Eastern Europe. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the presence of 21 antidepressant pharmaceuticals at specific points of the main Polish river - the Vistula, a smaller river of the Warsaw region - the Utrata, as well as in tap water samples of Warsaw. Samples were collected twice at one month intervals and analysed using solid-phase extraction (SPE) technique coupled with the liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) method operated under the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). This is the first study where active compounds such as moclobemid or trazodone in the environment have been investigated. Environmental risk assessment of antidepressants in Poland was estimated on the basis of annuals sale data extracted from the NFZ (Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia-National Health Service) base of reimbursed pharmaceuticals(1). Predicted environmental concentration (PEC) of target pharmaceuticals were compared with their measured concentration (MEC). Moreover, the application of the EMEA/CHMP guideline for environmental risk assessment of the antidepressants was discussed. The highest concentration of antidepressants was observed in the small river Utrata. In tap water only trace amounts of antidepressants including citalopram (up to 1.5ng/l), mianserin (up to 0.9ng/l), sertraline (<3.1ng/l), moclobemid (up to 0.3ng/l) and venlafaxine (up to 1.9ng/l) were detected. However this highlights their inadequate elimination in the drinking waste treatment facility. The presence of antidepressants in drinking water and the aquatic environment could have long-term effects even at low exposure level

  9. Tip Characterization Method using Multi-feature Characterizer for CD-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chumei; Dixson, Ronald G.; Walecki, Peter S.; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Irmer, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) metrology, the tip is a key source of uncertainty. Images taken with an AFM show a change in feature width and shape that depends on tip geometry. This geometric dilation is more pronounced when measuring features with high aspect ratios, and makes it difficult to obtain absolute dimensions. In order to accurately measure nanoscale features using an AFM, the tip dimensions should be known with a high degree of precision. We evaluate a new AFM tip characterizer, and apply it to critical dimension AFM (CD-AFM) tips used for high aspect ratio features. The characterizer is made up of comb-shaped lines and spaces, and includes a series of gratings that could be used as an integrated nanoscale length reference. We also demonstrate a simulation method that could be used to specify what range of tip sizes and shapes the characterizer can measure. Our experiments show that for non re-entrant features, the results obtained with this characterizer are consistent to 1 nm with the results obtained by using widely accepted but slower methods that are common practice in CD-AFM metrology. A validation of the integrated length standard using displacement interferometry indicates a uniformity of better than 0.75%, suggesting that the sample could be used as highly accurate and SI traceable lateral scale for the whole evaluation process. PMID:26720439

  10. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  11. Differential pattern of hand-tapping compromise in vascular versus idiopathic parkinsonism: a study based on computerized movement analysis.

    PubMed

    Bäzner, Hansjörg; Schanz, Jurik; Blahak, Christian; Grips, Eva; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Hennerici, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We tested the characteristics and the differential pattern of upper extremity motor compromise, comparing hand tapping in patients with subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE; n = 18), idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; n = 18), and in healthy controls (n = 18). Both patient groups showed significant compromise in hand tapping compared with that in controls, with higher coefficients of variability (CV) regarding tapping amplitude and angular velocity, determined using a computerized movement analysis system. A differential tapping pattern in both patient groups could be demonstrated in that patients with PD showed lower tapping amplitudes than patients with SVE. Both patient groups displayed abnormalities in tapping rhythmicity compared with that in the control group.

  12. An Evaluation of the Chicago Teacher Advancement Program (Chicago TAP) after Four Years. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazerman, Steven; Seifullah, Allison

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, using funds from the federal Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) and private foundations, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) began piloting its version of a schoolwide reform model called the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP). Under the TAP model, teachers can earn extra pay and take on increased responsibilities through promotion (to mentor…

  13. TAP Helps States and Local Governments Reach Their Wind Power Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    Technical Assistance Project: Wind and Hydropower Program provides information to state and local officials regarding the U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Project (TAP). The TAP program provides access to wind energy experts at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, including the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  14. Metabolic pathways regulated by TAp73 in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Massimiliano; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are involved in both physiological and pathological processes including neurodegeneration and cancer. Therefore, cells have developed scavenging mechanisms to maintain redox homeostasis under control. Tumor suppressor genes play a critical role in the regulation of antioxidant genes. Here, we investigated whether the tumor suppressor gene TAp73 is involved in the regulation of metabolic adaptations triggered in response to oxidative stress. H2O2 treatment resulted in numerous biochemical changes in both control and TAp73 knockout (TAp73−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts, however the extent of these changes was more pronounced in TAp73−/− cells when compared to control cells. In particular, loss of TAp73 led to alterations in glucose, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. In addition, H2O2 treatment resulted in increased pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity in null mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Overall, our results suggest that in the absence of TAp73, H2O2 treatment results in an enhanced oxidative environment, and at the same time in an increased pro-anabolic phenotype. In conclusion, the metabolic profile observed reinforces the role of TAp73 as tumor suppressor and indicates that TAp73 exerts this function, at least partially, by regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:27119504

  15. Percutaneous tapping for the treatment of sinusitis-related intracranial epidural abscess in children

    PubMed Central

    Miyabe, Rumi; Niida, Mami; Obonai, Toshio; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Okada, Takaharu

    2014-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy with medically intractable sinusitis-related intracranial epidural abscess in the frontal region was treated using percutaneous tapping. Drainage of pus measuring 7 ml yielded excellent postoperative course without cosmetic disadvantage on the forehead. Percutaneous tapping is considered to be the ideal treatment because of minimal invasiveness and cosmetic aspects of the wound. PMID:25624941

  16. An Evaluation of the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) in Chicago: Year Two Impact Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazerman, Steven; Seifullah, Allison

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) began implementing a schoolwide reform called the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) using funds from the federal Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) and private foundations. Under the TAP model, teachers can earn extra pay and responsibilities through promotion to mentor or master teacher as well as annual…

  17. Tapping into the Academic Workforce: Beyond Complaints to Dialogue, Resolution and Accommodation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labeouf, Joanne P.

    This document highlights some of the main problems in using temporary, adjunct, and part-time (TAP) faculty, a practice that is becoming commonplace in higher education, especially at the community college level. Institutions use TAP faculty for several reasons: economic motivation, staffing flexibility in times of fluctuating enrollments,…

  18. 40 CFR 141.86 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... copper in tap water. 141.86 Section 141.86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.86 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water. (a) Sample site location. (1) By...

  19. 40 CFR 141.86 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... copper in tap water. 141.86 Section 141.86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.86 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water. (a) Sample site location. (1) By...

  20. 40 CFR 141.86 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... copper in tap water. 141.86 Section 141.86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.86 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water. (a) Sample site location. (1) By...

  1. Children with spinal dysraphism: transversus abdominis plane (TAP) catheters to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lauren J; Birmingham, Patrick; Yerkes, Elizabeth; Suresh, Santhanam

    2010-10-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block catheters may offer an alternative to a central neuraxial blockade for patients undergoing major abdominal surgery (Paediatr Anaesth 19: 2009; 296). This case series consists of two children with spinal dysraphism in whom bilateral TAP block catheters were placed for postoperative pain relief. Administration of low dose, low concentration local anesthetic provided both children with excellent postoperative analgesia.

  2. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  3. AF-M315E Propulsion System Advances and Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert K.; Allen, May; Driscoll, Elizabeth; Spores, Ronald A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.; Vasek, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Even as for the GR-1 awaits its first on-orbit demonstration on the planned 2017 launch of NASA's Green Propulsion Infusion Mission (GPIM) program, ongoing efforts continue to advance the technical state-of-the-art through improvements in the performance, life capability, and affordability of both Aerojet Rocketdyne's 1-N-class GR-1 and 20-N-class GR-22 green monopropellant thrusters. Hot-fire testing of a design upgrade of the GR-22 thruster successfully demonstrated resolution of a life-limiting thermo-structural issue encountered during prototype testing on the GPIM program, yielding both an approximately 2x increase in demonstrating life capability, as well as fundamental insights relating to how ionic liquid thrusters operate, thruster scaling, and operational factors affecting catalyst bed life. Further, a number of producibility improvements, related to both materials and processes and promising up to 50% unit cost reduction, have been identified through a comprehensive Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) assessment activity recently completed at Aerojet Rocketdyne. Focused specifically on the GR-1 but applicable to the common-core architecture of both thrusters, ongoing laboratory (heavyweight) thruster testing being conducted under a Space Act Agreement at NASA Glenn Research Center has already validated a number of these proposed manufacturability upgrades, additionally achieving a greater than 40% increase in thruster life. In parallel with technical advancements relevant to conventional large spacecraft, a joint effort between NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne is underway to prepare 1-U CubeSat AF-M315E propulsion module for first flight demonstration in 2018.

  4. Wetting properties of AFM probes by means of contact angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhenhua; Bhushan, Bharat

    2006-09-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique was developed to measure the wetting properties of probe tips. By advancing and receding the AFM tip across the water surface, the meniscus force between the tip and the liquid was measured at the tip-water separation. The water contact angle was determined from the meniscus force. The obtained contact angle results were compared with that by the sessile drop method. It was found that the AFM based technique provided higher contact angle values than the sessile drop method. The mechanisms responsible for the difference are discussed.

  5. Biological mechanisms associated with triazophos (TAP) removal by horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCW).

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Feng, Yuqin; Dai, Yanran; Cui, Naxin; Anderson, Bruce; Cheng, Shuiping

    2016-05-15

    Triazophos (TAP) is a widely used pesticide that is easily accumulated in the environment due to its relatively high stability: this accumulation from agricultural runoff results in potential hazards to aquatic ecosystems. Constructed wetlands are generally considered to be an effective technology for treating TAP polluted surface water. However, knowledge about the biological mechanisms of TAP removal is still lacking. This study investigates the responses of a wetland plant (Canna indica), substrate enzymes and microbial communities in bench-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (HSCWs) loaded with different TAP concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5 and 5 mg · L(-1)). The results indicate that TAP stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in the roots of C. indica. The highest TAP concentrations significantly inhibited photosynthetic activities, as shown by a reduced effective quantum yield of PS II (ΦPS II) and lower electron transport rates (ETR). However, interestingly, the lower TAP loadings exhibited some favorable effects on these two variables, suggesting that C. indica is a suitable species for use in wetlands designed for treatment of low TAP concentrations. Urease and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the wetland substrate were activated by TAP. Two-way ANOVA demonstrated that urease activity was influenced by both the TAP concentrations and season, while acidphosphatase (ACP) only responded to seasonal variations. Analysis of high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed seasonal variations in the microbial community structure of the wetland substrate at the phylum and family levels. In addition, urease activity had a greater correlation with the relative abundance of some functional microbial groups, such as the Bacillaceae family, and the ALP and ACP may be influenced by the plant more than substrate microbial communities.

  6. Tap Arduino: An Arduino microcontroller for low-latency auditory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization experiments.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Benjamin G; van Vugt, Floris T

    2016-12-01

    Timing abilities are often measured by having participants tap their finger along with a metronome and presenting tap-triggered auditory feedback. These experiments predominantly use electronic percussion pads combined with software (e.g., FTAP or Max/MSP) that records responses and delivers auditory feedback. However, these setups involve unknown latencies between tap onset and auditory feedback and can sometimes miss responses or record multiple, superfluous responses for a single tap. These issues may distort measurements of tapping performance or affect the performance of the individual. We present an alternative setup using an Arduino microcontroller that addresses these issues and delivers low-latency auditory feedback. We validated our setup by having participants (N = 6) tap on a force-sensitive resistor pad connected to the Arduino and on an electronic percussion pad with various levels of force and tempi. The Arduino delivered auditory feedback through a pulse-width modulation (PWM) pin connected to a headphone jack or a wave shield component. The Arduino's PWM (M = 0.6 ms, SD = 0.3) and wave shield (M = 2.6 ms, SD = 0.3) demonstrated significantly lower auditory feedback latencies than the percussion pad (M = 9.1 ms, SD = 2.0), FTAP (M = 14.6 ms, SD = 2.8), and Max/MSP (M = 15.8 ms, SD = 3.4). The PWM and wave shield latencies were also significantly less variable than those from FTAP and Max/MSP. The Arduino missed significantly fewer taps, and recorded fewer superfluous responses, than the percussion pad. The Arduino captured all responses, whereas at lower tapping forces, the percussion pad missed more taps. Regardless of tapping force, the Arduino outperformed the percussion pad. Overall, the Arduino is a high-precision, low-latency, portable, and affordable tool for auditory experiments.

  7. Probing Cytoskeletal Structures by Coupling Optical Superresolution and AFM Techniques for a Correlative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Zanacchi, Francesca Cella; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and show the application of some of the most advanced fluorescence superresolution techniques, STED AFM and STORM AFM microscopy towards imaging of cytoskeletal structures, such as microtubule filaments. Mechanical and structural properties can play a relevant role in the investigation of cytoskeletal structures of interest, such as microtubules, that provide support to the cell structure. In fact, the mechanical properties, such as the local stiffness and the elasticity, can be investigated by AFM force spectroscopy with tens of nanometers resolution. Force curves can be analyzed in order to obtain the local elasticity (and the Young's modulus calculation by fitting the force curves from every pixel of interest), and the combination with STED/STORM microscopy integrates the measurement with high specificity and yields superresolution structural information. This hybrid modality of superresolution-AFM working is a clear example of correlative multimodal microscopy. PMID:24027190

  8. Nanogap based graphene coated AFM tips with high spatial resolution, conductivity and durability.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Mario; Gao, Teng; Yin, Zixuan; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan; Tong, Yuzhen; Shen, Ziyong; Duan, Huiling

    2013-11-21

    After one decade of analyzing the intrinsic properties of graphene, interest into the development of graphene-based devices and micro electromechanical systems is increasing. Here, we fabricate graphene-coated atomic force microscope tips by growing the graphene on copper foil and transferring it onto the apex of a commercially available AFM tip. The resulting tip exhibits surprising enhanced resolution in nanoscale electrical measurements. By means of topographic AFM maps and statistical analyses we determine that this superior performance may be related to the presence of a nanogap between the graphene and the tip apex, which reduces the tip radius and tip-sample contact area. In addition, the graphene-coated tips show a low tip-sample interaction, high conductivity and long life times. The novel fabrication-friendly tip could improve the quality and reliability of AFM experiments, while reducing the cost of AFM-based research.

  9. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-27

    dynamic response • Waterhammer effect Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Hydroxyethylhydrazinium Nitrate ...Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HEHN) (HAN) [ ]-NO3 + [ ]HOCH2CH2N2H4 [ ]-+[ ]NH3OH NO3 AF-M315E

  10. Quantitative Measurements of Elastic Properties with Ultrasonic-Based AFM and Conventional Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, D. C.

    A prime motivation for the original development of ultrasonic-based AFM methods was to enable measurements of elastic properties with nanoscale spatial resolution. In this chapter, we discuss the quantitative measurement of elastic modulus with ultrasonic-based AFM methods and compare it to measurement by more conventional or established techniques. First, we present the basic principles of modulus measurement with methods that involve contact resonance spectroscopy, such as atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and ultrasonic AFM (U-AFM). Fundamental concepts of modulus measurement with more established approaches, especially instrumented (nano-) indentation (NI) and surface acoustic wave spectroscopy (SAWS), are then discussed. We consider the relative strengths and limitations of various approaches, for example measurement accuracy, spatial resolution, and applicability to different materials. Example results for specific material systems are given with an emphasis on studies involving direct intercomparison of different techniques. Finally, current research in this area and opportunities for future work are described.

  11. Leveraging Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) Senior Leadership Corps Diversity to Improve Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    commanders and AFMS senior leadership; • Set a single PME standard for AFMS officers; • Shift provider billets to patient care roles and establish...single PME standard, and by realigning human resources to increase clinical currency, medical readiness and resource efficiency. Some structural...organizational entity. Like running a surgical service or a medical service. . . . It’s much bigger than that, because you’re dealing with finance and

  12. Surface Microstructure of Mo(C)N Coatings Investigated by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, T.; Zubar, T.; Chizhik, S.; Gilewicz, A.; Lupicka, O.; Warcholinski, B.

    2016-12-01

    MoCN coatings have been formed by cathodic arc evaporation using the mixture of acetylene and nitrogen and pure molybdenum target. The surface structure, in conjunction with x-ray data, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM results show differently shaped grain forms on the surface of coatings investigated. The increase in carbon in chemical coatings composition results in the reduction in surface grain size and the increase in roughness of the coatings.

  13. Attaching single biomolecules selectively to the apex of AFM tips for measuring specific interactions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianhua; Xiao, Zhongdang; Yam, Chi-Ming; Qin, Guoting; Deluge, Maxence; Boutet, Sabine; Cai, Chengzhi

    2005-11-01

    We present a general approach for preparing well-defined AFM tips for probing single target molecules. We demonstrated that carboxylic acid groups could be generated by electrochemical oxidation selectively at the apex of an AFM tip that is coated with a monolayer of oligo(ethylene glycol) derivatives for resisting nonspecific interactions. These carboxylic acid groups were used as handles to tether only one ligand molecule, such as biotin, to the tip apex for measurement of specific interactions with biomolecules.

  14. Using XAFS, EDAX and AFM in comparative study of various natural and synthetic emeralds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, P.; Saini, N. L.; Dalela, S.; Bhardwaj, D. M.; Fernandes, S.; Gupta, R. P.; Garg, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed XAFS, EDAX and AFM studies on some natural and synthetic emeralds. While the XAFS results yield information on changes in the valence of the Cr ion and the n-n distance the AFM is used to determine the areal atomic density on surface of the crystals. It is a pilot study to explore if the three techniques can offer a possible way of distinguishing between the natural and synthetic emeralds and the results are promising.

  15. Fate of phosphorus in diluted urine with tap water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Wen, Guoqi; Wang, Huihui; Zhu, Xiaoqi; Hu, Zhengyi

    2014-10-01

    P loss during the fresh urine storage process is inevitable because of the presence of Ca and Mg. Dilution is one of the most important parameters influencing urine composition and subsequent P recovery. This study aimed to investigate the fate of P in urine with different dilution ratios (Vwater/Vurine, i.e., 0/100, 25/75, 50/50 and 75/25). The results indicate that the percentage of P loss increased from 43% to 76% as the dilution ratio increased from 0/100 to 75/25 because of more Ca and Mg obtained from tap water. Meanwhile, P removal efficiency through struvite precipitation decreased from 51% to 8% because of lower supersaturation ratio as a result of dilution. Struvite crystals with high purity were still obtained even under a dilution ratio of 50/50 urine solution. Batch experiments were also performed to study the influence of temperature (15-35°C) on P recovery and crystal size. For different dilution ratios of urine solutions, no significant discrepancy for the P removal efficiencies were observed at 15 and 35°C, whereas the P removal efficiencies at 25°C showed an increasing gap with those at 15 and 35°C. The largest average crystal sizes were found at 25°C, which was opposite to the trend of P removal efficiency.

  16. Automatic and Objective Assessment of Alternating Tapping Performance in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Memedi, Mevludin; Khan, Taha; Grenholm, Peter; Nyholm, Dag; Westin, Jerker

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of a method for enabling quantitative and automatic scoring of alternating tapping performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten healthy elderly subjects and 95 patients in different clinical stages of PD have utilized a touch-pad handheld computer to perform alternate tapping tests in their home environments. First, a neurologist used a web-based system to visually assess impairments in four tapping dimensions (‘speed’, ‘accuracy’, ‘fatigue’ and ‘arrhythmia’) and a global tapping severity (GTS). Second, tapping signals were processed with time series analysis and statistical methods to derive 24 quantitative parameters. Third, principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensions of these parameters and to obtain scores for the four dimensions. Finally, a logistic regression classifier was trained using a 10-fold stratified cross-validation to map the reduced parameters to the corresponding visually assessed GTS scores. Results showed that the computed scores correlated well to visually assessed scores and were significantly different across Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores of upper limb motor performance. In addition, they had good internal consistency, had good ability to discriminate between healthy elderly and patients in different disease stages, had good sensitivity to treatment interventions and could reflect the natural disease progression over time. In conclusion, the automatic method can be useful to objectively assess the tapping performance of PD patients and can be included in telemedicine tools for remote monitoring of tapping. PMID:24351667

  17. Contribution of tap water to mineral intakes of Canadian preschool children.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R S; Vanderkooy, P S; McLennan, C E; Mercer, N M

    1987-01-01

    Tap water consumption was estimated from 3 day weighed dietary records in 102 Canadian preschool children (4-5 yr of age; 58 males, 44 females). Cold tap water samples were also collected from each child's household (64 hard water households, 38 soft water households) and analyzed for calcium, magnesium, sodium, zinc, copper, and sodium by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Median consumption of tap water consumed alone and tapwater alone plus that used in beverages (ml per day) was 36.5 (range 0-791) and 171.5 (range 0-1036), respectively. Average intakes of macrominerals for males (M) and females (F) from all sources of hard tap water were (mg/day): calcium (M) 16.5, (F) 13.2; magnesium (M) 6.6, (F) 4.5; and sodium (M) 2.3, (F) 2.3. Average intakes of macrominerals from soft water are as follows: calcium (M) 0.1, (F) 0.1; magnesium (M) 0, (F) 0; and sodium (M) 31.0, (F) 24.4. Trace element intakes from tap water were negligible. Hard tap water provided less than 8% of the Canadian Recommended Nutrient Intake (RNI) for magnesium, less than 3% for calcium, and less than 1% for zinc. Mineral contributions of soft tap water to the RNIs were less than 2%.

  18. On the Cutting Performance of Coated HSS Taps When Machining of Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwkova, Petra; Piska, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with a quality of the PVD coated HSS taps when cutting the stainless austenitic chromiumnickel non-stabilized steel DIN 1.4301 (X5CrNi 18-10). The main attention is focused on the analysis of loading (cutting moment, specific energy) of the HSS taps by means of pieso-electrical dynamometer Kistler 9272 and the relation between the quality of duplex and triplex PVD coatings and their effects on the quality of machined thread surfaces and tool life of the taps. The results showed a safe and stabilized cutting with acceptable quality of threads for HSSE with the TiN+TiCN+DLC coating.

  19. A rapid and automated relocation method of an AFM probe for high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Shi, Jialin; Jiao, Niandong; Wang, Zhidong; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-09-30

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is one of the most powerful tools for high-resolution imaging and high-precision positioning for nanomanipulation. The selection of the scanning area of the AFM depends on the use of the optical microscope. However, the resolution of an optical microscope is generally no larger than 200 nm owing to wavelength limitations of visible light. Taking into consideration the two determinants of relocation-relative angular rotation and positional offset between the AFM probe and nano target-it is therefore extremely challenging to precisely relocate the AFM probe to the initial scan/manipulation area for the same nano target after the AFM probe has been replaced, or after the sample has been moved. In this paper, we investigate a rapid automated relocation method for the nano target of an AFM using a coordinate transformation. The relocation process is both simple and rapid; moreover, multiple nano targets can be relocated by only identifying a pair of reference points. It possesses a centimeter-scale location range and nano-scale precision. The main advantages of this method are that it overcomes the limitations associated with the resolution of optical microscopes, and that it is label-free on the target areas, which means that it does not require the use of special artificial markers on the target sample areas. Relocation experiments using nanospheres, DNA, SWCNTs, and nano patterns amply demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the proposed method, which provides technical support for mass nanomanipulation and detection based on AFM for multiple nano targets that are widely distributed in a large area.

  20. AFM study of the thermotropic behaviour of supported DPPC bilayers with and without the model peptide WALP23.

    PubMed

    Yarrow, F; Kuipers, B W M

    2011-01-01

    Temperature-controlled Atomic Force Microscopy (TC-AFM) in Contact Mode is used here to directly image the mechanisms by which melting and crystallization of supported, hydrated DPPC bilayers proceed in the presence and absence of the model peptide WALP23. Melting from the gel L(β)' to the liquid-crystalline L(α) phase starts at pre-existing line-type packing defects (grain boundaries) in absence of the peptide. The exact transition temperature is shown to be influenced by the magnitude of the force exerted by the AFM probe on the bilayer, but is higher than the main transition temperature of non-supported DPPC vesicles in all cases due to bilayer-substrate interactions. Cooling of the fluid L(α) bilayer shows the formation of the line-type defects at the borders between different gel-phase regions that originate from different nuclei. The number of these defects depends directly on the rate of cooling through the transition, as predicted by classical nucleation theory. The presence of the transmembrane, synthetic model peptide WALP23 is known to give rise to heterogeneity in the bilayer as microdomains with a striped appearance are formed in the DPPC bilayer. This striated phase consists of alternating lines of lipids and peptide. It is shown here that melting starts with the peptide-associated lipids in the domains, whose melting temperature is lowered by 0.8-2.0°C compared to the remaining, peptide-free parts of the bilayer. The stabilization of the fluid phase is ascribed to adaptations of the lipids to the shorter peptide. The lipids not associated with the peptide melt at the same temperature as those in the pure DPPC supported bilayer.

  1. Antibacterial TAP-mimic Electrospun Polymer Scaffold – Effects on P. gingivalis-Infected Dentin Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Maria Tereza P.; Evans, Joshua D.; Gregory, Richard L.; Valera, Marcia C.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate, in-vitro, the effects of a recently developed triple antibiotic paste (TAP)-mimic polymer nanofibrous scaffold against Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg)-infected dentin biofilm. Materials and Methods Dentin specimens (4×4×1mm3) were prepared from human canines. The specimens were sterilized, inoculated with Pg (ATCC 33277), and incubated for one week to allow for biofilm formation. Infected dentin specimens were exposed for 3 days to the following treatments: antibiotic-free polydioxanone scaffold (PDS, control), PDS+25wt.%TAP (25 mg of each antibiotic [metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline] per mL of the PDS polymer solution), or a saturated TAP-based solution (50 mg of each antibiotic per mL of saline solution). In order to serve as the negative control, infected dentin specimens were left untreated (bacteria only). To determine the antimicrobial efficacy of the TAP-mimic scaffold, a colony-forming unit (CFU/mL) (n=10/group) measurement was performed. Furthermore, additional specimens (n=2/group) were prepared to qualitatively study biofilm inhibition via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistics were performed and significance was set at the 5% level. Results Both the TAP-mimic scaffold and the positive control (TAP solution) led to complete bacterial elimination, differing statistically (p<0.05) from the negative control group (bacteria only). No statistical differences were observed for CFU/mL data between antibiotic-free scaffolds (2.7 log10 CFU/mL) and the negative control (5.9 log10 CFU/mL). Conclusions The obtained data revealed significant antimicrobial properties of the novel PDS-based TAP-mimic scaffold against an established Pg-infected dentin biofilm. Clinical relevance Collectively, the data suggest that the proposed nanofibrous scaffold might be used as an alternative to the advocated clinical gold standard (i.e., TAP) for intracanal disinfection prior to regenerative endodontics. PMID:26319981

  2. Digital tapped delay lines for HWIL testing of matched filter radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Richard F.; Braselton, William J.; Mohlere, Richard D.

    2009-05-01

    Matched filter processing for pulse compression of phase coded waveforms is a classic method for increasing radar range measurement resolution. A generic approach for simulating high resolution range extended radar scenes in a Hardware in the Loop (HWIL) test environment is to pass the phase coded radar transmit pulse through an RF tapped delay line comprised of individually amplitude- and phase-weighted output taps. In the generic approach, the taps are closely spaced relative to time intervals equivalent to the range resolution of the compressed radar pulse. For a range-extended high resolution clutter scene, the increased number of these taps can make an analog implementation of an RF tapped delay system impractical. Engineers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) have addressed this problem by transferring RF tapped delay line signal operations to the digital domain. New digital tapped delay line (DTDL) systems have been designed and demonstrated which are physically compact compared to analog RF TDLs, leverage low cost FPGA and data converter technology, and may be readily expanded using open slots in a VME card cage. In initial HWIL applications, the new DTDLs have been shown to produce better dynamic range in pulse compressed range profiles than their analog TDL predecessors. This paper describes the signal requirements and system architecture for digital tapped delay lines. Implementation, performance, and HWIL simulation integration issues for AMRDEC's first generation DTDLs are addressed. The paper concludes with future requirements and plans for ongoing DTDL technology development at AMRDEC.

  3. Comparison of the Mineral Content of Tap Water and Bottled Waters

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Arik; Garzon, Philippe; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Because of growing concern that constituents of drinking water may have adverse health effects, consumption of tap water in North America has decreased and consumption of bottled water has increased. Our objectives were to 1) determine whether North American tap water contains clinically important levels of calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and sodium (Na+) and 2) determine whether differences in mineral content of tap water and commercially available bottled waters are clinically important. DESIGN We obtained mineral analysis reports from municipal water authorities of 21 major North American cities. Mineral content of tap water was compared with published data regarding commercially available bottled waters and with dietary reference intakes (DRIs). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Mineral levels varied among tap water sources in North America and among bottled waters. European bottled waters generally contained higher mineral levels than North American tap water sources and North American bottled waters. For half of the tap water sources we examined, adults may fulfill between 8% and 16% of their Ca2+ DRI and between 6% and 31% of their Mg2+ DRI by drinking 2 liters per day. One liter of most moderate mineralization European bottled waters contained between 20% and 58% of the Ca2+ DRI and between 16% and 41% of the Mg2+ DRI in adults. High mineralization bottled waters often contained up to half of the maximum recommended daily intake of Na+. CONCLUSION Drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals. Physicians should encourage patients to check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs. PMID:11318912

  4. Tapping of Love waves in an isotropic surface waveguide by surface-to-bulk wave transduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Chang, C.-P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical study of tapping a Love wave in an isotropic microacoustic surface waveguide is given. The surface Love wave is tapped by partial transduction into a bulk wave at a discontinuity. It is shown that, by careful design of the discontinuity, the converted bulk wave power and the radiation pattern may be controlled. General formulas are derived for the calculation of these important characteristics from a relatively general surface contour deformation.

  5. An Investigation into the Bias Error Caused by Anomalies in Static Pressure Taps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, James Lloyd

    Static pressure taps are widely used in studying aerodynamics. They are used both in the design process (wind tunnel testing) and for controlling the aircraft (FADS). With the high levels of accuracy possible from current pressure measurement devices and the precise controls required for high-speed flights, bias caused by anomalies in pressure taps needed to be quantified. The parameters investigated in this study were the yaw angle, off-normal angle, and the diameter. The yaw angle was measured relative to the direction of air flow and varied between 0 and 360 degrees. The off-normal angles were measured relative to an axis perpendicular to the surface and were: 30, 20, and 10 degrees. The diameter of the pressure tap was varied up to 50% of the boundary layer thickness. For all of these a 0.026" diameter tap was used as a reference this corresponded to approximately 10% of the boundary layer thickness. It was discovered that a 30 degree off-normal tap with a yaw angle of 0 degrees gave a bias error of 0.3% of the dynamic pressure. Other off-normal and yaw angles gave smaller bias errors. Yaw angles of between 0 and 90 degrees gave positive bias errors and yaw angles between 90 and 180 degrees gave negative bias errors. These errors decreased as the off-normal angle decreased. It was also found that larger diameter taps gave larger pressure bias errors. Taps with a diameter smaller than the reference gave negative bias relative to the reference tap pressure. All results were non-dimensionalized by the boundary layer thickness, or the dynamic pressure.

  6. Functional Analysis of the Accessory Protein TapA in Bacillus subtilis Amyloid Fiber Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation relies on the assembly of a fibrous scaffold formed by the protein TasA. TasA polymerizes into highly stable fibers with biochemical and morphological features of functional amyloids. Previously, we showed that assembly of TasA fibers requires the auxiliary protein TapA. In this study, we investigated the roles of TapA sequences from the C-terminal and N-terminal ends and TapA cysteine residues in its ability to promote the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers. We found that the cysteine residues are not essential for the formation of TasA fibers, as their replacement by alanine residues resulted in only minor defects in biofilm formation. Mutating sequences in the C-terminal half had no effect on biofilm formation. However, we identified a sequence of 8 amino acids in the N terminus that is key for TasA fiber formation. Strains expressing TapA lacking these 8 residues were completely defective in biofilm formation. In addition, this TapA mutant protein exhibited a dominant negative effect on TasA fiber formation. Even in the presence of wild-type TapA, the mutant protein inhibited fiber assembly in vitro and delayed biofilm formation in vivo. We propose that this 8-residue sequence is crucial for the formation of amyloid-like fibers on the cell surface, perhaps by mediating the interaction between TapA or TapA and TasA molecules. PMID:24488317

  7. Designing PMF with Negative Tap Coefficient Based on FBG Delay Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fenfei; Yang, Ming

    2013-06-01

    DIRECT global optimization algorithm is innovatively used in design of PMF. Tap coefficient is attained by achieving DIRECT algorithm with C language and Matlab language is employed to simulate the amplitude response of filters. We have designed PMF (photonic microwave filter) with negative tap coefficient and then optimize the design. The minimum shape factor is as low as 1.3180. The results show that the algorithm is highly efficient in designing filter and can produce necessary passband and stopband response characteristics.

  8. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Palmer, E; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell-activating protein TAP is a murine phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein whose expression is controlled by the Ly-6 locus. Previous studies have suggested an important role for this protein in physiological T-cell activation. Using oligonucleotide probes, we have now isolated a cDNA clone whose predicted sequence would encode a protein with an NH2-terminal sequence identical to that of the TAP molecule. Further analysis of the predicted protein sequence revealed a cysteine-rich protein with a hydrophobic domain at the COOH terminus and without N-linked glycosylation sites--all features consistent with our previous analysis of the TAP protein. In Southern blot analysis, the Ly-6.2 cDNA clone detects a multigene family and a restriction fragment length polymorphism that maps precisely to the Ly-6 locus. Expression of the cDNA clone in COS cells demonstrates that it codes for TAP and clarifies the relationship between the epitopes recognized by various alpha Ly-6 monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we have studied the expression of Ly-6 mRNA in a variety of cell lineages. Ly-6 transcripts were detected in all organs examined, including spleen, kidney, lung, brain, and heart. This demonstrates that the Ly-6 locus is transcriptionally active in a wide range of organs and suggests that the role of TAP or TAP-like proteins might extend to other tissues. Images PMID:2895473

  9. p53 and TAp63 promote keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in breeding tubercles of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Boris; Metzger, Manuel; Richardson, Rebecca; Knyphausen, Philipp; Ramezani, Thomas; Franzen, Rainer; Schmelzer, Elmon; Bloch, Wilhelm; Carney, Thomas J; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    p63 is a multi-isoform member of the p53 family of transcription factors. There is compelling genetic evidence that ΔNp63 isoforms are needed for keratinocyte proliferation and stemness in the developing vertebrate epidermis. However, the role of TAp63 isoforms is not fully understood, and TAp63 knockout mice display normal epidermal development. Here, we show that zebrafish mutants specifically lacking TAp63 isoforms, or p53, display compromised development of breeding tubercles, epidermal appendages which according to our analyses display more advanced stratification and keratinization than regular epidermis, including continuous desquamation and renewal of superficial cells by derivatives of basal keratinocytes. Defects are further enhanced in TAp63/p53 double mutants, pointing to partially redundant roles of the two related factors. Molecular analyses, treatments with chemical inhibitors and epistasis studies further reveal the existence of a linear TAp63/p53->Notch->caspase 3 pathway required both for enhanced proliferation of keratinocytes at the base of the tubercles and their subsequent differentiation in upper layers. Together, these studies identify the zebrafish breeding tubercles as specific epidermal structures sharing crucial features with the cornified mammalian epidermis. In addition, they unravel essential roles of TAp63 and p53 to promote both keratinocyte proliferation and their terminal differentiation by promoting Notch signalling and caspase 3 activity, ensuring formation and proper homeostasis of this self-renewing stratified epithelium.

  10. Generating Tap Test Images with a Free-Hand Motorized Tapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D.; Foreman, C.; Hsu, D.

    2009-03-01

    Previously we have described the Computer Aided Tap Tester (CATT), a simple instrumented probe and software that facilitates the generation of tap test C-scans in field environments. Early in the CATT development it was noted that inspectors prefer hand tapping at random locations over the part, eventually covering the part to the satisfaction of the inspector. To speed inspections, a regimented method of tapping was incorporated into the CATT via a grid laid over the part. Although the CATT system is quite simple to use, the method of tapping at each grid location in a pre-determined raster pattern continues to encounter resistance from the inspectors. The preferred free scanning of the inspection area dovetails nicely with the GenScan system previously reported on, where the operator scans over the inspection area freely, starting with larger pixels, and refines the geometry of flaw indications with finer pixels. As part of an Air Force project, we are merging the CATT instrumented tap data with position encoding and pixel change on-the-fly features of the GenScan. A description and demonstration of its operation will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory under Contract♯FA8650-04-C-5228 at Iowa State University's Center for NDE.

  11. Chemotaxis of Escherichia coli to pyrimidines: a new role for the signal transducer tap.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Rebecca E

    2008-02-01

    Escherichia coli exhibits chemotactic responses to sugars, amino acids, and dipeptides, and the responses are mediated by methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). Using capillary assays, we demonstrated that Escherichia coli RP437 is attracted to the pyrimidines thymine and uracil and the response was constitutively expressed under all tested growth conditions. All MCP mutants lacking the MCP Tap protein showed no response to pyrimidines, suggesting that Tap, which is known to mediate dipeptide chemotaxis, is required for pyrimidine chemotaxis. In order to confirm the role of Tap in pyrimidine chemotaxis, we constructed chimeric chemoreceptors (Tapsr and Tsrap), in which the periplasmic and cytoplasmic domains of Tap and Tsr were switched. When Tapsr and Tsrap were individually expressed in an E. coli strain lacking all four native MCPs, Tapsr mediated chemotaxis toward pyrimidines and dipeptides, but Tsrap did not complement the chemotaxis defect. The addition of the C-terminal 19 amino acids from Tsr to the C terminus of Tsrap resulted in a functional chemoreceptor that mediated chemotaxis to serine but not pyrimidines or dipeptides. These results indicate that the periplasmic domain of Tap is responsible for detecting pyrimidines and the Tsr signaling domain confers on Tapsr the ability to mediate efficient chemotaxis. A mutant lacking dipeptide binding protein (DBP) was wild type for pyrimidine taxis, indicating that DBP, which is the primary chemoreceptor for dipeptides, is not responsible for detecting pyrimidines. It is not yet known whether Tap detects pyrimidines directly or via an additional chemoreceptor protein.

  12. New idea of suppressing free surface vortex during tapping liquid steel from converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jin; Kim, Sang-Joon; Lee, Hae-Geon

    2016-01-01

    During tapping liquid steel from a converter to a ladle, slag may carry over due to a formation of free surface vortex. Such vortex should be suppressed in order to minimize contamination of the steel by slag. In the present study, a new idea is proposed to minimize the vortex formation by applying dual tapping hole system. The idea was tested using a rectangular shape water vessel with dual tapping holes, supplemented by a numerical simulations, in order to evaluate feasibility of the dual tapping hole system. Both the water model experiment and the numerical simulation showed similar tendencies that the dual tapping hole system is promising to prevent the vortex formation. Experimental results showed that the free surface vortex formation is highly sensitive to shape and configuration of the nozzle. From the numerical simulation, flow characteristics were obtained, and vortex canceling between two nozzles is confirmed. Effect of dual tapping hole increased with increasing distance between two holes in the present experimental condition. Finally, a 1/7.8 scale-down water vessel simulating a real converter was employed in order to confirm the validity of the above findings. The result showed almost the same tendencies with the previous findings.

  13. Disinfection of Burkholderia cepacia complex from non-touch taps in a neonatal nursery.

    PubMed

    Kotsanas, Despina; Brett, Judith; Kidd, Tim J; Stuart, Rhonda L; Korman, Tony M

    2008-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) comprises nine closely related species or genomovars. It is an important causative agent of opportunistic infections and waterborne nosocomial infections. B. cepacia (formerly genomovar I) was identified from the blood culture of a baby in our neonatal unit (NU) in March 2005. B. cepacia was isolated four times from clinical specimens since the introduction of non-touch taps in the NU from 2000 to 2005 and only once from 1994 to 2000. Environmental samples were collected from the NU, including tap water from non-touch taps. Clinical and environmental isolates of Bcc were characterized using molecular identification and strain typing. A literature review was undertaken to delineate a method for eradication of Bcc. Several variations for hot water eradication of the organism from the taps were attempted. Genotyping and molecular analysis revealed that tap water isolates were B. cenocepacia which was a different species from the B. cepacia isolated from blood cultures of the neonate. However, B. cenocepacia has been known to cause nosocomial outbreaks and it was eventually eradicated from the NU by using repeated thermal shock (hot water at 65 degrees C for 10 min), changing taps and decolonizing sinks with hypochlorite. Molecular typing is useful in assisting the investigation of Bcc nosocomial infections.

  14. Functional and Genetic Characterization of the Tap Efflux Pump in Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Virginie; Dainese, Elisa; Martín, Carlos; Thompson, Charles J.; De Rossi, Edda; Manganelli, Riccardo; Aínsa, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Efflux pumps extrude a wide variety of chemically unrelated compounds conferring multidrug resistance and participating in numerous physiological processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses many efflux pumps, and their roles in drug resistance and physiology are actively investigated. In this work we found that tap mutant cells showed changes in morphology and a progressive loss of viability upon subcultivation in liquid medium. Transcriptome analysis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG revealed that disruption of the Rv1258c gene, encoding the Tap efflux pump, led to an extensive change in gene expression patterns during stationary phase, with no changes during exponential growth. In stationary phase, Tap inactivation triggered a general stress response and led to a general repression of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis, in particular the formation of the peptidoglycan; this suggested the accumulation of an unknown Tap substrate that reaches toxic concentrations during stationary phase. We also found that both disruption and overexpression of tap altered susceptibility to many clinically approved antibiotics in M. bovis BCG. Acriflavine and tetracycline accumulation assays and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) potentiation experiments demonstrated that this phenotype was due to an active efflux mechanism. These findings emphasize the important role of the Tap efflux pump in bacterial physiology and intrinsic drug resistance. PMID:22232275

  15. PPIRank - an advanced method for ranking protein-protein interations in TAP/MS data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tandem affinity purification coupled with mass-spectrometry (TAP/MS) analysis is a popular method for the identification of novel endogenous protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in large-scale. Computational analysis of TAP/MS data is a critical step, particularly for high-throughput datasets, yet it remains challenging due to the noisy nature of TAP/MS data. Results We investigated several major TAP/MS data analysis methods for identifying PPIs, and developed an advanced method, which incorporates an improved statistical method to filter out false positives from the negative controls. Our method is named PPIRank that stands for PPI ranking in TAP/MS data. We compared PPIRank with several other existing methods in analyzing two pathway-specific TAP/MS PPI datasets from Drosophila. Conclusion Experimental results show that PPIRank is more capable than other approaches in terms of identifying known interactions collected in the BioGRID PPI database. Specifically, PPIRank is able to capture more true interactions and simultaneously less false positives in both Insulin and Hippo pathways of Drosophila Melanogaster. PMID:24565074

  16. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  17. Mutant AFM 2 of Alcaligenes faecalis for phenol biodegradation using He-Ne laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Wen, Jianping; Caiyin, Qinggele; Lin, Liangcai; Hu, Zongding

    2006-11-01

    He-Ne laser technology was utilized in this study to investigate the response of Alcaligenes faecalis to laser stimulation. The irradiation experiments were conducted by the adjustment of the output power from 5 to 25 mW and the exposure time from 5 to 25 min. The results showed that the survival rate changed regularly with the variety of irradiation dose, and high positive mutation frequency was determined by both the energy density and the output power. The mutant strain AFM 2 was obtained. Phenol biodegradation assay demonstrated that AFM 2 possessed a more prominent phenol-degrading potential than its parent strain, which presumably attributed to the improvements of phenol hydroxylase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activities. The phenol of 2000 mgl(-1) was completely degraded by AFM 2 within 85.5h at 30 degrees C. In addition, the cell growth and phenol degradation kinetics of the mutant strain AFM 2 and its parent strain in batch cultures were also investigated at the wide initial phenol concentration ranging from 0 to 2000 mgl(-1) by Haldane model. The results of these experiments further demonstrated that the mutant strain AFM 2 possessed a higher capacity to resist phenol.

  18. Accelerated design and quality control of impact modifiers for plastics through atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Gunter

    2011-03-01

    Standard polymer resins are often too brittle or do not meet other mechanical property requirements for typical polymer applications. To achieve desired properties it is common to disperse so called ``impact modifiers'', which are spherical latex particles with diameters of much less than one micrometer, into the pure resin. Understanding and control of the entire process from latex particle formation to subsequent dispersion into polymer resins are necessary to accelerate the development of new materials that meet specific application requirements. In this work AFM imaging and nanoindentation techniques in combination with AFM-based spectroscopic techniques were applied to assess latex formation and dispersion. The size and size distribution of the latex particles can be measured based on AFM amplitude modulation images. AFM phase images provide information about the chemical homogeneity of individual particles. Nanoindentation may be used to estimate their elastic and viscoelastic properties. Proprietary creep and nanoscale Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) tests that we have developed were used to measure these mechanical properties. The small size of dispersed latex inclusions requires local mechanical and spectroscopic analysis techniques with high lateral and spatial resolution. We applied the CRAVE AFM method, developed at NIST, to perform mechanical analysis of individual latex inclusions and compared results with those obtained using nanoscale DMA. NanoIR, developed by Anasys Inc., and principal component confocal Raman were used for spectroscopic analysis and results from both techniques compared.

  19. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  20. Quantitating membrane bleb stiffness using AFM force spectroscopy and an optical sideview setup.

    PubMed

    Gonnermann, Carina; Huang, Chaolie; Becker, Sarah F; Stamov, Dimitar R; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-03-01

    AFM-based force spectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cell mechanics and adhesion on the single cell level. However, standard setups featuring an AFM mounted on an inverted light microscope only provide a bottom view of cell and AFM cantilever but cannot visualize vertical cell shape changes, for instance occurring during motile membrane blebbing. Here, we have integrated a mirror-based sideview system to monitor cell shape changes resulting from motile bleb behavior of Xenopus cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during AFM elasticity and adhesion measurements. Using the sideview setup, we quantitatively investigate mechanical changes associated with bleb formation and compared cell elasticity values recorded during membrane bleb and non-bleb events. Bleb protrusions displayed significantly lower stiffness compared to the non-blebbing membrane in the same cell. Bleb stiffness values were comparable to values obtained from blebbistatin-treated cells, consistent with the absence of a functional actomyosin network in bleb protrusions. Furthermore, we show that membrane blebs forming within the cell-cell contact zone have a detrimental effect on cell-cell adhesion forces, suggesting that mechanical changes associated with bleb protrusions promote cell-cell detachment or prevent adhesion reinforcement. Incorporating a sideview setup into an AFM platform therefore provides a new tool to correlate changes in cell morphology with results from force spectroscopy experiments.

  1. Combined force spectroscopy, AFM and calorimetric studies to reveal the nanostructural organization of biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Germà, C; Morros, A; Montero, M T; Hernández-Borrell, J; Domènech, Ò

    2014-10-01

    In this work we studied a binary lipid matrix of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (POPG), a composition that mimics the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. More specifically, liposomes with varying fractions of POPG were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a binary phase diagram of the system was created. Additionally, we performed atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of similar compositions at different temperatures, in order to create a pseudo-binary phase diagram specific to this membrane model. AFM study of SLBs is of particular interest, as it is conceived as the most adequate technique not only for studying lipid bilayer systems but also for imaging and even nanomanipulating inserted membrane proteins. The construction of the above-mentioned phase diagram enabled us to grasp better the thermodynamics of the thermal lipid transition from a gel-like POPE:POPG phase system to a more fluid phase system. Finally, AFM force spectroscopy (FS) was used to determine the nanomechanics of these two lipid phases at 27°C and at different POPG fractions. The resulting data correlated with the specific composition of each phase was calculated from the AFM phase diagram obtained. All the experiments were done in the presence of 10 mM of Ca(2+), as this ion is commonly used when performing AFM with negatively charged phospholipids.

  2. Noise in NC-AFM measurements with significant tip–sample interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lübbe, Jannis; Temmen, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The frequency shift noise in non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) imaging and spectroscopy consists of thermal noise and detection system noise with an additional contribution from amplitude noise if there are significant tip–sample interactions. The total noise power spectral density D Δ f(f m) is, however, not just the sum of these noise contributions. Instead its magnitude and spectral characteristics are determined by the strongly non-linear tip–sample interaction, by the coupling between the amplitude and tip–sample distance control loops of the NC-AFM system as well as by the characteristics of the phase locked loop (PLL) detector used for frequency demodulation. Here, we measure D Δ f(f m) for various NC-AFM parameter settings representing realistic measurement conditions and compare experimental data to simulations based on a model of the NC-AFM system that includes the tip–sample interaction. The good agreement between predicted and measured noise spectra confirms that the model covers the relevant noise contributions and interactions. Results yield a general understanding of noise generation and propagation in the NC-AFM and provide a quantitative prediction of noise for given experimental parameters. We derive strategies for noise-optimised imaging and spectroscopy and outline a full optimisation procedure for the instrumentation and control loops. PMID:28144538

  3. Morphology of Vapor-Deposited Ice at Low Temperatures by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, , Jr.; Donev, J. M. K.; Tait, B. R. Long, Jr.; Yu, Q.

    2002-03-01

    The morphology of multilayer films of ice on various substrates is measured by AFM as a function of vapor-deposition and annealing temperatures below 150K. The films are deposited in-situ in UHV from an effusive doser at 67 degrees from the surface normal. For depositions near 100K on clean Au(111), previous measurements by Donev et al. using needle-sensor AFM indicate that 3-D clustering starts near 120K for initially flat thin films of amorphous solid water (ASW). For depositions below 85K on clean Au(111), preliminary measurements using non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) indicate that clustering does not occur during annealing until bulk diffusion becomes operative at T>140K. Deposition at glancing angle at the lower temperatures is known to increase porosity and is also expected to decrease the number of crystalline nuclei in the ASW. For depositions near 100K on mica that had been annealed in UHV, preliminary measurements using ncAFM show clustering near 120K. Supported by U. W. Nanotechnology Fellowship (J.M.K.D.), Mary Gates Fellowship (B. R. L.), and M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

  4. Effect of AFM probe geometry on visco-hyperelastic characterization of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Papi, Massimiliano; De Spirito, Marco; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2015-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation is very suited for nano- and microscale mechanical characterization of soft materials. Although the structural response of polymeric networks that form soft matter depends on viscous effects caused by the relative slippage of polymeric chains, the usual assumption made in the AFM-based characterization is that the specimen behaves as a purely elastic material and viscous forces are negligible. However, for each geometric configuration of the AFM tip, there will be a limit indentation rate above which viscous effects must be taken into account to correctly determine mechanical properties. A parametric finite element study conducted on 12 geometric configurations of a blunt cone AFM tip (overall, the study included about 200 finite element analyses) allowed us to determine the limit indentation rate for each configuration. The selected tip dimensions cover commercially available products and account for changes in tip geometry caused by serial measurements. Nanoindentation rates cover typical experimental conditions set in AFM bio-measurements on soft matter. Viscous effects appear to be more significant in the case of sharper tips. This implies that, if quantitative data on sample viscosity are not available, using a rounded indenter and carrying out experiments below the limit indentation rate will allow errors in the determination of mechanical properties to be minimized.

  5. Evaluation of the electrical contact area in contact-mode scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, Umberto; Hantschel, Thomas; Giammaria, Guido; Chintala, Ravi Chandra; Conard, Thierry; Bender, Hugo; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2015-06-01

    The tunneling current through an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is used to evaluate the effective electrical contact area, which exists between tip and sample in contact-AFM electrical measurements. A simple procedure for the evaluation of the effective electrical contact area is described using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in combination with a thin dielectric. We characterize the electrical contact area for coated metal and doped-diamond tips operated at low force (<200 nN) in contact mode. In both cases, we observe that only a small fraction (<10 nm2) of the physical contact (˜100 nm2) is effectively contributing to the transport phenomena. Assuming this reduced area is confined to the central area of the physical contact, these results explain the sub-10 nm electrical resolution observed in C-AFM measurements.

  6. Evaluation of the electrical contact area in contact-mode scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Celano, Umberto E-mail: u.celano@gmail.com; Chintala, Ravi Chandra; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Hantschel, Thomas; Giammaria, Guido; Conard, Thierry; Bender, Hugo

    2015-06-07

    The tunneling current through an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is used to evaluate the effective electrical contact area, which exists between tip and sample in contact-AFM electrical measurements. A simple procedure for the evaluation of the effective electrical contact area is described using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in combination with a thin dielectric. We characterize the electrical contact area for coated metal and doped-diamond tips operated at low force (<200 nN) in contact mode. In both cases, we observe that only a small fraction (<10 nm{sup 2}) of the physical contact (∼100 nm{sup 2}) is effectively contributing to the transport phenomena. Assuming this reduced area is confined to the central area of the physical contact, these results explain the sub-10 nm electrical resolution observed in C-AFM measurements.

  7. Quality comparison of tap water vs. bottled water in the industrial city of Yanbu (Saudi Arabia).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqbool; Bajahlan, Ahmad S

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to compare the quality of bottled water with potabilized desalinated tap water. Fourteen brands of local and imported bottled water samples were collected from the local market and analyzed for physicochemical parameters in the Royal Commission Environmental Laboratory. Results were compared with 5-year continuous monitoring data of tap water from different locations in Madinat Yanbu Al-Sinaiyah (MYAS) including storage tanks of desalination plant. Results show that there was no significant difference in the quality of tap water and bottled water. Bacteriological test was never found positive in the 5-year data in tap water. Similarly, physicochemical analysis shows the persistent quality of tap water. Based on hardness analysis, bottled and tap water are categorized as soft water. Trihalomethanes (THMs) study also indicates that traces of disinfection by products (DBPs) are present in both tap and bottled water and are much less than the World Health Organization and Environmental Protection Agency maximum permissible limits. It is also important to note that the tap water distribution network in MAYS is a high-pressure recirculation network and there is no chance to grow bacteria in stagnant water in pipe lines or houses. Recently, the Royal Commission has replaced the whole drinking water network, which was made of asbestos-cemented pipes with glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) pipes, to avoid any asbestos contaminations. Based on these results, it is concluded that drinking water distributed in the city is of very good and persistent quality, comparable with bottled water. Continuous monitoring also guarantees the safe drinking water to the community. Hence, it is the responsibility of the Royal Commission to encourage the peoples in the city to drink tap water as it is as good as bottled water even better than some of the brands and is monitored regularly. It is also much cheaper compared to bottled water and is available round the clock

  8. DNA-duplex linker for AFM-SELEX of DNA aptamer against human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Musashi; Okumura, Yuzo; Amino, Tomokazu; Miyachi, Yusuke; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-02-15

    DNA-duplex interactions in thymines and adenins are used as a linker for the novel methodology of Atomic Force Microscope-Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXpotential enrichment (AFM-SELEX). This study used the hydrogen bonds in 10 mer of both thymines (T10) and adenines (A10). Initially, the interactive force in T10-A10 was measured by AFM, which returned an average interactive force of approximately 350pN. Based on this result, DNA aptamers against human serum albumin could be selected in the 4th round, and 15 different clones could be sequenced. The lowest dissociation constant of the selected aptamer was identified via surface plasmon resonance, and it proved to be identical to that of the commercial aptamer. Therefore, specific hydrogen bonds in DNA can be useful linkers for AFM-SELEX.

  9. In situ nanomanipulators as a tool to separate individual tobermorite crystals for AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianhe; Holzer, Lorenz; Kägi, Ralf; Winnefeld, Frank; Keller, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of cementitious materials are limited, mainly due to the lack of appropriate sample preparation techniques. In porous autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC), calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is produced in its crystalline form, tobermorite. The crystals are lath-like with a length of several micrometers. In this work, we demonstrate the application of nanomanipulators to separate an individual tobermorite crystal from the bulk AAC for subsequent AFM investigations. The nanomanipulators are operated directly in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). We studied the interaction between moisture and the tobermorite surface under controlled relative humidity (RH). The results of topography and adhesion force measurements with AFM suggest that the surface of tobermorite is hydrophobic, which contrasts the macroscopic material properties (e.g. moisture transport in capillary pores).

  10. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young’s modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins. PMID:25893163

  11. AFM characterization of nonwoven material functionalized by ZnO sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Bingyao; Yan Xiong; Wei Qufu Gao Weidong

    2007-10-15

    Sputter coatings provide new approaches to the surface functionalization of textile materials. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven material was used as a substrate for creating functional nanostructures on the fiber surfaces. A magnetron sputter coating was used to deposit functional zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures onto the nonwoven substrate. The evolution of the surface morphology of the fibers in the nonwoven web was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM observations revealed a significant difference in the morphology of the fibers before and after the sputter coating. The AFM images also indicated the effect of the sputtering conditions on the surface morphology of the fibers. The increase in the sputtering time led to the growth of the ZnO grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher pressure in the sputtering chamber could cause the formation of larger grains on the fiber surfaces. The higher power used also generated larger grains on the fiber surfaces.

  12. AFM study of forces between silica, silicon nitride and polyurethane pads.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Igor; Ong, Quy K; Shodiev, Hasan; Chechik, Nina; James, David; Oliver, Mike

    2006-08-15

    Interaction of silica and silicon nitride with polyurethane surfaces is rather poorly studied despite being of great interest for modern semiconductor industry, e.g., for chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) processes. Here we show the results from the application of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to study the forces between silica or silicon nitride (AFM tips) and polyurethane surfaces in aqueous solutions of different acidity. The polyurethane surface potentials are derived from the measured AFM data. The obtained potentials are in rather good agreement with measurements of zeta-potentials using the streaming-potentials method. Another important parameter, adhesion, is also measured. While the surface potentials of silica are well known, there are ambiguous results on the potentials of silicon nitride that is naturally oxidized. Deriving the surface potential of the naturally oxidized silicon nitride from our measurements, we show that it is not oxidized to silica despite some earlier published expectations.

  13. Imaging and force measurement of LDL and HDL by AFM in air and liquid.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chaoye; Ao, Meiying; Liu, Zhanghua; Chen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The size and biomechanical properties of lipoproteins are tightly correlated with their structures/functions. While atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image lipoproteins the force measurement of these nano-sized particles is missing. We detected that the sizes of LDL and HDL in liquid are close to the commonly known values. The Young's modulus of LDL or HDL is ∼0.4 GPa which is similar to that of some viral capsids or nanovesicles but greatly larger than that of various liposomes. The adhesive force of LDL or HDL is small (∼200 pN). The comparison of AFM detection in air and liquid was also performed which is currently lacking. Our data may provide useful information for better understanding and AFM detection of lipoproteins.

  14. The AFM Observation of Single Polyethylene Molecules in Coiled State on Mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, V. V.; Yaminsky, I. V.

    2003-12-01

    Single polyethylene molecules and their small aggregates have been deposited on mica from diluted solutions at elevated temperatures and visualized by AFM in coiled and crystalline states. Coils have two-dimensional conformations with both highly tangled sites and locally extended segments with a length much exceeding the persistent length in a solution. The length measurements of coils reveal a wide distribution with the length of a maximum much smaller than the length of fully stretched molecules, moreover the long coils have been observed indicating the existence of linear multimolecular aggregates. Two models have been considered for the explanation of the observed deficit in the coils length, correspondingly the model implying the substantial smoothing of a winding chain trajectory due to the lack of the AFM resolution and the model of locally extended surface conformations with the long intramolecular folds. The roots of the apparent negative AFM height contrast of coils have been discussed.

  15. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  16. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution.

  17. Polo-like kinase 2 acting as a promoter in human tumor cells with an abundance of TAp73

    PubMed Central

    Hu, ZhengBo; Xu, ZunYing; Liao, XiaoHong; Yang, Xiao; Dong, Cao; Luk, KuaDi; Jin, AnMin; Lu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Background TAp73, a member of the p53 tumor suppressor family, is frequently overexpressed in malignant tumors in humans. TAp73 abundance and phosphorylation modification result in variations in transcriptional activity. In a previous study, we found that the antitumor function of TAp73 was reactivated by dephosphorylation in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) displayed a close relationship with the p53 family in affecting the fate of cells. Herein, we investigate the hypothesis that PLK2 phosphorylates TAp73 and inhibits TAp73 function. Materials and methods Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and osteosarcoma cell lines were used as natural models of the different expression levels of TAp73. Phosphorylation predictor software Scansite 3.0 and the predictor GPS-polo 1.0 were used to analyze the phosphorylation sites. Coimmunoprecipitation, phosphor-tag Western blot, metabolic labeling, and indirect immunofluorescence assays were used to determine the interactions between PLK2 and TAp73. TAp73 activity was assessed by Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, which we used to detect P21 and PUMA, both downstream genes of TAp73. The physiological effects of PLK2 cross talk with TAp73 on cell cycle progress and apoptosis were observed by flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays. Results PLK2 binds to and phosphorylates TAp73. PLK2 phosphorylates TAp73 at residue Ser48 and prohibits TAp73 translocation to the nucleus. Additionally, PLK2 inhibition combined with a DNA-damaging drug upregulated p21 and PUMA mRNA expression to a greater extent than DNA-damaging drug treatment alone. Inhibiting PLK2 in TAp73-enriched cells strengthened the effects of the DNA-damaging drug on both G1 phase arrest and apoptosis. Pretreatment with TAp73-siRNA weakened these effects. Conclusion These findings reveal a novel PLK2 function (catalyzed phosphorylation of TAp73) which

  18. An Evaluation of the Impacts of AF-M315E Propulsion Systems for Varied Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Oleson, Steven R.; Fittje, James; Colozza, Anthony; Packard, Tom; Gyekenyesi, John; McLean, Christopher H.; Spores, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the AF-M315E COMPASS study is to identify near-term (3-5 years) and long term (5 years +) opportunities for infusion, specifically the thruster and associated component technologies being developed as part of the GPIM project. Develop design reference missions which show the advantages of the AF-M315E green propulsion system. Utilize a combination of past COMPASS designs and selected new designs to demonstrate AF-M315E advantages. Use the COMPASS process to show the puts and takes of using AF-M315E at the integrated system level.

  19. FRAME (Force Review Automation Environment): MATLAB-based AFM data processor.

    PubMed

    Partola, Kostyantyn R; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-05-03

    Data processing of force-displacement curves generated by atomic force microscopes (AFMs) for elastic moduli and unbinding event measurements is very time consuming and susceptible to user error or bias. There is an evident need for consistent, dependable, and easy-to-use AFM data processing software. We have developed an open-source software application, the force review automation environment (or FRAME), that provides users with an intuitive graphical user interface, automating data processing, and tools for expediting manual processing. We did not observe a significant difference between manually processed and automatically processed results from the same data sets.

  20. Self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Feerick, Emer M; Wilson, Joanne; Jarman-Smith, Marcus; Ó'Brádaigh, Conchur M; McGarry, J Patrick

    2014-10-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been conducted. Six CFR-PEEK suture anchor designs were investigated using PEEK-OPTIMA® Reinforced, a medical grade of CFR-PEEK. Experimental tests were conducted to investigate the maximum axial force and torque required for self-taping insertion of each anchor design. Additional experimental tests were conducted for some anchor designs using pilot holes. Computational simulations were conducted to determine the maximum stress in each anchor design at various stages of insertion. Simulations also were performed to investigate the effect of wall thickness in the anchor head. The maximum axial force required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 150 N for any anchor design. The maximum torque required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 0.8 Nm. Computational simulations reveal significant stress concentrations in the region of the anchor tip, demonstrating that a re-design of the tip geometry should be performed to avoid fracture during self-tapping, as observed in the experimental component of this study. This study demonstrates the ability of PEEK-OPTIMA Reinforced suture anchors to self-tap polyurethane foam bone analogue. This provides motivation to further investigate the self-tapping ability of CFR-PEEK suture anchors in animal/cadaveric bone. An optimised design for CFR-PEEK suture anchors offers the advantages of radiolucency, and mechanical properties similar to bone with the ability to self-tap. This may have positive implications for reducing surgery times and the associated costs with the procedure.

  1. Loss of antigen-presenting molecules (MHC class I and TAP-1) in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korkolopoulou, P.; Kaklamanis, L.; Pezzella, F.; Harris, A. L.; Gatter, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    Presentation of endogenous antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes is mediated by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. For the stable assembly of MHC class I complex it is necessary that the antigenic peptide is transported by the MHC-encoded transporters TAP-1 and TAP-2 into a pre-Golgi region. T-cell-mediated host-vs-tumour response might therefore depend on the presence of these molecules on tumour cells. The presence of MHC class I antigens and TAP-1 was studied in a series of 93 resection specimens of non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) by immunohistochemical methods using antibodies against the assembled class I molecule, beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m), heavy-chain A locus, A2 allele and TAP-1 protein. Eighty-six patients were included in the survival analysis. Total loss of class I molecule was observed in 38% of the cases and was usually accompanied by loss of beta 2-m and of heavy chain A locus. Selective loss of A locus was seen in 8.3% and of A2 allele in 27% of the cases. TAP-1 loss was always combined with beta 2-m and/or heavy chain A locus loss. No correlation was found between the expressional status of any of the above molecules, including the selective A2 allelic loss and histological type, degree of differentiation, tumoral stage, nodal stage and survival. Our findings suggest that loss of antigen-presenting molecules (including both MHC class I alleles and TAP-1) is a frequent event in lung cancer. However, the immunophenotypic profile of MHC class I and TAP-1 seems to be unrelated in vivo to the phenotype, growth or survival of NSCLC. Images Figure 1 PMID:8546899

  2. Cross-cultural influences on rhythm processing: reproduction, discrimination, and beat tapping

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J.; Bentley, Jocelyn; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to entrain movement to musical rhythm occurs in virtually all individuals across cultures. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on perception, production, and beat tapping for rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were the same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced by the culture of the participant and the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than for unfamiliar rhythms. Moreover, there were differences between the two participant groups, and between the two types of rhythms, in the metrical level selected for beat tapping. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion

  3. A mechanism of viral immune evasion revealed by cryo-EM analysis of the TAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Michael L.; Hite, Richard K.; Steffen, Alanna M.; Damko, Ermelinda; Li, Zongli; Walz, Thomas; Chen, Jue

    2015-01-01

    Cellular immunity against viral infection and tumor cells depends on antigen presentation by the major histocompatibility complex class 1 molecules (MHC I). Intracellular antigenic peptides are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and then loaded onto the nascent MHC I, which are exported to the cell surface and present peptides to the immune system1. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize non-self peptides and program the infected or malignant cells for apoptosis. Defects in TAP account for immunodeficiency and tumor development. To escape immune surveillance, some viruses have evolved strategies to either down-regulate TAP expression or directly inhibit TAP activity. To date neither the architecture of TAP nor the mechanism of viral inhibition has been elucidated at the structural level. In this study we describe the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of human TAP in complex with its inhibitor ICP47, a small protein produced by the herpes simplex virus I. We show that the twelve transmembrane helices and two cytosolic nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the transporter adopt an inward-facing conformation with the two NBDs separated. The viral inhibitor ICP47 forms a long helical hairpin, which plugs the translocation pathway of TAP from the cytoplasmic side. Association of ICP47 precludes substrate binding and also prevents NBD closure necessary for ATP hydrolysis. This work illustrates a striking example of immune evasion by persistent viruses. By blocking viral antigens from entering the ER, herpes simplex virus is hidden from cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which may contribute to establishing a lifelong infection in the host. PMID:26789246

  4. Service Infrastructure for Cross-Matching Distributed Datasets Using OGSA-DAI and TAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliman, M.; Alemu, T.; Hume, A.; van Hemert, J.; Mann, R. G.; Noddle, K.; Valkonen, L.

    2011-07-01

    One of the most powerful and important goals for VO developers has been to enable cross-match queries between disparate datasets for end users. This has only been achieved within the VO using the early SkyNode infrastructure and has not been reproduced using current IVOA standards. To remedy that situation, the Wide Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU) has worked with the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Center (EPCC) in leveraging the OGSA-DAI grid middleware to enable cross catalog queries on distributed VO services. We have achieved this goal by building a three layer service stack that places the OGSA-DAI software above multiple individual services implementing the IVOA's new Table Access Protocol (TAP), and then a single TAP service is placed above this and presented to the end users. Users can then execute ADQL queries that cross-match between the disparate datasets as though they were in the same database with acceptable performance rates on the resulting data flow. The OGSA-DAI software is able to interrogate any compliant TAP service to acquire the necessary metadata for insertion into the single federated TAP service used for cross-match queries. We are currently testing this distributed infrastructure using the TAP services provided by WFAU for the UKIDSS DR3 and SDSS DR7 datasets in combination with the TAP service available from the Canadian Astronomy Data Center (this last without requiring any action from CADC staff). This forms the basis for a large-scale distributed data mining workflow and similar activities can be readily implemented as more TAP services come online. Future work will involve releasing this infrastructure to the greater astronomical community as an IVOA compliant service for users.

  5. Novel combination of near-field s-SNOM microscopy with peak-force tapping for nano-chemical and nano-mechanical material characterization with sub-20 nm spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin; Carneiro, Karina; Habelitz, Stefan; Mueller, Thomas; BNS Team; UCSF Team

    Heterogeneity in material systems requires methods for nanoscale chemical identification. Scattering scanning near-field microscopy (s-SNOM) is chemically sensitive in the infrared fingerprint region while providing down to 10 nm spatial resolution. This technique detects material specific tip-scattering in an atomic force microscope. Here, we present the first combination of s-SNOM with peak-force tapping (PFT), a valuable AFM technique that allows precise force control between tip and sample down to 10s of pN. The latter is essential for imaging fragile samples, but allows also quantitative extraction of nano-mechanical properties, e.g. the modulus. PFT can further be complemented by KPFM or conductive AFM for nano-electrical mapping, allowing access to nanoscale optical, mechanical and electrical information in a single instrument. We will address several questions ranging from graphene plasmonics to material distributions in polymers. We highlight a biological application where dental amelogenin protein was studied via s-SNOM to learn about its self-assembly into nanoribbons. At the same time PFT allows to track crystallization to distinguish protein from apatite crystals for which amelogenin is supposed to act as a template.

  6. Complement--tapping into new sites and effector systems.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Complement is traditionally known to be a system of serum proteins that provide protection against pathogens through direct cell lysis and the mobilization of innate and adaptive immunity. However, recent work indicates that the complement system has additional physiological roles beyond those in host defence. In this Opinion article, we describe the new modes and locations of complement activation that enable it to interact with other cell effector systems, such as growth factor receptors, inflammasomes and metabolic pathways. We propose that the location of complement activation dictates its function.

  7. Tracking the concentration of heterotrophic plate count bacteria from the source to the consumer's tap.

    PubMed

    Pepper, I L; Rusin, P; Quintanar, D R; Haney, C; Josephson, K L; Gerba, C P

    2004-05-01

    The goal of this project was to quantify the concentration of heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria within water reaching consumer's taps, and from the sources used by a major utility serving the City of Tucson, AZ. With this information, the amounts and sources of HPC bacteria consumed at the tap could be determined. Samples of water were collected on a monthly basis from two well fields, the CAVSARP recovery well field and Southern Avra Valley well field which serves as one of the groundwater sources for Tucson, AZ, and the distribution system which serves the same homes from which tap water was also tested. The average concentration of HPC in source waters within Southern Avra Valley Wells was 56 CFU/ml (range 1-1995/ml). From the CAVSARP recovery well field, corresponding values were 38 CFU/ml (1 to 502 CFU/ml). Unblended groundwater in the chlorinated distribution system averaged 22 CFU/ml (range 1-794). Blended water at the chlorinated distribution site averaged 47 CFU/ml (range 10-158). There was a major shift in the percentage of gram negative to gram-positive bacteria from the wells to the distribution system, to the tap. In the surface CAP source water, 76% of the bacteria were gram-negative compared to 27% gram-negative in the CAVSARP recovery wells. In contrast, Avra Valley wells contained 17% gram-negative bacteria. In both the Tucson groundwater distribution sites and blended distribution sites, the corresponding number of gram negative bacteria was 12%. Finally at the tap, only 0.2% of the bacteria were gram-negative. The average number of bacteria in household taps averaged 3072 HPC/ml and was equal or greater than 500 ml 68% of the time. This study shows that the number of HPC bacteria increases dramatically from the distribution system to the consumers tap. Thus, the major source of bacteria ingested by the average consumer in Tucson originates from bacteria within the household distribution system or the household tap, rather than from source

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Lumbar Tapping Utilization for Suspected Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Under-Drainage Malfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Beom; Ahn, Ho-Young; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yang, Ji-Ho; Yi, Jin-Seok; Lee, Il-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of shunt malfunction can be challenging since neuroimaging results are not always correlated with clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a simple, minimally invasive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lumbar tapping test that predicts shunt under-drainage in hydrocephalus patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological features of 48 patients who underwent routine CSF lumbar tapping after ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) operation using a programmable shunting device. We compared shunt valve opening pressure and CSF lumbar tapping pressure to check under-drainage. Results The mean pressure difference between valve opening pressure and CSF lumbar tapping pressure of all patients were 2.21±24.57 mmH2O. The frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 2.06±1.26 times. Eighty five times lumbar tapping of 41 patients showed that their VPS function was normal which was consistent with clinical improvement and decreased ventricle size on computed tomography scan. The mean pressure difference in these patients was −3.69±19.20 mmH2O. The mean frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 2.07±1.25 times. Fourteen cases of 10 patients revealed suspected VPS malfunction which were consistent with radiological results and clinical symptoms, defined as changes in ventricle size and no clinical improvement. The mean pressure difference was 38.07±23.58 mmH2O. The mean frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 1.44±1.01 times. Pressure difference greater than 35 mmH2O was shown in 2.35% of the normal VPS function group (2 of 85) whereas it was shown in 64.29% of the suspected VPS malfunction group (9 of 14). The difference was statistically significant (p=0.000001). Among 10 patients with under-drainage, 5 patients underwent shunt revision. The causes of the shunt malfunction included 3 cases of proximal occlusion and 2 cases of distal obstruction and valve malfunction. Conclusion Under-drainage of CSF should be

  9. Expression of a Translationally Fused TAP-Tagged Plasma Membrane Proton Pump in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane proton ATPase genes, AHA1 and AHA2, are the two most highly expressed isoforms of an 11 gene family and are collectively essential for embryo development. We report the translational fusion of a tandem affinity-purification tag to the 5′ end of the AHA1 open reading frame in a genomic clone. Stable expression of TAP-tagged AHA1 in Arabidopsis rescues the embryonic lethal phenotype of endogenous double aha1/aha2 knockdowns. Western blots of SDS-PAGE and Blue Native gels show enrichment of AHA1 in plasma membrane fractions and indicate a hexameric quaternary structure. TAP-tagged AHA1 rescue lines exhibited reduced vertical root growth. Analysis of the plasma membrane and soluble proteomes identified several plasma membrane-localized proteins with alterred abundance in TAP-tagged AHA1 rescue lines compared to wild type. Using affinity-purification mass spectrometry, we uniquely identified two additional AHA isoforms, AHA9 and AHA11, which copurified with TAP-tagged AHA1. In conclusion, we have generated transgenic Arabidopsis lines in which a TAP-tagged AHA1 transgene has complemented all essential endogenous AHA1 and AHA2 functions and have shown that these plants can be used to purify AHA1 protein and to identify in planta interacting proteins by mass spectrometry. PMID:24397334

  10. Widespread Occurrence of Benzotriazoles and Benzothiazoles in Tap Water: Influencing Factors and Contribution to Human Exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Junjie; Sun, Hongwen; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-03-01

    Despite the frequent detection of benzotriazoles (BTRs) and benzothiazoles (BTHs) in groundwater and surface-water environments, knowledge on their occurrence and profile in tap water is still scarce. This study demonstrates widespread occurrence of these compounds in tap water from 51 major cities in China, which have ranges of tap water and influencing factors (e.g., water-source type and gross domestic product of the cities) were discussed. Difference of concentration level and compound profile of BTRs and BTHs in tap water and their surface water source, as well as in wastewater treatment plant effluents, is described. For the first time, different sources of contamination (i.e. from the water source and from distribution systems) are proposed for BTRs and BTHs, respectively. In addition, the contribution of tap water to human exposure to these compounds is assessed.

  11. A novel spontaneous mutation in the TAP2 gene unravels its role in macrophage survival.

    PubMed

    Lapenna, Antonio; Omar, Ibrahim; Berger, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We report a new mouse strain with a single point mutation in the type 2 transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP2). This strain randomly arose in one of our C57BL/6J mouse colonies and was initially discovered because of the lack of CD8(+) T cells in the periphery. Following our observation, we subsequently revealed a lack of cell surface MHC-I expression, derived from TAP2 protein deficiency. Our strain, named eightless, has a C to T substitution in exon 5 resulting in a glutamine to stop codon substitution at position 285 in the TAP2 protein. Interestingly, in addition to the expected lack of CD8(+) T cell phenotype, eightless mice have a diminished number of macrophages in their peritoneum. Moreover, following peritoneal inflammation, elicited eightless macrophages showed impaired survival both in vivo and ex vivo. Our study describes the first ever TAP2 complete knockout mouse strain and provides a possible explanation for why patients with TAP2 deficiency syndrome present clinical manifestations that would suggest a phagocyte defect rather than a lack of CD8(+) T cells.

  12. Detection of bacterial endotoxin in drinking tap and bottled water in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Abdulraheem, Abdulkareem; Mustafa, Seham; Al-Saffar, Nabeel; Shahjahan, Muhammed

    2012-12-01

    This study was carried out to measure and compare the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in a variety of samples from drinking tap and bottled water available in Kuwait by using the Limulus Amoebocyte lysate test. A total of 29 samples were tested. Samples were collected from a variety of locations throughout the six governorates of Kuwait and 23 brands of local and imported bottled water samples were collected from the local market. The concentration of bacterial endotoxin was measured by using the standard Limulus Amoebocyte lysate test, gel clot method. This study showed that measured endotoxin concentrations in tap drinking water varied from 2.4 to 33.8 EU/ml with the average endotoxin concentration of 14.2 EU/ml. While the results of endotoxin concentrations in the bottled water were <0.03 to 20.1 EU/ml with an average of 1.96 EU/ml. The average concentration of endotoxin in bottled water is 13.5 % of the average concentration of endotoxin in tap drinking water. This experimental investigation has proved that drinking bottled water has less endotoxin as compared to tap water in Kuwait. It is also demonstrated that the endotoxin concentration did not exceed the acceptable level in drinking tap water.

  13. Public thresholds for chlorinous flavors in U.S. tap water.

    PubMed

    Mackey, E D; Baribeau, H; Crozes, G F; Suffet, I H; Piriou, P

    2004-01-01

    Considering this rapid growth in the purchasing of bottled water and home filtration devices, utilities are increasingly concerned about consumer dissatisfaction with tap water quality. This project aimed to characterize public perceptions of chlorinous flavors in drinking water, and how these impact customers' choices with respect to consumption of tap water alternatives. On-site taste tests at seven water utilities with 30 to 40 panelists at each site, were conducted using a forced-choice triangle test method (ASTM method E679-91) to measure public sensitivity to chlorine and chloramine in drinking water. The chlor(am)ine concentration increased from set to set. The best-estimate sensitivity limit for each panelist was the geometric mean of that concentration at which the last miss occurred and the next (adjacent) higher concentration. The measured sensitivity limit of average American populations to free chlorine (159 persons tested) and chloramine (93 persons tested) in tap water were 0.8 and 3.7 mg/L Cl2, respectively. These thresholds are much higher than those previously reported in the literature using trained FPA panels. No significant differences were observed between tap water users and users of tap water alternatives or between the various markets tested with respect to average sensitivity, though individual sensitivity varied widely.

  14. Longitudinal and Source-to-Tap New Orleans, LA, USA Drinking Water Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Hull, Natalie Marie; Holinger, Eric P; Ross, Kimberly A; Robertson, Charles E; Harris, J Kirk; Stevens, Mark J; Pace, Norman R

    2017-03-15

    The two municipal drinking water systems of New Orleans, LA, USA were sampled to compare microbiology of independent systems that treat the same surface water from the Mississippi River. To better understand temporal trends and sources of microbiology delivered to taps, these treatment plants and distribution systems were subjected to source-to-tap sampling over four years. Both plants employ traditional treatment by chloramination, applied during or after settling, followed by filtration before distribution in a warm, low water age system. Longitudinal samples indicated microbiology to have stability both spatially and temporally, and between treatment plants and distribution systems. Disinfection had the greatest impact on microbial composition, which was further refined by filtration and influenced by distribution and premise plumbing. Actinobacteria spp. exhibited trends with treatment. In particular, Mycobacterium spp., very low in finished waters, occurred idiosyncratically at high levels in some tap waters, indicating distribution and/or premise plumbing as main contributors of mycobacteria. Legionella spp., another genus containing potential opportunistic pathogens, also occurred ubiquitously. Source water microbiology was most divergent from tap water, and each step of treatment brought samples more closely similar to tap waters.

  15. A Direct-Learning Approach to Acquiring a Bimanual Tapping Skill.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Claire F; Gomes, Thábata V B; Benda, Rodolfo N

    2016-12-27

    The theory of direct learning (D. M. Jacobs & C. F. Michaels, 2007 ) has proven useful in understanding improvement in perception and exploratory action. Here the authors assess its usefulness for understanding the learning of a motor skill, bimanual tapping at a difficult phase relation. Twenty participants attempted to learn to tap with 2 index fingers at 2 Hz with a phase lag of 90° (i.e., with a right-right period of 500 ms and a right-left period of 125 ms). There were 30 trials, each with 50 tapping cycles. Computer-screen feedback informed of errors in both period and phase for each pair of taps. Participants differed dramatically in their success. Learning was assessed by identifying the succession of attractors capturing tapping over the experiment. A few participants' attractors migrated from antiphase to 90° with an appropriate period; others became attracted to a fixed right-left interval, rather than phase, with or without attraction to period. Changes in attractor loci were explained with mixed success by direct learning, inviting elaboration of the theory. The transition to interval attractors was understood as a change in intention, and was remarkable for its indifference to typical bimanual interactions.

  16. Demographic factors associated with perceptions about water safety and tap water consumption among adults in Santa Clara County, California, 2011.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Brianna; Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

    2014-06-12

    The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11-0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11-2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption.

  17. Investigation of Molecular Interactions between AFM-Tip and Thiol Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhami, Ahmed; Moore, Justin; Lee, T. Randall

    Among various self-assembly processes, the formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is one of the most elegant ways for making an organic film with specific surface properties. Recently, much effort has been devoted in using AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to understanding the formation of alkanethiol SAMs on gold surfaces. Investigating the factors that affect the AFM tip-SAMs interactions is necessary to clarify the controversial results of these studies. Here, we investigated the interactions between bare AFM-tips and several SAMs thiols-gold surfaces under controlled humidity conditions. Our results demonstrate that the Tip-SAM interactions can be used to precisely determine the length of the thiol chains, the adhesion force between thiols head groups and the AFM tip, and the strength of the thiol-gold contact. Our findings on the dynamics and the structure of the SAMs of alkanethiols on gold are useful for detail understanding of the thermodynamics, kinetics and mechanisms of SAM technology assembly. NSF.

  18. AFM tip characterization by using FFT filtered images of step structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; Xue, Bo; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    The measurement resolution of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is largely dependent on the radius of the tip. Meanwhile, when using AFM to study nanoscale surface properties, the value of the tip radius is needed in calculations. As such, estimation of the tip radius is important for analyzing results taken using an AFM. In this study, a geometrical model created by scanning a step structure with an AFM tip was developed. The tip was assumed to have a hemispherical cone shape. Profiles simulated by tips with different scanning radii were calculated by fast Fourier transform (FFT). By analyzing the influence of tip radius variation on the spectra of simulated profiles, it was found that low-frequency harmonics were more susceptible, and that the relationship between the tip radius and the low-frequency harmonic amplitude of the step structure varied monotonically. Based on this regularity, we developed a new method to characterize the radius of the hemispherical tip. The tip radii estimated with this approach were comparable to the results obtained using scanning electron microscope imaging and blind reconstruction methods.

  19. Combined AFM nano-machining and reactive ion etching to fabricate high aspect ratio structures.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ping; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Tang, Zirong

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, a new combined method of sub-micron high aspect ratio structure fabrication is developed which can be used for production of nano imprint template. The process includes atomic force microscope (AFM) scratch nano-machining and reactive ion etching (RIE) fabrication. First, 40 nm aluminum film was deposited on the silicon substrate by magnetron sputtering, and then sub-micron grooves were fabricated on the aluminum film by nano scratch using AFM diamond tip. As aluminum film is a good mask for etching silicon, high aspect ratio structures were finally fabricated by RIE process. The fabricated structures were studied by SEM, which shows that the grooves are about 400 nm in width and 5 microm in depth. To obtain sub-micron scale groove structures on the aluminum film, experiments of nanomachining on aluminum films under various machining conditions were conducted. The depths of the grooves fabricated using different scratch loads were also studied by the AFM. The result shows that the material properties of the film/substrate are elastic-plastic following nearly a bilinear law with isotropic strain hardening. Combined AFM nanomachining and RIE process provides a relative lower cost nano fabrication technique than traditional e-beam lithography, and it has a good prospect in nano imprint template fabrication.

  20. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  1. [AFM-based technologies as the way towards the reverse Avogadro number].

    PubMed

    Pleshakova, T O; Shumov, I D; Ivanov, Yu D; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Achievement of the concentration detection limit for proteins at the level of the reverse Avogadro number determines the modern development of proteomics. In this review, the possibility of approximating the reverse Avogadro number by using nanotechnological methods (AFM-based fishing with mechanical and electrical stimulation, nanowire detectors, and other methods) are discussed. The ability of AFM to detect, count, visualize and characterize physico-chemical properties of proteins at concentrations up to 10(-17)-10(-18) M is demonstrated. The combination of AFM-fishing with mass-spectrometry allows the identification of proteins not only in pure solutions, but also in multi-component biological fluids (serum). The possibilities to improve the biospecific fishing efficiency by use of SOMAmers in both AFM and nanowire systems are discussed. The paper also provides criteria for evaluation of the sensitivity of fishing-based detection systems. The fishing efficiency depending on the detection system parameters is estimated. The practical implementation of protein fishing depending on the ratio of the sample solution volume and the surface of the detection system is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of today's promising nanotechnological protein detection methods implemented on the basis of these schemes.

  2. First-principles AFM image simulation with frozen density embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    We present efficient first-principles method of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM). Ordinary nc-AFM simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) require exhaustive computational cost because it involves thousands of total energy calculations. Regarding the sample as a fixed external potential can reduce the computational cost, and we adopt frozen density embedding theory (FDET) for this purpose. Simulated nc-AFM images with FDET using a carbon monoxide tip well reproduces the full DFT images of benzene, pentacene, and graphene, although optimized tip-sample distances and interaction energies in FDET are underestimated and overestimated, respectively. The FDET-based simulation method is promising for AFM image simulation of surfaces and two-dimensional materials. This work was supported by U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46286 and Award No. DE-SC0008877, and by Welch Foundation under Grant F-1837. Computational resources are provided by NERSC and TACC.

  3. Implications of the contact radius to line step (CRLS) ratio in AFM for nanotribology measurements.

    PubMed

    Helt, James M; Batteas, James D

    2006-07-04

    Investigating the mechanisms of defect generation and growth at surfaces on the nanometer scale typically requires high-resolution tools such as the atomic force microscope (AFM). To accurately assess the kinetics and activation parameters of defect production over a wide range of loads (F(z)), the AFM data should be properly conditioned. Generally, AFM wear trials are performed over an area defined by the length of the slow (L(sscan)) and fast scan axes. The ratio of L(sscan) to image resolution (res, lines per image) becomes an important experimental parameter in AFM wear trials because it defines the magnitude of the line step (LS = L(sscan)/res), the distance the AFM tip steps along the slow scan axis. Comparing the contact radius (a) to the line step (LS) indicates that the overlap of successive scans will result unless the contact radius-line step ratio (CRLS) is < or =(1)/(2). If this relationship is not considered, then the scan history (e.g., contact frequency) associated with a single scan is not equivalent at different loads owing to the scaling of contact radius with load (a proportional variant F(z)(1/3)). Here, we present a model in conjunction with empirical wear tests on muscovite mica to evaluate the effects of scan overlap on surface wear. Using the Hertz contact mechanics definition of a, the CRLS model shows that scan overlap pervades AFM wear trials even under low loads. Such findings indicate that simply counting the number of scans (N(scans)) in an experiment underestimates the full history conveyed to the surface by the tip and translates into an error in the actual extent to which a region on the surface is contacted. Utilizing the CRLS method described here provides an approach to account for image scan history accurately and to predict the extent of surface wear. This general model also has implications for any AFM measurement where one wishes to correlate scan-dependent history to image properties as well as feature resolution in scanned

  4. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Coligan, J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO4/PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. We, therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, we further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin. Images PMID:3033645

  5. Tunable complex-valued multi-tap microwave photonic filter based on single silicon-on-insulator microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Juan; Sancho, Juan; Pu, Minhao; Gasulla, Ivana; Yvind, Kresten; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2011-06-20

    A complex-valued multi-tap tunable microwave photonic filter based on single silicon-on-insulator microring resonator is presented. The degree of tunability of the approach involving two, three and four taps is theoretical and experimentally characterized, respectively. The constraints of exploiting the optical phase transfer function of a microring resonator aiming at implementing complex-valued multi-tap filtering schemes are also reported. The trade-off between the degree of tunability without changing the free spectral range and the number of taps is studied in-depth. Different window based scenarios are evaluated for improving the filter performance in terms of the side-lobe level.

  6. Levels of major and trace elements, including rare earth elements, and ²³⁸U in Croatian tap waters.

    PubMed

    Fiket, Željka; Rožmarić, Martina; Krmpotić, Matea; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2015-05-01

    Concentrations of 46 elements, including major, trace, and rare earth elements, and (238)U in Croatian tap waters were investigated. Selected sampling locations include tap waters from various hydrogeological regions, i.e., different types of aquifers, providing insight into the range of concentrations of studied elements and (238)U activity concentrations in Croatian tap waters. Obtained concentrations were compared with the Croatian maximum contaminant levels for trace elements in water intended for human consumption, as well as WHO and EPA drinking water standards. Concentrations in all analyzed tap waters were found in accordance with Croatian regulations, except tap water from Šibenik in which manganese in concentration above maximum permissible concentration (MPC) was measured. Furthermore, in tap water from Osijek, levels of arsenic exceeded the WHO guidelines and EPA regulations. In general, investigated tap waters were found to vary considerably in concentrations of studied elements, including (238)U activity concentrations. Causes of variability were further explored using statistical methods. Composition of studied tap waters was found to be predominately influenced by hydrogeological characteristics of the aquifer, at regional and local level, the existing redox conditions, and the household plumbing system. Rare earth element data, including abundances and fractionation patterns, complemented the characterization and facilitated the interpretation of factors affecting the composition of the analyzed tap waters.

  7. Biosynthesis, glycosylation, and partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the T-cell-activating protein TAP

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, H.; Coligan, J.; Benacerraf, B.; Rock, K.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have characterized the TAP molecule, an Ly-6 linked T-cell-activating glycoprotein. The three TAP bands that are precipitated from metabolically labeled cells display a common migration pattern in isoelectric focusing/NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE gels and have common N-terminal sequences. This sequence is rich in cysteine and is homologous to that previously reported for the Ly-6.1E antigen. They therefore, compared TAP and Ly-6.1E biochemically and found them to be structurally distinct. Given the role of TAP in T-cell activation, they further studied whether the molecule was phosphorylated. We have not found evidence for phosphorylation of the TAP protein. The carbohydrates present on the TAP molecule are resistant to peptide N-glycosidase F in vitro and tunicamycin in vivo. The upper band of the TAP triplet is susceptible to treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid and thus seems to be of the O-linked rather than of the N-linked variety. The biosynthetic processing of TAP was studied in pulse-chase experiments. The middle band of the TAP triplet appears to be the earliest detectable species. Its conversion to the O-linked high molecular weight species can be blocked by monensin.

  8. A Study of Microstrip Line Balanced Filters with Attenuation Poles Based on Tapped Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Kouji

    We propose microstrip-line balanced filters with controllable attenuation poles by using tapped resonators. These filters are basically composed of a coupled-line and tapped resonators. The coupled-line provides bandpass responses with attenuation poles and balanced filter operation. Also, the tappd resonators provide bandpass responses and attenuation poles. The position and number of the attenuation pole are controlled by the choice of the kind of the tapped resonator. In this paper, we examine a filter with an unbalanced port and a balanced port as well as a filter with a balanced port and a balanced port. The presented filters are simulated with commercial simulators and are measured with a vector network analyzer. We have confirmed that the bandpass characteristics with controllable attenuation poles and balanced characteristics(amplitude and phase balance performances) are obtained. The measured results of the fabricated filters agree well with the simulated results.

  9. TAp73 promotes cell survival upon genotoxic stress by inhibiting p53 activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongshi; Ming, Lihua; Zou, Fangdong; Peng, Ye; Houten, Bennett Van; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    p53 plays a key role in regulating DNA damage response by suppressing cell cycle progression or inducing apoptosis depending on extent of DNA damage. However, it is not clear why mild genotoxic stress favors growth arrest, whereas excessive lesions signal cells to die. Here we showed that TAp73, a p53 homologue thought to have a similar function as p53, restrains the transcriptional activity of p53 and prevents excessive activation of its downstream targets upon low levels of DNA damage, which results in cell cycle arrest. Extensive DNA damage triggers TAp73 depletion through ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation of E2F1, leading to enhanced transcriptional activation by p53 and subsequent induction of apoptosis. These findings provide novel insights into the regulation of p53 function and suggest that TAp73 keeps p53 activity in check in regulating cell fate decisions upon genotoxic stress. PMID:25237903

  10. Predicting consumer preferences for mineral composition of bottled and tap water.

    PubMed

    Platikanov, Stefan; Hernández, Alejandra; González, Susana; Luis Cortina, Jose; Tauler, Roma; Devesa, Ricard

    2017-01-01

    The overall liking for taste of water was correlated with the mineral composition of selected bottled and tap waters. Sixty-nine untrained volunteers assessed and rated twenty-five different commercial bottled and tap waters from. Water samples were physicochemical characterised by analysing conductivity, pH, total dissolved solids (TDS) and major anions and cations: HCO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl(-), NO3(-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+). Residual chlorine levels were also analysed in the tap water samples. Globally, volunteers preferred waters rich in calcium bicarbonate and sulfate, rather than in sodium chloride. This study also demonstrated that it was possible to accurately predict the overall liking by a Partial Least Squares regression using either all measured physicochemical parameters or a reduced number of them. These results were in agreement with previously published results using trained panellists.

  11. Follow you, follow me: continuous mutual prediction and adaptation in joint tapping.

    PubMed

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Vuust, Peter; Roepstorff, Andreas; Frith, Chris D

    2010-11-01

    To study the mechanisms of coordination that are fundamental to successful interactions we carried out a joint finger tapping experiment in which pairs of participants were asked to maintain a given beat while synchronizing to an auditory signal coming from the other person or the computer. When both were hearing each other, the pair became a coupled, mutually and continuously adaptive unit of two "hyper-followers", with their intertap intervals (ITIs) oscillating in opposite directions on a tap-to-tap basis. There was thus no evidence for the emergence of a leader-follower strategy. We also found that dyads were equally good at synchronizing with the irregular, but responsive other as with the predictable, unresponsive computer. However, they performed worse when the "other" was both irregular and unresponsive. We thus propose that interpersonal coordination is facilitated by the mutual abilities to (a) predict the other's subsequent action and (b) adapt accordingly on a millisecond timescale.

  12. Selective export of MHC class I molecules from the ER after their dissociation from TAP.

    PubMed

    Spiliotis, E T; Manley, H; Osorio, M; Zúñiga, M C; Edidin, M

    2000-12-01

    It has been assumed that upon dissociation from TAP, MHC class I molecules exit the ER by nonselective bulk flow. We now show that exit must occur by association with cargo receptors. Inconsistent with exit by bulk flow, loading of MHC class I molecules with high-affinity peptides triggers dissociation from TAP but has no effect on rates of ER-to-Golgi transport. Moreover, peptide-loaded MHC class I molecules accumulate at ER exit sites from which TAP molecules are excluded. Consistent with receptor-mediated exit, ER-to-Golgi transport of MHC class I molecules is independent of their cytoplasmic tails, which themselves lack ER export motifs. In addition, we show that MHC class I molecules associate with the putative cargo receptor BAP31.

  13. Effects of Tailored Surface Chemistry on Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: a Surface-Analytical Study by XPS and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Andrea; Careri, Maria; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Rossi, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Since it was proposed for the first time, desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been evaluated for applicability in numerous areas. Elucidations of the ionization mechanisms and the subsequent formation of isolated gas-phase ions have been proposed so far. In this context, the role of both surface and pneumatic effects on ion-formation yield has recently been investigated. Nevertheless, the effect of the surface chemistry has not yet been completely understood. Functionalized glass surfaces have been prepared, in order to tailor surface performance for ion formation. Three substrates were functionalized by depositing three different silanes [3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MTES), octyltriethoxysilane (OTES), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxy-silane (FOTES)] from toluene solution onto standard glass slides. Surface characterization was carried out by contact-angle measurements, tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Morphologically homogeneous and thickness-controlled films in the nm range were obtained, with surface free energies lying between 15 and 70 mJ/m2. These results are discussed, together with those of DESI-MS on low-molecular-weight compounds such as melamine, tetracycline, and lincomycin, also taking into account the effects of the sprayer potential and its correlation with surface wettability. The results demonstrate that ion-formation efficiency is affected by surface wettability, and this was demonstrated operating above and below the onset of the electrospray.

  14. Versatile method for AFM-tip functionalization with biomolecules: fishing a ligand by means of an in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Naik, Vikrant V; Chu, Zonglin; Drew, Michael E; Spencer, Nicholas D; Yamakoshi, Yoko

    2015-04-21

    A facile and universal method for the functionalization of an AFM tip has been developed for chemical force spectroscopy (CFS) studies of intermolecular interactions of biomolecules. A click reaction between tripod-acetylene and an azide-linker-ligand molecule was successfully carried out on the AFM tip surface and used for the CFS study of ligand-receptor interactions.

  15. Interacting cortical and basal ganglia networks underlying finding and tapping to the musical beat.

    PubMed

    Kung, Shu-Jen; Chen, Joyce L; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2013-03-01

    Humans are able to find and tap to the beat of musical rhythms varying in complexity from children's songs to modern jazz. Musical beat has no one-to-one relationship with auditory features-it is an abstract perceptual representation that emerges from the interaction between sensory cues and higher-level cognitive organization. Previous investigations have examined the neural basis of beat processing but have not tested the core phenomenon of finding and tapping to the musical beat. To test this, we used fMRI and had musicians find and tap to the beat of rhythms that varied from metrically simple to metrically complex-thus from a strong to a weak beat. Unlike most previous studies, we measured beat tapping performance during scanning and controlled for possible effects of scanner noise on beat perception. Results showed that beat finding and tapping recruited largely overlapping brain regions, including the superior temporal gyrus (STG), premotor cortex, and ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC). Beat tapping activity in STG and VLPFC was correlated with both perception and performance, suggesting that they are important for retrieving, selecting, and maintaining the musical beat. In contrast BG activity was similar in all conditions and was not correlated with either perception or production, suggesting that it may be involved in detecting auditory temporal regularity or in associating auditory stimuli with a motor response. Importantly, functional connectivity analyses showed that these systems interact, indicating that more basic sensorimotor mechanisms instantiated in the BG work in tandem with higher-order cognitive mechanisms in PFC.

  16. Risk characterization of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in tap water.

    PubMed

    Stern, B R; Tardiff, R G

    1997-12-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) can enter surface water and groundwater through wet atmospheric deposition or as a result of fuel leaks and spills. About 30% of the U.S. population lives in areas where MTBE is in regular use. Ninety-five percent of this population is unlikely to be exposed to MTBE in tap water at concentrations exceeding 2 ppb, and most will be exposed to concentrations that are much lower and may be zero. About 5% of this population may be exposed to higher levels of MTBE in tap water, resulting from fuel tank leaks and spills into surface or groundwater used for potable water supplies. This paper describes the concentration ranges found and anticipated in surface and groundwater, and estimates the distribution of doses experienced by humans using water containing MTBE to drink, prepare food, and shower/bathe. The toxic properties (including potency) of MTBE when ingested, inhaled, and in contact with the skin are summarized. Using a range of human toxic potency values derived from animal studies, margins of exposure (MOE) associated with alternative chronic exposure scenarios are estimated to range from 1700 to 140,000. Maximum concentrations of MTBE in tap water anticipated not to cause adverse health effects are determined to range from 700 to 14,000 ppb. The results of this analysis demonstrate that no health risks are likely to be associated with chronic and subchronic human exposures to MTBE in tap water. Although some individuals may be exposed to very high concentrations of MTBE in tap water immediately following a localized spill, these exposures are likely to be brief in duration due to large-scale dilution and rapid volatilization of MTBE, the institution of emergency response and remediation measures to minimize human exposures, and the low taste and odor thresholds of MTBE which ensure that its presence in tap water is readily detected at concentrations well below the threshold for human injury.

  17. Boiling of simulated tap water: effect on polar brominated disinfection byproducts, halogen speciation, and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Xiangru; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Osiol, Jennifer; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Tap water typically contains numerous halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) as a result of disinfection, especially of chlorination. Among halogenated DBPs, brominated ones are generally significantly more toxic than their chlorinated analogues. In this study, with the aid of ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry by setting precursor ion scans of m/z 79/81, whole spectra of polar brominated DBPs in simulated tap water samples without and with boiling were revealed. Most polar brominated DBPs were thermally unstable and their levels were substantially reduced after boiling via decarboxylation or hydrolysis; the levels of a few aromatic brominated DBPs increased after boiling through decarboxylation of their precursors. A novel adsorption unit for volatile total organic halogen was designed, which enabled the evaluation of halogen speciation and mass balances in the simulated tap water samples during boiling. After boiling for 5 min, the overall level of brominated DBPs was reduced by 62.8%, of which 39.8% was volatilized and 23.0% was converted to bromide; the overall level of chlorinated DBPs was reduced by 61.1%, of which 44.4% was volatilized and 16.7% was converted to chloride; the overall level of halogenated DBPs was reduced by 62.3%. The simulated tap water sample without boiling was cytotoxic in a chronic (72 h) exposure to mammalian cells; this cytotoxicity was reduced by 76.9% after boiling for 5 min. The reduction in cytotoxicity corresponded with the reduction in overall halogenated DBPs. Thus, boiling of tap water can be regarded as a "detoxification" process and may reduce human exposure to halogenated DBPs through tap water ingestion.

  18. An NC-AFM and KPFM study of the adsorption of a triphenylene derivative on KBr(001)

    PubMed Central

    Hinaut, Antoine; Pujol, Adeline; Chaumeton, Florian; Martrou, David; Gourdon, André

    2012-01-01

    Summary The adsorption on KBr(001) of a specially designed molecule, consisting of a flat aromatic triphenylene core equipped with six flexible propyl chains ending with polar cyano groups, is investigated by using atomic force microscopy in the noncontact mode (NC-AFM) coupled to Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature. Two types of monolayers are identified, one in which the molecules lie flat on the surface (MLh) and another in which they stand approximately upright (MLv). The Kelvin voltage on these two structures is negatively shifted relative to that of the clean KBr surface, revealing the presence of surface dipoles with a component pointing along the normal to the surface. These findings are interpreted with the help of numerical simulations. It is shown that the surface–molecule interaction is dominated by the electrostatic interaction of the cyano groups with the K+ ions of the substrate. The molecule is strongly adsorbed in the MLh structure with an adsorption energy of 1.8 eV. In the MLv layer, the molecules form π-stacked rows aligned along the polar directions of the KBr surface. In these rows, the molecules are less strongly bound to the substrate, but the structure is stabilized by the strong intermolecular interaction due to π-stacking. PMID:22496995

  19. High throughput nanofabrication of silicon nanowire and carbon nanotube tips on AFM probes by stencil-deposited catalysts.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Daniel S; Savu, Veronica; Zhu, Xueni; Bu, Ian Y Y; Milne, William I; Brugger, Juergen; Boggild, Peter

    2011-04-13

    A new and versatile technique for the wafer scale nanofabrication of silicon nanowire (SiNW) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tips on atomic force microscope (AFM) probes is presented. Catalyst material for the SiNW and MWNT growth was deposited on prefabricated AFM probes using aligned wafer scale nanostencil lithography. Individual vertical SiNWs were grown epitaxially by a catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process and MWNTs were grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) process on the AFM probes. The AFM probes were tested for imaging micrometers-deep trenches, where they demonstrated a significantly better performance than commercial high aspect ratio tips. Our method demonstrates a reliable and cost-efficient route toward wafer scale manufacturing of SiNW and MWNT AFM probes.

  20. Granular Species Segregation under Vertical Tapping: Effects of Size, Density, Friction, and Shaking Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Vizia, Maria Domenica De; Fierro, Annalisa; Tarzia, Marco; Coniglio, Antonio; Nicodemi, Mario

    2006-02-01

    We present extensive molecular dynamics simulations on species segregation in a granular mixture subject to vertical taps. We discuss how grain properties, e.g., size, density, friction, as well as shaking properties, e.g., amplitude and frequency, affect such a phenomenon. Both the Brazil nut effect (larger particles on the top, BN) and the reverse Brazil nut effect (larger particles on the bottom, RBN) are found and we derive the system comprehensive “segregation diagram” and the BN to RBN crossover line. We also discuss the role of friction and show that particles which differ only for their frictional properties segregate in states depending on the tapping acceleration and frequency.

  1. Physiological responses to a tap dance choreography: comparisons with graded exercise test and prescription recommendations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Samantha M L; Simões, Herbert G; Moreira, Sergio R; Lima, Ricardo M; Almeida, Jeeser A; Ribeiro, Fabiana M R; Puga, Guilherme M; Campbell, Carmen S G

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the physiological responses to a tap dance choreography and to compare with those observed during a maximal treadmill exercise test, in tap dancers. Eight women (19.6 +/- 2.4 years; 162.3 +/- 4.4 cm; 54.0 +/- 2.3 kg; 20.5 +/- 1.4 kg.m; and 5.1 +/- 2.6 years of tap dance training) were submitted to the following procedures: (a) graded exercise test (GXT) on a treadmill until volitional exhaustion with 0.8 km.h of increment at each 3 and 1 minute of interval between stages and (b) tap dance choreography (TAP)-"The Shim Sham Shimmy"-consisting of 9 stages of 3 minutes with 1-minute rest between stages. Expired gas analyses were performed in all experimental sessions, providing breath-by-breath values for respiratory exchange rate (RER), oxygen uptake (VO(2)), and carbon dioxide production (CO2). Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were also measured. During the rest period between stages, blood samples (25 microl) were collected from the ear lobe for lactate threshold (LT) determination. It was observed that at the end of the TAP, subjects achieved an average of 83.8 +/- 6.2% of the HRmax and 68.9 +/- 11.3% of the VO(2)max, both previously identified in the GXT. The choreography demanded 204.7 +/- 31.3 kcal, an average RER of 0.88 +/- 0.05 and mean RPE of 13 +/- 2. The VO(2), HR, and RPE values did not significantly differ from those at the LT intensity identified during the GTX. Based on the present results, it was concluded that the TAP performance in the "The Shim Sham Shimmy" choreography elicited acute physiologic responses similar to those observed at the LT intensity, thus suggesting that Tap Dance constitutes a useful exercise modality for aerobic fitness and cardiovascular health improvements.

  2. Disparity in disinfection byproducts concentration between hot and cold tap water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2015-03-01

    The quality of water entering a distribution system may differ substantially from the quality at the point of exposure to the consumer. This study investigated temporal variations in the levels of regulated and non-regulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in cold and hot tap water in a home on a medium-sized municipal water system. In addition, samples were collected directly from the water plant with some being held in accordance with a simulated distribution system (SDS) test protocol. The location for this work was a system in western Massachusetts, USA that uses free chlorine as a final disinfectant. Very little short term variability of DBPs at the point of entry (POE) was observed. The concentration of DBPs in the time-variable SDS test was similar to concentrations in the cold water tap. For most DBPs, the concentrations continued to increase as the cold water tap sample was held for the time-variable SDS incubation period. However, the impact of heating on DBP levels was compound specific. For example, the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloropicrin (CP) were substantially higher in the hot water tap than in the cold water time-variable SDS samples. In contrast, the concentration of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was lower in the heated hot tap water, but about equal to that observed in the cold tap water. The situation was more pronounced for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone (TCP), which all showed lower concentrations in the hot water then in either of the cold water samples (instantaneous or time-variable SDS). The latter was viewed as a clear indication of thermally-induced decomposition. The ratio of unknown total organic halide (UTOX) to TOX was substantially lower in the hot tap water as the THM to TOX ratio became correspondingly larger. The results of this study show that DBP exposure in the home is not well represented by

  3. Is lead in tap water still a public health problem? An observational study in Glasgow.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, G. C.; Britton, A.; Gilmour, W. H.; Moore, M. R.; Murray, G. D.; Robertson, S. J.; Womersley, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between tap water lead and maternal blood lead concentrations and assess the exposure of infants to lead in tap water in a water supply area subjected to maximal water treatment to reduce plumbosolvency. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey and collection of kettle water from a representative sample of mothers; blood and further water samples were collected in a random sample of households and households with raised water lead concentrations. SETTING: Loch Katrine water supply area, Glasgow. SUBJECTS: 1812 mothers with a live infant born between October 1991 and September 1992. Blood lead concentrations were measured in 342 mothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean geometric blood lead concentrations and the prevalence of raised tap water lead concentration. RESULTS: 17% of households had water lead concentration of 10 micrograms/l (48.3 nmol/l) or more in 1993 compared with 49% of households in 1981. Tap water lead remained the main correlate or raised maternal blood lead concentrations and accounted for 62% and 76% of cases of maternal blood lead concentrations above 5 and 10 micrograms/dl (0.24 and 0.48 mumol/l) respectively. The geometric mean maternal blood lead concentration was 3.65 micrograms/dl (0.18 mumol/l) in a random sample of mothers and 3.16 micrograms/dl (0.15 mumol/l) in mothers whose tap water lead concentrations were consistently below 2 micrograms/l (9.7 nmol/l). No mother in the study had a blood lead concentration above 25 micrograms/dl (1.21 mumol/l). An estimated 13% of infants were exposed via bottle feeds to tap water lead concentrations exceeding the World Health Organisation's guideline of 10 micrograms/l (48.3 nmol/l). CONCLUSIONS: Tap water lead and maternal blood led concentrations in the Loch Katrine water supply area have fallen substantially since the early 1980s. Maternal blood lead concentrations are well within limits currently considered safe for human health. Tap water lead is still a public health

  4. Tapping Stem Cells to Target AMD: Challenges and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Caroline; Grassmann, Felix; Riolfi, Julia; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are increasingly gaining attention in biomedicine as valuable resources to establish patient-derived cell culture models of the cell type known to express the primary pathology. The idea of “a patient in a dish” aims at basic, but also clinical, applications with the promise to mimic individual genetic and metabolic complexities barely reflected in current invertebrate or vertebrate animal model systems. This may particularly be true for the inherited and complex diseases of the retina, as this tissue has anatomical and physiological aspects unique to the human eye. For example, the complex age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in Western societies, can be attributed to a large number of genetic and individual factors with so far unclear modes of mutual interaction. Here, we review the current status and future prospects of utilizing hPSCs, specifically induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), in basic and clinical AMD research, but also in assessing potential treatment options. We provide an outline of concepts for disease modelling and summarize ongoing and projected clinical trials for stem cell-based therapy in late-stage AMD. PMID:26239128

  5. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of the bimodal amplitude-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) imaging mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereby the fundamental eigenmode is driven by using the amplitude-modulation technique (AM-AFM) while a higher eigenmode is driven by using either the constant-excitation or the constant-amplitude variant of the frequency-modulation (FM-AFM) technique. We also offer a comparison to the original bimodal AFM method, in which the higher eigenmode is driven with constant frequency and constant excitation amplitude. General as well as particular characteristics of the different driving schemes are highlighted from theoretical and experimental points of view, revealing the advantages and disadvantages of each. This study provides information and guidelines that can be useful in selecting the most appropriate operation mode to characterize different samples in the most efficient and reliable way.

  6. Vibrational CD (VCD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of DNA interaction with Cr3+ ions: VCD and AFM evidence of DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Andrushchenko, V; Leonenko, Z; Cramb, D; van de Sande, H; Wieser, H

    The interaction of natural calf thymus DNA with Cr(3+) ions was studied at room temperature by means of vibrational CD (VCD) and infrared absorption (ir) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cr(3+) ion binding mainly to N(7) (G) and to phosphate groups was demonstrated. Psi-type VCD spectra resembling electronic CD (ECD) spectra, which appear during psi-type DNA condensation, were observed. These spectra are characterized mainly by an anomalous, severalfold increase of VCD intensity. Such anomalous VCD spectra were assigned to DNA condensation with formation of large and dense particles of a size comparable to the wavelength of the probing ir beam and possessing large-scale helicity. Atomic force microscopy confirmed DNA condensation by Cr(3+) ions and the formation of tight DNA particles responsible for the psi-type VCD spectra. Upon increasing the Cr(3+) ion concentration the shape of the condensates changed from loose flower-like structures to highly packed dense spheres. No DNA denaturation was seen even at the highest concentration of Cr(3+) ions studied. The secondary structure of DNA remained in a B-form before and after the condensation. VCD and ir as well as AFM proved to be an effective combination for investigating DNA condensation. In addition to the ability of VCD to determine DNA condensation, VCD and ir can in the same experiment provide unambiguous information about the secondary structure of DNA contained in the condensed particles.

  7. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "An Evaluation of the Chicago Teacher Advancement Program (Chicago TAP)"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study examined whether the Chicago Public Schools' Teacher Advancement Program (TAP), which provides mentoring, leadership opportunities, and financial incentives to teachers, improved student academic achievement and teacher retention. The study examined the academic achievement of more than 7,600 students in grades 4-8 from 34 schools in the…

  8. Colorimetric detection of copper ions in tap water during the synthesis of silver/dopamine nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-rong; Niu, Hong-yun; Zhang, Xiao-le; Cai, Ya-qi

    2011-12-21

    A facile, economic and eco-friendly colorimetric sensor for Cu(2+) using dopamine/silver nanoparticles was developed. The sensor shows excellent sensitivity and selectivity toward Cu(2+) in the range of 3.2-512 ppb and can be applied for Cu(2+) detection in tap water.

  9. Microprocessor controlled anodic stripping voltameter for trace metals analysis in tap water

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, R.G.; Park, F.W.; Kirsten, F.A.; Phillips, S.L.; Binnall, E.P.

    1981-04-01

    The construction and use of a portable, microprocessor controlled anodic stripping voltameter for on-site simultaneous metal analysis of copper, lead and cadmium in tap water is discussed. The instrumental system is comprised of a programmable controller which permits keying in analytical parameters such as sparge time and plating time; a rotating cell for efficient oxygen removal and amalgam formation; and, a magnetic tape which can be used for data storage. Analysis time can be as short as 10 to 15 minutes. The stripping analysis is based on a pre-measurement step during which the metals from a water sample are concentrated into a thin mercury film by deposition from an acetate solution of pH 4.5. The concentrated metals are then electrochemically dissolved from the film by application of a linearly increasing anodic potential. Typical peak-shaped curves are obtained. The heights of these curves are related to the concentration of metals in the water by calibration data. Results of tap water analysis showed 3 +- 1 ..mu..g/L lead, 22 +- 0.3 ..mu..g/L copper, and less than 0.2 ..mu..g/L cadmium for a Berkeley, California tap water, and 1 to 1000 ..mu..g/L Cu, 1 to 2 ..mu..g/L Pb for ten samples of Seattle, Washington tap water. Recommendations are given for a next generation instrument system.

  10. Development and Deployment of the Purdue TAP Green Enterprise Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Ethan A.

    2013-01-01

    Purdue University--Mechanical, Engineering, and Technology (MET) faculty and Purdue Technical Assistance Program (TAP) staff partnered with the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) to create a new workforce training program and certificate exam in the field of green manufacturing. This article describes how the body of knowledge for the…

  11. pH Dependence of Photoinduced Electron Transfer with [Ru(TAP)3](2).

    PubMed

    Troian-Gautier, Ludovic; Mugeniwabagara, Epiphanie; Fusaro, Luca; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Luhmer, Michel

    2017-02-20

    The quenching of the excited state of [Ru(TAP)3](2+) (TAP = 1,4,5,8-tetraazaphenanthrene) by guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP), N-acetyltyrosine (N-Ac-Tyr), and hydroquinone (H2Q) has been studied in aqueous solution over a wide range of pH values including, for the first time, strongly acidic media. This quenching by electron transfer was examined by steady-state (1)H photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) as well as by more conventional techniques, among which are pulsed laser-induced transient absorption and emission experiments. A deeper knowledge of the photochemical behavior of [Ru(TAP)3](2+) has been gained thanks to the combined use of these two approaches, photo-CIDNP and electronic spectroscopies, highlighting their complementarity. In contrast to what was believed, it is found that the protonated excited state of [Ru(TAP)3](2+) may give rise to an electron transfer with N-Ac-Tyr and H2Q. Such a photoinduced electron transfer does not occur with protonated GMP, however. (1)H photo-CIDNP experiments are expected to be particularly promising for characterization of the reductive quenching of excited-state ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes comprising several nonequivalent protonation sites.

  12. Isolating the perceptual from the social: tapping in shared space results in improved synchrony.

    PubMed

    Wu, David W-L; Chapman, Craig S; Walker, Esther; Bischof, Walter F; Kingstone, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Current theory suggests that interpersonal synchrony is an important social behavior in that it not only serves as a form of "social glue," but it also arises automatically in a social context. Theorists suggest potential mechanisms for interpersonal synchrony, ranging from a "low-level" social-perceptual system account to a "high-level" social-motivational explanation. Past studies that suggest synchrony can be influenced by social factors do not discriminate between these accounts. The current investigation seeks to isolate the effect of the high-level social system on interpersonal synchrony by investigating the effects of spatial proximity on unintentional coordinated tapping between two naïve participants. Dyads performed a synchronization-continuation task either in the same room, in different rooms, or in different rooms but with the ability to hear each other tap. Participant taps were represented by a box that flashed on the monitor to control visual information across all three conditions. Same-room dyads had increased coordination over different-room dyads, whereas dyads that shared audio but were in different rooms showed an intermediate level of coordination. The present study demonstrates that shared space, independent of perceptual differences in stimuli, can increase unintentional coordinated tapping.

  13. Early-Stage Chunking of Finger Tapping Sequences by Persons Who Stutter and Fluent Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits-Bandstra, Sarah; De Nil, Luc F.

    2013-01-01

    This research note explored the hypothesis that chunking differences underlie the slow finger-tap sequencing performance reported in the literature for persons who stutter (PWS) relative to fluent speakers (PNS). Early-stage chunking was defined as an immediate and spontaneous tendency to organize a long sequence into pauses, for motor planning,…

  14. AN INTEGRATED RESEARCH AGENDA TO EVALUATE TAP WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS AND HUMAN HEALTH: PART 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Integrated Research Agenda to Evaluate Tap Water Disinfection Byproducts and Human Health: Part I

    Michele Lynberg1, David Ashley 2, Pauline Mendola3, J. R. Nuckols4, Kenneth Cantor5, Benjamin Blount 2, Philip Singer6, Charles Wilkes7, Lorraine Backer1, and Peter Langlo...

  15. TIME TO PREGNANCY IN RELATION TO TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANE LEVELS IN TAP WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time to pregnancy in relation to total trihalomethane levels in tap water
    Shanna H. Swan, Cuirong Ren, Gayle C. Windham, Laura Fenster, Kirsten Waller. (University of Missouri and California Department of Health Services).

    We have previously reported increased risks o...

  16. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Maura J; O'Connell, Katharine; Vesper, Stephen J; Mistry, Jatin H; King, Dawn; Kostich, Mitch; Pfaller, Stacy

    2014-03-18

    In the United States, 6,868 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009-2010. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and recovered from a variety of natural freshwater environments. Human exposure to L. pneumophila Sg1 may occur from aerosolization and subsequent inhalation of household and facility water. In this study, two primer/probe sets (one able to detect L. pneumophila and the other L. pneumophila Sg1) were determined to be highly sensitive and selective for their respective targets. Over 272 water samples, collected in 2009 and 2010 from 68 public and private water taps across the United States, were analyzed using the two qPCR assays to evaluate the incidence of L. pneumophila Sg1. Nearly half of the taps showed the presence of L. pneumophila Sg1 in one sampling event, and 16% of taps were positive in more than one sampling event. This study is the first United States survey to document the occurrence and colonization of L. pneumophila Sg1 in cold water delivered from point of use taps.

  17. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  18. Preparation and Support of a Tap Test on the Leading Edge Surfaces of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohr, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on a Tap test for the leading edge surfaces of the Space Shuttle. A description of the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) flight system is given, and the rationale and approach for improving the WLEIDS system. The three phases of the strategy of the test project amd the results of the tests are reviewed.

  19. A Glove for Tapping and Discrete 1D/2D Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sam A.; Smith, Andy; Bahram, Sina; SaintAmant, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a glove with which users enter input by tapping fingertips with the thumb or by rubbing the thumb over the palmar surfaces of the middle and index fingers. The glove has been informally tested as the controller for two semi-autonomous robots in a a 3D simulation environment. A preliminary evaluation of the glove s performance is presented.

  20. Effect of a polysaccharide (TAP) from the fruiting bodies of Tremella aurantia on glucose metabolism in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kiho, T; Morimoto, H; Kobayashi, T; Usui, S; Ukai, S; Aizawa, K; Inakuma, T

    2000-02-01

    An acidic polysaccharide (TAP) obtained from the fruiting bodies of Tremella aurantia significantly increased the activities of glucokinase, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and decreased the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase in normal and diabetic mouse liver after intraperitoneal administration, while the glycogen content in the liver was reduced. Furthermore, TAP lowered the plasma cholesterol level in normal and diabetic mice.