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Sample records for afm x-ray photoelectron

  1. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 20 X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Database (Version 4.1) (Web, free access)   The NIST XPS Database gives access to energies of many photoelectron and Auger-electron spectral lines. The database contains over 22,000 line positions, chemical shifts, doublet splittings, and energy separations of photoelectron and Auger-electron lines.

  2. Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-05-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

  3. Interpretation of nanoparticle X-ray photoelectron intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Wolfgang S. M. Chudzicki, Maksymillian; Smekal, Werner; Powell, Cedric J.

    2014-06-16

    X-ray photoelectron (XPS) intensities have been simulated for spherical core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) in different geometrical arrangements in order to investigate the validity of commonly made assumptions for the interpretation of XPS NP intensities. The single-sphere approximation is valid for a powder sample when all spatial coordinates of the NP positions are uncorrelated. Correlations along either the depth coordinate or the lateral coordinates lead to features in the angular distribution that provide information on these correlations. The XPS intensity is proportional to the surface-to-volume ratio of nanoparticles but only for NP sizes exceeding the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons.

  4. Probing deeper by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O. Martinez, E.; Delaye, V.; Detlefs, B.; Zegenhagen, J.; Gaumer, C.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2014-02-03

    We report an hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method combining high excitation energy (15 keV) and improved modelling of the core-level energy loss features. It provides depth distribution of deeply buried layers with very high sensitivity. We show that a conventional approach relying on intensities of the core-level peaks is unreliable due to intense plasmon losses. We reliably determine the depth distribution of 1 ML La in a high-κ/metal gate stack capped with 50 nm a-Si. The method extends the sensitivity of photoelectron spectroscopy to depths beyond 50 nm.

  5. Effect of X-ray flux on polytetrafluoroethylene in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the X-ray flux in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (STAT) on the constitution of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface has been examined. The radiation dose rate for our specimen was about 10 to the 7th rad/s. The structure, magnitude and binding energy of the C(1s) and F(1s) features of the XPS spectrum and the mass spectrum of gaseous species evolved during irradiation are observed. The strong time dependence of these signals over a period of several hours indicated that the surface constitution of PTFE is greatly affected by this level of radiation dose. The results are consistent with the development of a heavily cross-linked or branched structure in the PTFE surface region and the evolution of short chain fragments into the gas phase.

  6. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, and raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of near-isogenic soft and hard wheat kernels and corresponding flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used to investigate vitreous (hard) and non-vitreous (soft) wheat kernels and their corresponding wheat flours. AFM data reveal two different microstructures. The vitreous kernel reveals a granular text...

  7. FORTRAN program for x ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reformatting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1989-01-01

    A FORTRAN program has been written for use on an IBM PC/XT or AT or compatible microcomputer (personal computer, PC) that converts a column of ASCII-format numbers into a binary-format file suitable for interactive analysis on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) computer running the VGS-5000 Enhanced Data Processing (EDP) software package. The incompatible floating-point number representations of the two computers were compared, and a subroutine was created to correctly store floating-point numbers on the IBM PC, which can be directly read by the DEC computer. Any file transfer protocol having provision for binary data can be used to transmit the resulting file from the PC to the DEC machine. The data file header required by the EDP programs for an x ray photoelectron spectrum is also written to the file. The user is prompted for the relevant experimental parameters, which are then properly coded into the format used internally by all of the VGS-5000 series EDP packages.

  8. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Gumí-Audenis, B; Carlà, F; Vitorino, M V; Panzarella, A; Porcar, L; Boilot, M; Guerber, S; Bernard, P; Rodrigues, M S; Sanz, F; Giannotti, M I; Costa, L

    2015-11-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  9. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gumí-Audenis, B.; Carlà, F.; Vitorino, M. V.; Panzarella, A.; Porcar, L.; Boilot, M.; Guerber, S.; Bernard, P.; Rodrigues, M. S.; Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I.; Costa, L.

    2015-01-01

    A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions. PMID:26524300

  10. Corrosion and degradation studies utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Holly Gwyndolen

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation involves studies of corrosion behavior at the surface of various metal samples, as well as the degradation of wool fibers obtained from the Star-Spangled Banner. Molybdenum metal and iron-zinc alloys were examined under corrosive conditions, and the degradation of the wool fibers was studied. The behavior of a polished molybdenum metal surface upon exposure to both aerated and deaerated water and 1.0 M NaCl solution was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Exposure to deaerated water and NaCl failed to produce oxidation of the metal surfaces, but exposing the polished metal surface to aerated water produced significant oxidation. Metal surfaces cleaned by argon-ion etching were found to be inert to oxidation by aerated water. The etching process also appears to passivate the metal surface. The behavior of molybdenum metal in 0.5 M Hsb2SOsb4 treated at various potentials has been studied using core and valence band XPS. The study indicates that Mosp{IV} and Mosp{VI} (including possibly Mosp{V} in some cases) were formed as the potential of the system was increased within the active range of molybdenum. The corrosive behavior of iron-zinc alloys that have been electroplated on plain steel in both aerated and deaerated quadruply-distilled water has been studied using XPS. Several different iron-zinc alloys were electroplated for comparative purposes: an iron-rich alloy, a zinc-rich alloy, and an alloy of similar iron and zinc composition. Treatment in aerated water produces oxidation for the iron-rich and similar composition alloys, but the oxide is reduced for the zinc-rich alloy. Degradation of the fibers in the original Star-Spangled Banner has been monitored using XPS and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Comparison of white and red wool fibers and linen fibers from the flag with new, mechanically-abraded, and chemically-treated white, red, and linen fibers, respectively, was performed in an attempt to determine the fibers' levels

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peak assignment for perfluoropolyether oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1990-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) oils are increasingly being used as vacuum pump oils and as lubricants for magnetic recording media and instrumentation for satellites. In this paper, the relative binding energies of three PFPE oils are determined. When sample oils are continuously irradiated during X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, the relative peak intensity of the spectra is altered significantly, indicating that gaseous products form from the oils during XPS measurements. Thus, attention should be paid to chemical changes when XPE is used to characterize fluorinated carbons such as PFPE oils.

  12. Feasibility tests of transmission x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy of wet samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Nelson, T.; Hansen, R.; Wallace, J.; Mercanti, D.; Capozi, M.; Baudat, P. A.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Tonner, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    We performed feasibility tests of photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy of wet samples in the water window (285-532 eV) soft x-ray spectral region. Water was successfully confined in an ultrahigh vacuum compatible compartment with x-ray transparent sides. This water cell was placed in the MEPHISTO spectromicroscope in a transmission geometry, and complete x-ray absorption spectra of the water window region were acquired. We also show micrographs of test samples, mounted outside of the compartment, and imaged through the water. This technique can be used to study liquid chemistry and, at least to the micron level, the microstructure of wet samples. Possibilities include cells in water or buffer, proteins in solution, oils of tribological interest, liquid crystals, and other samples not presently accessible to the powerful x-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy technique.

  13. Polytetrafluoroethylene transfer film studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was rubbed against nickel in ultrahigh vacuum at loads up to 3.9 N and speeds up to 94 mm/sec. The transfer film formed on the nickel was analyzed using X-ray phototectron spectroscopy. The film was indistinguishable from bulk PTFE except for the possible presence of a small amount of NiF2. The transfer film was found to be about 1 molecule (0.5 nm) thick under all conditions; but at speeds above 10 mm/sec, there was evidence of bulk transfer in the form of fragments as well. The thickness measurements required a choice among conflicting published values of the inelastic mean free path for electrons in polymers. The values chosen gave internally consistent results.

  14. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew A; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Jordan, Inga; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Müächler, Jean-Pierre; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto; Wörner, Hans Jakob; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2013-07-01

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II α lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented. PMID:23902081

  15. A new endstation at the Swiss Light Source for ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of liquid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Matthew A.; Redondo, Amaia Beloqui; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Mächler, Jean-Pierre; Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Lee, Ming-Tao; Ammann, Markus; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Huthwelker, Thomas; Birrer, Mario; Honegger, Juri; Wetter, Reto; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van

    2013-07-15

    A new liquid microjet endstation designed for ultraviolet (UPS) and X-ray (XPS) photoelectron, and partial electron yield X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The new endstation, which is based on a Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 electron spectrometer, is the first liquid microjet endstation capable of operating in vacuum and in ambient pressures up to the equilibrium vapor pressure of liquid water at room temperature. In addition, the Scienta HiPP-2 R4000 energy analyzer of this new endstation allows for XPS measurements up to 7000 eV electron kinetic energy that will enable electronic structure measurements of bulk solutions and buried interfaces from liquid microjet samples. The endstation is designed to operate at the soft X-ray SIM beamline and at the tender X-ray Phoenix beamline. The endstation can also be operated using a Scienta 5 K ultraviolet helium lamp for dedicated UPS measurements at the vapor-liquid interface using either He I or He II α lines. The design concept, first results from UPS, soft X-ray XPS, and partial electron yield XAS measurements, and an outlook to the potential of this endstation are presented.

  16. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of derivitized coal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.R.; Mc Intyre, N.S.; Mac Phee, J.A.; Aye, K.T.

    1987-04-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to study the low temperature oxidation of coal. /sup 18/O has been used to trace the oxygen distribution on the coal surface. Several chemical derivations have been observed on the oxidized coal surface and the reactivity of specific regions have been monitored.

  17. Soft-x-ray transmission photoelectron spectromicroscopy with the MEPHISTO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, Luca; Fauchoux, O.; Valiquer, A.; Nelson, T.; Capozi, M.; Baudat, P. A.; Cerrina, F.; Chen, Z.; Perfetti, P.; Tonner, B. P.; Margaritondo, G.

    1998-09-01

    We complemented with data taken in transmission mode the recently described tests of the novel spectromicroscope MEPHISTO (Microscope à Emission de Photoélectrons par Illumination Synchrotronique de type Onduleur). Transmitted x rays were converted by a photocathode into photoelectrons, which were subsequently electron-optically processed by the spectromicroscope producing submicron-resolution images. Test images demonstrated excellent contrast.

  18. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of arsenic mobilization during mackinawite (FeS) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Y; Han, Young-Soo; Hayes, Kim F

    2010-02-01

    In this study we investigated the speciation of the solid-phase As formed by reacting 2 x 10(-4) M As(III) with 1.0 g/L mackinawite and the potential for these sorbed species to be mobilized (released into the aqueous phase) upon exposure to atmospheric oxygen at pH 4.9, 7.1, and 9.1. Before oxygen exposure, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses indicated that As(III) was removed from the aqueous phase by forming As(0), AsS, and surface precipitates as thioarsenites at pH 4.9 and As(0) and thioarsenite surface precipitates at pH 7.1 and 9.1. When oxygen was introduced, XAS analysis indicated that As(0) and the surface precipitates were quickly transformed, whereas AsS was persistent. During intermediate oxygen exposure times, dissolved As increased at pH 4.9 and 7.1 due to the rapid oxidation of As(0) and the slow precipitation of iron (oxyhydr)oxides, the oxidation products of mackinawite. This indicates that oxidative mobilization is a potential pathway for arsenic contamination of water at acidic to neutral pH. The mobilized As was eventually resorbed by forming edge-sharing and double-corner-sharing surface complexes with iron (oxyhydr)oxides.

  19. Photoelectron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules with X-ray free-electron laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kyo; Teramoto, Takahiro; Akagi, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Takashi; Majima, Takuya; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Ogawa, Kanade; Sakai, Hirofumi; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Tsuru, Shota; Wada, Ken; Yabashi, Makina; Yagishita, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of deep inner-shell 2p X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns from laser-aligned I2 molecules using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. The XPD patterns of the I2 molecules, aligned parallel to the polarization vector of the XFEL, were well matched with our theoretical calculations. Further, we propose a criterion for applying our molecular-structure-determination methodology to the experimental XPD data. In turn, we have demonstrated that this approach is a significant step toward the time-resolved imaging of molecular structures. PMID:26369428

  20. Optical and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of α-Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ram; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Vinay; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    α-Al2O3 powder sample was synthesized at 550 °C via solution combustion synthesis (SCS) method using urea as an organic fuel. The sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Optical spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) without any further thermal treatment. XRD study reveals that the powder crystallized directly in the hexagons α-Al2O3 phase. A band gap of 5.7 eV was estimated using diffuse reflectance spectra. For surface investigation X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out. The XPS survey scan study of α-Al2O3 powder reveals that the sample is free from impurity. The core levels of Al-2s and O-1s are also reported.

  1. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T. Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia; Åhlund, John

    2015-08-15

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N{sub 2}(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of γ-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunmo; Hong, W.; Han, J. H.; Choi, D. M.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Kim, H. D.; Kim, J.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of γ-ray irradiation on herring sperm single-stranded DNA have been studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the view of the bonding configurations and the structural modifications. The significant changes in the hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous bonding energies, as revealed by the XPS analysis, indicate that electron transfers result in the creation of radicals and in DNA strand breaks.

  3. Simple photoelectron x-ray beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    A UHV compatible x-ray beam position monitor is described. The monitor operates by detecting the photoelectrons emitted by two parallel tungsten wires. A key feature of the monitor is the simplicity of its design and construction which allows it to fit on a 2 3/4 in. conflat flange. When combined with a simple log-ratio current amplifier the monitor gives an output linear in the beam position with a sensitivity better than 0.02 mm.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of copper(II), copper(I), and mixed valence systems.

    PubMed

    Rupp, H; Weser, U

    1976-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using copper(II), copper(I) and the mixed valence Cu(II)/Cu(I) compounds was employed as a means of studying electron transfer reactions in copper proteins. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of copper(II) compounds display characteristic satellites of both variable size and resolution. Some of these satellites could be assigned to specific ligand interactions. Unlike electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of copper(I) compounds allowed the unequivocal assignment of this oxidation state. No satellites at all could be detected in the Cu(I) spectra. Furthermore, established mixed valence Cu(II)/Cu(I) complexes including Cu2SO3-CuSO3-2H2O and Cu4Cl5 (ethylenediamine)2 proved essentially a mixture of distinct portions of Cu(I) and Cu(II). This indicates that both oxidation states of copper survive in such complexes. In contrast, all Cu X-ray photoelectron signals of the more tentatively described mixed valence complexes Na2Cu3S3 and the mineral covellite, CuI4CuII2(S2)2S2, could be attributed exclusively to Cu(I). In view of the known binding of copper with sulfur in many copper proteins, it was of utmost importance to study the copper-sulfur interactions. We have demonstrated the absence of Cu(II) in CuS. This indicates strong metal-induced polarization of sulfur resulting in electron transfer to copper to yield Cu(I). PMID:953045

  5. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of oxidized surfaces of iron sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Tomashevich, Yevgeny; Vorobyev, Sergey; Saikova, Svetlana; Romanchenko, Alexander; Félix, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using an excitation energy range of 2 keV to 6 keV in combination with Fe K- and S K-edge XANES, measured simultaneously in total electron (TEY) and partial fluorescence yield (PFY) modes, have been applied to study near-surface regions of natural polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 and pyrrhotite Fe1-xS before and after etching treatments in an acidic ferric chloride solution. It was found that the following near-surface regions are formed owing to the preferential release of iron from oxidized metal sulfide lattices: (i) a thin, no more than 1-4 nm in depth, outer layer containing polysulfide species, (ii) a layer exhibiting less pronounced stoichiometry deviations and low, if any, concentrations of polysulfide, the composition and dimensions of which vary for pyrite and pyrrhotite and depend on the chemical treatment, and (iii) an extended almost stoichiometric underlayer yielding modified TEY XANES spectra, probably, due to a higher content of defects. We suggest that the extended layered structure should heavily affect the near-surface electronic properties, and processes involving the surface and interfacial charge transfer.

  6. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  7. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for electrochemical reactions in ordinary solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobata, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Noguchi, Hidenori; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Uosaki, Kohei

    2013-09-09

    In situ electrochemical X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus, which allows XPS at solid/liquid interfaces under potential control, was constructed utilizing a microcell with an ultra-thin Si membrane, which separates vacuum and a solution. Hard X-rays from a synchrotron source penetrate into the Si membrane surface exposed to the solution. Electrons emitted at the Si/solution interface can pass through the membrane and be analyzed by an analyzer placed in vacuum. Its operation was demonstrated for potential-induced Si oxide growth in water. Effect of potential and time on the thickness of Si and Si oxide layers was quantitatively determined at sub-nanometer resolution.

  8. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the B-N-Ti system

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, S.; Barr, T.L.; Sobczak, N.; Benko, E.; Morgiel, J.

    1997-03-01

    Composite nitrides (such as BN, TiN) are widely used in various industrial applications because of their extreme wear and corrosion resistance, thermal and electrical properties. In order to obtain composite materials with these optimal properties, it is important to elucidate whether any chemical reactions occur at nitride/metal interfaces, e.g., those involving BN-Ti/TiN. Materials of interest include the deposition by PVD of Ti and TiN on BN substrates. Some of these systems were then subjected to varying degrees of physical and thermal alteration. Detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has therefore been rendered of these interfaces using cross-sectional display and sputter etching. Resulting structural and morphological features have been investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Diffusion of the nitridation, oxynitride formation and interfacial growth are of general interest.

  9. Surface state analysis of wet ground silicon nitride powders by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Yasumori, Atsuo; Okada, Kiyoshi

    1995-09-01

    Three kinds of silicon nitride powders, i.e. as-prepared direct-nitridation powder, HF-treated direct-nitridation powder, and as-prepared imide decomposition powder, were wet ground by ball milling in water and the surface state change due to the grinding was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The thickness of the oxidized surface layer of the powder was calculated from the peak area ratio and the chemical composition was evaluated from the Auger parameter (AP). Surface oxidized phase amount gradually increased with longer milling time and the thickness increased almost three times after 7 days milling, compared to as those of the unground samples. Chemical composition of the oxidized phase formed by the grinding was pure silica irrespective to the samples, although those of the oxidized phase in the unground samples differed among the samples.

  10. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using an environmental cell with silicon nitride membrane windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemi, Eika; Watanabe, Yoshio; Oji, Hiroshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-06-21

    We applied hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) to a sample under ambient pressure conditions using an environmental cell with an approximately 24 nm-thick SiN{sub x} membrane window. As a model chemical substance, europium (II) iodide (EuI{sub 2}) sealed in the cell with argon gas was investigated with HAXPES to identify the chemical species present inside the cell. The optical and morphological properties of the sample within the cell were measured with optical and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. We confirmed the effectiveness of the gas barrier properties of the cell with the SiN{sub x} window and demonstrated its applicability to various other optical and electron measurements as well as HAXPES.

  11. Comparison of hard and soft x-ray photoelectron spectra of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, F.; Werner, W. S. M.; Sacchi, M.; Torelli, P.; Cautero, M.; Cautero, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Huotari, S.; Monaco, G.; Paolicelli, G.; Smekal, W.; Stefani, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2007-08-01

    A detailed comparison of the surface sensitivity of x-ray photoemission spectroscopy for hard and soft x rays is presented and discussed. Electron scattering parameters and their energy dependence are given for Si and two Si spectra are analyzed: a MgKα (hν=1253.6eV) excited spectrum of the Si2p and 2s lines and a hard x-ray excited spectrum (hν=5925eV) of the Si1s line. The differential inelastic scattering characteristics for Si are extracted from reflection electron energy loss spectra taken at energies of 1500 and 4000eV . Using these scattering characteristics and electron mean free paths from the literature, simulated spectra are compared with experiment. The experimental spectra are deconvoluted to give the true intrinsic line shape corresponding to the theoretical collision statistics when interference effects between intrinsic and extrinsic scattering are neglected. The magnitude of interference effects cannot be assessed by our analysis. Within the (unknown) uncertainty introduced by neglecting interference effects, it is possible to determine the relative intensity of intrinsic and extrinsic excitations. In this way, it is found that in the case of the soft x-ray excited photoelectron spectrum of the shallower electronic shells ( 2p and 2s ), intrinsic plasmon creation is rather weak, and the apparent asymmetric line shape of the spectrum might be interpreted as the fact that electron-hole pair creation dominates the intrinsic loss spectrum, while an alternative explanation in terms of surface core level shifted components is also proposed. For the deeper core electronic shell, probed with hard x rays, the opposite situation is observed: while intrinsic electron-hole pair creation was not observed, a strong contribution of intrinsic plasmon losses of about 30% was seen.

  12. Contact-free pyroelectric measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehre, D.; Cohen, H.

    2013-07-29

    Non-contact pyroelectricity measurements based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are presented. Applied to Lithium Tantalate crystals, we demonstrate how the XPS-derived surface potential provides a simple probe of the desired property, free of all top-contact related difficulties. In particular, the increase in Lithium Tantalate spontaneous polarization under cooling, an experimentally challenging feature, is evaluated. We further inspect the roll of surface contaminants and the control over trapped surface charge in the XPS vacuum environment. Our approach can be extended to other non-contact probes, as well as to measuring additional electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity.

  13. Oxidation of stepped Pt(111) studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bandlow, Jochen; Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo; Papp, C.; Traenkenschuh, B.; Streber, R.; Lorenz, M. P. A.; Fuhrmann, T.; Steinrueck, H.-P.; Denecke, R.

    2011-05-01

    In this comparative density functional theory and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the interaction of oxygen with stepped Pt(111) surfaces, we show that both the initial adsorption and oxidation occur at the steps rather than terraces. An equivalent behavior was observed for the oxide formation at higher chemical potentials, where, after the formation of a one-dimensional PtO{sub 2}-type oxide at the steps, similar oxide chains form on the (111) terraces, indicating the initial stages of bulk oxide formation.

  14. Composition of RF-sputtered refractory compounds determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    RF-sputtered coatings of CrB2, MoSi2, Mo2C, TiC, and MoS2 were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data on stoichiometry, impurity content, and chemical bonding were obtained. The influences of sputtering target history, deposition time, RF power level, and substrate bias were studied. Significant deviations from stoichiometry and high oxide levels were related to target outgassing. The effect of substrate bias depended on the particular coating material studied.

  15. Short-range order in amorphous SiO{sub x} by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, Yu. N.; Gritsenko, V. A.

    2011-07-01

    The Si 2p x ray photoelectron spectra of SiO{sub x} with a different composition of 0 {<=} x {<=} 2 have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The SiO{sub x} films were prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition from SiH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O source at 750 deg. C. Neither random bonding nor random mixture models can adequately describe the structure of these compounds. The interpretation of the experimental results is discussed according to a large scale potential fluctuation due to the spatial variation of chemical composition in SiO{sub x}.

  16. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  17. The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron: inelastic X-ray scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range.

    PubMed

    Rueff, J P; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Prieur, D; Moreno, Th; Balédent, V; Lassalle-Kaiser, B; Rault, J E; Simon, M; Shukla, A

    2015-01-01

    The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in the 2.3-12 keV hard X-ray range. These two techniques offer powerful complementary methods of characterization of materials with bulk sensitivity, chemical and orbital selectivity, resonant enhancement and high resolving power. After a description of the beamline components and endstations, the beamline capabilities are demonstrated through a selection of recent works both in the solid and gas phases and using either IXS or HAXPES approaches. Prospects for studies on liquids are discussed.

  18. The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron: inelastic X-ray scattering and photoelectron spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range.

    PubMed

    Rueff, J P; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Prieur, D; Moreno, Th; Balédent, V; Lassalle-Kaiser, B; Rault, J E; Simon, M; Shukla, A

    2015-01-01

    The GALAXIES beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) in the 2.3-12 keV hard X-ray range. These two techniques offer powerful complementary methods of characterization of materials with bulk sensitivity, chemical and orbital selectivity, resonant enhancement and high resolving power. After a description of the beamline components and endstations, the beamline capabilities are demonstrated through a selection of recent works both in the solid and gas phases and using either IXS or HAXPES approaches. Prospects for studies on liquids are discussed. PMID:25537606

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of graphitic carbon nanomaterials doped with heteroatoms

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Thomas; Ayala, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Summary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the best tools for studying the chemical modification of surfaces, and in particular the distribution and bonding of heteroatom dopants in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although these materials have superb intrinsic properties, these often need to be modified in a controlled way for specific applications. Towards this aim, the most studied dopants are neighbors to carbon in the periodic table, nitrogen and boron, with phosphorus starting to emerge as an interesting new alternative. Hundreds of studies have used XPS for analyzing the concentration and bonding of dopants in various materials. Although the majority of works has concentrated on nitrogen, important work is still ongoing to identify its precise atomic bonding configurations. In general, care should be taken in the preparation of a suitable sample, consideration of the intrinsic photoemission response of the material in question, and the appropriate spectral analysis. If this is not the case, incorrect conclusions can easily be drawn, especially in the assignment of measured binding energies into specific atomic configurations. Starting from the characteristics of pristine materials, this review provides a practical guide for interpreting X-ray photoelectron spectra of doped graphitic carbon nanomaterials, and a reference for their binding energies that are vital for compositional analysis via XPS. PMID:25671162

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of the {omega} phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Dongyang; Lu, Yafeng; Zhang, Kong; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Lian

    2012-11-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the {omega} phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy with a nominal composition of Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (wt.%), and the {omega} and the {beta} phase were distinguished by deconvoluting the XPS spectra of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p core level regions. In addition, it is found that the binding energy of core level electron of alloying elements shifts comparing with that of pure metals, and the fact was interpreted by charge redistribution model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique could be used to characterize the nano-scale {omega} phase in {beta} alloys. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the {omega} phase in Ti-5553 alloy by XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding energy of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p electron are different in the {omega} and {beta} phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural difference leads to the binding energy gap.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of graphitic carbon nanomaterials doped with heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Pichler, Thomas; Ayala, Paola

    2015-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is one of the best tools for studying the chemical modification of surfaces, and in particular the distribution and bonding of heteroatom dopants in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. Although these materials have superb intrinsic properties, these often need to be modified in a controlled way for specific applications. Towards this aim, the most studied dopants are neighbors to carbon in the periodic table, nitrogen and boron, with phosphorus starting to emerge as an interesting new alternative. Hundreds of studies have used XPS for analyzing the concentration and bonding of dopants in various materials. Although the majority of works has concentrated on nitrogen, important work is still ongoing to identify its precise atomic bonding configurations. In general, care should be taken in the preparation of a suitable sample, consideration of the intrinsic photoemission response of the material in question, and the appropriate spectral analysis. If this is not the case, incorrect conclusions can easily be drawn, especially in the assignment of measured binding energies into specific atomic configurations. Starting from the characteristics of pristine materials, this review provides a practical guide for interpreting X-ray photoelectron spectra of doped graphitic carbon nanomaterials, and a reference for their binding energies that are vital for compositional analysis via XPS.

  2. Quantitative interpretation of molecular dynamics simulations for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Parry, Krista M.; Powell, Cedric J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, energy-dependent ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has emerged as a powerful analytical probe of the ion spatial distributions at the vapor (vacuum)-aqueous electrolyte interface. These experiments are often paired with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in an attempt to provide a complete description of the liquid interface. There is, however, no systematic protocol that permits a straightforward comparison of the two sets of results. XPS is an integrated technique that averages signals from multiple layers in a solution even at the lowest photoelectron kinetic energies routinely employed, whereas MD simulations provide a microscopic layer-by-layer description of the solution composition near the interface. Here, we use the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) to quantitatively interpret atom-density profiles from MD simulations for XPS signal intensities using sodium and potassium iodide solutions as examples. We show that electron inelastic mean free paths calculated from a semi-empirical formula depend strongly on solution composition, varying by up to 30% between pure water and concentrated NaI. The XPS signal thus arises from different information depths in different solutions for a fixed photoelectron kinetic energy. XPS signal intensities are calculated using SESSA as a function of photoelectron kinetic energy (probe depth) and compared with a widely employed ad hoc method. SESSA simulations illustrate the importance of accounting for elastic-scattering events at low photoelectron kinetic energies (<300 eV) where the ad hoc method systematically underestimates the preferential enhancement of anions over cations. Finally, some technical aspects of applying SESSA to liquid interfaces are discussed.

  3. Quantitative interpretation of molecular dynamics simulations for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Parry, Krista M; Powell, Cedric J; Tobias, Douglas J; Brown, Matthew A

    2016-04-21

    Over the past decade, energy-dependent ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) has emerged as a powerful analytical probe of the ion spatial distributions at the vapor (vacuum)-aqueous electrolyteinterface. These experiments are often paired with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in an attempt to provide a complete description of the liquidinterface. There is, however, no systematic protocol that permits a straightforward comparison of the two sets of results. XPS is an integrated technique that averages signals from multiple layers in a solution even at the lowest photoelectron kinetic energies routinely employed, whereas MD simulations provide a microscopic layer-by-layer description of the solution composition near the interface. Here, we use the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) to quantitatively interpret atom-density profiles from MD simulations for XPS signal intensities using sodium and potassium iodide solutions as examples. We show that electron inelastic mean free paths calculated from a semi-empirical formula depend strongly on solution composition, varying by up to 30% between pure water and concentrated NaI. The XPS signal thus arises from different information depths in different solutions for a fixed photoelectron kinetic energy. XPS signal intensities are calculated using SESSA as a function of photoelectron kinetic energy (probe depth) and compared with a widely employed ad hoc method. SESSA simulations illustrate the importance of accounting for elastic-scattering events at low photoelectron kinetic energies (<300 eV) where the ad hoc method systematically underestimates the preferential enhancement of anions over cations. Finally, some technical aspects of applying SESSA to liquidinterfaces are discussed. PMID:27389231

  4. Electronic Structures of Uranium Compounds Studied by Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of uranium-based compounds have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays has made it possible to directly observe their bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces. It has been shown that the band structures and Fermi surfaces of itinerant compounds such as UB2, UN, and UFeGa5 are quantitatively described by a band-structure calculation treating all U 5f electrons as itinerant. Furthermore, the overall electronic structures of heavy-fermion compounds such as UPd2Al3, UNi2Al3, and URu2Si2 are also explained by a band-structure calculation, although some disagreements exist, which might originate from the electron correlation effect. This suggests that the itinerant description of U 5f states is an appropriate starting point for the description of their electronic structures. The situation is similar for ferromagnetic superconductors such as UGe2, URhGe, UCoGe, and UIr, although the complications from their low-symmetry crystal structures make it more difficult to describe their detailed electronic structures. The local electronic structures of the uranium site have been probed by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays. The comparisons of core-level spectra of heavy-fermion compounds with typical itinerant and localized compounds suggest that the local electronic structures of most itinerant and heavy-fermion compounds are close to the U 5f3 configuration except for UPd2Al3 and UPt3. The core-level spectrum of UPd2Al3 has similarities to those of both itinerant and localized compounds, suggesting that it is located at the boundary between the itinerant and localized states. Moreover, the spectrum of UPt3 is very close to that of the localized compound UPd3, suggesting that it is nearly localized, although there are narrow quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of EF.

  5. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques.

  6. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectra of ruthenium oxide films and ruthenium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, I.D.; Shifrina, R.R.; Roginskaya, Yu.E.; Popov, A.V.; Varlamova, T.V.

    1988-03-01

    The IR and x-ray photoelectron spectra of ruthenium hydroxide and of ruthenium oxide films produced by ruthenium chloride hydroxide decomposition at 300, 400, 500, and 600 degrees C were examined in order to obtain information concerning the effect of hydration on the structure and electronic properties of the surface of ruthenium oxide electrodes. It was shown that Ru hydroxide and Ru oxide films contain both water molecules and hydroxyl groups; the latter are retained up to higher temperatures (600 degrees C) in the Ru oxide films than in Ru hydroxide. It was found that water makes the materials studied amorphous, and it also was found that hydration influences their electronic structure (valence band and the electronic core levels of Ru and O).

  7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency-sputtered refractory compound steel interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtering was used to deposit Mo2C, Mo2B5, and MoSi2 coatings on 440C steel substrates. Both sputter etched and preoxidized substrates were used, and the films were deposited with and without a substrate bias of -300 V. The composition of the coatings was measured as a function of depth by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with argon ion etching. In the interfacial region there was evidence that bias produced a graded interface in Mo2B5 but not in Mo2C. Oxides of iron and of all film constituents except carbon were presented in all cases but the iron oxide concentration was higher and the layer thicker on the preoxidized substrates. The film and iron oxides were mixed in the MoSi2 and Mo2C films but layered in the Mo2B5 film. The presence of mixed oxides correlates with enhanced film adhesion.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of rice kernels and flours: Measurement of surface chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Malik A; Gaiani, Claire; Fukai, Shu; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the ability of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to differentiate rice macromolecules and to calculate the surface composition of rice kernels and flours. The uncooked kernels and flours surface composition of the two selected rice varieties, Thadokkham-11 (TDK11) and Doongara (DG) demonstrated an over-expression of lipids and proteins and an under-expression of starch compared to the bulk composition. The results of the study showed that XPS was able to differentiate rice polysaccharides (mainly starch), proteins and lipids in uncooked rice kernels and flours. Nevertheless, it was unable to distinguish components in cooked rice samples possibly due to complex interactions between gelatinized starch, denatured proteins and lipids. High resolution imaging methods (Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy) were employed to obtain complementary information about the properties and location of starch, proteins and lipids in rice kernels and flours. PMID:27374542

  9. Surface properties of SmB6 from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heming, N.; Treske, U.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Inosov, D. S.; Shitsevalova, N. Y.; Filipov, V. B.; Krause, S.; Koitzsch, A.

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the properties of cleaved SmB6 single crystals by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At low temperatures and freshly cleaved samples a surface core level shift is observed which vanishes when the temperature is increased. A Sm valence between 2.5 and 2.6 is derived from the relative intensities of the Sm2 + and Sm3 + multiplets. The B/Sm intensity ratio obtained from the core levels is always larger than the stoichiometric value. Possible reasons for this deviation are discussed. The B 1s signal shows an unexpected complexity: An anomalous low energy component appears with increasing temperature and is assigned to the formation of a suboxide at the surface. While several interesting intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the SmB6 surface are elucidated in this manuscript, no clear indication of a trivial mechanism for the prominent surface conductivity is found.

  10. Determination of InN/Diamond Heterojunction Band Offset by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is not only a free standing highly transparent window but also a promising carrier confinement layer for InN based devices, yet little is known of the band offsets in InN/diamond system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to measure the energy discontinuity in the valence band offset (VBO) of InN/diamond heterostructure. The value of VBO was determined to be 0.39 ± 0.08 eV and a type-I heterojunction with a conduction band offset (CBO) of 4.42 ± 0.08 eV was obtained. The accurate determination of VBO and CBO is important for the application of III-N alloys based electronic devices. PMID:27502672

  11. An x ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of Au(x)In(y) alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayne, Douglas T.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1990-01-01

    Four gold-indium alloys were studied by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The binding energies and intensity ratios of the Au 4f7/2 and In 3d5/2 core levels were determined for the bulk alloy compositions of Au(10 percent In), Au3In, AuIn, and AuIn2. These values were determined for the native oxides on the materials, for the surfaces prepared by ion bombardment to remove the oxide and for surfaces scraped in-situ with a ceramic tool to expose the bulk composition. These results furnish calibration values that allow determination of the composition of thin films of this alloy system. In addition the binding energies add to the data base for understanding the effect of alloying on core level binding energies. As an illustration, these results are used to determine the composition of a series of alloy films formed by incongruent evaporation of an alloy charge.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of chemically-etched Nd-Ce-Cu-O surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Gupta, A.; Kussmaul, A.

    1991-01-01

    Acetic acid, Br2, and HCl solutions are investigated for removing insulating species from Nd(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4-delta) (NCCO) thin film surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that the HCl etch is most effective, yielding O 1s spectra comparable to those obtained from samples cleaned in vacuum and a clear Fermi edge in the valence band region. Reduction and oxidation reversibly induces and eliminates, respectively, Fermi level states for undoped samples, but has no clearly observable effect on the XPS spectra for doped samples. Reactivity to air is much less for NCCO compared to hole superconductors, which is attributed to the lack of reactive alkaline earth elements in NCCO.

  13. Uses of Auger and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of adhesion and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1990-01-01

    Three studies are described characterizing the possible contributions of surface science to tribology. These include surface contamination formed by the interaction of a surface with the environment, contaminants obtained with diffusion of compounds, and surface chemical changes resulting from selective thermal evaporation. Surface analytical tools such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) incorporated directly into adhesion and friction systems are primarily used to define the nature of tribological surfaces before and after tribological experimentation and to characterize the mechanism of solid-to-solid interaction. Emphasis is on fundamental studies involving the role of surfaces in controlling the adhesion and friction properties of materials emerging as a result of the surface analyses. The materials which were studied include metals and ceramics such as elemental metals, amorphous alloys (metallic glasses), and silicon-based ceramics.

  14. X-ray photoelectron and mass spectroscopic study of electron irradiation and thermal stability of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1990-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was subjected to 3 keV electron bombardment and then heated in vacuum to 300 C. The behavior of the material as a function of radiation dose and temperature was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface and mass spectroscopy of the species evolved. A quantitative comparison of the radiation dose rate with that in other reported studies showed that, for a given total dose, the damage observed by XPS is greater for higher dose rates. Lightly damaged material heated to 300 C evolved saturated fluorocarbon species, whereas unsaturated fluorocarbon species evolved from heavily damaged material. After heating the heavily damaged material, those features in the XPS that were associated with damage diminished, giving the appearance that the radiation damage annealed. The apparent annealing of the radiation damage was found to be due to the covering of the network by saturated fragments that easily diffused through the decomposed material to the surface region upon heating.

  15. Highly Angle-Resolved X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction from Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, K.; Shiraki, S.; Ishii, H.; Owari, M.; Nihei, Y.

    We have carried out the highly angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPED) measurements by using the input-lens system for restriction of the detection angle. In the input-lens system, high angular resolution and high throughput are accomplished by placing an aperture not on the image plane but on the diffraction plane of electron optics. The aperture sizes (ϕ 4 mm, ϕ 2 mm, ϕ 0.5 mm, ϕ 0.25 mm) correspond to the angular resolutions (± 0.6°, ± 0.3°, ± 0.08°, ± 0.04°) respectively. Highly angle-resolved Ge3d XPED patterns from Ge(111) obtained by the angle-resolving system contain fine structure such as Kikuchi patterns. The fine structure was reproduced by multiple scattering cluster calculations.

  16. [Surface and interface analysis of PTCDA/ITO using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)].

    PubMed

    Ou, Gu-ping; Song, Zhen; Gui, Wen-ming; Zhang, Fu-jia

    2006-04-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface and interface of PTCDA/ITO in PTCDA/p-Si organic-on-inorganic photoelectric detector was investigated. From C1s fine spectrum we found that the binding energy of C atoms in perylene rings was 284.6 eV; and the binding energy of C atoms in acid radical was 288.7 eV; moreover, some C atoms were oxidized by O atoms from ITO. The binding energy of O atoms in C=O bonds and C-O-C bonds was 531.5 and 533.4 eV, respectively. At the interface, the peak of high binding energy in C1s spectrum disappeared, and the main peak shifted toward lower binding energy.

  17. Measurement of barrier height of Pd on diamond (100) surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F. N.; Liu, J. W.; Zhang, J. W.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, W.; Liu, Z. C.; Wang, H. X.

    2016-05-01

    Barrier height (VBH) values for Pd/hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) and Pd/oxygen-terminated diamond (O-diamond) have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. H-diamond and O-diamond have been formed on the same diamond (100) layer grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on which Pd layers have been evaporated. The VBH values for Pd/H-diamond and Pd/O-diamond are determined to be -0.27 eV and 1.73 eV, respectively. It indicates that Pd is a suitable metal for ohmic and Schottky contacts on H-diamond and O-diamond, respectively. The experimental ΦBH values are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation results.

  18. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650 nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO2 exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500 nA/W and 11 × 10-6 for 445 nm illumination.

  19. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650 nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO{sub 2} exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500 nA/W and 11 × 10{sup −6} for 445 nm illumination.

  20. A laser-based instrument for the study of ultrafast chemical dynamics by soft x-ray-probe photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent-Glandorf, Lora; Scheer, Michael; Samuels, David A.; Bierbaum, Veronica; Leone, Stephen R.

    2002-04-01

    A laser-based instrument is described for the study of femtosecond dissociation dynamics of gas phase molecules via time-resolved vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Visible or UV pump pulses are generated with nonlinear crystal techniques on a Ti:sapphire laser output, while soft x-ray probe pulses are created via high-order harmonic generation of the same laser in rare gases. Here we describe the optical layout of the pump-probe system, the means for separation of the high-order harmonics in the soft x-ray probe beam, including a description of the two grating setup used to compress the high-harmonic pulses and the magnetic bottle photoelectron spectrometer used for data collection. The feasibility of using the generated high-harmonic pulses for an array of gaseous phase photoelectron spectroscopy experiments is established. These include measurements of valence shell and core-level photoelectron transitions in atoms and molecules, the tunability of the soft x-ray harmonic through Rydberg resonances, and the energy bandwidths of the harmonics. Cross correlations between the visible/UV and soft x-ray pulses, by above threshold ionization, are used to establish the pulse timing, pulse duration, and spatial overlap for ultrafast studies. The observed real time photodissociation of Br2 serves as a demonstration of the pump-probe ultrafast technique and the applicability to ultrafast time-resolved chemical dynamics.

  1. Probing ultrathin film continuity and interface abruptness with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenyu; Nahm, Rambert K.; Engstrom, James R.; Ma, Paul F.

    2013-11-15

    The authors have examined ultrathin (≤10 Å) tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on three surfaces relevant to interconnect layers in microelectronic devices: thermally grown SiO{sub 2}; a Cu thin film grown by physical vapor deposition, and a carbon-doped SiO{sub 2} porous low-κ thin film. The authors have employed ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS), low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the continuity of these thin films, and by implication, the abruptness of the thin film/substrate interface. On SiO{sub 2} and low-κ, the authors find similar results: both ARXPS and AFM indicate that smooth, uniform thin films are deposited, consistent with nearly layer-by-layer growth of TaN{sub x} on these surfaces. Examination of these films using LEISS reveals that while the 10 Å TaN{sub x} thin films are continuous, the 5 Å TaN{sub x} thin films are not continuous and may possess on the order of ∼10% exposed substrate in the form of small subnanometer inclusions. On Cu, the situation is quite different. The TaN{sub x} thin films on these surfaces are not continuous, and our results point to a mixed layer of TaN{sub x} and Cu forming during ALD. In all cases, if one were to rely solely on results from ARXPS, the picture would be incomplete as the results from LEISS are ultimately decisive concerning thin film continuity.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and luminescent properties of Y2O3:Bi3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafer, R. M.; Coetsee, E.; Yousif, A.; Kroon, R. E.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results provided proof for the blue and green emission of Bi3+ in the Y2O3:Bi3+ phosphor. The Y2O3:Bi3+ phosphor was successfully prepared by the combustion process during the investigation of down-conversion materials for Si solar cell application. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that a single-phase cubic crystal structure with the Ia3 space group was formed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the Bi3+ ion replaces the Y3+ ion in two different coordination sites in the Y2O3 crystal structure. The O 1s peak shows five peaks, two which correlate with the O2- ion in Y2O3 in the two different sites, two which correlate with O2- in Bi2O3 in the two different sites and the remaining peak relates to hydroxide. The Y 3d spectrum shows two peaks for the Y3+ ion in the Y2O3 structure in two different sites and the Bi 4f spectrum shows the Bi3+ ion in the two different sites in Bi2O3. The photoluminescence (PL) results showed three broad emission bands in the blue and green regions under ultraviolet excitation, which were also present for panchromatic cathodoluminescence (CL) results. These three peaks have maxima at ∼3.4, 3.0 and 2.5 eV. The PL emission ∼3.0 eV (blue emission) showed two excitation bands centered at ∼3.7 and 3.4 eV while the PL emission at ∼2.5 eV (green emission) showed a broad excitation band from ∼4 to 3.4 eV. The panchromatic CL images were obtained for selected wavelengths at (2.99 ± 0.08) eV (for blue emission) and (2.34 ± 0.06) eV (for green emission). These luminescence results correlate with the XPS results that show that there are two different Bi3+ sites in the host lattice.

  3. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-08-30

    The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils. PMID:25064258

  4. Reactive ZnO/Ti/ZnO interfaces studied by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Knut, Ronny Lindblad, Rebecka; Rensmo, Håkan; Karis, Olof; Grachev, Sergey; Faou, Jean-Yvon; Søndergård, Elin

    2014-01-28

    The chemistry and intermixing at buried interfaces in sputter deposited ZnO/Ti/ZnO thin layers were studied by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The long mean free path of the photoelectrons allowed for detailed studies of the oxidation state, band bending effects, and intrinsic doping of the buried interfaces. Oxidation of the Ti layer was observed when ZnO was deposited on top. When Ti is deposited onto ZnO, Zn Auger peaks acquire a metallic character indicating a strong reduction of ZnO at the interface. Annealing of the stack at 200 °C results in further reduction of ZnO and oxidation of Ti. Above 300 °C, oxygen transport from the bulk of the ZnO layer takes place, leading to re-oxidation of ZnO at the interface and further oxidation of Ti layer. Heating above 500 °C leads to an intermixing of the layers and the formation of a Zn{sub x}TiO{sub y} compound.

  5. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: X-ray absorption near the edge structure and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on pyrite prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Ying-Shu; Wang, Bao-Yi; Wei, Long; Kui, Re-Xi; Qian, Hai-Jie

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports how pyrite films were prepared by thermal sulfurization of magnetron sputtered iron films and characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on a 4B9B beam line at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The band gap of the pyrite agrees well with the optical band gap obtained by a spectrophotometer. The octahedral symmetry of pyrite leads to the splitting of the d orbit into t2g and eg levels. The high spin and low spin states were analysed through the difference of electron exchange interaction and the orbital crystal field. Only when the crystal field splitting is higher than 1.5 eV, the two weak peaks above the white lines can appear, and this was approved by experiments in the present work.

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of CaSO 4:Dy thermoluminescent phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, A. K.; Jha, S. N.; Olivi, L.; Phase, D. M.; Kher, R. K.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2007-11-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have been carried out on CaSO4:Dy phosphor samples at the Dy L3 edge with synchrotron radiation. Measurements were carried out on a set of samples which were subjected to post-preparation annealing at different temperatures and for different cycles. The EXAFS data have been analysed to find the Dy-S and Dy-O bond lengths in the neighbourhood of the Dy atoms in a CaSO4 matrix. The observations from EXAFS measurements were verified with XANES and XPS techniques. On the basis of these measurements, efforts were made to explain the loss of thermoluminescence sensitivity of CaSO4:Dy phosphors after repeated cycles of annealing at 400 °C in air for 1 h.

  7. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bond nature in NpO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Teterin, A. Yu.; Ivanov, K. E.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Maslakov, K. I.; Kalmykov, St. N.; Petrov, V. G.; Enina, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis was done of the x-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE) range of 0 to ˜35 eV for neptunium dioxide (NpO2) valence electrons. The BEs and structure of the core electronic shells (˜35-1250 eV) as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the finite fragment of the NpO2 lattice and the data of other authors were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-˜15 eV) and the inner (˜15-˜35 eV) valence molecular orbitals (OVMO and IVMO, respectively). The filled Np 5f electronic states were shown to form in the NpO2 valence band. The Np 6p electrons participate in formation of both the IVMO and the OVMO (bands). The filled Np 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to take the maximum part in the IVMO formation. The MO composition and the sequence order in the BE range 0-˜35 eV in NpO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative MO scheme for NpO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in neptunium dioxide and the interpretation of other x-ray spectra of NpO2.

  8. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Argon-Plasma-Treated Fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Lopata, Eugene S.; Finney, Lorie S.

    1994-01-01

    Films of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and of a tetrafluoroethylene-perfluoroalkyl vinyl ether (approximately 49:1) copolymer (PFA) were exposed to a radio-frequency argon plasma and then examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The use of fluoropolymer films nearly free of surface hydrocarbon contamination as well as the use of a monochromatized X-ray source for XPS removed two factors contributing to conflicting reports on the effect of exposure time on the fluorine-to-carbon (F/C) and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios for several Ar-plasma-treated fluoropolymers. Contrary to literature indications, a common pattern was found for PTFE and PFA: a moderate decrease in F/C ratio (from 1.99 to 1.40, and from 1.97 to 1.57, respectively), together with a moderate increase in O/C ratio (from negligible to about 0.10, and from 0.012 to about O.10, respectively) at very short exposures, after which the F/C ratios remained essentially constant on prolonged exposures, while the O/C ratios for PTFE and PFA leveled off at 0.11 and 0.15, respectively. The XPS C(sub 1s), spectra for these polymers exposed to the Ar plasma for 20 min were similar and presented, besides a prominent peak at 292.0 eV (CF2,) and a minor peak at 294.0 or 294.1 eV (CF3), a composite band of four curve-resolved peaks (approximately 285-290 eV) representing various CH, CC, CO, CN, and CF functionalities.

  9. First-principles core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy calculation on arsenic defects in silicon crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Hiroki; Miyazawa, Miki; Matsushima, Naoki; Yamauchi, Jun

    2014-02-21

    We investigate the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding energies of As 3d in Si for various defects in neutral and charged states by first-principles calculation. It is found that the complexes of a substitutional As and a vacancy in charged and neutral states explain the experimentally observed unknown peak very well.

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic evidence for bacteria-enhanced dissolution of hornblende

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, B. E.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Barnes, A.; Pantano, C. G.

    2000-04-01

    An Arthrobacter species capable of extracting Fe from hornblende was isolated from a soil from the Adirondacks, NY (USA). This bacteria isolate, used in batch experiments with hornblende, accelerated the release of Fe from hornblende without measurably affecting Al release. The isolate produces both low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) and a catecholate siderophore. Polished hornblende (glass and crystal) discs were analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after incubation with growing Arthrobacter sp. to investigate whether the bacteria caused a distinguishable chemical signature on the upper 100 Å of mineral surface. After removal of the arthrobacter grown on hornblende crystal or glass substrates using lysozyme, XPS revealed surface depletion of Fe for samples grown for several days in buffered (crystal) and unbuffered (crystal and glass) media. Fe/Si ratios of hornblende surfaces dissolved under biotic conditions are significantly lower than Fe/Si ratios on surfaces dissolved under abiotic conditions for similar amounts of time. Enhanced Fe release and the formation of Fe-depleted surfaces is inferred to be caused by catechol complexation at the mineral surface. Because natural siderophore was not isolated in sufficient quantities to run bacteria-free leaching experiments, parallel investigations were run with a commercially available siderophore (desferrioxamine B). Desferrioxamine B was observed to enhance release of Fe, Si, and Al from hornblende both with and without added bacteria. Formation of desferrioxamine-Fe surface complexes were probed by studying the multiple splitting and shift in intensities of the N 1s line analyzed by XPS on siderophore ± Fe on gold surfaces and siderophore + hornblende crystal surfaces. Based upon the observed formation of an hydroxamate (desferrioxamine) surface complex on hornblende, we infer that catecholate siderophores, such as those produced by the arthrobacter, also complex on the

  11. Surface composition analysis of HF vapour cleaned silicon by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolieff, A.; Martin, F.; Amouroux, A.; Marthon, S.; Westendorp, J. F. M.

    1991-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements on silicon surfaces treated by HF gaseous cleaning are described. Various cleaning recipes, which essentially differ by the amount of water present during the reaction were studied; the composition of the silicon surface was measured in terms of monolayer coverage of oxygen, fluorine and carbon. These gaseous cleaned surfaces are compared with those of commonly deglazed silicon samples by using an aqueous HF bath. The F(1s), O(1s), Si(2p), C(1s) photoelectron lines were monitored, and concentrations determined as usual by integration of the lines after removal of the non-linear backgroune. The F(1s), C(1s) and Si(2p) lines were decomposed into several components corresponding to different chemical bonds. The results show that the amount of fluorine is directly correlated with the amount of oxygen: the higher the oxygen level on the sample, the more important is the fluorine content till 0.7 ML, essentially in a O sbnd Si sbnd F bonding state. For more aggresive etching leaving less than one monolayer of oxygen, the Si sbnd F bond becomes predominant. The ratio of the SiF to OSiF concentrations is a significant signature of the deoxidation state of the surface. Hydrophobicity of the water appears in the range of 25% Si sbnd F bonds. With very aggresive etching processes, 67% Si sbnd F bonds and 33% O sbnd Si sbnd F bonds are reached and the total amount of fluoride drops below 0.3 ML. For comparison, only Si sbnd F bonds are observed after a wet etching in a dilute HF bath without a rinse with a much lower fluorine concentration. The balance between Si sbnd F and O sbnd Si sbnd F remains stable and seems to be representative of the surface states provided by the etching process.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of rhodium-ligand interaction in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shuang; Lovelock, Kevin R. J.; Licence, Peter

    2016-02-01

    We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify the interaction between the rhodium atom and phosphine ligands in six 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids ([C8C1Im][X]). The formation of a mono-phosphine rhodium complex based upon addition of triphenylphosphine (PPh3) is confirmed by XPS in all ionic liquids studied herein. Due to the electron donation effect of the ligand, the rhodium atom becomes more negatively charged and thus exhibits a lower measured binding energy. The influence of the anion basicity on the formation of different types of rhodium complexes is also investigated. By introducing a biphosphine ligand, a chelated diphosphine rhodium complex is formed in ionic liquids with more basic anions and verified by both XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). The measured Rh 3d binding energies are correlated to the reaction selectivity of a hydroformylation reaction which inspires a method to design a metal catalyst to control the chemical reaction towards desired products in the future.

  13. Interpretation of x-ray photoelectron spectra of elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, B.C.; Kraft, O.; Shuh, D.K.; Kelly, M.A.; Nix, W.D.; Pianetta, P.; Hagstroem, S.

    1999-05-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of amorphous carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films using a direct current magnetron reactive sputter system. Nanoindentation of the CN{sub x} films and amorphous carbon films deposited under similar conditions shows the CN{sub x} films are extremely elastic, that the addition of nitrogen fundamentally changes the mechanical properties of the films, and that traditional methods of calculating the hardness and Young{close_quote}s modulus may not be valid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the N(1s) and C(1s) core levels show multiple bonding arrangements. In a new interpretation of the XPS data, the two predominant N(1s) spectral features have been identified, based on comparison to reference data in the literature, as those belonging to nitrogen in a four-bond arrangement and nitrogen in a three-bond arrangement, independent of hybridization. The formation of a fourth bond allows nitrogen to substitute for C atoms in a carbon-based graphitic system without the formation of dangling bonds or unfilled states. The relationship between nitrogen incorporation in a carbon-based ring structure and measured film properties is rationalized based on previously published models. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Challenges for lithium species identification in complementary Auger and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M.; Zier, M.; Oswald, S.; Eckert, J.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of high spatial resolution and near-surface chemical information makes Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) a powerful tool for comprehensive surface analysis. The recent interest in lithium metal as an active material in lithium sulphur or lithium air batteries increases the demand for a thorough knowledge of the reactions happening at the electrode interface. Applying AES to the complex surfaces of batteries, however, requires a detailed understanding of the interactions occurring with the highly reactive materials during investigation, especially when using metallic lithium with its passivation layers formed even under glove box atmosphere. The article is focused on the influence of electron beam damage and residual gas under ultra-high vacuum conditions on the observations made. Immediate irradiation effects are shown to highly depend on electron dose leading to misinterpretation the surface composition and a non-sufficient stability of the sample. The results are further supported by coupled X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements that help to understand the beam induced phenomena. An improved output of the spectroscopic measurement could be achieved employing AES mappings. This allows an improved insight into the local distribution of different lithium compounds in the material surface and can also be applied to other battery active materials.

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of select multi-layered transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Joseph; Cook, Kevin M.; Naguib, Michael; Eklund, Per; Gogotsi, Yury; Rosen, Johanna; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is presented in this work for select MXenes—a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and carbonitrides. Given their 2D nature, understanding their surface chemistry is paramount. Thus we identify and quantify the surface groups present before, and after, sputter-cleaning as well as freshly prepared vs. aged multi-layered cold pressed discs. The nominal compositions of the MXenes studied here are Ti3C2Tx, Ti2CTx, Ti3CNTx, Nb2CTx and Nb4C3Tx, where T represents surface groups that this work attempts to quantify. In all the cases, the presence of three surface terminations, single bondO, single bondOH and single bondF, in addition to OH-terminations relatively strongly bonded to H2O molecules, was confirmed. Moreover, from XPS peak fits, it was possible to establish the average sum of the negative charges of the terminations for the aforementioned MXenes. Based on this work, it is now possible to quantify the nature of the surface terminations. This information can, in turn, be used to better design and tailor these novel 2D materials for various applications.

  16. Closing the pressure gap in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy by membrane hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Delmelle, Renaud; Borgschulte, Andreas; Probst, Benjamin; Alberto, Roger; Züttel, Andreas; Bleiner, Davide

    2015-05-15

    Comprehensive studies of gas-solid reactions require the in-situ interaction of the gas at a pressure beyond the operating pressure of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The recent progress of near ambient pressure XPS allows to dose gases to the sample up to a pressure of 20 mbar. The present work describes an alternative to this experimental challenge, with a focus on H{sub 2} as the interacting gas. Instead of exposing the sample under investigation to gaseous hydrogen, the sample is in contact with a hydrogen permeation membrane, through which hydrogen is transported from the outside to the sample as atomic hydrogen. Thereby, we can reach local hydrogen concentrations at the sample inside an UHV chamber, which is equipped with surface science tools, and this corresponds to a hydrogen pressure up to 1 bar without affecting the sensitivity or energy resolution of the spectrometer. This experimental approach is validated by two examples, that is, the reduction of a catalyst precursor for CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and the hydrogenation of a water reduction catalyst for photocatalytic H{sub 2} production, but it opens the possibility of the new in situ characterisation of energy materials and catalysts.

  17. Internal Photoemission and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Studies of Sulfur-Passivated GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenji; Ikoma, Hideaki

    1993-02-01

    Internal photoemission and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements were performed to investigate the effect of sulfur passivation on the GaAs surface and the degradation of the GaAs surface exposed to air ambient after the passivation. The reverse bias dependence of the Schottky barrier height was very small in the as-sulfur-treated sample and was mainly explained by the image force lowering effect. However, it increased as this sample was exposed to air, indicating an increase in the interface state density. The XPS studies showed that both the Ga and As oxides were hardly observed in the sulfur-passivated samples. This indicates that sulfur passivation strongly suppresses oxidation of GaAs. However, a small amount of elemental arsenic was observed with a trace of the As suboxides (such as AsO) after exposure to air and it increased as the exposure time was increased. These results were probably correlated with the increase in the bias dependence of the Schottky barrier height in samples exposed to air after the passivation. Thermal oxidation of GaAs was found to be retarded by sulfur passivation until oxidation time was about 10 min at 300°C. A possible model of suppression of oxidation by sulfur passivation was also discussed.

  18. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates synthesised by reactive milling

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Leon . E-mail: l.black@shu.ac.uk; Garbev, Krassimir; Beuchle, Guenter; Stemmermann, Peter; Schild, Dieter

    2006-06-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to analyse a series of mechanochemically synthesised, nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The samples, with Ca/Si ratios of 0.2 to 1.5, showed structural features of C-S-H(I). XPS analysis revealed changes in the extent of silicate polymerisation. Si 2p, Ca 2p and O 1s spectra showed that, unlike for the crystalline calcium silicate hydrate phases studied previously, there was no evidence of silicate sheets (Q{sup 3}) at low Ca/Si ratios. Si 2p and O 1s spectra indicated silicate depolymerisation, expressed by decreasing silicate chain length, with increasing C/S. In all spectra, peak narrowing was observed with increasing Ca/Si, indicating increased structural ordering. The rapid changes of the slope of FWHM of Si 2p, {delta} {sub Ca-Si} and {delta} {sub NBO-BO} as function of C/S ratio indicated a possible miscibility gap in the C-S-H-solid solution series between C/S 5/6 and 1. The modified Auger parameter ({alpha}') of nanocrystalline C-S-H decreased with increasing silicate polymerisation, a trend already observed studying crystalline C-S-H. Absolute values of {alpha}' were shifted about - 0.7 eV with respect to crystalline phases of equal C/S ratio, due to reduced crystallinity.

  20. Thickness determination of molecularly thin lubricant films by angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chongjun; Bai, Mingwu

    2007-03-01

    An angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method used to measure the thickness of molecularly thin lubricants was developed. The method was built based on an island model of patched overlayer on a flat substrate by using the photoemission signal solely from the lubricant film. Typical molecularly thin Zdol films on the CHx overcoat of unused commercial magnetic disks were measured to verify the metrology. The lubricant thickness determined by the metrology was equal to the recent result by thermostatic high vacuum atomic force microscopy. The measured deduction in the thickness of the molecularly thin lubricant films, successively irradiated by the monochromatic source operated at 14 kV/250 W, was as low as 1 Ǻ during the first irradiation hour. XPS spectra showed that no hydrocarbons, water or oxygen were adsorbed over the Zdol outer surfaces in the tested XPS conditions. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of C 1s in Zdol or in CHx was found to be independent of take off angle (TOA) when TOA < 40°. The IMFP of C 1s in Zdol was ˜63.5 Ǻ and the lubricant island thickness was ˜35 Ǻ.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of select multi-layered transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    DOE PAGES

    Halim, Joseph; Cook, Kevin M.; Naguib, Michael; Eklund, Per; Gogotsi, Yury; Rosen, Johanna; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is presented in this work for select MXenes—a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and carbonitrides. Given their 2D nature, understanding their surface chemistry is paramount. Thus we identify and quantify the surface groups present before, and after, sputter-cleaning as well as freshly prepared vs. aged multi-layered cold pressed discs. The nominal compositions of the MXenes studied here are Ti3C2Tx, Ti2CTx, Ti3CNTx, Nb2CTx and Nb4C3Tx, where T represents surface groups that this work attempts to quantify. In all the cases, the presence of three surface terminations, single bondO, single bondOHmore » and single bondF, in addition to OH-terminations relatively strongly bonded to H2O molecules, was confirmed. Moreover, from XPS peak fits, it was possible to establish the average sum of the negative charges of the terminations for the aforementioned MXenes. Based on this work, it is now possible to quantify the nature of the surface terminations. This information can, in turn, be used to better design and tailor these novel 2D materials for various applications.« less

  2. Effect of Space Radiation Processing on Lunar Soil Surface Chemistry: X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.J.; Baragiola, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the chemistry and microstructure of the surfaces of lunar soil grains is dominated by a reference frame derived mainly from electron microscopy observations [e.g. 1,2]. These studies have shown that the outermost 10-100 nm of grain surfaces in mature lunar soil finest fractions have been modified by the combined effects of solar wind exposure, surface deposition of vapors and accretion of impact melt products [1,2]. These processes produce surface-correlated nanophase Feo, host grain amorphization, formation of surface patinas and other complex changes [1,2]. What is less well understood is how these changes are reflected directly at the surface, defined as the outermost 1-5 atomic monolayers, a region not easily chemically characterized by TEM. We are currently employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surface chemistry of lunar soil samples that have been previously studied by TEM. This work includes modification of the grain surfaces by in situ irradiation with ions at solar wind energies to better understand how irradiated surfaces in lunar grains change their chemistry once exposed to ambient conditions on earth.

  3. Ultrafast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the microsecond time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Höfert, O.; Gleichweit, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Papp, C.

    2013-09-15

    We introduce a new approach for ultrafast in situ high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study surface processes and reaction kinetics on the microsecond timescale. The main idea is to follow the intensity at a fixed binding energy using a commercial 7 channeltron electron analyzer with a modified signal processing setup. This concept allows for flexible switching between measuring conventional XP spectra and ultrafast XPS. The experimental modifications are described in detail. As an example, we present measurements for the adsorption and desorption of CO on Pt(111), performed at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II, with a time resolution of 500 μs. Due to the ultrafast measurements, we are able to follow adsorption and desorption in situ at pressures of 2 × 10{sup −6} mbar and temperatures up to 500 K. The data are consistently analyzed using a simple model in line with data obtained with conventional fast XPS at temperatures below 460 K. Technically, our new approach allows measurement on even shorter timescales, down to 20 μs.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis of aluminum ion stress in barley roots. [Hordeum vulgare

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, M.M.; Foy, C.D.; Coradetti, C.A.; Reinsel, M.D. )

    1990-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to analyze root surface changes when Dayton barley (Hordeum vulgare) (Al tolerant) and Kearney barley (Al sensitive) seedlings were grown in nutrient solution in the presence and absence of 37.0 micromolar Al. The electron spectra from root surfaces contained strong lines in order of decreasing intensity from organic forms of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen and weak lines due to inorganic elements in the form of anions and cations on the surface. The surface composition of root tips from Kearney was C, 65.6%; 0, 26.8%; N, 4.4% and tips from Dayton was C, 72.7%; O, 23.6%; N, 1.9%, grown in the absence of aluminum. Electron lines characteristic of nitrate, potassium, chloride, phosphate were also present in the spectra from those roots. Dayton roots grown in the presence of 37.0 micromolar aluminum contained 2.1% aluminum while Kearney contained 1.3% aluminum. The ratio of aluminum to phosphate was close to 1.0. Dayton roots usually contained twice as much aluminum phosphate in the surface region as Kearney. Dayton may be less susceptible to Al toxic effects by accumulation of aluminum phosphate on the root surface which then acts as a barrier to the transport of aluminum into the interior of the roots.

  5. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  6. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  7. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Newberg, John T; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-09-28

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10(-5) to 2 × 10(-3) Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 10(3) Torr(-1). The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors. PMID:26299301

  8. Chemistry of carbon polymer composite electrode - An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Skou, Eivind

    2015-01-01

    Surface chemistry of the electrodes in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is of great importance for the cell performance. Many groups have reported that electrode preparation condition has a direct influence on the resulting electrode properties. In this work, the oxidation state of electrode components and the composites (catalyst ionomer mixtures) in various electrode structures were systematically studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Based on the spectra, when catalyst is physically mixed with Nafion ionomer, the resulting electrode surface chemistry is a combination of the two components. When the electrode is prepared with a lamination procedure, the ratio between fluorocarbon and graphitic carbon is decreased. Moreover, ether type oxide content is decreased although carbon oxide is slightly increased. This indicates structure change of the catalyst layer due to an interaction between the ionomer and the catalyst and possible polymer structural change during electrode fabrication. The surface of micro porous layer was found to be much more influenced by the lamination, especially when it is in contact with catalysts in the interphase. Higher amount of platinum oxide was observed in the electrode structures (catalyst ionomer mixture) compared to the catalyst powder. This also indicates a certain interaction between the functional groups in the polymer and platinum surface.

  9. Study of the oxidation of gold-tin preforms using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. Ashley; Merchant, Sailesh M.; Perry, D. L.

    1995-11-01

    This study uses x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the nature of the oxide formed on clean Au-Sn binary alloys (ζ and δ phases) and on preforms with the eutectic composition (29 at % Sn) at low O2 pressures (<10-3 Torr) and at high O2 pressures (up to one atmosphere) at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200 °C. Sn Auger parameters and XPS angular-resolved data were obtained in addition to the core binding energies to identify the oxide layer. The oxidation of the Au-Sn alloys is basically similar to the oxidation of metallic Sn. The Auger parameter indicates that with low-pressure oxidation a layered oxide structure is formed consisting of SnO and a slightly tin-rich oxide at the interface. Probably a thin skin of Sn(IV) oxide exists on the outer surface of the low-pressure oxide. High-temperature and low-pressure promotes the growth of SnO. As the pressure is increased the Sn(IV) oxide grows more noticeably and with high-pressure oxidation the Sn(IV) oxide grows thicker than the Sn(II) oxide at the interface. The Sn(II) oxide at the interface appears similar to the Sn(II) oxide structure formed at low pressure. The Auger parameter indicates that the Sn(IV) oxide possesses a structure different than that of Cassiterite.

  10. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies of Lithium-Oxygen Redox Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Harding, Jonathon R.; Mutoro, Eva; Baggetto, Loïc; Dudney, Nancy J.; Liu, Zhi; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in nonaqueous electrolytes significantly hinders the development of rechargeable lithium-air batteries. Here we employ a solid-state Li4+xTi5O12/LiPON/LixV2O5 cell and examine in situ the chemistry of Li-O2 reaction products on LixV2O5 as a function of applied voltage under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and at 500 mtorr of oxygen pressure using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS). Under UHV, lithium intercalated into LixV2O5 while molecular oxygen was reduced to form lithium peroxide on LixV2O5 in the presence of oxygen upon discharge. Interestingly, the oxidation of Li2O2 began at much lower overpotentials (~240 mV) than the charge overpotentials of conventional Li-O2 cells with aprotic electrolytes (~1000 mV). Our study provides the first evidence of reversible lithium peroxide formation and decomposition in situ on an oxide surface using a solid-state cell, and new insights into the reaction mechanism of Li-O2 chemistry. PMID:23056907

  11. A versatile instrument for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: The Lund cell approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Jan; Andersen, Jesper N.; Schnadt, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    During the past one and a half decades ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) has grown to become a mature technique for the real-time investigation of both solid and liquid surfaces in the presence of a gas or vapour phase. APXPS has been or is being implemented at most major synchrotron radiation facilities and in quite a large number of home laboratories. While most APXPS instruments operate using a standard vacuum chamber as the sample environment, more recently new instruments have been developed which focus on the possibility of custom-designed sample environments with exchangeable ambient pressure cells (AP cells). A particular kind of AP cell solution has been driven by the development of the APXPS instrument for the SPECIES beamline of the MAX IV Laboratory: the solution makes use of a moveable AP cell which for APXPS measurements is docked to the electron energy analyser inside the ultrahigh vacuum instrument. Only the inner volume of the AP cell is filled with gas, while the surrounding vacuum chamber remains under vacuum conditions. The design enables the direct connection of UHV experiments to APXPS experiments, and the swift exchange of AP cells allows different custom-designed sample environments. Moreover, the AP cell design allows the gas-filled inner volume to remain small, which is highly beneficial for experiments in which fast gas exchange is required. Here we report on the design of several AP cells and use a number of cases to exemplify the utility of our approach.

  12. Closing the pressure gap in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy by membrane hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Probst, Benjamin; Alberto, Roger; Züttel, Andreas; Bleiner, Davide; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Comprehensive studies of gas-solid reactions require the in-situ interaction of the gas at a pressure beyond the operating pressure of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The recent progress of near ambient pressure XPS allows to dose gases to the sample up to a pressure of 20 mbar. The present work describes an alternative to this experimental challenge, with a focus on H2 as the interacting gas. Instead of exposing the sample under investigation to gaseous hydrogen, the sample is in contact with a hydrogen permeation membrane, through which hydrogen is transported from the outside to the sample as atomic hydrogen. Thereby, we can reach local hydrogen concentrations at the sample inside an UHV chamber, which is equipped with surface science tools, and this corresponds to a hydrogen pressure up to 1 bar without affecting the sensitivity or energy resolution of the spectrometer. This experimental approach is validated by two examples, that is, the reduction of a catalyst precursor for CO2 hydrogenation and the hydrogenation of a water reduction catalyst for photocatalytic H2 production, but it opens the possibility of the new in situ characterisation of energy materials and catalysts.

  13. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE LAYERS IN NITINOL USING X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Christopfel, R.; Mehta, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol is a shape memory alloy whose properties allow for large reversible deformations and a return to its original geometry. This nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy has become a material used widely in the biomedical fi eld as a stent to open up collapsed arteries. Both ambient and biological conditions cause surface oxidation in these devices which in turn change its biocompatibility. The thickness of oxidized layers can cause fractures in the material if too large and can allow for penetration if too thin. Depending on the type and abundance of the chemical species on or near the surface, highly toxic metal ions can leak into the body causing cell damage or even cell death. Thus, biocompatibility of such devices is crucial. By using highly surface sensitive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the surface of these structures, it is possible to decipher both layer composition and layer thickness. Two samples, both of which were mechanically polished, were investigated. Of the two samples, one was then exposed to a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to mimic the chemical properties of blood, while the other remained unexposed. Although both samples were found to have oxide layers of appropriate thickness (on the order of a few nm), it was found that the sample exposed to the saline solution had a slightly thicker oxide layer and more signifi cantly, a phosphate layer very near the surface suggesting toxic metal components are well contained within the sample. These are considerable indications of a biocompatible device.

  14. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of select multi-layered transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Joseph; Cook, Kevin M.; Naguib, Michael; Eklund, Per; Gogotsi, Yury; Rosen, Johanna; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a detailed high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is presented for select MXenes-a recently discovered family of two-dimensional (2D) carbides and carbonitrides. Given their 2D nature, understanding their surface chemistry is paramount. Herein we identify and quantify the surface groups present before, and after, sputter-cleaning as well as freshly prepared vs. aged multi-layered cold pressed discs. The nominal compositions of the MXenes studied here are Ti3C2Tx, Ti2CTx, Ti3CNTx, Nb2CTx and Nb4C3Tx, where T represents surface groups that this work attempts to quantify. In all the cases, the presence of three surface terminations, sbnd O, sbnd OH and sbnd F, in addition to OH-terminations relatively strongly bonded to H2O molecules, was confirmed. From XPS peak fits, it was possible to establish the average sum of the negative charges of the terminations for the aforementioned MXenes. Based on this work, it is now possible to quantify the nature of the surface terminations. This information can, in turn, be used to better design and tailor these novel 2D materials for various applications.

  16. Characterization of plasma fluorinated zirconia for dental applications by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, S. D.; Piascik, J. R.; Stoner, B. R.

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses fluorination of biomedical-grade yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) by sulfur hexafluoride plasma treatment and characterization of near-surface chemistry products by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Deconvolution of the Zr 3d and Y 3d XPS core level spectra revealed formation of both ZrF4 and YF3. In addition, seven-coordinate ZrO2F5 and/or ZrO3F4 phases were deconvolved, retaining similar atomic coordination as the parent oxide and believed to have formed by substitutional displacement of oxygen by fluorine. No additional components attributed to yttria oxyfluoride were deconvolved. Argon ion sputter depth profiling determined the overlayer to be ∼4.0 nm in thickness, and angle resolved XPS showed no angle dependence on component percentages likely due to fluorination extending into the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline substrates. Importantly, the conversion layer did not induce any apparent change in zirconia crystallinity by inspection of Zr-O 3d5/2,3/2 peak positions and full-width-at-half-maximum values, important for retaining its desirable mechanical properties.

  17. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmissivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmissivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach could serve as a basis for non-invasive in situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmissivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments, and might also pave the way to advanced schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  18. ASCITOVG - FORTRAN PROGRAM FOR X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY DATA REFORMATTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Able, P. B.

    1994-01-01

    It is often desirable to use a central, more powerful computer to analyze data captured on a local machine. ASCITOVG is a program for use on an IBM PC series computer which creates binary format files from columns of ASCII-format numbers. The resultant files are suitable for interactive analysis on a DEC PDP-11/73 under the Micro-RSX operating system running the VGS-5000 Enhanced Data Processing (EDP) software package. EDP performs data analysis interactively with a color graphics display, speeding up the analysis considerably when compared with batch job processing. Its interactive analysis capabilities also allow the researcher to watch for spurious data that might go undetected when some form of automatic spectrum processing is used. The incompatibility in floating-point number representations of an IBM PC and a DEC computer were resolved by a FORTRAN subroutine that correctly converts single-precision, floating-point numbers on the PC so that they can be directly read by DEC computers, such as a VAX. The subroutine also can convert binary DEC files (single-precision, floating-point numbers) to IBM PC format. This may prove a more efficient method of moving data from, for instance, a VAX-cluster down to a local IBM PC for further examination, manipulation, or display. The input data file used by ASCITOVG is simply a text file in the form of a column of ASCII numbers, with each value followed by a carriage return. These can be the output of a data collection routine or can even be keyed in through the use of a program editor. The data file header required by the EDP programs for an x-ray photoelectron spectrum is also written to the file. The spectrum parameters, entered by the user when the program is run, are coded into the header format used internally by all of the VGS-5000 series EDP packages. Any file transfer protocol having provision for binary data can be used to transmit the resulting file from the PC to the DEC machine. Each EDP data file has at least

  19. Band bending at ferroelectric surfaces and interfaces investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, Nicoleta Georgiana

    2014-11-24

    This work reports on the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to quantify band bending at ferroelectric free surfaces and at their interfaces with metals. Surfaces exhibiting out-of-plane ferroelectric polarization are characterized by a band bending, due to the formation of a dipole layer at the surface, composed by the uncompensated polarization charges (due to ionic displacement) and to the depolarization charge sheet of opposite sign, composed by mobile charge carriers, which migrate near surface, owing to the depolarization electric field. To this surface band bending due to out-of-plane polarization states, metal-semiconductor Schottky barriers must be considered additionally when ferroelectrics are covered by metal layers. It is found that the net band bending is not always an algebraic sum of the two effects discussed above, since sometimes the metal is able to provide additional charge carriers, which are able to fully compensate the surface charge of the ferroelectric, up to the vanishing of the ferroelectric band bending. The two cases which will be discussed in more detail are Au and Cu deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3}(001) single crystal thin layers, prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Gold forms unconnected nanoparticles, and their effect on the band bending is the apparition of a Schottky band bending additional to the band bending due to the out-of-plane polarization. Copper, starting with a given thickness, forms continuous metal layers connected to the ground of the system, and provide electrons in sufficient quantity to compensate the band bending due to the out-of-plane polarization.

  20. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Analysis of the Oxide of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Toshifumi; Ikoma, Hideaki

    1992-12-01

    Oxides of GaAs grown using various oxidation processes were analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxides investigated were the native (naturally grown or exposed to air), the chemical (grown in boiling deionized water) and the thermal (at 350°C and 500°C in dry oxygen) ones. With the use of a spectral deconvolution technique, all types of suboxides of both As and Ga including elemental arsenic were observed in addition to well-known As2O3 and Ga2O3. Elemental arsenic is considered to be one of the oxidized forms of GaAs. As2O5 was observed in the thermal oxides. In the chemical oxide and the native oxide grown in short exposure to air, elemental arsenic is the main component of oxide, while As2O3 is the dominant species in more highly oxidized films such as the thermal oxide. XPS data suggest that oxidation of As bonded in GaAs proceeds as GaAs→elemental As (As0)→As2O (As1+)→AsO (As2+)→As2O3 (As3+)→As2O5 (As5+). Oxidation of Ga bonded in GaAs advances as GaAs→Ga2O (Ga1+)→GaO (Ga2+)→Ga2O3 (Ga3+). Angle-resolved XPS measurements and semiquantitative analyses of these data were performed and an effective thickness of each oxide was also derived with simplified assumptions. The native and the chemical oxides were nearly stoichiometric. However, the thermal oxide was substantially Ga-rich due to desorption and evaporation of As2O3 from the surface during oxidation.

  1. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars. PMID:25881450

  2. Repair and Utilization of the Kratos XSAM 800 X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives for this summer faculty fellowship were first to repair the Kratos XSAM 800 X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS) and then to utilize the instrument to participate in ongoing research projects at KSC and in the researcher's own laboratory at UCF. The first 6 weeks were used in repairing the instrument. Working both alone and with the Kratos service engineer, a number of hardware problems, largely associated with the sample stage control system, were corrected. Defective parts were identified and fixed in the computer driver boards, the stage power supply, and the driver interface. The power supply was completely replaced. After four weeks of work, the instrument was functional. This occurred on a Wednesday. The following Friday the instrument had to be completely shut down because the power to the O & C Building was to be turned off. The instrument was properly secured. On Monday, the instrument was powered up and the original problems returned. After another 2 weeks of work, a software problem was identified. This problem caused the computer to use a defective port for the sample stage control. It was circumvented by rewriting the startup routine. The final 3 weeks of the fellowship were spent using the XPS to analyze samples being studied in the Langley materials project (Martha Williams) and a catalyst project (Dr. Orlando Melendez). During this time, several sample analysis requests from other groups at KSC also came in and those samples were run as well. The summer faculty fellowship also allowed many contacts to be made. After meeting with the sensors group, two projects were identified for collaboration and white papers are being prepared. One project aims to develop small, very sensitive hydrogen detectors and the other to develop a broad area, easily monitored, zero power consumption hydrogen detector. In addition to the work mentioned above, the XPS was utilized in a study underway in Dr. Hampton's laboratory at UCF.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the surface film on magnesium powders.

    PubMed

    Burke, Paul J; Bayindir, Zeynel; Kipouros, Georges J

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are attractive for use in automotive and aerospace applications because of their low density and good mechanical properties. However, difficulty in forming magnesium and the limited number of available commercial alloys limit their use. Powder metallurgy may be a suitable solution for forming near-net-shape parts. However, sintering pure magnesium presents difficulties due to surface film that forms on the magnesium powder particles. The present work investigates the composition of the surface film that forms on the surface of pure magnesium powders exposed to atmospheric conditions and on pure magnesium powders after compaction under uniaxial pressing at a pressure of 500 MPa and sintering under argon at 600 °C for 40 minutes. Initially, focused ion beam microscopy was utilized to determine the thickness of the surface layer of the magnesium powder and found it to be ~10 nm. The X-ray photoelectron analysis of the green magnesium sample prior to sintering confirmed the presence of MgO, MgCO(3)·3H(2)O, and Mg(OH)(2) in the surface layer of the powder with a core of pure magnesium. The outer portion of the surface layer was found to contain MgCO(3)·3H(2)O and Mg(OH)(2), while the inner portion of the layer is primarily MgO. After sintering, the MgCO(3)·3H(2)O was found to be almost completely absent, and the amount of Mg(OH)(2) was also decreased significantly. This is postulated to occur by decomposition of the compounds to MgO and gases during the high temperature of sintering. An increase in the MgO content after sintering supports this theory.

  4. AFM-measured surface roughness of SU-8 structures produced by deep x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, K. D.; Lochel, B.; Harvey, E. C.; Hayes, J. P.; Peele, A. G.

    2006-10-01

    Deep x-ray lithography is a well-known technique used to pattern ultra high aspect ratio microstructures. It relies on the fact that higher energy synchrotron x-rays have the ability to penetrate millimeters of resist layers. However, the spectral shape of the beam will vary as a function of penetration depth, sometimes by design, so as to distribute the dose differently for different thickness structures and always as a result of filtering of lower energies. Some studies have shown that in PMMA sidewall roughness can be affected by spectral issues. SU-8 is now the resist of choice for certain high aspect ratio structures due to its high sensitivity and contrast. As sidewall roughness is a key parameter in several potential applications of high aspect ratio structures, we therefore investigated the surface roughness of 500 µm thick SU-8 structures exposed using beam spectra with peak energies between 3 keV and 12 keV. Results indicate that as the x-ray energy increases so too does the surface roughness. The surface roughness also increases as a function of feature depth. We attribute this to the random secondary physical processes of photo and Auger electron scattering both of which are strongly energy dependent.

  5. Observation and simulation of hard x ray photoelectron diffraction to determine polarity of polycrystalline zinc oxide films with rotation domains

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jesse R.; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohashi, Naoki; Pis, Igor; Kobata, Masaaki; Winkelmann, Aimo; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2012-02-01

    X ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns of polar zinc oxide (ZnO) surfaces were investigated experimentally using hard x rays and monochromatized Cr K{alpha} radiation and theoretically using a cluster model approach and a dynamical Bloch wave approach. We focused on photoelectrons emitted from the Zn 2p{sub 3/2} and O 1s orbitals in the analysis. The obtained XPD patterns for the (0001) and (0001) surfaces of a ZnO single crystal were distinct for a given emitter and polarity. Polarity determination of c-axis-textured polycrystalline ZnO thin films was also achieved with the concept of XPD, even though the in-plane orientation of the columnar ZnO grains was random.

  6. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and the Role of Relaxation Energy in Understanding Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Frank O.; White, Michael G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the measurement of electrons ejected from a system which is being irradiated with X-rays or ultraviolet photons, and a theoretical model for calculating core-electron ionization energies. (MLH)

  7. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²⁺ and Pt⁴⁺ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.

  8. Using “Tender” X-ray Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy as A Direct Probe of Solid-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt2+ and Pt4+ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry. PMID:25950241

  9. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; et al

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquidmore » and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²⁺ and Pt⁴⁺ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.« less

  10. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  11. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  12. Photoelectron diffraction from single oriented molecules: Towards ultrafast structure determination of molecules using x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Misato; Fujikawa, Takashi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Mizuno, Tomoya; Adachi, Jun-ichi; Yagishita, Akira

    2013-06-01

    We provide a molecular structure determination method, based on multiple-scattering x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) calculations. This method is applied to our XPD data on several molecules having different equilibrium geometries. Then it is confirmed that, by our method, bond lengths and bond angles can be determined with a resolution of less than 0.1 Å and 10∘, respectively. Differently from any other scenario of ultrafast structure determination, we measure the two- or three-dimensional XPD of aligned or oriented molecules in the energy range from 100 to 200 eV with a 4π detection velocity map imaging spectrometer. Thanks to the intense and ultrashort pulse properties of x-ray free-electron lasers, our approach exhibits the most probable method for obtaining ultrafast real-time structural information on small to medium-sized molecules consisting of light elements, i.e., a “molecular movie.”

  13. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the hydration of C{sub 2}S thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rheinheimer, Vanessa; Casanova, Ignasi

    2014-06-01

    Electron-beam evaporation was used to produce thin films of β-dicalcium silicate. Chemical and mineralogical compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and grazing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), respectively. Results show that no fractionation occurs during evaporation and isostructural condensation of the material as synthesized films have the same composition as the initial bulk material. Samples were gradually hydrated under saturated water spray conditions and analyzed with XPS. Polymerization of the silicate chains due to hydration, and subsequent formation of C-S-H, has been monitored through evaluation of energy shifts on characteristic silicon peaks. Quantitative analyses show changes on the surface by the reduction of the Ca/Si ratio and an increase on the difference between binding energies of bridging and non-bridging oxygen. Finally, SEM/FIB observation shows clear differences between the surface and cross section of the initial sample and the reacted sample.

  14. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  15. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    PubMed

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  16. "Un-annealed and Annealed Pd Ultra-Thin Film on SiC Characterized by Scanning Probe Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. J.; Shi, D. T.; Elshot, K.; Bryant, E.; Lafate, K.; Chen, H.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    Pd/SiC has been used as a hydrogen and a hydrocarbon gas sensor operated at high temperature. UHV (Ultra High Vacuum)-Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were applied to study the relationship between the morphology and chemical compositions for Pd ultra-thin films on SiC (less than 30 angstroms) at different annealing temperatures. Pd ultra-thin film on 6H-SiC was prepared by the RF sputtering method. The morphology from UHV-STM and AFM shows that the Pd thin film was well deposited on SiC substrate, and the Pd was partially aggregated to round shaped participates at an annealing temperature of 300 C. At 400 C, the amount of surface participates decreases, and some strap shape participates appear. From XPS, Pd2Si was formed on the surface after annealing at 300 C, and all Pd reacted with SiC to form Pd2Si after annealing at 400 C. The intensity of the XPS Pd peak decreases enormously at 400 C. The Pd film diffused into SiC, and the Schottky barrier height has almost no changes. The work shows the Pd sicilides/SiC have the same electronic properties with Pd/SiC, and explains why the Pd/SiC sensor still responds to hydrogen at high operating temperatures.

  17. Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the biocorrosion of copper by alginic acid polysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, John G.; Geesey, Gill G.; Hankins, Michael R.; Wright, Randy B.; Wichlacz, Paul L.

    1989-08-01

    Thin films (3.4 nm) of copper on germanium substrates were exposed to 2% alginic acid polysaccharide aqueous solution. Pre- and post-exposure characterization were done by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ancillary graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the removal process of the copper thin film from the germanium substrate. Results indicate that some of the copper was oxidized by the alginic acid solution. Some of the copper was removed from the Cu/Ge interface and incorporated into the polymer matrix. Thus, biocorrosion of copper was exhibited by the alginic acid polysaccharide.

  18. Identification of metal s states in Sn-doped anatase by polarisation dependent hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regoutz, A.; Oropeza, F. E.; Poll, C. G.; Payne, D. J.; Palgrave, R. G.; Panaccione, G.; Borgatti, F.; Agrestini, S.; Utsumi, Y.; Tsuei, K. D.; Liao, Y. F.; Watson, G. W.; Egdell, R. G.

    2016-03-01

    The contributions of Sn 5s and Ti 4s states to the valence band electronic structure of Sn-doped anatase have been identified by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal s state intensity is strongly enhanced relative to that of O 2p states at high photon energies due to matrix element effects when electrons are detected parallel to the direction of the polarisation vector of the synchrotron beam, but becomes negligible in the perpendicular direction. The experimental spectra in both polarisations are in good agreement with cross section and asymmetry parameter weighted partial densities of states derived from density functional theory calculations.

  19. Structure and Bonding in Chlorine-Functionalized Nanodiamond--Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Panich, Alexander M; Sergeev, Nikolay A; Olszewski, Marcin; Froumin, Natalya; Dideykin, Arthur T; Sokolov, Vasiliy V; Vul', Alexander Ya

    2015-02-01

    We report on investigation of detonation nanodiamond annealed at 800C°in chlorine atmosphere by means of 1H, 13C and 35Cl nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of these methods are found to be consistent with each other and evidence formation of chlorine-carbon groups and sp2 carbon shell on the nanodiamond surface. The data obtained provide detailed information about the structure and bonding in this diamond nanoparticle. Interaction of nuclear spins with unpaired electron spins of dangling bonds results in fast 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation.

  20. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Analysis of Gold Surfaces after Removal of Thiolated DNA Oligomers by Ultraviolet/Ozone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Bass, Andrew D.; Sanche, Léon

    2012-01-01

    Well ordered films of molecular DNA can be formed by the attachment of thiolated DNA oligonucleotides to a supporting gold substrate. The gold substrate represents a significant fraction of the total cost of preparing such films and it is thus important to determine whether such substrates can be reused. Here we investigate with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy the suitability of UV/ozonolysis previously employed to remove alkanethiols from gold, for removing 40-mer, single and double stranded synthetic DNA. We find that while UV/O3 can indeed remove thiolated DNA from gold slides, the treatment times required permit the implantation of additional organic contaminants. PMID:20000594

  1. Application of maximum-entropy spectral estimation to deconvolution of XPS data. [X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Klein, J. D.; Barton, J. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between maximum-entropy spectral estimation and traditional methods of deconvolution used in electron spectroscopy. The maximum-entropy method is found to have higher resolution-enhancement capabilities and, if the broadening function is known, can be used with no adjustable parameters with a high degree of reliability. The method and its use in practice are briefly described, and a criterion is given for choosing the optimal order for the prediction filter based on the prediction-error power sequence. The method is demonstrated on a test case and applied to X-ray photoelectron spectra.

  2. Nanocrystalline tin oxide: Possible origin of its weak ferromagnetism deduced from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Lian, Yadong; Gu, Min; Yu, Ji; Tang, Tong B.; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline tin oxide was fabricated, with molar ratio O/Sn determined as 1.40, 1.55, 1.79, 1.92 and 1.96 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They displayed weak ferromagnetism, the sample with O/Sn = 1.55 showing the maximum saturation magnetization reaching almost 8 ×10-3 emu /g at room temperature. 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance allowed the deduction, based on four resolved resonance peaks, that their Sn ions had four possible coordination numbers, namely 3, 4, 5 and 6. The relative fraction of 4-coordinated cations was the one found to bear positive linear correlation with saturation magnetization of the sample. It is surmised that magnetism in tin oxide results mainly from 4-coordination Sn ions, of valance about +3, as estimated from the binding energies of their 3d photoelectron emission levels.

  3. Composition of CuAu alloy and changes upon corrosion studied by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Parasmani; Detlefs, Blanka; Gupta, Ajay; Kolb, Dieter; Zegenhagen, Jorg

    2011-03-01

    Metals and their alloys are highly susceptible to corrosion in wet environment. Dealloying is a particular type of corrosion, attacking practically all metals in industrial use: When an alloy is coming into contact with an electrolyte, the less noble metal may go into solution, typically causing crack formation and subsequent material failure upon stress. We used bulk sensitive Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) with an excitation energy of 6 keV as a new powerful tool to investigate the chemical composition of alloys and changes upon dealloying, studying Cu x Au (with x = 4.1) alloy films of 9 to 50 nm thickness. Morphology, structure and composition were further characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectivity and quantitative X-ray fluorescence. The HAXPES analysis revealed that chemical shifts of metal core-levels, i.e. Au 4 f and Cu 3 s , can be used as a benchmark for the alloy composition. HAXPES as a function of electron emission angle allowed depth sensitive determination of the chemical composition before and after dealloying in sulphuric acid.

  4. Forward scattering in hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Structural investigation of buried Mn–Ga films

    SciTech Connect

    ViolBarbosa, Carlos E. Ouardi, Siham; Fecher, Gerhard H. Felser, Claudia; Kubota, Takahide; Mizukami, Shigemi; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Ikenaga, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) in combination with hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has been used to study the structure of buried layers in thin multilayer films. A detailed layer-by-layer investigation was performed using the element-specific, local-probe character of XPD. In the present work, angular-resolved HAXPES at a photon energy of 7.94 keV photon energy was used to investigate a Cr/Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38}/Mg/MgO multilayer system. Differences in the angular distributions of electrons emitted from Mn and Ga atoms revealed that the structure of Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} changes from L1{sub 0} towards D0{sub 22} for increasing annealing temperatures. A c/a ratio of 1.81 ± 0.06 was determined for the buried Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} layer in a D0{sub 22} structure from the XPD experiment. The improvement of the structural order of the Mn{sub 62}Ga{sub 38} layer is accompanied by an improvement of the structure of the overlying MgO layer.

  5. Silicon nanocrystals with high boron and phosphorus concentration hydrophilic shell—Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Minoru Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Masataka; Imakita, Kenji

    2014-02-28

    Boron (B) and phosphorus (P) codoped silicon (Si) nanocrystals, which exhibit very wide range tunable luminescence due to the donor to acceptor transitions and can be dispersed in polar liquids without organic ligands, are studied by Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Codoped Si nanocrystals exhibit a Raman spectrum significantly different from those of intrinsic ones. First, the Raman peak energy is almost insensitive to the size and is very close to that of bulk Si crystal in the diameter range of 2.7 to 14 nm. Second, the peak is much broader than that of intrinsic ones. Furthermore, an additional broad peak, the intensity of which is about 20% of the main peak, appears around 650 cm{sup −1}. The peak can be assigned to local vibrational modes of substitutional B and B-P pairs, B clusters, B-interstitial clusters, etc. in Si crystal. The Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies suggest that a crystalline shell heavily doped with these species is formed at the surface of a codoped Si nanocrystal and it induces the specific properties, i.e., hydrophilicity, high-stability in water, high resistance to hydrofluoric acid, etc.

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of irradiation-induced amorphizaton of Gd2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Lian, J.; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.; Boatner, L. A.

    2001-09-01

    The radiation-induced evolution of the microstructure of Gd2Ti2O7, an important pyrochlore phase in radioactive waste disposal ceramics and a potential solid electrolyte and oxygen gas sensor, has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Following the irradiation of a Gd2Ti2O7 single crystal with 1.5 MeV Xe+ ions at a fluence of 1.7×1014Xe+/cm2, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a 300-nm-thick amorphous layer at the specimen surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the Ti 2p and O 1s electron binding energy shifts of Gd2Ti2O7 before and after amorphization showed that the main results of ion-irradiation-induced disorder are a decrease in the coordination number of titanium and a transformation of the Gd-O bond. These features resemble those occurring in titanate glass formation, and they have implications for the chemical stability and electronic properties of pyrochlores subjected to displacive radiation damage.

  7. Photoelectron interference fringes by super intense x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Koudai; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2009-09-01

    The photoelectron spectra of H- produced by circularly polarized strong high-frequency laser pulses are theoretically studied. An oscillating substructure in the above-threshold ionization (ATI) peaks is observed, which extends the validity of the earlier findings in the 1D calculations [K. Toyota et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 043418 (2007)] and 3D calculations for linear polarization [O. I. Tolstikhin, Phys. Rev. A 77, 032712 (2008)]. Its origin is due to an interference between a pair of photoelectron wave packets created in the rising and falling part of the pulse, which appears clearly in the stabilization regime.

  8. A novel X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the Al/SiO2 interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Vasquez, R. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Zamani, N.; Maserjian, J.

    1985-01-01

    The nondestructive measurement of the chemical and physical characteristics of the interface between bulk SiO2 and thick aluminum films is reported. Both X-ray phototelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrical measurements of unannealed, resistively evaporated Al films on thermal SiO2 indicate an atomically abrupt interface. Post metallization annealing at 450 C induces reduction of the SiO2 by the aluminum, at a rate consistent with the bulk reaction rate. The XPS measurement is performed from the SiO2 side after the removal of the Si substrate with XeF2 gas and thinning of the SiO2 layer with HF:ETOH. This represents a powerful new approach to the study of metal-insulator and related interfaces.

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of cleaning procedures for synchrotron radiation beamline materials at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Liu, C.; Kuzay, T.M.; McDowell, M.W.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    TZM (a high-temperature molybdenum alloy), machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel were cleaned using environmentally safe, commercially available cleaning detergents. The surface cleanliness was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that a simple alkaline detergent is very effective at removal of organic and inorganic surface contaminants or foreign particle residue from machining processes. The detergent can be used with ultrasonic agitation at 140 {degree}F to clean the TZM molybdenum, machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel. A citric-acid-based detergent was also found to be effective at cleaning metal oxides, such as iron oxide, molybdenum oxide, as well as tungsten oxides, at mild temperatures with ultrasonic agitation, and it can be used to replace strong inorganic acids to improve cleaning safety and minimize waste disposal and other environmental problems. The efficiency of removing the metal oxides depends on both cleaning temperature and time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  10. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Depth Profiling of Electrochemically Prepared Thin Oxide Layers on Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donik, Črtomir; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Mandrino, Djordje; Jenko, Monika

    2011-10-01

    The surface oxidation of duplex stainless steel (DSS 2205) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experiments were performed on the alloy after controlled oxidation in a chloride-enriched solution at controlled potentials. The evolution of the passive film formed on the DSS in a chloride solution was studied using cyclic voltammetry with XPS surface characterization at selected potentials. The evolution of the oxide films and its specific compositions formed on the DSS was studied as a function of depth. Fe/Cr oxidized layers and oxide thicknesses were observed and correlated with the various potentiostatic potentials. The importance of Mo and Cr inside the oxide films in this article is studied and described, whereas their role in the protective layer, as oxides, is significant.

  11. Understanding Chemical versus Electrostatic Shifts in X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the present article is on understanding the insight that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements can provide when studying self-assembled monolayers. Comparing density functional theory calculations to experimental data on deliberately chosen model systems, we show that both the chemical environment and electrostatic effects arising from a superposition of molecular dipoles influence the measured core-level binding energies to a significant degree. The crucial role of the often overlooked electrostatic effects in polar self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is unambiguously demonstrated by changing the dipole density through varying the SAM coverage. As a consequence of this effect, care has to be taken when extracting chemical information from the XP spectra of ordered organic adsorbate layers. Our results, furthermore, imply that XPS is a powerful tool for probing local variations in the electrostatic energy in nanoscopic systems, especially in SAMs. PMID:26937264

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the chemistry involved in tin oxide film growth during chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mannie, Gilbere J. A.; Gerritsen, Gijsbert; Abbenhuis, Hendrikus C. L.; Deelen, Joop van; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.; Thuene, Peter C.

    2013-01-15

    The chemistry of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) processes is believed to be complex, and detailed reports on reaction mechanisms are scarce. Here, the authors investigated the reaction mechanism of monobutyl tinchloride (MBTC) and water during SnO{sub 2} thin film growth using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XPS results indicate an acid-base hydrolysis reaction mechanism, which is tested with multilayer experiments, demonstrating self-terminating growth. In-house developed TEM wafers are used to visualize nucleation during these multilayer experiments, and results are compared with TEM results of APCVD samples. Results show almost identical nucleation behavior implying that their growth mechanism is identical. Our experiments suggest that in APCVD, when using MBTC and water, SnO{sub 2} film growth occurs via a heterolytic bond splitting of the Sn-Cl bonds without the need to invoke gas-phase radical or coordination chemistry of the MBTC precursor.

  13. Annealing dependence of diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights probed by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaowei, M.; Muller, E. M.; Rumaiz, A. K.; Weiland, C.; Cockayne, E.; Woicik, J. C.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Smedley, J.

    2012-05-14

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the diamond valence-band maximum was determined by theoretically calculating the diamond density of states and applying cross section corrections. The diamond-platinum Schottky barrier height was lowered by 0.2 eV after thermal annealing, indicating annealing may increase carrier injection in diamond devices leading to photoconductive gain. The platinum contacts on oxygen-terminated diamond was found to provide a higher Schottky barrier and therefore a better blocking contact than that of the silver contact in diamond-based electronic devices.

  14. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM–ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041

  15. Band alignment of Ga2O3/Si heterojunction interface measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengwei; Nishihagi, Kazuo; Wang, Xu; Saito, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Tooru; Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Arita, Makoto; Guo, Qixin

    2016-09-01

    Ga2O3 thin films were deposited on (111) Si substrate by pulsed laser deposition method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to determine the valence band offset at Ga2O3/Si heterojunction interface. We measured the binding energies of Si 2p and Ga 2p3/2 core levels and the valence band maxima energies. The valence band offset is determined to be 3.5 ± 0.1 eV. As a consequence a type Ι heterojunction with a conduction band offset of 0.2 ± 0.1 eV is found. The determination of the band alignment of Ga2O3/Si heterojunction facilitates the design of optical and electronic devices based on the Ga2O3/Si structure.

  16. Characterization of SiC fibers by soft x-ray photoelectron and photoabsorption spectroscopies and scanning Auger microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qing; McDowell, M.W.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Synchrotron radiation soft x-ray photoelectron and photoabsorption spectroscopy was used to characterize commercially obtained SiC fibers produced by CVD on a W core and followed by a C passivating layer. Depth profiling of the fiber through the C/SiC interface was done by making Si 2p and C 1s core level PES and PAS, as well as scanning Auger microscopy, measurements following Ar{sup +} sputtering. No significant changes in either photoemission or absorption or Auger line shapes were observed versus depth, indicating no significant interfacial reaction. The line shapes of the carbonaceous coatings are predominantely graphite-like and those of the CVD SiC coatings are microcrystalline, with disorder present to some extent in both cases.

  17. Theoretical characterization of X-ray absorption, emission, and photoelectron spectra of nitrogen doped along graphene edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-aki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    2013-01-24

    K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), and photoelectron (XPS) spectra of nitrogen doped along graphene edges are systematically investigated by using first-principles methods. In this study we considered pyridinium-like, pyridine-like, cyanide-like, and amine-like nitrogens at armchair and zigzag edges and pyrrole-like nitrogen at armchair edge as well as graphite-like nitrogen at graphene interior site. Our results indicate that nitrogen configuration and its location (armchair or zigzag edge) in nitrogen-doped graphene can be identified via the spectral analysis. Furthermore, some controversial spectral features observed in experiment for N-doped graphene-like materials are unambiguously assigned. The present analysis gives an explanation to the reason why the peak assignment is usually made differently between XPS and XAS.

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of cleaning procedures for synchrotron radiation beamline materials at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Liu, C.; Kuzay, T.M.; McDowell, M.W.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    TZM (a high temperature molybdenum alloy), machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel were cleaned using environmentally safe, commercially available cleaning detergents. The surface cleanliness was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that a simple alkaline detergent is very effective at removal of organic and inorganic surface contaminants or foreign particle residue from machining processes. The detergent can be used with ultrasonic agitation at 140 F to clean the TZM molybdenum, machinable tungsten, and 304 stainless steel. A citric-acid-based detergent was also found to be effective at cleaning metal oxides, such as iron oxide, molybdenum oxide, as well as tungsten oxides at mild temperatures with ultrasonic agitation, and it can be used to replace strong inorganic acids to improve cleaning safety and minimize waste disposal and other environmental problems. The efficiency of removing the metal oxides depends on both cleaning temperature and time.

  19. Thermal stability of electron-irradiated poly(tetrafluoroethylene) - X-ray photoelectron and mass spectroscopic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1990-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was subjected to 3 keV electron bombardment and then heated in vacuum to 300 C. The behavior of the material as a function of radiation dose and temperature was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface and mass spectroscopy of the species evolved. Lightly damaged material heated to 300 C evolved saturated fluorocarbon species, whereas unsaturated fluorocarbon species were evolved from heavily damaged material. After heating the heavily damaged material, those features in the XPS spectrum that were associated with damage diminished, giving the appearance that the radiation damage had annealed. The observations were interpreted by incorporating mass transport of severed chain fragments and thermal decomposition of severely damaged material into the branched and cross-linked network model of irradiated PTFE. The apparent annealing of the radiation damage was due to covering of the network by saturated fragments that easily diffused through the decomposed material to the surface region upon heating.

  20. Band alignment at a MgO/GaSb heterointerface using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruxue; Wei, Zhipeng; Liu, Xue; Li, Yongfeng; Fang, Xuan; Tang, Jilong; Fang, Dan; Gao, Xian; Wang, Dengkui; Hao, Yongqin; Yao, Bin; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    The valence band offset (ΔE V) of a MgO/GaSb heterostructure was determined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. A ΔE V value of 2.84 ± 0.10 eV was calculated by using Ga 3d3/2 and Mg 2p1/2 binding energies as references. Taking the empirical band gaps of 7.83 eV and 0.73 eV for MgO and GaSb thin films into consideration, respectively, we obtained the type-I band alignment of a MgO/GaSb heterostructure with a conduction band offset (ΔE c) of 4.26 ± 0.10 eV, suggesting a nested interface band alignment.

  1. Application of ESCA to the determination of stoichiometry in sputtered coatings and interface regions. [X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize radiofrequency sputter deposited films of several refractory compounds. Both the bulk film properties such as purity and stoichiometry and the character of the interfacial region between the film and substrate were examined. The materials were CrB2, MoS2, Mo2C, and Mo2B5 deposited on 440C steel. It was found that oxygen from the sputtering target was the primary impurity in all cases. Biasing improves the film purity. The effect of biasing on film stoichiometry is different for each compound. Comparison of the interfacial composition with friction data suggests that adhesion of these films is improved if a region of mixed film and iron oxides can be formed.

  2. Electronic structure of Al- and Ga-doped ZnO films studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gabás, M.; Ramos Barrado, José R.; Torelli, P.; Barrett, N. T.

    2014-01-01

    Al- and Ga-doped sputtered ZnO films (AZO, GZO) are semiconducting and metallic, respectively, despite the same electronic valence structure of the dopants. Using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we observe that both dopants induce a band in the electronic structure near the Fermi level, accompanied by a narrowing of the Zn 3d/O 2p gap in the valence band and, in the case of GZO, a substantial shift in the Zn 3d. Ga occupies substitutional sites, whereas Al dopants are in both substitutional and interstitial sites. The latter could induce O and Zn defects, which act as acceptors explaining the semiconducting character of AZO and the lack of variation in the optical gap. By contrast, mainly substitutional doping is consistent with the metallic-like behavior of GZO.

  3. Probing buried organic-organic and metal-organic heterointerfaces by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Watanabe, Yoshio; Nakajima, Atsushi; Son, Jin-Young; Oji, Hiroshi

    2012-11-26

    We present a nondestructive characterization method for buried hetero-interfaces for organic/organic and metal/organic systems using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) which can probe electronic states at depths deeper than {approx}10 nm. A significant interface-derived signal showing a strong chemical interaction is observed for Au deposited onto a C{sub 60} film, while there is no such additional feature for copper phthalocyanine deposited onto a C{sub 60} film reflecting the weak interaction between the molecules in the latter case. A depth analysis with HAXPES reveals that a Au-C{sub 60} intermixed layer with a thickness of 5.1 nm is formed at the interface.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of cubic boron nitride single crystals grown under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lixin; Chen, Zhanguo; Liu, Xiuhuan; Gao, Yanjun; Jia, Gang

    2012-02-01

    The defects, impurities and their bonding states of unintentionally doped cubic boron nitride (cBN) single crystals were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that nitrogen vacancy (VN) is the main native defect of the cBN crystals since the atomic ratio of B:N is always larger than 1 before Ar ion sputtering. After sputter cleaning, around 6 at% carbon, which probably comes from the growth chamber, remains in the samples as the main impurity. Carbon can substitute nitrogen lattice site and form the bonding states of Csbnd Bsbnd N or Csbnd B, which can be verified by the XPS spectra of C1s, B1s and N1s. The C impurity (acceptor) and N vacancy (donor) can compose the donor-acceptor complex to affect the electrical and optical properties of cBN crystals.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of para-substituted benzoic acids chemisorbed to aluminum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kreil, Justin; Ellingsworth, Edward; Szulczewski, Greg

    2013-11-15

    A series of para-substituted, halogenated (F, Cl, Br, and I) benzoic acid monolayers were prepared on the native oxide of aluminum surfaces by solution self-assembly and spin-coating techniques. The monolayers were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angles. Several general trends are apparent. First, the polarity of the solvent is critical to monolayer formation. Protic polar solvents produced low coverage monolayers; in contrast, nonpolar solvents produced higher coverage monolayers. Second, solution deposition yields a higher surface coverage than spin coating. Third, the thickness of the monolayers determined from XPS suggests the plane of the aromatic ring is perpendicular to the surface with the carboxylate functional group most likely binding in a bidentate chelating geometry. Fourth, the saturation coverage (∼2.7 × 10{sup 14} molecules cm{sup −2}) is independent of the para-substituent.

  6. Effects of proton irradiation on single-stranded DNA studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Han, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been employed in order to study the effects of proton irradiation on herring sperm single-stranded DNA. Systematic changes of the chemical shifts in the C, N, O, and P XPS line components as functions of the irradiation dose were observed, indicative of the bonding configurations in the DNA system. While the C 1 s XPS lines showed weak blueshifts, the N 1 s, O 1 s, and P 2 p XPS lines showed blueshifts with a marked dependence on the irradiation dose in a prominent manner. Our results show that linear energy transfer by charged particles and photons may have distinct molecular-level effects as the C 1 s, N 1 s, O 1 s, and P 2 p XPS lines showed redshifts in our previous study of effects of the γ-ray irradiation on the same system.

  7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of disordering in Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Lian, J; Wang, L M; Ewing, R C; Wang, R G; Pan, W

    2002-03-11

    The dramatic increases in ionic conductivity in Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 solid solution are related to disordering on the cation and anion lattices. Disordering in Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As Zr substitutes for Ti in Gd2Ti2O7 to form Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 (0.25 < x < or =0.75), the corresponding O 1s XPS spectrum merges into a single symmetric peak. This confirms that the cation antisite disorder occurs simultaneously with anion disorder. Furthermore, the O 1s XPS spectrum of Gd2Zr2O7 experimentally suggests the formation of a split vacancy.

  8. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Disordering in Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 Pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Lian, J.; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.; Wang, R. G.; Pan, W.

    2002-03-01

    The dramatic increases in ionic conductivity in Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 solid solution are related to disordering on the cation and anion lattices. Disordering in Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As Zr substitutes for Ti in Gd2Ti2O7 to form Gd2(Ti1-xZrx)2O7 (0.25

  9. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hehn, Iris; Schuster, Swen; Wächter, Tobias; Abu-Husein, Tarek; Terfort, Andreas; Zharnikov, Michael; Zojer, Egbert

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM-ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041

  10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of the interaction between rhodium acetate and ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shuang; Jiang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used as a probe of the interaction between rhodium acetate ([Rh2(OAc)4]) and ionic liquids. Due to the impact of the anion of ionic liquids on the electronic environment of the rhodium centre, the measured Rh 3d binding energies of [Rh2(OAc)4] dissolved in a series of ionic liquids were found to decrease along with the increasing of the basicity of anions. The reduction of Rh(II) to Rh(0) in 1-octyl-3methylimidazolium acetate ([C8C1Im][OAc]) under UHV condition was monitored by XPS. The intensity of the new formed metallic Rh(0) peak was found increased along with time. The surface enrichment of the new formed Rh(0) species in the system was also concluded.

  11. XPS studies of structure-induced radiation effects at the Si/SiO2 interface. [X ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Lewis, B. F.; Zamini, N.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1980-01-01

    The interfacial structures of radiation hard and soft oxides grown by dry and wet processes on silicon substrates have been examined by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that the primary difference in the local atomic structure at the Si/SiO2 interface is the significantly higher concentration of strained 120 deg SiO2 bonds and SiO interfacial species in soft samples. Results of in situ radiation damage experiments using low energy electrons (0-20 eV) are reported which correlate with the presence of a strained layer of SiO2 (20 A) at the interface. The results are interpreted in terms of a structural model for hole and electron trap generation by ionizing radiation.

  12. Mixed adlayer of alkanethiol and peptide on GaAs(100): quantitative characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wampler, Heeyeon P; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y; Lee, Kangho; Janes, David B; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-04-01

    Homogeneous and mixed adlayers composed of an alkanethiol (1-octadecanethiol, ODT) and a peptide (CGISYGRKKRRQRRR) on GaAs(100) were formed in two different solvent systems: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The chemical composition of each adlayer was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The data showed that the makeup of the adlayer and its stability largely depends on the solvent used. Angle-resolved XPS also revealed that the adlayer thickness and tilt angles were different from values obtained from ellipsometry measurements and vastly varied between the two solvents used. The coverage data extracted from the XPS measurements indicated that homogeneous adlayers of peptide in PBS buffer form a multilayered film. Homogeneous alkanethiol adlayers exhibited monolayer coverage under all solvent treatments. Coadsorbed layers containing both alkanethiol and peptide have fractional monolayer coverage in both solvents. PMID:18275237

  13. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-08-04

    Molecular-level insight into the dissociation of nitric acid in water is obtained from photoelectron X-ray spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our combined studies reveal surprisingly abrupt changes in solvation configurations of undissociated nitric acid at approximately 4 M concentration. Experimentally, this is inferred from N1s binding energy shifts of HNO3(aq) as a function of concentration, and is associated with variations in the local electronic structure of the nitrogen atom. It also shows up as a discontinuity in the degree of dissociation as a function of concentration, determined here from the N1s photoelectron signal intensity, which can be separately quantified for undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq). Intermolecular interactions within the nitric acid solution are discussed on the basis of MD simulations, which reveal that molecular HNO3 interacts remarkably weakly with solvating water molecules at low concentration; around 4 M there is a turnover to a more structured solvation shell, accompanied by an increase in hydrogen bonding between HNO3 and water. We suggest that the driving force behind the more structured solvent configuration of HNO3 is the overlap of nitric acid solvent shells that sets in around 4 M concentration. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. Surface study of stainless steel electrode deposition from soil electrokinetic (EK) treatment using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Embong, Zaidi; Johar, Saffuwan; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan

    2015-04-29

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation relies upon application of a low-intensity direct current through the soil between stainless steel electrodes that are divided into a cathode array and an anode array. This mobilizes charged species, causing ions and water to move toward the electrodes. Metal ions and positively charged organic compounds move toward the cathode. Anions such as chloride, fluoride, nitrate, and negatively charged organic compounds move toward the anode. Here, this remediation techniques lead to a formation of a deposition at the both cathode and anode surface that mainly contributed byanion and cation from the remediated soil. In this research, Renggam-Jerangau soil species (HaplicAcrisol + RhodicFerralsol) with a surveymeter reading of 38.0 ± 3.9 μR/hr has been investigation in order to study the mobility of the anion and cation under the influence electric field. Prior to the EK treatment, the elemental composition of the soil and the stainless steel electrode are measured using XRF analyses. Next, the soil sample is remediated at a constant electric potential of 30 V within an hour of treatment period. A surface study for the deposition layer of the cathode and anode using X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that a narrow photoelectron signal from oxygen O 1s, carbon, C 1s silica, Si 2p, aluminium, Al 2p and chromium, Cr 2p exhibited on the electrode surface and indicate that a different in photoelectron intensity for each element on both electrode surface. In this paper, the mechanism of Si{sup 2+} and Al{sup 2+} cation mobility under the influence of voltage potential between the cathode and anode will be discussed in detail.

  15. Surface study of stainless steel electrode deposition from soil electrokinetic (EK) treatment using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embong, Zaidi; Johar, Saffuwan; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan

    2015-04-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) remediation relies upon application of a low-intensity direct current through the soil between stainless steel electrodes that are divided into a cathode array and an anode array. This mobilizes charged species, causing ions and water to move toward the electrodes. Metal ions and positively charged organic compounds move toward the cathode. Anions such as chloride, fluoride, nitrate, and negatively charged organic compounds move toward the anode. Here, this remediation techniques lead to a formation of a deposition at the both cathode and anode surface that mainly contributed byanion and cation from the remediated soil. In this research, Renggam-Jerangau soil species (HaplicAcrisol + RhodicFerralsol) with a surveymeter reading of 38.0 ± 3.9 μR/hr has been investigation in order to study the mobility of the anion and cation under the influence electric field. Prior to the EK treatment, the elemental composition of the soil and the stainless steel electrode are measured using XRF analyses. Next, the soil sample is remediated at a constant electric potential of 30 V within an hour of treatment period. A surface study for the deposition layer of the cathode and anode using X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that a narrow photoelectron signal from oxygen O 1s, carbon, C 1s silica, Si 2p, aluminium, Al 2p and chromium, Cr 2p exhibited on the electrode surface and indicate that a different in photoelectron intensity for each element on both electrode surface. In this paper, the mechanism of Si2+ and Al2+ cation mobility under the influence of voltage potential between the cathode and anode will be discussed in detail.

  16. Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus: Bridging the pressure gap.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Vélez, J J; Pfeifer, V; Hävecker, M; Wang, R; Centeno, A; Zurutuza, A; Algara-Siller, G; Stotz, E; Skorupska, K; Teschner, D; Kube, P; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Hofmann, S; Schlögl, R; Knop-Gericke, A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main goals in catalysis is the characterization of solid/gas interfaces in a reaction environment. The electronic structure and chemical composition of surfaces become heavily influenced by the surrounding environment. However, the lack of surface sensitive techniques that are able to monitor these modifications under high pressure conditions hinders the understanding of such processes. This limitation is known throughout the community as the "pressure gap." We have developed a novel experimental setup that provides chemical information on a molecular level under atmospheric pressure and in presence of reactive gases and at elevated temperatures. This approach is based on separating the vacuum environment from the high-pressure environment by a silicon nitride grid-that contains an array of micrometer-sized holes-coated with a bilayer of graphene. Using this configuration, we have investigated the local electronic structure of catalysts by means of photoelectron spectroscopy and in presence of gases at 1 atm. The reaction products were monitored online by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. The successful operation of this setup was demonstrated with three different examples: the oxidation/reduction reaction of iridium (noble metal) and copper (transition metal) nanoparticles and with the hydrogenation of propyne on Pd black catalyst (powder). PMID:27250406

  17. Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus: Bridging the pressure gap.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Vélez, J J; Pfeifer, V; Hävecker, M; Wang, R; Centeno, A; Zurutuza, A; Algara-Siller, G; Stotz, E; Skorupska, K; Teschner, D; Kube, P; Braeuninger-Weimer, P; Hofmann, S; Schlögl, R; Knop-Gericke, A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main goals in catalysis is the characterization of solid/gas interfaces in a reaction environment. The electronic structure and chemical composition of surfaces become heavily influenced by the surrounding environment. However, the lack of surface sensitive techniques that are able to monitor these modifications under high pressure conditions hinders the understanding of such processes. This limitation is known throughout the community as the "pressure gap." We have developed a novel experimental setup that provides chemical information on a molecular level under atmospheric pressure and in presence of reactive gases and at elevated temperatures. This approach is based on separating the vacuum environment from the high-pressure environment by a silicon nitride grid-that contains an array of micrometer-sized holes-coated with a bilayer of graphene. Using this configuration, we have investigated the local electronic structure of catalysts by means of photoelectron spectroscopy and in presence of gases at 1 atm. The reaction products were monitored online by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. The successful operation of this setup was demonstrated with three different examples: the oxidation/reduction reaction of iridium (noble metal) and copper (transition metal) nanoparticles and with the hydrogenation of propyne on Pd black catalyst (powder).

  18. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Contamination on Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Exposed to a Nitrogen Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Lopata, Eugene S.; Finney, Lorie S.

    1993-01-01

    In this note, we show that X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) data and the changes in surface properties attending exposure of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films to a nitrogen plasma can likewise be misinterpreted when the interfering role of minor surface hydrocarbon contamination is not taken into account.

  19. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Hydrocarbon Contamination on Poly(Tetrafluoroethylene) Exposed to a Nitrogen Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Lopata, Eugene S.; Finney, Lorie S.

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that unless the surface of poly(tetrafluoroethylene)(PTFE) is free of hydrocarbon contamination, anomalous changes in the oxygen and fluorine contents, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and hence also the surface properties, may be improperly ascribed to a PTFE film exposed to a oxygen plasma.

  20. Catalyst Chemical State during CO Oxidation Reaction on Cu(111) Studied with Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Near Edge X-ray Adsorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eren, Baran; Heine, Christian; Bluhm, Hendrik; Somorjai, Gabor A; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-09-01

    The chemical structure of a Cu(111) model catalyst during the CO oxidation reaction in the CO+O2 pressure range of 10-300 mTorr at 298-413 K was studied in situ using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron and adsorption spectroscopy techniques [X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS)]. For O2:CO partial pressure ratios below 1:3, the surface is covered by chemisorbed O and by a thin (∼1 nm) Cu2O layer, which covers completely the surface for ratios above 1:3 between 333 and 413 K. The Cu2O film increases in thickness and exceeds the escape depth (∼3-4 nm) of the XPS and NEXAFS photoelectrons used for analysis at 413 K. No CuO formation was detected under the reaction conditions used in this work. The main reaction intermediate was found to be CO2(δ-), with a coverage that correlates with the amount of Cu2O, suggesting that this phase is the most active for CO oxidation.

  1. X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Direct Element Specific Surface Magnetometry of Nanomagnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, James G.

    1997-03-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of xray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the "sum rules."[1] Unfortunately, sum rule analyses are hampered by several limitations [2], including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic Xray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al [3] demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now we [4] have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus [5], it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together [6], this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source. [7,8] This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. 1. B.T. Thole et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68,1943 (1992); P. Carra et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 694 (1993). 2. J.G. Tobin et al Phys. Rev. B 52, 6530 (1995). 3. E. Tamura et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 73, 1533 (1994) 4. J.G. Tobin, K.W. Goodman, F.O. Schumann, R.F. Willis, J

  2. Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES) Investigation of the Silicon Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin T; Heskett, David R; Nguyen, Cao Cuong; Nie, Mengyun; Woicik, Joseph C; Lucht, Brett L

    2015-09-16

    Binder-free silicon (BF-Si) nanoparticle anodes were cycled with 1.2 M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC), fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), or EC with 15% FEC (EC:FEC), extracted from cells and analyzed by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HAXPES). All of the electrolytes generate an SEI which is integrated with Si containing species. The EC and EC:FEC electrolytes result in the generation of LixSiOy after the first cycle while LixSiOy is only observed after five cycles for the FEC electrolyte. The SEI initially generated from the EC electrolyte is primarily composed of lithium ethylene dicarbonate (LEDC) and LiF. However, after five cycles, the composition changes, especially near the surface of silicon because of decomposition of the LEDC. The SEI generated from the EC:FEC electrolytes contains LEDC, LiF, and poly(FEC) and small changes are observed upon additional cycling. The SEI generated with the FEC electrolyte contains LiF and poly(FEC) and small changes are observed upon additional cycling. The stability of the SEI correlates with the observed capacity retention of the cells.

  3. ANALYSIS OF PASSIVATED SURFACES FOR MASS SPECTROMETER INLET SYSTEMS BY AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo, H.; Clark, E.

    2010-09-01

    Stainless steel coupons approximately 0.5' in diameter and 0.125' thick were passivated with five different surface treatments and an untreated coupon was left as a control. These surface treatments are being explored for use in tritium storage containers. These coupons were made to allow surface analysis of the surface treatments using well-know surface analysis techniques. Depth profiles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on these coupons to characterize the surface and near surface regions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were collected as well. All of the surface treatments studied here appear to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7-0.9 nm thick) as well as the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E's silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  4. Band alignment of ZnO/multilayer MoS2 interface determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinke; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Qiang; He, Jiazhu; Chen, Le; Li, Kuilong; Jia, Fang; Zeng, Yuxiang; Lu, Youming; Yu, Wenjie; Zhu, Deliang; Liu, Wenjun; Wu, Jing; He, Zhubing; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2016-08-01

    The energy band alignment between ZnO and multilayer (ML)-MoS2 was characterized using high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ZnO film was deposited using an atomic layer deposition tool, and ML-MoS2 was grown by chemical vapor deposition. A valence band offset (VBO) of 3.32 eV and a conduction band offset (CBO) of 1.12 eV were obtained for the ZnO/ML-MoS2 interface without any treatment. With CHF3 plasma treatment, a VBO and a CBO across the ZnO/ML-MoS2 interface were found to be 3.54 eV and 1.34 eV, respectively. With the CHF3 plasma treatment, the band alignment of the ZnO/ML-MoS2 interface has been changed from type II or staggered band alignment to type III or misaligned one, which favors the electron-hole pair separation. The band alignment difference is believed to be dominated by the down-shift in the core level of Zn 2p or the interface dipoles, which is caused by the interfacial layer rich in F.

  5. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of gas/solidinterfaces at near-ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Havecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Kiskinova,Maya; Schlogl, Robert; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-12-03

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a quantitative, chemically specific technique with a probing depth of a few angstroms to a few nanometers. It is therefore ideally suited to investigate the chemical nature of the surfaces of catalysts. Because of the scattering of electrons by gas molecules, XPS is generally performed under vacuum conditions. However, for thermodynamic and/or kinetic reasons, the catalyst's chemical state observed under vacuum reaction conditions is not necessarily the same as that of a catalyst under realistic operating pressures. Therefore, investigations of catalysts should ideally be performed under reaction conditions, i.e., in the presence of a gas or gas mixtures. Using differentially pumped chambers separated by small apertures, XPS can operate at pressures of up to 1 Torr, and with a recently developed differentially pumped lens system, the pressure limit has been raised to about 10 Torr. Here, we describe the technical aspects of high-pressure XPS and discuss recent applications of this technique to oxidation and heterogeneous catalytic reactions on metal surfaces.

  6. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of water on metals and oxides at ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Yamamoto, S.; Bluhm, H.; Andersson, K.; Ketteler, G.; Ogasawara, H.; Salmeron, M.; Nilsson, A.

    2007-10-29

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing the elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. Conventional XPS experiments have been limited to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions due to a short mean free path of electrons in a gas phase. The recent advances in instrumentation coupled with third-generation synchrotron radiation sources enables in-situ XPS measurements at pressures above 5 Torr. In this review, we describe the basic design of the ambient pressure XPS setup that combines differential pumping with an electrostatic focusing. We present examples of the application of in-situ XPS to studies of water adsorption on the surface of metals and oxides including Cu(110), Cu(111), TiO2(110) under environmental conditions of water vapor pressure. On all these surfaces we observe a general trend where hydroxyl groups form first, followed by molecular water adsorption. The importance of surface OH groups and their hydrogen bonding to water molecules in water adsorption on surfaces is discussed in detail.

  7. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Pyridinium-Based Ionic Liquids: Comparison to Imidazolium- and Pyrrolidinium-Based Analogues.

    PubMed

    Men, Shuang; Mitchell, Daniel S; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Licence, Peter

    2015-07-20

    We investigate eight 1-alkylpyridinium-based ionic liquids of the form [Cn Py][A] by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electronic environment of each element of the ionic liquids is analyzed. In particular, a reliable fitting model is developed for the C 1s region that applies to each of the ionic liquids. This model allows the accurate charge correction of binding energies and the determination of reliable and reproducible binding energies for each ionic liquid. Shake-up/off phenomena are determinedfor both C 1s and N 1s spectra. The electronic interaction between cations and anions is investigated for both simple ionic liquids and an example of an ionic-liquid mixture; the effect of the anion on the electronic environment of the cation is also explored. Throughout the study, a detailed comparison is made between [C8 Py][A] and analogues including 1-octyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium- ([C8 C1 Pyrr][A]), and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium- ([C8 C1 Im][A]) based samples, where X is common to all ionic liquids.

  8. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: II. In situ analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P. |; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in individual biotite crystals in thin sections of ten metapelites and one syenite. The in situ XPS analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in biotite crystals in the metapelites were compared with published Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe values determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) for mineral separates from the same hand samples. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greatest for samples with the lowest Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe (by MS). For eight metamorphic biotites with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe = 9-27% comparison of the two techniques yielded a linear correlation of r = 0.94 and a statistically acceptable fit of [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub xps} = [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub ms}. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greater for two samples with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe {le} 6% (by MS). For biotite in the syenite sample, Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by both in situ XPS and bulk wet chemistry/electron probe microanalysis were similar. This contribution demonstrates that XPS can be used to analyze bulk Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in minerals in thin sections when appropriate precautions taken to avoid oxidation of the near-surface during preparation of samples. 25 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Band offsets of TiZnSnO/Si heterojunction determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, R. J.; Jiang, Q. J.; Yan, W. C.; Feng, L. S.; Lu, B.; Ye, Z. Z.; Li, X. F.; Li, X. D.; Lu, J. G.

    2014-09-28

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was utilized to measure the valence band offset (ΔE{sub V}) of the TiZnSnO (TZTO)/Si heterojunction. TZTO films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using magnetron sputtering at room temperature. By using the Zn 2p{sub 3/2} and Sn 3d{sub 5/2} energy levels as references, the value of ΔE{sub V} was calculated to be 2.69 ± 0.1 eV. Combining with the experimental optical energy band gap of 3.98 eV for TZTO extracted from the UV-vis transmittance spectrum, the conduction band offset (ΔE{sub C}) was deduced to be 0.17 ± 0.1 eV at the interface. Hence, the energy band alignment of the heterojunction was determined accurately, showing a type-I form. This will be beneficial for the design and application of TZTO/Si hybrid devices.

  10. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: I. Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P.; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe were calibrated with nine single crystals of biotite of known Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe content. Peak shape parameters for the component Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} Fe 3p peaks were obtained by a constrained lease squares fitting method that minimized the difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by XPS and wet chemistry/electron microprobe (WCEM) analyses. Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} peak separation was estimated from the separation of minima in the second derivative of Fe 3p spectra. The single set of derived peak parameters yielded a good linear correlation (r = 0.87) between XPS and WCEM values over the sample displaying progressive oxidation during XPS analysis resulted in Fe{sup 2} and Fe{sup 3+} component peak shapes largely consistent with the constrained least squares fitting methods. Beam damage, which appeared to be restricted to three single crystals with low {Sigma}Fe, low Fe/Mg, and high Fe(II)/{Sigma}Fe, caused increases in Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe that were proportional to the duration of sample exposure. 60 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. An XPS study of the stability of Fomblin Z25 on the native oxide of aluminum. [x ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jones, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of Fomblin Z25, a perfluoropolyalkylether lubricant, were vapor deposited onto clean, oxidized aluminum and sapphire surfaces, and their behavior at different temperatures was studied using x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It was found that the interfacial fluid molecules decompose on the native oxide at room temperature, and continue to decompose at elevated temperatures, as previous studies had shown to occur on clean metal. TDS indicated that different degradation mechanisms were operative for clean and oxidized aluminum. On sapphire substrates, no reaction was observed at room temperature. Our conclusion is that the native oxide of aluminum is neither passive nor protective towards Fomblin Z25. At high temperatures (150 C) degradation of the polymer on sapphire produced a debris layer at the interface with a chemical composition similar to the one formed on aluminum oxide. Rubbing a Fomblin film on a single crystal sapphire also induced the decomposition of the lubricant in contact with the interface and the formulation of a debris layer.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the stability of Fomblin Z25 on the native oxide of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jones, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Thin films of Fomblin Z25, a perfluoropolyalkylether lubricant, were vapor deposited onto clean, oxidized aluminum, and onto sapphire surfaces, and their behavior at different temperatures was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The interfacial fluid molecules decompose on the native oxide at room temperature, and continue to decompose at elevated temperatures, as previous studies had shown to occur on the clean metal. TDS indicated that different degradation mechanisms were operative for clean and oxidized aluminum. On sapphire substrates, no reaction was observed at room temperature. The native oxide of aluminum is neither passive nor protective towards Fomblin Z25. At higher temperatures (150 C), degradation of the polymer on sapphire produced a debris layer at the interface with a chemical composition similar to the one formed on aluminum oxide. Rubbing a Fomblin film on a single crystal sapphire also induced the decomposition of the lubricant in contact with the interface and the formation of a debris layer.

  13. Interaction between M/CuO (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn) as studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourasia, Anil; Stahl, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    The technique of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the chemical reactivity between metal M (where M is Ti, V, Cr, or Mn) and copper oxide at the M/CuO interface. Thin films of copper (about 20 nm) were deposited on silicon substrates by the e-beam method. Such samples were oxidized in an oxygen environment in a quartz tube furnace at 400°C. The formation of CuO was checked by the XPS spectral data. Thin films of the metal M were then deposited on these CuO sample. The M 2p, oxygen 1s and copper 2p regions were investigated by XPS. The magnesium anode (energy = 1253.6 eV) has been used for this purpose. The metal 2p peaks shift to the high binding energy side while the satellites associated with the copper core level peaks disappear. The shifting of the metal 2p peaks is associated with the formation of the oxide. The disappearance of the satellites in the copper 2p region is associated with the reduction of copper oxide to elemental copper. The spectral data show chemical reactivity at the M/CuO interface. Supported by Organized Reseach, TAMU-Commerce.

  14. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Heating Effects on Pd/6H-SiC Schottky Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak

    1998-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study the effects of heat treatment on the Pd/6H-SiC Schottky diode structure. After heating the structure at 425 C for 140 h, a very thin surface layer of PdO mixed with SiO(x) formed on the palladium surface of the Schottky structure. Heat treatment promoted interfacial diffusion and reaction which significantly broadened the interfacial region. In the interfacial region, the palladium concentration decreases with depth, and the interfacial products are Pd(x)Si (x = 1,2,3,4). In the high Pd concentration regions, Pd4Si is the major silicide component while gr and Pd2Si are major components in the low Pd concentration region. At the center of the interface, where the total palladium concentration equals that of silicon, the concentrations of palladium associated with various palladium silicides (Pd(x)Si, x= 1,2,3,4) are approximately equal. The surface passivation layer composed of PdO and SiO, may significantly affect the electronic and catalytic properties of the surface of the Schottky diode which plays a major role in gas detection. The electronic properties of the Schottky structure may be dominated by a (Pd+Pd(x)Si)/SiC interface. In order to stabilize the properties of the Schottky structure the surface and interface diffusion and reactions must be controlled.

  15. UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tewell, Craig R.

    2002-08-19

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl{sub 4} and a Al(Et){sub 3} co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl{sub 2} and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl{sub 4} in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl{sub 2} by TiCl{sub 4} resulting in a thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x}, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x} on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to {approx}1 Torr of Al(Et){sub 3}.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of boron defects in silicon crystal: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Jun; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Suwa, Yuji

    2016-05-01

    We carried out a comprehensive study on the B 1s core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) binding energies and formation energies for boron defects in crystalline silicon by first-principles calculation with careful evaluation of the local potential boundary condition for the model system using the supercell corresponding to 1000 Si atoms. It is reconfirmed that the cubo-octahedral B12 cluster in silicon crystal is unstable and exists at the saddle point decaying to the icosahedral and S4 B12 clusters. The electrically active clusters without any postannealing of ion-implanted Si are identified as icosahedral B12 clusters. The experimentally proposed threefold coordinated B is also identified as a ⟨ 001 ⟩ B - Si defect. For an as-doped sample prepared by plasma doping, the calculated XPS spectra for complexes consisting of vacancies and substitutional B atoms are consistent with the experimental spectra. It is proposed that, assuming that the XPS peak at 187.1 eV is due to substitutional B (Bs), the experimental XPS peaks at 187.9 and 186.7 eV correspond to interstitial B at the H-site and ⟨ 001 ⟩ B - Si defects, respectively. In the annealed samples, the complex of Bs and interstitial Si near the T-site is proposed as a candidate for the experimental XPS peak at 188.3 eV.

  17. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of Bixa orellana seeds.

    PubMed

    Felicissimo, Marcella P; Bittencourt, Carla; Houssiau, Laurent; Pireaux, Jean-Jacques

    2004-04-01

    Three different experiments were performed in order to obtain the major carotenoid composition of the natural colorant annatto (E160b) through ToF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analyses. In the first experiment, Bixa orellana seeds aril as well as its interior part were analyzed. The analysis of the seeds aril by ToF-SIMS gives the colorant fingerprint without any sample treatment, showing the presence of bixin and its characteristic fragments. The analysis performed in the interior part of the seeds indicates the presence of Fe. The second set of measurements was conducted on the seeds organic extract right after extraction revealing the same components observed by in situ measurement. A third set of measurements was performed aiming to determine the reason for the organic extract color shift observed after 3 months of exposure to ambient light at room temperature. In this case, it was possible to evidence the degradation of bixin by the loss of xylene molecules through ToF-SIMS and the probable carotenoid oxidation based on the C1s XPS spectrum of the degraded extract. PMID:15053514

  18. Uniqueness plots: A simple graphical tool for identifying poor peak fits in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhupinder; Diwan, Anubhav; Jain, Varun; Herrera-Gomez, Alberto; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2016-11-01

    Peak fitting is an essential part of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) narrow scan analysis, and the Literature contains both good and bad examples of peak fitting. A common cause of poor peak fitting is the inclusion of too many fit parameters, often without a sound chemical and/or physical basis for them, and/or the failure to reasonably constrain them. Under these conditions, fit parameters are often correlated, and therefore lacking in statistical meaning. Here we introduce the uniqueness plot as a simple graphical tool for identifying bad peak fits in XPS, i.e., fit parameter correlation. These plots are widely used in spectroscopic ellipsometry. We illustrate uniqueness plots with two data sets: a C 1s narrow scan from ozone-treated carbon nanotube forests and an Si 2p narrow scan from an air-oxidized silicon wafer. For each fit, we consider different numbers of parameters and constraints on them. As expected, the uniqueness plots are parabolic when fewer fit parameters and/or more constraints are applied. However, they fan out and eventually become horizontal lines as more unconstrained parameters are included in the fits. Uniqueness plots are generated by plotting the chi squared (χ2) value for a fit vs. a systematically varied value of a parameter in the fit. The Abbe criterion is also considered as a figure of merit for uniqueness plots in the Supporting Information. We recommend that uniqueness plots be used by XPS practitioners for identifying inappropriate peak fits.

  19. Compositional depth profile of a native oxide LPCVD MNOS structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurzbach, J. A.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is no report of an unambiguous analysis of the composition and interfacial structure of MNOS (metal-nitride oxide semiconductor) systems, despite the technological importance of these systems. The present investigation is concerned with a study of an MNOS structure on the basis of a technique involving the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with a controlled stopped-flow chemical-etching procedure. XPS is sensitive to the structure of surface layers, while stopped-flow etching permits the controlled removal of overlying material on a scale of atomic layers, to expose new surface layers as a function of thickness. Therefore, with careful analysis of observed intensities at measured depths, this combination of techniques provides depth resolution between 5 and 10 A. According to the obtained data there is intact SiO2 at the substrate interface. There appears to be a thin layer containing excess bonds to silicon on top of the SiO2.

  20. Photoelectric characteristics of silicon P—N junction with nanopillar texture: Analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Jia-Ou; Yi, Fu-Ting; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Nian; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2014-09-01

    Silicon nanopillars are fabricated by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching with the cesium chloride (CsCl) islands as masks originally from self-assembly. Wafers with nanopillar texture or planar surface are subjected to phosphorus (P) diffusion by liquid dopant source (POCl3) at 870 °C to form P—N junctions with a depth of 300 nm. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to measure the Si 2p core levels of P—N junction wafer with nanopillar texture and planar surface. With a visible light excitation, the P—N junction produces a new electric potential for photoelectric characteristic, which causes the Si 2p core level to have a energy shift compared with the spectrum without the visible light. The energy shift of the Si 2p core level is -0.27 eV for the planar P—N junction and -0.18 eV for the nanopillar one. The difference in Si 2p energy shift is due to more space lattice defects and chemical bond breaks for nanopillar compared with the planar one.

  1. Investigation of composition and chemical state of elements in iron boride by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyoshin, V. G.; Kharlamov, A. I.; Prokopenko, V. M.

    1981-06-01

    The composition and chemical state of iron and boron in the surface layer of iron boride under different kinds of pretreatment of samples have been investigated by the method of X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. It has been found that in the initial sample there is oxygen chemically combined with iron and boron atoms. Upon heating (450°C) in hydrogen, in argon, and in vacuo there occurs removal of oxygen only from iron atoms (no pure iron was found to be formed). Boron oxidizes and there probably appears a new surface combination of boron with oxygen in which the bonding energy of 1 s electrons is higher than that in B 2O 3. Treatment of the iron boride surface with argon ions and with protons ensures uniform removal of oxygen from iron and boron atoms. It has been found that thermal treatment of iron boride leads to depletion of iron atoms from the sample surface layer, and pickling with argon ions and with protons leads to strong enrichment. Iron boride samples subjected to Ar + and H + bombardment tend to undergo significant oxidation when subsequently exposed to air at room temperature.

  2. Three-Dimensional Electron Realm in VSe2 by Soft-X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: Origin of Charge-Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocov, Vladimir N.; Shi, Ming; Kobayashi, Masaki; Monney, Claude; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Krempasky, Juraj; Schmitt, Thorsten; Patthey, Luc; Berger, Helmuth; Blaha, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The resolution of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) in three-dimensional (3D) momentum k is fundamentally limited by ill defined surface-perpendicular wave vector k⊥ associated with the finite photoelectron mean free path. Pushing ARPES into the soft-x-ray energy region sharpens the k⊥ definition, allowing accurate electronic structure investigations in 3D materials. We apply soft-x-ray ARPES to explore the 3D electron realm in a paradigm transition metal dichalcogenide VSe2. Essential to break through the dramatic loss of the valence band photoexcitation cross section at soft-x-ray energies is the advanced photon flux performance of our synchrotron instrumentation. By virtue of the sharp 3D momentum definition, the soft-x-ray ARPES experimental band structure and Fermi surface of VSe2 show a textbook clarity. We identify pronounced 3D warping of the Fermi surface and show that its concomitant nesting acts as the precursor for the exotic 3D charge-density waves in VSe2. Our results demonstrate the immense potential of soft-x-ray ARPES to explore details of 3D electronic structure.

  3. Valence band offset of β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A sample of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure has been grown by dry thermal oxidation of GaN on a sapphire substrate. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the β-Ga2O3 layer was formed epitaxially on GaN. The valence band offset of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure is measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the valence band of the β-Ga2O3/GaN structure is 1.40 ± 0.08 eV. PMID:23046910

  4. Interface electronic properties of co-evaporated MAPbI3 on ZnO(0001): In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Li, Xiaoli; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Feng; Zhong, Dingyong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the interface electronic properties of ZnO(0001)/CH3NH3PbI3 were investigated by both X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The CH3NH3PbI3 thin films were grown on single crystalline ZnO(0001) substrate in situ by co-evaporation of PbI2 and CH3NH3I at room temperature with various thickness from 1.5 nm to 190 nm. It was found that the conduction band minimum of ZnO lies 0.3 eV below that of CH3NH3PbI3, while the valence band maximum of ZnO lies 2.1 eV below that of CH3NH3PbI3, implying that the electrons can be effectively transported from CH3NH3PbI3 to ZnO, and the holes can be blocked in the same time. A PbI2 rich layer was initially formed at the interface of ZnO(0001)/CH3NH3PbI3 during the growth. As a consequence, an interface barrier was built up which may prevent the electron transport at the interface.

  5. Probing cation antisite disorder in Gd2 Ti2 O7 pyrochlore by site-specific near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachimuthu, P.; Thevuthasan, S.; Engelhard, M. H.; Weber, W. J.; Shuh, D. K.; Hamdan, N. M.; Mun, B. S.; Adams, E. M.; McCready, D. E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Lindle, D. W.; Balakrishnan, G.; Paul, D. M.; Gullikson, E. M.; Perera, R. C. C.; Lian, J.; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.

    2004-09-01

    Disorder in Gd2Ti2O7 is investigated by near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NEXAFS shows Ti4+ ions occupy octahedral sites with a tetragonal distortion induced by vacant oxygen sites. O1s XPS spectra obtained with a charge neutralization system from Gd2Ti2O7(100) and the Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore used by Chen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 105901 (2002)], both yielded a single peak, unlike the previous result on the latter that found two peaks. The current results give no evidence for an anisotropic distribution of Ti and O. The extra features reported in the aforementioned communication resulted from charging effects and incomplete surface cleaning. Thus, a result confirming the direct observation of simultaneous cation-anion antisite disordering and lending credence to the split vacancy model has been clarified.

  6. Study of Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on Nano-Structured Carbon Films using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, Pranita B.; Porter, Lisa M.; McCullough, L. A.; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Engelhard, Mark H.; Baer, Donald R.

    2012-10-12

    Nanostructured carbon (ns-C) films fabricated by stabilization and pyrolysis of di-block copolymers are of interest for a variety of electrical/electronic applications due to their chemical inertness, high-temperature insensitivity, very high surface area, and tunable electrical resistivity over a wide range [Kulkarni et al., Synth. Met. 159, (2009) 177]. Because of their high porosity and associated high specific surface area, controlled surface cleaning studies are important for fabricating electronic devices from these films. In this study, quantification of surface composition and surface cleaning studies on ns-C films synthesized by carbonization of di-block copolymers of polyacrylonitrile-b-poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PAN-b-PBA) at two different temperatures were carried out. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis and to determine the efficacy of various surface cleaning methods for ns-C films and to examine the polymer residues in the films. The in-situ surface cleaning methods included: HF vapor treatment, vacuum annealing, and exposure to UV-ozone. Quantitative analysis of high-resolution XPS scans showed 11 at. % of nitrogen present in the films pyrolyzed at 600 °C, suggesting incomplete denitrogenation of the copolymer films. The nitrogen atomic concentration reduced significantly for films pyrolyzed at 900 °C confirming extensive denitrogenation at that temperature. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nitrogen sub-peaks indicated higher loss of nitrogen atoms residing at the edge of graphitic clusters relative to that of nitrogen atoms within the graphitic cluster, suggesting higher graphitization with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Of the surface cleaning methods investigated, in-situ annealing of the films at 300 °C for 40 min was found to be the most efficacious in removing adventitious carbon and oxygen impurities from the surface.

  7. Study of surface cleaning methods and pyrolysis temperatures on nanostructured carbon films using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, Pranita; Porter, Lisa M.; McCullough, Lynne A.; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Engelhard, Mark; Baer, Donald

    2012-11-15

    Nanostructured carbon (ns-C) films fabricated by stabilization and pyrolysis of diblock copolymers are of interest for a variety of electrical/electronic applications due to their chemical inertness, high-temperature insensitivity, very high surface area, and tunable electrical resistivity over a wide range [Kulkarni et al., Synth. Met. 159, 177 (2009)]. Because of their high porosity and associated high specific surface area, controlled surface cleaning studies are important for fabricating electronic devices from these films. In this study, quantification of surface composition and surface cleaning studies on ns-C films synthesized by carbonization of diblock copolymers of polyacrylonitrile-b-poly(n-butyl acrylate) at two different temperatures were carried out. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis and to determine the efficacy of various surface cleaning methods for ns-C films and to examine the polymer residues in the films. The in-situ surface cleaning methods included HF vapor treatment, vacuum annealing, and exposure to UV-ozone. Quantitative analysis of high-resolution XPS scans showed 11 at. % nitrogen was present in the films pyrolyzed at 600 Degree-Sign C, suggesting incomplete denitrogenation of the copolymer films. The nitrogen atomic concentration decreased significantly for films pyrolyzed at 900 Degree-Sign C confirming extensive denitrogenation at that temperature. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nitrogen subpeaks indicated higher loss of nitrogen atoms residing at the edge of graphitic clusters relative to that of nitrogen atoms within the graphitic clusters, suggesting higher graphitization with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Of the surface cleaning methods investigated, in-situ annealing of the films at 300 Degree-Sign C for 40 min was found to be the most efficacious in removing adventitious carbon and oxygen impurities from the surface.

  8. Angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) analysis of lanthanum oxide for micro-flexography printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, S.; Yusof, M. S.; Embong, Z.; Maksud, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-flexography printing was developed in patterning technique from micron to nano scale range to be used for graphic, electronic and bio-medical device on variable substrates. In this work, lanthanum oxide (La2O3) has been used as a rare earth metal candidate as depositing agent. This metal deposit was embedded on Carbon (C) and Silica (Si) wafer substrate using Magnetron Sputtering technique. The choose of Lanthanum as a target is due to its wide application in producing electronic devices such as thin film battery and printed circuit board. The La2O3 deposited on the surface of Si wafer substrate was then analyzed using Angle Resolve X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). The position for each synthetic component in the narrow scan of Lanthanum (La) 3d and O 1s are referred to the electron binding energy (eV). The La 3d narrow scan revealed that the oxide species of this particular metal is mainly contributed by La2O3 and La(OH)3. The information of oxygen species, O2- component from O 1s narrow scan indicated that there are four types of species which are contributed from the bulk (O2-), two chemisorb component (La2O3) and La(OH)3 and physisorp component (OH). Here, it is proposed that from the adhesive and surface chemical properties of La, it is suitable as an alternative medium for micro-flexography printing technique in printing multiple fine solid lines at nano scale. Hence, this paper will describe the capability of this particular metal as rare earth metal for use in of micro-flexography printing practice. The review of other parameters contributing to print fine lines will also be described later.

  9. Quantitative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-based depth profiling of bioleached arsenopyrite surface by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tingting; Lu, Xiancai; Liu, Huan; Li, Juan; Zhu, Xiangyu; Lu, Jianjun; Wang, Rucheng

    2014-02-01

    In supergene environments, microbial activities significantly enhance sulfide oxidation and result in the release of heavy metals, causing serious contamination of soils and waters. As the most commonly encountered arsenic mineral in nature, arsenopyrite (FeAsS) accounts for arsenic contaminants in various environments. In order to investigate the geochemical behavior of arsenic during microbial oxidation of arsenopyrite, (2 3 0) surfaces of arsenopyrite slices were characterized after acidic (pH 2.00) and oxidative decomposition with or without an acidophilic microorganism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The morphology as well as chemical and elemental depth profiles of the oxidized arsenopyrite surface were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With the mediation of bacteria, cell-shaped and acicular pits were observed on the reacted arsenopyrite surface, and the concentration of released arsenic species in solution was 50 times as high as that of the abiotic reaction after 10 days reaction. Fine-scale XPS depth profiles of the reacted arsenopyrite surfaces after both microbial and abiotic oxidation provided insights into the changes in chemical states of the elements in arsenopyrite surface layers. Within the 450 nm surface layer of abiotically oxidized arsenopyrite, Fe(III)-oxides appeared and gradually increased towards the surface, and detectable sulfite and monovalent arsenic appeared above 50 nm. In comparison, higher contents of ferric sulfate, sulfite, and arsenite were found in the surface layer of approximately 3 μm of the microbially oxidized arsenopyrite. Intermediates, such as Fe(III)-AsS and S0, were detectable in the presence of bacteria. Changes of oxidative species derived from XPS depth profiles show the oxidation sequence is Fe > As = S in abiotic oxidation, and Fe > S > As in microbial oxidation. Based on these results, a possible reaction path of microbial oxidation was proposed in a concept model.

  10. Following the molecular motion of near-resonant excited CO on Pt(111): A simulated x-ray photoelectron diffraction study based on molecular dynamics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Greif, Michael; Nagy, Tibor; Soloviov, Maksym; Castiglioni, Luca; Hengsberger, Matthias; Meuwly, Markus; Osterwalder, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    A THz-pump and x-ray-probe experiment is simulated where x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns record the coherent vibrational motion of carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed on a Pt(111) surface. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the excitation of frustrated wagging-type motion of the CO molecules by a few-cycle pulse of 2 THz radiation is calculated. From the atomic coordinates, the time-resolved XPD patterns of the C 1s core level photoelectrons are generated. Due to the direct structural information in these data provided by the forward scattering maximum along the carbon-oxygen direction, the sequence of these patterns represents the equivalent of a molecular movie. PMID:26798798

  11. An in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the initial stages of rf magnetron sputter deposition of indium tin oxide on p-type Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Rein, M. H.; Holt, A. O.; Hohmann, M. V.; Klein, A.; Thogersen, A.; Mayandi, J.; Monakhov, E. V.

    2013-01-14

    The interface between indium tin oxide and p-type silicon is studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This is done by performing XPS without breaking vacuum after deposition of ultrathin layers in sequences. Elemental tin and indium are shown to be present at the interface, both after 2 and 10 s of deposition. In addition, the silicon oxide layer at the interface is shown to be composed of mainly silicon suboxides rather than silicon dioxide.

  12. Surface morphology and chemistry of Prunus laurocerasus L. leaves: a study using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Mark C; Roberts, Clive J; Briggs, David; Davies, Martyn C; Friedmann, Adrian; Hart, Clifford A; Bell, Gordon A

    2005-04-01

    The surface properties of the plant cuticle play a crucial role in plant-pathogen interactions and the retention and penetration of agriculturally important chemicals. This paper describes the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine surface-specific chemical and material properties of the adaxial surface of Prunus laurocerasus L. leaves. XPS data, derived from the uppermost few nanometres (< 10 nm) of the leaf surface, were consistent with the wax components and functionality known to be present within the waxes. ToF-SIMS provided molecular speciation from the outermost monolayer of the leaf surface, indicating the importance of a family of acetates with chain lengths ranging from C20 to C34. The presence of alkanes with C29 and C31 chain lengths was also confirmed. SEM and TM-AFM topography images revealed a textured granular surface, while simultaneously recorded AFM phase images revealed heterogeneous material properties at the nanoscale. The relevance of these data to plant cuticle development, allelochemistry and agrochemical delivery is discussed.

  13. Self-consistent modelling of X-ray photoelectron spectra from air-exposed polycrystalline TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Hultman, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present first self-consistent modelling of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) Ti 2p, N 1s, O 1s, and C 1s core level spectra with a cross-peak quantitative agreement for a series of TiN thin films grown by dc magnetron sputtering and oxidized to different extent by varying the venting temperature Tv of the vacuum chamber before removing the deposited samples. So-obtained film series constitute a model case for XPS application studies, where certain degree of atmosphere exposure during sample transfer to the XPS instrument is unavoidable. The challenge is to extract information about surface chemistry without invoking destructive pre-cleaning with noble gas ions. All TiN surfaces are thus analyzed in the as-received state by XPS using monochromatic Al Kα radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV). Details of line shapes and relative peak areas obtained from deconvolution of the reference Ti 2p and N 1 s spectra representative of a native TiN surface serve as an input to model complex core level signals from air-exposed surfaces, where contributions from oxides and oxynitrides make the task very challenging considering the influence of the whole deposition process at hand. The essential part of the presented approach is that the deconvolution process is not only guided by the comparison to the reference binding energy values that often show large spread, but in order to increase reliability of the extracted chemical information the requirement for both qualitative and quantitative self-consistency between component peaks belonging to the same chemical species is imposed across all core-level spectra (including often neglected O 1s and C 1s signals). The relative ratios between contributions from different chemical species vary as a function of Tv presenting a self-consistency check for our model. We propose that the cross-peak self-consistency should be a prerequisite for reliable XPS peak modelling as it enhances credibility of obtained chemical information, while relying

  14. Al capping layers for nondestructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of transition-metal nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Greczynski, Grzegorz Hultman, Lars; Petrov, Ivan; Greene, J. E.

    2015-09-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analyses of materials that have been air exposed typically require ion etching in order to remove contaminated surface layers. However, the etching step can lead to changes in sample surface and near-surface compositions due to preferential elemental sputter ejection and forward recoil implantation; this is a particular problem for metal/gas compounds and alloys such as nitrides and oxides. Here, the authors use TiN as a model system and compare XPS analysis results from three sets of polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in a separate vacuum chamber. The films are either (1) air-exposed for ≤10 min prior to insertion into the ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) XPS system; (2) air-exposed and subject to ion etching, using different ion energies and beam incidence angles, in the XPS chamber prior to analysis; or (3) Al-capped in-situ in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. The authors show that thin, 1.5–6.0 nm, Al capping layers provide effective barriers to oxidation and contamination of TiN surfaces, thus allowing nondestructive acquisition of high-resolution core-level spectra representative of clean samples, and, hence, correct bonding assignments. The Ti 2p and N 1s satellite features, which are sensitive to ion bombardment, exhibit high intensities comparable to those obtained from single-crystal TiN/MgO(001) films grown and analyzed in-situ in a UHV XPS system and there is no indication of Al/TiN interfacial reactions. XPS-determined N/Ti concentrations acquired from Al/TiN samples agree very well with Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil analysis results while ion-etched air-exposed samples exhibit strong N loss due to preferential resputtering. The intensities and shapes of the Ti 2p and N 1s core level signals from Al/TiN/Si(001) samples do not change following long-term (up to 70 days) exposure to ambient conditions

  15. CO(2)-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-11-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd-In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa.Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd(1)In(1) phase exhibits a similar "Cu-like" electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd(1)Zn(1) counterpart.Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd(1)In(1) phase in MSR yielded a CO(2)-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In(2)O(3)-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In(2)O(3), intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO(2) using this Pd(1)In(1) phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with "Pd-like" electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed.To achieve CO(2)-TOF values on the isolated Pd(1)In(1) intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In(2)O(3), at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO(2) conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd(1)In(1) inhibited inverse water-gas-shift reaction on In(2)O(3) and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO(2)-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  16. CO2-selective methanol steam reforming on In-doped Pd studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rameshan, Christoph; Lorenz, Harald; Mayr, Lukas; Penner, Simon; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Arrigo, Rosa; Haevecker, Michael; Blume, Raoul; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert; Klötzer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (in situ XPS) was used to study the structural and catalytic properties of Pd–In near-surface intermetallic phases in correlation with previously studied PdZn and PdGa. Room temperature deposition of ∼4 monolayer equivalents (MLEs) of In metal on Pd foil and subsequent annealing to 453 K in vacuum yields a ∼1:1 Pd/In near-surface multilayer intermetallic phase. This Pd1In1 phase exhibits a similar “Cu-like” electronic structure and indium depth distribution as its methanol steam reforming (MSR)-selective multilayer Pd1Zn1 counterpart. Catalytic characterization of the multilayer Pd1In1 phase in MSR yielded a CO2-selectivity of almost 100% between 493 and 550 K. In contrast to previously studied In2O3-supported PdIn nanoparticles and pure In2O3, intermediate formaldehyde is only partially converted to CO2 using this Pd1In1 phase. Strongly correlated with PdZn, on an In-diluted PdIn intermetallic phase with “Pd-like” electronic structure, prepared by thermal annealing at 623 K, methanol steam reforming is suppressed and enhanced CO formation via full methanol dehydrogenation is observed. To achieve CO2-TOF values on the isolated Pd1In1 intermetallic phase as high as on supported PdIn/In2O3, at least 593 K reaction temperature is required. A bimetal-oxide synergism, with both bimetallic and oxide synergistically contributing to the observed catalytic activity and selectivity, manifests itself by accelerated formaldehyde-to-CO2 conversion at markedly lowered temperatures as compared to separate oxide and bimetal. Combination of suppression of full methanol dehydrogenation to CO on Pd1In1 inhibited inverse water–gas-shift reaction on In2O3 and fast water activation/conversion of formaldehyde is the key to the low-temperature activity and high CO2-selectivity of the supported catalyst. PMID:23226689

  17. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and morphologic studies of Ru nanoparticles deposited onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavand, R.; Yelon, A.; Sacher, E.

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) function as effective catalysts in specific reactions, such as methanation and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses. It is our purpose to physicochemically characterize their surfaces, at which catalysis occurs, by surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), using the symmetric peak component anaylsis technique developed in our laboratory to reveal previously hidden components. Ru NPs were deposited by evaporation (0.25-1.5 nm nominal deposition range) onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). In addition to their surfaces being characterized by XPS, an indication of morphology was obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our use of symmetric peak component XPS analysis has revealed detailed information on a previously unidentified surface oxide initially formed, as well as on the valence electronic structure and its variation with NP size, information that is of potential importance in the use of these NPs in catalysis. Each of the several Ru core XPS spectra characterized (3d, 3p and 3s) was found to be composed of three symmetric components. Together with two metal oxide O1s components, these give evidence of a rather complex, previously unidentified oxide that is initially formed. The Ru valence band (4d and 5s) spectra clearly demonstrate a loss of metallicity, a simultaneous increase of the Kubo gap, and an abrupt transfer in valence electron density from the 4d to the 5s orbitals (known as electron spill-over), as the NP size decreases below 0.5 nm. TEM photomicrographs, as a function of deposition rate, show that, at a rate that gives insufficient time for the NP condensation energy to dissipate, the initially well-separated NPs are capable of diffusing laterally and aggregating. This indicates weak NP bonding to the HOPG substrate. Carbide is formed, at both high and low deposition rates, at Ru deposition thicknesses greater than 0.25 nm, its formation explained by Ru NPs reacting with residual

  18. In situ study of an oxidation reaction on a Pt/C electrode by ambient pressure hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Yasumasa Uemura, Yohei; Yokoyama, Toshihiko; Wang, Heng; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Senba, Yasunori; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Goto, Shunji; Sekizawa, Oki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro; Uruga, Tomoya; Tada, Mizuki

    2014-09-29

    We have constructed an ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy instrument that uses hard X-ray radiation at the high-performance undulator beamline BL36XU of SPring-8. The dependence of the Au 4f peak intensity from Au foil on the ambient N{sub 2} pressure was measured. At a photon energy of 7.94 keV, the Au 4f peak intensity maintained 40% at 3000 Pa compared with that at high vacuum. We designed a polymer electrolyte fuel cell that allows us to perform X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of an electrode under working conditions. The oxidized Pt peaks were observed in the Pt 3d{sub 5/2} level of Pt nanoparticles in the cathode, and the peaks clearly depended on the applied voltage between the anode and cathode. Our apparatus can be applied as a valuable in situ tool for the investigation of the electronic states and adsorbed species of polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrode catalysts under the reaction conditions.

  19. Analysis of electronic structure of amorphous InGaZnO/SiO{sub 2} interface by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, Y.; Ishikawa, Y.; Maejima, N.; Matsui, F.; Matsui, H.; Yamazaki, H.; Urakawa, S.; Horita, M.; Daimon, H.; Uraoka, Y.

    2013-10-28

    The electronic structures of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) on a SiO{sub 2} layers before and after annealing were observed by constant final state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CFS-XPS) and X-ray adsorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). From the results of angle-resolved CFS-XPS, the change in the electronic state was clearly observed in the a-IGZO bulk rather than in the a-IGZO/SiO{sub 2} interface. This suggests that the electronic structures of the a-IGZO bulk strongly affected the thin-film transistor characteristics. The results of XANES indicated an increase in the number of tail states upon atmospheric annealing (AT). We consider that the increase in the number of tail states decreased the channel mobility of AT samples.

  20. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system’s design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump–probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in ‘single-shot image’, ‘shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)’ and ‘shot-to-shot sweep’ modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in ‘ordinary sweep’ mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the

  1. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    PubMed

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL. PMID:24365935

  2. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    PubMed

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL.

  3. Assigning Oxidation States to Organic Compounds via Predictions from X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: A Discussion of Approaches and Recommended Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vipul; Ganegoda, Hasitha; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2014-02-11

    The traditional assignment of oxidation numbers to organic molecules is problematic. Accordingly, in 1999, Calzaferri proposed a simple and elegant solution that is based on the similar electronegativities of carbon and hydrogen: hydrogen would be assigned an oxidation number of zero when bonded to carbon. Here we show that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a core electron spectroscopy that is sensitive to oxidation states of elements, confirms his suggestion. In particular, in this work we: (i) list the typical rules for assigning oxidation numbers, (ii) discuss the traditional assignment of oxidation numbers to organic molecules, (iii) review Calzaferri’s solution, (iv) introduce X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), (v) show the consistency of Calzaferri’s suggestion with XPS results, (vi) provide supporting examples from the literature, (vii) provide examples from our own research, and (viii) further confirm the Calzaferri suggestion/photoelectron spectroscopy results by discussing two organic well-known reactions. We end by reechoing Calzaferri’s suggestion that the traditional rules for assigning oxidation numbers to organic molecules be modified.

  4. A high pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experimental method for characterization of solid-liquid interfaces demonstrated with a Li-ion battery system

    SciTech Connect

    Maibach, Julia; Xu, Chao; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Edström, Kristina; Eriksson, Susanna K.; Åhlund, John; Siegbahn, Hans; Rensmo, Håkan; Hahlin, Maria

    2015-04-15

    We report a methodology for a direct investigation of the solid/liquid interface using high pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS). The technique was demonstrated with an electrochemical system represented by a Li-ion battery using a silicon electrode and a liquid electrolyte of LiClO{sub 4} in propylene carbonate (PC) cycled versus metallic lithium. For the first time the presence of a liquid electrolyte was realized using a transfer procedure where the sample was introduced into a 2 mbar N{sub 2} environment in the analysis chamber without an intermediate ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) step in the load lock. The procedure was characterized in detail concerning lateral drop gradients as well as stability of measurement conditions over time. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrate that the solid substrate and the liquid electrolyte can be observed simultaneously. The results show that the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition for the wet electrode is stable within the probing time and generally agrees well with traditional UHV studies. Since the methodology can easily be adjusted to various high pressure photoelectron spectroscopy systems, extending the approach towards operando solid/liquid interface studies using liquid electrolytes seems now feasible.

  5. Structure analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure for amorphous MS3 (M: Ti, Mo) electrodes in all-solid-state lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Takuya; Deguchi, Minako; Mitsuhara, Kei; Ohta, Toshiaki; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Kowada, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure changes of sulfurs in amorphous TiS3 and MoS3 for positive electrodes of all-solid-state lithium batteries are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The all-solid-state cell with amorphous TiS3 electrode shows the reversible capacity of about 510 mAh g-1 for 10 cycles with sulfur-redox in amorphous TiS3 during charge-discharge process. On the other hand, the cell with amorphous MoS3 shows the 1st reversible capacity of about 720 mAh g-1. The obtained capacity is based on the redox of both sulfur and molybdenum in amorphous MoS3. The irreversible capacity of about 50 mAh g-1 is observed at the 1st cycle, which is attributed to the irreversible electronic structure change of sulfur during the 1st cycle. The electronic structure of sulfur in amorphous MoS3 after the 10th charge is similar to that after the 1st charge. Therefore, the all-solid-state cell with amorphous MoS3 electrode shows relatively good cyclability after the 1st cycle.

  6. Understanding the electronic structure of IrO2 using hard-X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kahk, J M; Poll, C G; Oropeza, F E; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Rueff, J-P; Agrestini, S; Utsumi, Y; Tsuei, K D; Liao, Y F; Borgatti, F; Panaccione, G; Regoutz, A; Egdell, R G; Morgan, B J; Scanlon, D O; Payne, D J

    2014-03-21

    The electronic structure of IrO2 has been investigated using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory. Excellent agreement is observed between theory and experiment. We show that the electronic structure of IrO2 involves crystal field splitting of the iridium 5d orbitals in a distorted octahedral field. The behavior of IrO2 closely follows the theoretical predictions of Goodenough for conductive rutile-structured oxides [J. B. Goodenough, J. Solid State Chem. 3, 490 (1971).

  7. Complementary low energy ion scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of polystyrene submitted to N 2/H 2 glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatto, F.; Rovani, S.; Kaufmann, I. R.; Soares, G. V.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Krug, C.

    2012-02-01

    Low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to access the elemental composition and chemical bonding characteristics of polystyrene (PS) surfaces sequentially treated by corona and glow discharge (plasma) processing in N 2/H 2 ambient. The latter has shown activity as suppressor of pathogenic Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. LEIS indicated that oxygen from the corona discharge process is progressively replaced by nitrogen at the PS surface. XPS shows C dbnd N and N sbnd C dbnd O chemical groups as significant inhibitors of bacterial adhesion, suggesting application in medical devices.

  8. Offset-corrected Δ -Kohn-Sham scheme for semiempirical prediction of absolute x-ray photoelectron energies in molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael; Moseler, Michael; Pastewka, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Absolute binding energies of core electrons in molecules and bulk materials can be efficiently calculated by spin paired density-function theory employing a Δ -Kohn-Sham (Δ KS ) scheme corrected by offsets that are highly transferable. These offsets depend on core level and atomic species and can be determined by comparing Δ KS energies to experimental molecular x-ray photoelectron spectra. We demonstrate the correct prediction of absolute and relative binding energies on a wide range of molecules, metals, and insulators.

  9. Electron-hole recombination on ZnO(0001) single-crystal surface studied by time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, R.; Yamamoto, S.; Ogawa, M.; Yamamoto, Sh.; Fujikawa, K.; Hobara, R.; Matsuda, I.; Ozawa, K.; Emori, M.; Sakama, H.; Kitagawa, S.; Daimon, H.

    2014-10-13

    Time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments were performed with time scales from picoseconds to nanoseconds to trace relaxation of surface photovoltage on the ZnO(0001) single crystal surface in real time. The band diagram of the surface has been obtained numerically using PES data, showing a depletion layer which extends to 1 μm. Temporal evolution of the photovoltage effect is well explained by a recombination process of a thermionic model, giving the photoexcited carrier lifetime of about 1 ps at the surface under the flat band condition. This lifetime agrees with a temporal range reported by the previous time-resolved optical experiments.

  10. Note: A combined aerodynamic lens/ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiment for the on-stream investigation of aerosol surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mysak, Erin R.; Starr, David E.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2010-01-15

    We discuss a new approach for the measurement of the surfaces of free aerosol particles with diameters from 50 to 1000 nm. Particles in this size range have significant influence on the heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere and affect human health. Interfacing an aerodynamic lens to an ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer permits measurement of the surface chemical composition of unsupported aerosol particles in real time. We discuss the basic considerations for the design of such an instrument, its current limitations and potentials for improvement. Results from a proof-of-principle experiment on silicon oxide particles with average diameters of 270 nm are shown.

  11. Electronic structure of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guo-Ling; Zhang, Fabi; Guo, Qixin; Cui, Yi-Tao; Oji, Hiroshi; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-07-13

    By combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and first-principles band structure calculations, the electronic states of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated to deepen the understanding of bulk information for this compound. The valence band spectra of HAXPES presented the main contribution from Ga 4sp, which are well represented by photoionization cross section weighted partial density of states. The experimental data complemented with the theoretical study yield a realistic picture of the electronic structure for β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of oxidized Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo-2Si austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.A., Jr.; Siriwardane, R.V.; Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2007-03-30

    Depth profile analysis (argon ion etching/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was conducted on a series of Fe–16Cr–16Ni–2Mn–1Mo–2Si austenitic stainless steel samples oxidized at 973 and 1073 K with exposure times of 25, 100, 193, 436 and 700 h. Surface and near surface rearrangement following oxidation resulted in a region of high Cr concentration on all oxidized samples. Temperature and time dependence to O2 penetration depth was observed. In general, O2 penetration depth was found to increase with increasing exposure up to 436 h. No increase in depth was observed between 436 and 700 h exposure time.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency sputtered chromium bromide, molybdenum disilicide, and molybdenum disulfide coatings and their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Brainard, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of CRB2, MOSI2, and MOS2 were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of sputtering target history, deposition time, RF power level, and substrate bias on film composition were studied. Friction tests were run on RF sputtered surfaces of 440-C steel to correlate XPS data with lubricating properties. Significant deviations from stoichiometry and high oxide levels for all three compounds were related to target outgassing. The effect of biasing on these two factors depended on the compound. Improved stoichiometry correlated well with good friction and wear properties.

  14. Understanding the electronic structure of IrO2 using hard-X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kahk, J M; Poll, C G; Oropeza, F E; Ablett, J M; Céolin, D; Rueff, J-P; Agrestini, S; Utsumi, Y; Tsuei, K D; Liao, Y F; Borgatti, F; Panaccione, G; Regoutz, A; Egdell, R G; Morgan, B J; Scanlon, D O; Payne, D J

    2014-03-21

    The electronic structure of IrO2 has been investigated using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional theory. Excellent agreement is observed between theory and experiment. We show that the electronic structure of IrO2 involves crystal field splitting of the iridium 5d orbitals in a distorted octahedral field. The behavior of IrO2 closely follows the theoretical predictions of Goodenough for conductive rutile-structured oxides [J. B. Goodenough, J. Solid State Chem. 3, 490 (1971). PMID:24702416

  15. Fingerprints of the hydrogen bond in the photoemission spectra of croconic acid condensed phase: An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ab-initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Bisti, F.; Stroppa, A.; Picozzi, S.; Ottaviano, L.

    2011-05-07

    The electronic structure of Croconic Acid in the condensed phase has been studied by comparing core level and valence band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments and first principles density functional theory calculations using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid functional and the GW approximation. By exploring the photoemission spectra for different deposition thicknesses, we show how the formation of the hydrogen bond network modifies the O 1s core level lineshape. Moreover, the valence band can be explained only if the intermolecular interactions are taken into account in the theoretical approach.

  16. Polarity of semipolar wurtzite crystals: X-ray photoelectron diffraction from GaN(101⁻1) and GaN(202⁻1) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, O. Jiříček, P.; Bartoš, I.; Paskova, T.

    2014-09-14

    Polarity of semipolar GaN(101⁻1) (101⁻1⁻) and GaN(202⁻1) (202⁻1⁻) surfaces was determined with X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) using a standard MgKα source. The photoelectron emission from N 1s core level measured in the a-plane of the crystals shows significant differences for the two crystal orientations within the polar angle range of 80–100° from the (0001) normal. It was demonstrated that XPD polar plots recorded in the a-plane are similar for each polarity of the GaN(101⁻1) and GaN(202⁻1) crystals if referred to (0001) crystal axes. For polarity determinations of all important GaN(h0h⁻l) semipolar surfaces, the above given polar angle range is suitable.

  17. Impact of Mg concentration on energy-band-depth profile of Mg-doped InN epilayers analyzed by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, M.; Tsuda, S.; Nagata, T.; Takeda, H.; Liao, M. Y.; Koide, Y.; Yang, A. L.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Uematsu, N.; Wang, K.; Araki, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2013-10-14

    The electronic structures of Mg-doped InN (Mg-InN) epilayers with the Mg concentration, [Mg], ranging from 1 × 10{sup 19} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} were systematically investigated by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. The angle-resolved results on the core-level and valence band photoelectron spectra as a function of [Mg] revealed that the energy band of Mg-InN showed downward bending due to the n{sup +} surface electron accumulation and p type layers formed in the bulk. With an increase in [Mg], the energy-band changed from monotonic to two-step n{sup +}p homojunction structures. The oxygen concentration rapidly increased at the middle-bulk region (∼4.5 to ∼7.5 nm) from the surface, which was one of the reasons of the transformation of two-step energy band.

  18. Evaluation of valence band top and electron affinity of SiO2 and Si-based semiconductors using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Akio; Makihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2016-08-01

    An evaluation method for the energy level of the valence band (VB) top from the vacuum level (VL) for metals, dielectrics, and semiconductors from the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is presented for the accurate determination of the energy band diagram for materials of interest. In this method, the VB top can be determined by the energy difference between the onset of VB signals and the cut-off energy for secondary photoelectrons by considering the X-ray excitation energy (hν). The energy level of the VB top for three kinds of Si-based materials (H-terminated Si, wet-cleaned 4H-SiC, and thermally grown SiO2) has been investigated by XPS under monochromatized Al Kα radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV). We have also demonstrated the determination of the electron affinity for the samples by this measurement technique in combination with the measured and reported energy bandgaps (E g).

  19. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/poly(N-dodecylacrylamide) Langmuir-Blodgett nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huie; Gao, Yu; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Our earlier research prepared ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) homopolymer monolayers at the air-water interface using amphiphilic poly(N-dodecylacrylamide) (pDDA) nanosheets with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. However, the miscibility of solvent for PVDF with the water sub-phase in the Langmuir trough makes the film composition unclear in spite of the feeding ratio of \\text{PVDF}:\\text{pDDA} (50:1). In this study, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) was used to investigate the surface chemical composition and the depth profile of the PVDF/pDDA LB nanofilms. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra confirmed by the detection of fluorine atoms that PVDF molecules were deposited successfully onto the substrate. The constant chemical composition with increasing takeoff angle from 15 to 75° reflects a well-regular layer structure of the PVDF LB nanofilm. The mixing ratio of \\text{PVDF}:\\text{pDDA} is 33:1, which contributes 89.8 wt % PVDF and 10.2 wt % in the PVDF/pDDA LB nanofilms.

  20. Study of energy band discontinuity in NiZnO/ZnO heterostructure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewan, Sheetal; Tomar, Monika; Goyal, Anshu; Kapoor, A. K.; Tandon, R. P.; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    A heterostructure based on ZnO and Ni doped ZnO (NiZnO) thin films has been prepared on c-plane sapphire substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy has been utilized to study the energy band discontinuities, i.e., valence band offset ( Δ E v ) and conduction band offset ( Δ E c ) at the interface of NiZnO and ZnO thin films. A type-II band alignment is identified at the interface of prepared heterostructure from the computed data, which is attractive for the realization of efficient optoelectronic devices.

  1. Measurement of the valence band-offset in a PbSe/ZnO heterojunction by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Lin; Qiu Jijun; Weng Binbin; Yuan Zijian; Shi Zhisheng; Li Xiaomin; Gan Xiaoyan; Sellers, Ian R.

    2012-12-24

    A heterojunction of PbSe/ZnO has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to directly measure the valence-band offset (VBO) of the heterojunction. The VBO, {Delta}E{sub V}, was determined as 2.51 {+-} 0.05 eV using the Pb 4p{sup 3/2} and Zn 2p{sup 3/2} core levels as a reference. The conduction-band offset, {Delta}E{sub C}, was, therefore, determined to be 0.59 {+-} 0.05 eV based on the above {Delta}E{sub V} value. This analysis indicates that the PbSe/ZnO heterojunction forms a type I (Straddling Gap) heterostructure.

  2. The role of cesium suboxides in low-work-function surface layers studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Ag-O-Cs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S.-J.; Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The oxidation of cesium on silver substrates has been studied using photoyield measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The occurrence of two O1s peaks in the core-level spectrum at 527.5 and 531.5-eV binding energy for cesium and oxygen exposures giving the optimum photoyield proves that two oxides of cesium exist in high-photoyield surfaces, and not Cs2O alone as previously thought. From the shape and position of the cesium peaks and the Auger parameter, the assignment of the O1s peaks at 527.5- and 531.5-eV binding energies to oxygen in Cs2O and Cs11O3, respectively, can be made. Hence the total cesium-oxygen layer is a mixed phase consisting of Cs2O + Cs11O3, approximately 20-40 A thick.

  3. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of GaAs (001) and InP (001) Cleaning Procedures Prior to Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contour, J. P.; Massies, J.; Saletes, A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of chemical etching by H2S04/H202/H20 (5/1/1) mixtures and of mechanopolishing by bromine-methanol diluted solution on GaAs (001) and InP (001) substrates for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The final rinse in running deionized water does not produce any passivating oxide layer on the substrate surface. Oxidation observed on GaAs and InP after these cleaning procedures occurs during substrate handling in air. The H2S04/H202/H20 mixture produces arsenic rich surface layers having an atomic ratio As/Ga of 1.15, whereas the bromine-methanol mechanopolishing leads to an arsenic or phosphorus depleted surface with atomic ratios As/Ga=0.7 and P/In=0.65.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the oxide removal mechanism of GaAs /100/ molecular beam epitaxial substrates in in situ heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A standard cleaning procedure for GaAs (100) molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) substrates is a chemical treatment with a solution of H2SO4/H2O2/H2O, followed by in situ heating prior to MBE growth. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies of the surface following the chemical treatment show that the oxidized As is primarily As(+ 5). Upon heating to low temperatures (less than (350 C) the As(+ 5) oxidizes the substrate to form Ga2O3 and elemental As, and the As(+ 5) is reduced to As(+ 3) in the process. At higher temperatures (500 C), the As(+ 3) and elemental As desorb, while the Ga(+ 3) begins desorbing at about 600 C.

  5. Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces. High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhongwei

    2013-12-06

    Surface structure, mobility, and composition of transition metal catalysts were studied by high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) at high gas pressures. HP-STM makes it possible to determine the atomic or molecular rearrangement at catalyst surfaces, particularly at the low-coordinated active surface sites. AP-XPS monitors changes in elemental composition and chemical states of catalysts in response to variations in gas environments. Stepped Pt and Cu single crystals, the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100) single crystal, and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size, shape and composition, were employed as the model catalysts for experiments in this thesis.

  6. The nature of the water nucleation sites on TiO2(110) surfacesrelvealed by ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ketteler, Guido; Yamamoto, Susumu; Bluhm, Hendrik; Andersson,Klas; Starr, David E.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson,Anders; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at ambient conditions of pressure (up to 1.5 Torr) and temperature (265K

  7. Electronic structure of ultrathin Fe films on TiO[sub 2](110) studied with soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, U. Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118-5698 ); Tao, H. ); Shinn, N.D. ); Madey, T.E. )

    1994-11-15

    We report on soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) of a TiO[sub 2](110) surface during deposition of Fe in the monolayer regime. At low fractional monolayer coverages, the adsorbed Fe atoms are oxidized and Ti cations at the interface become reduced due to Fe adsorption. SXPS from shallow core levels and valence bands show that Fe starts to exhibit metallic character at a coverage of approximately 0.7 equivalent monolayers. Two well separated defect states appear in the band gap of TiO[sub 2] at iron coverages well below one monolayer. We use resonant photoemission to obtain information on the partial density of states, and we assign these defect states as being Fe-derived and Ti-derived states, located at the Fe and Ti sites, respectively. We suggest that a position change of oxygen is involved in the bonding of Fe on the TiO[sub 2](110) surface.

  8. Investigation of chemical distribution in the oxide bulk layer in Ti/HfO{sub 2}/Pt memory devices using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ran; Du, Xianghao; Han, Zuyin; Sun, Weideng

    2015-04-27

    Resistive switching (RS) of Ti/HfO{sub 2}/Pt memory devices was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hf{sup 4+} monotonously decreases with depth increasing towards to HfO{sub 2}/Pt interface in low resistance state, while a fluctuation distribution of Hf{sup 4+} is shown in high resistance state (HRS) and in the pristine Ti/HfO{sub 2}/Pt devices (without any SET or RESET process). It is explained by the existence of locally accumulated oxygen vacancies (clusters) in the oxide bulk layer in HRS and pristine states. A dynamic model of RS processes was proposed that the oxygen vacancy clusters dominantly determines the resistivity by the connecting/rupture between the neighbor cluster sites in the bulk.

  9. Oxides on GaAs and InAs surfaces: An x-ray-photoelectron-spectroscopy study of reference compounds and thin oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, G.; Skheyta-Kabbani, R.; Gendry, M.

    1994-04-01

    The chemical composition of thin native oxide layers grown on GaAs and InAs by ultraviolet (UV)/ozone and thermal oxidation is investigated using x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy. Core-level binding energies, core-level intensities, and valence-band spectra are compared with data for bulk crystalline binary or ternary As, In, and Ga oxides. The chemical compositions, which vary strongly from GaAs to InAs and from thermal to UV oxidation, appear to be controlled by both thermodynamic and kinetic factors. Only for GaAs thermal oxidation are the products predicted at thermodynamic equilibrium obtained. In all cases the native oxides can be described as single phase nonstoichiometric compounds and not as a macroscopic mixture of stoichiometric binary oxides.

  10. Determination of atomic hydrogen in hydrocarbons by means of the reflected electron energy loss spectroscopy and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, V. P.; Gryazev, A. S.; Efremenko, D. S.; Kaplya, P. S.; Ridzel, O. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Elastic peaks electron spectroscopy (EPES) is a perspective tool for measuring the hydrogen atomic density in hydrocarbons. It is known that hydrogen elastic peaks overlap inelastic energy loss spectra. This fact complicates the quantitative interpretation of EPES spectra. In this paper, a novel technique based on the joint use of EPES and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is proposed. A key part of the method is the inelastic scattering background subtraction which is performed in two steps. At the first step, differential inelastic scattering cross-sections are retrieved from PES spectra, while at the second step, the retrieved cross-sections are used to remove the inelastic scattering signal from EPES spectra. Both REELS and PES spectra are described on the base of the invariant imbedding method forming a consistent framework for the surface state analysis. A good agreement is obtained between calculated spectra and experimental data.

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of carbon fiber surfaces. 22. Comparison between surface treatment of untreated and previously surface-treated fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Q.; Viswanathan, H.; Audi, A.A.; Sherwood, P.M.A.

    2000-04-01

    IM7 PAN-based carbon fibers, with a proprietary surface treatment applied by the manufacturer, were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface treatment applied by the manufacturer was removed by heating in a vacuum. The fibers detreated in this manner were then subjected to electrochemical treatment. The electrochemical behavior of the as-received fibers and detreated fibers were measured and analyzed. When the same electrochemical treatment was applied to the as-received fibers with their commercial surface treatment intact, a different surface chemistry was observed for the detreated fibers. This study shows that the surface chemistry of treated fibers depends closely on the initial surface chemistry of the fibers and its detreatment. This work shows the importance of using untreated or detreated fibers as precursors for applying reproducible surface treatment so that one can understand and control the surface chemistry of fibers and their interfacial interaction in composites.

  12. Kinetic study of GeO disproportionation into a GeO{sub 2}/Ge system using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shengkai; Liu Honggang; Toriumi, Akira

    2012-08-06

    GeO disproportionation into GeO{sub 2} and Ge is studied through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct evidence for the reaction 2GeO {yields} GeO{sub 2} + Ge after annealing in ultra-high vacuum is presented. Activation energy for GeO disproportionation is found to be about 0.7 {+-} 0.2 eV through kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. A kinetic model of GeO disproportionation is established by considering oxygen transfer in the GeO network. The relationship between GeO disproportionation and GeO desorption induced by GeO{sub 2}/Ge interfacial reaction is discussed, and the apparent contradiction between GeO desorption via interfacial redox reaction and GeO disproportionation into Ge and GeO{sub 2} is explained by considering the oxygen vacancy.

  13. Conduction band offset at GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission and charge-corrected x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. F.; Nishimula, T.; Nagashio, K.; Kita, K.; Toriumi, A.

    2013-03-11

    We report a consistent conduction band offset (CBO) at a GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) and charge-corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). IPE results showed that the CBO value was larger than 1.5 eV irrespective of metal electrode and substrate type variance, while an accurate determination of valence band offset (VBO) by XPS requires a careful correction of differential charging phenomena. The VBO value was determined to be 3.60 {+-} 0.2 eV by XPS after charge correction, thus yielding a CBO (1.60 {+-} 0.2 eV) in excellent agreement with the IPE results. Such a large CBO (>1.5 eV) confirmed here is promising in terms of using GeO{sub 2} as a potential passivation layer for future Ge-based scaled CMOS devices.

  14. Non-destructive assessment of the polarity of GaN nanowire ensembles using low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, O. Jiříček, P.; Bartoš, I.; Fernández-Garrido, S.; Geelhaar, L.; Brandt, O.; Paskova, T.

    2015-01-12

    We investigate GaN nanowire ensembles spontaneously formed in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy by non-destructive low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). We show that GaN nanowire ensembles prepared on AlN-buffered 6H-SiC(0001{sup ¯}) substrates with well-defined N polarity exhibit similar LEED intensity-voltage curves and angular distribution of photo-emitted electrons as N-polar free-standing GaN layers. Therefore, as in the case of GaN layers, LEED and XPD are found to be suitable techniques to assess the polarity of GaN nanowire ensembles on a macroscopic scale. The analysis of GaN nanowire ensembles prepared on bare Si(111) allows us to conclude that, on this non-polar substrate, the majority of nanowires is also N-polar.

  15. Electronic structures and bonding properties of chlorine-treated nitrogenated carbon nanotubes: X-ray absorption and scanning photoelectron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, S. C.; Pao, C. W.; Tsai, H. M.; Chiou, J. W.; Pong, W. F.; Chen, C. W.; Tsai, M.-H.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Chen, L. C.; Chen, K. H.; Graham, W. G.

    2007-05-07

    The electronic and bonding properties of nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) exposed to chlorine plasma were investigated using C and N K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM). The C and N K-edge XANES spectra of chlorine-treated N-CNTs consistently reveal the formation of pyridinelike N-CNTs by the observation of 1s{yields}{pi}*(e{sub 2u}) antibonding and 1s{yields}{pi}*(b{sub 2g}) bonding states. The valence-band photoemission spectra obtained from SPEM images indicate that chlorination of the nanotubes enhances the C-N bonding. First-principles calculations of the partial densities of states in conjunction with C K-edge XANES data identify the presence of C-Cl bonding in chlorine treated N-CNTs.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and friction studies of nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and sliding friction experiments were conducted with hot-pressed, polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in sliding contact with various transition metals at room temperature in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that the coefficients of friction for Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity in these metals: the more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites correlate with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite surfaces increases the coefficients of friction for the Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite-metal interfaces.

  17. Band alignment study of lattice-matched In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P and Ge using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Man Hon Samuel E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Zhou, Qian; Gong, Xiao; Yeo, Yee-Chia E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Ji Sheng; Loke, Wan Khai; Wicaksono, Satrio; Yoon, Soon Fatt; Tok, Eng Soon

    2014-09-08

    Lattice-matched In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P was grown on a p-type Ge(100) substrate with a 10° off-cut towards the (111) by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy, and the band-alignment of In{sub 0.49}Ga{sub 0.51}P on Ge substrate was obtained by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band offset for the InGaP/Ge(100) interface was found to be 0.64 ± 0.12 eV, with a corresponding conduction band offset of 0.60 ± 0.12 eV. The InGaP/Ge interface is found to be of the type I band alignment.

  18. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium, carbide, molybdenum carbide, and titanium boride coatings and their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of titanium carbide, molybdenum carbide and titanium boride were tested as wear resistant coatings on stainless steel in a pin on disk apparatus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the sputtered films with regard to both bulk and interface composition in order to obtain maximum film performance. Significant improvements in friction behavior were obtained when properly biased films were deposited on deliberately preoxidized substrates. XPS depth profile data showed thick graded interfaces for bias deposited films even when adherence was poor. The addition of 10 percent hydrogen to the sputtering gas produced coatings with thin poorly adherent interfaces. Results suggest that some of the common practices in the field of sputtering may be detrimental to achieving maximum adherence and optimum composition for these refractory compounds.

  19. Elemental content of enamel and dentin after bleaching of teeth (a comparative study between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, H.; Ahmed, Doaa; Eldakrouri, Ashraf

    2013-06-21

    The elemental content of the superficial and inner enamel as well as that of dentin was analyzed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of bleached and unbleached tooth specimens. It is thus clear from the spectral analysis using both the LIBS and XPS technique that elemental changes (though insignificant within the scopes of this study) of variable intensities do occur on the surface of the enamel and extend deeper to reach dentin. The results of the LIBS revealed a slight reduction in the calcium levels in the bleached compared to the control specimens in all the different bleaching groups and in both enamel and dentin. The good correlation found between the LIBS and XPS results demonstrates the possibility of LIBS technique for detection of minor loss in calcium and phosphorus in enamel and dentin.

  20. Investigation of the near-surface structures of polar InN films by chemical-state-discriminated hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, A. L.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobata, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Sakata, O.; Kobayashi, K.; Matsushita, T.; Pis, I.; Imura, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2013-01-21

    Near-surface structures of polar InN films were investigated by laboratory-based hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction (HXPD) with chemical-state-discrimination. HXPD patterns from In 3d{sub 5/2} and N 1s core levels of the In-polar and N-polar InN films were different from each other and compared with the simulation results using a multiple-scattering cluster model. It was found that the near-surface structure of the In-polar InN film was close to the ideal wurtzite structure. On the other hand, on the N-polar InN film, defects-rich surface was formed. In addition, the existence of the In-polar domains was observed in the HXPD patterns.

  1. Carbon reaction and diffusion on Ni(111), Ni(100), and Fe(110): Kinetic parameters from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltner, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Jacob, T.

    2008-08-28

    This paper investigates the reactivity of elemental carbon films deposited from the vapor phase with Fe and Ni substrates at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are presented as a method for evaluating kinetic reaction data. Carbon films are deposited on different surface orientations representing geometries from a dense atom packing as in fcc (111) to an open surface structure as in fcc (100). During annealing experiments several reactions are observed (carbon subsurface diffusion, carbide formation, carbide decomposition, and graphite ordering). These reactions and the respective kinetic parameters are analyzed and quantified by XPS measurements performed while annealing at elevated temperatures (620-820 K). The resulting activation barriers for carbon subsurface diffusion are compared with calculated values using the density functional theory. The determined kinetic parameters are used to reproduce the thermal behavior of carbon films on nickel surfaces.

  2. Elucidating the electronic structure of supported gold nanoparticles and its relevance to catalysis by means of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinecke, Benjamin N.; Kuhl, Kendra P.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Li, Lin; Voss, Johannes; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nilsson, Anders; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the electronic structure of Au (gold) nanoparticles supported onto TiO2 with a goal of elucidating the most important effects that contribute to their high catalytic activity. We synthesize and characterize with high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) 3.4, 5.3, and 9.5 nm diameter TiO2-supported Au nanoparticles with nearly spherical shape and measure their valence band using Au 5d subshell sensitive hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) conducted at Spring-8. Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various Au surface structures, we interpret the observed changes in the Au 5d valence band structure as a function of size in terms of an increasing percentage of Au atoms at corners/edges for decreasing particle size. This work elucidates how Au coordination number impacts the electronic structure of Au nanoparticles, ultimately giving rise to their well-known catalytic activity.

  3. Adsorption and stability of malonic acid on rutile TiO2 (110), studied by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syres, Karen L.; Thomas, Andrew G.; Graham, Darren M.; Spencer, Ben F.; Flavell, Wendy R.; Jackman, Mark J.; Dhanak, Vinod R.

    2014-08-01

    The adsorption of malonic acid on rutile TiO2 (110) has been studied using photoelectron spectroscopy and C K-edge, near edge X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Analysis of the O 1s and Ti 2p spectra suggest that the molecule adsorbs dissociatively in a doubly-bidentate adsorption geometry as malonate. The data are unable to distinguish between a chelating bonding mode with the backbone of the molecule lying along the [001] azimuth or a bridging geometry along the direction. Work carried out on a wiggler beamline suggests that the molecule is unstable under irradiation by high-flux synchrotron radiation from this type of insertion device.

  4. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeuchi, J.; Hamamatsu, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S.

    2015-08-28

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode.

  5. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on band alignment at poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/ZnO interface

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, T.; Hayakawa, R.; Chikyow, T.; Oh, S.; Wakayama, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    2012-10-22

    We used hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the interfacial electronic states of a poly(styrenesulfonate) doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:PSS) contact on a ZnO single crystal. An understanding of the interfacial band structure is useful for putting the organic contact to practical use. We observed upward band bending of the ZnO layer a few nanometers from the interface. The detected ZnO bulk region exhibited a flat band structure, meaning that the PEDOT:PSS does not greatly deplete the ZnO layer. The band bending caused the charge injection barrier formation with the result that the contact exhibited the Schottky property.

  6. Surface carbonation of synthetic C-S-H samples: A comparison between fresh and aged C-S-H using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Leon Garbev, Krassimir; Gee, Ian

    2008-06-15

    This paper presents a continuation of studies into silicate anion structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A series of C-S-H samples have been prepared mechanochemically, and then stored under ambient conditions for six months. Storage led to surface carbonation, the extent of which was dependent upon the calcium/silicon ratio of the fresh sample. Carbonation arose through decalcification of the C-S-H, leading to increased silicate polymerisation. The surfaces of the most calcium-rich phases (C/S = 1.33 and 1.50) underwent complete decalcification to yield silica (possibly containing some silanol groups) and calcium carbonate. Carbonation, and hence changes in silicate anion structure, was minimal for the C-S-H phases with C/S = 0.67 and 0.75.

  7. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the biocorrosion of copper by Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, J.G.; Geesey, G.G.; Hankins, M.R.; Wright, R.B.; Wichlacz, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thin films (3.4 nm) of copper on germanium substrates were exposed to 10% Gum Arabic aqueous solution, 1% BCS (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions) and 0.5% Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions). Pre- and post-exposure characterization were done by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ancillary graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the removal process of the copper thin film from the germanium substrate. Results indicate that the copper was oxidized by the Gum Arabic and BCS, and some was removed from the Cu/Ge interface by all three polymers and incorporated into the polymer matrix. Thus biocorrosion of copper was exhibited by the Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of AlGaN surfaces exposed to air and treated in NH4OH solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Tamotsu; Ootomo, Shin-ya; Nakasaki, Ryuusuke; Oyama, Susumu; Kihara, Michio

    2000-05-01

    Chemical properties of Al0.17Ga0.83N surfaces exposed to air and treated in an NH4OH solution were systematically investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An air-exposed sample showed highly nonstoichiometric surface which included a large amount of Ga and Al oxides. The angle-resolved XPS analysis revealed that the natural oxide layer possessed a complicated composition distribution in depth and that the Al-oxide component was dominant on the topmost layer. A drastic reduction of such Al-oxide component as well as Ga-related oxide was achieved after the treatment in an NH4OH solution at 50 °C for 10 min, resulting in a constant in-depth composition distribution. The NH4OH-based treatment was found to enhance the intensity of the E2 (high) Raman peak and to reduce the root-mean-square value of surface roughness.

  9. Elemental content of enamel and dentin after bleaching of teeth (a comparative study between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, H.; Ahmed, Doaa; Eldakrouri, Ashraf

    2013-06-01

    The elemental content of the superficial and inner enamel as well as that of dentin was analyzed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of bleached and unbleached tooth specimens. It is thus clear from the spectral analysis using both the LIBS and XPS technique that elemental changes (though insignificant within the scopes of this study) of variable intensities do occur on the surface of the enamel and extend deeper to reach dentin. The results of the LIBS revealed a slight reduction in the calcium levels in the bleached compared to the control specimens in all the different bleaching groups and in both enamel and dentin. The good correlation found between the LIBS and XPS results demonstrates the possibility of LIBS technique for detection of minor loss in calcium and phosphorus in enamel and dentin.

  10. Performance of a size-selected nanocluster deposition facility and in situ characterization of grown films by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shyamal; Bhattacharyya, S. R.

    2014-06-15

    We report here on a newly installed gas aggregation type nanocluster deposition unit based on magnetron sputtering ion source with mass selection of the clusters by quadrupole mass filter. The system is ultra high vacuum compatible and is equipped with an in situ X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy facility, giving compositional information of the films formed by nanoclusters deposition on a substrate. Detailed descriptions and working of the components of the system are presented. For the characterization of the nanocluster source and associated mass filter for size selected clusters, the dependence of output performance as a function of aggregation length, sputter gas flow and magnetron power of the cluster source have been studied. Copper nanoclusters deposited on Silicon (100) surface and on transmission electron microscope grids are, respectively, studied with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for the morphology.

  11. Real-time observation of the dry oxidation of the Si (100) surface with ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enta, Y.; Mun, B.S.; Rossi, M.; Ross Jr, P.N.; Hussain, Zahid; Fadley, C.S.; Lee, K.-S.; Kim, S.-K.

    2007-09-20

    We have applied ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Si 2p chemical shifts to study the real-time dry oxidation of Si(100), using pressures in the range of 0.01-1 Torr and temperatures of 300-530 oC, and examining the oxide thickness range from 0 to ~;;25 Angstrom. The oxidation rate is initially very high (with rates of up to ~;;225 Angstrom/h) and then, after a certain initial thickness of the oxide in the range of 6-22 Angstrom is formed, decreases to a slow state (with rates of ~;;1.5-4.0 Angstrom/h). Neither the rapid nor the slow regime is explained by the standard Deal-Grove model for Si oxidation.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of initial growth mechanism of CdTe layers grown on (100)GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Syuji; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Yasuda, Kazuhito; Sugiura, Yoshiyuki; Saji, Manabu; Tanaka, Akikazu

    1990-02-01

    Variations of the GaAs surface conditions and the adsorption of the precursor elements of Cd and Te on the (100)GaAs substrate were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at the initial stage of CdTe growth by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy. The stoichiometry of GaAs substrates was found to recover by annealing in the H2 environment (500 °C, 5 min), while the surface was initially in an As-rich condition after etching with H2SO4:H2O2:H2O (5:1:1). The preferential adsorption of Te on the GaAs surface was also observed. <100> oriented growth was obtained routinely when the GaAs surface was fully stabilized with Te after the H2 anneal under the above conditions. <111> oriented growth resulted when dimethylcadmium was first introduced after the anneal.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of a nonsuperconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductor-normal-metal-superconductor barrier material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Hunt, B. D.; Foote, M. C.; Bajuk, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    A film of a novel nonsuperconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) barrier material was grown using conditions similar to those reported by Agostinelli et al. (1991) for forming a cubic semiconducting (c-YBCO) phase, and the material was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A comparison of the XPS spectra of this material to those obtained from the orthorhombic and tetragonal phases of YBCO (o-YBCO and t-YBCO, respectively) showed that the barrier material had spectral characteristics different from those of o-YBCO and t-YBCO, particularly in the O 1s region. Features associated with the Cu-O chain and surface-reconstructed Cu-O planes were absent, consistent with expectations for the simple perovskite crystal structure of c-YBCO proposed by Agostinelli et al.

  14. Auger electron nanoscale mapping and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with gas cluster ion beam sputtering to study an organic bulk heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Seong; Heo, Sung; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Hwan Park, Jong; Chung, Yeonji; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeongsu; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2014-06-16

    The lateral and vertical distributions of organic p/n bulk heterojunctions for an organic solar cell device are, respectively, investigated using nanometer-scale Auger electron mapping and using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering. The concentration of sulfur, present only in the p-type material, is traced to verify the distribution of p-type (donor) and n-type (acceptor) materials in the blended structure. In the vertical direction, a considerable change in atomic sulfur concentration is observed using XPS depth profiling with Ar GCIB sputtering. In addition, Auger electron mapping of sulfur reveals the lateral 2-dimensional distribution of p- and n-type materials. The combination of Auger electron mapping with Ar GCIB sputtering should thereby allow the construction of 3-dimensional distributions of p- and n-type materials in organic photovoltaic cells.

  15. Probing the Reversible Changes in Electronic Structure Induced by Liquid Electrolyte Gating in WO3 Thin Films by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, Julie; Viol Barbosa, Carlos; Altendorf, Simone; Kiss, Janos; Utsumi, Yuki; Samant, Mahesh; Tjeng, Liu Hao; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a d0 transition metal oxide that has attracted broad interest from both application and fundamental materials physics standpoints. It has been studied for use in photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation, smart windows, gas sensors and has been shown to exhibit high temperature surface superconductivity when doped with K or Cs. Many of these studies necessitate modifications in the carrier concentration and in particular oxygen deficiencies. In this work, we utilize liquid electrolyte gating to create oxygen vacancies in WO3 thin films, a process we will show is reversible. The modifications in the electronic structure (core levels and valance band) resulting from the gating are probed by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrolyte gating leads to a significant population of W 5d states in the conduction band and an enormous change in the W 4f core levels. Ab initio density functional theory is used to help describe the origin of these modifications in the electronic structure.

  16. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopic study of the adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, J.G.; Moers, H.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-08-30

    The adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been investigated at 25/sup 0/C. Clean surfaces were prepared in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopies (AES). Adsorption of I/sub 2/ was studied for exposures up to 100 langmuirs (1 langmuir = 10/sup -6/ torr s) on uranium metal and to 75 langmuirs on uranium dioxide. Above about 2-langmuir I/sub 2/ exposure on uranium, spectroscopic evidence is obtained to indicate the beginning of UI/sub 3/ formation. Saturation coverage for I/sub 2/ adsorption on uranium dioxide occurs at approximately 10-15 langmuirs. Analysis of the XPS and AES results as well as studies of spectra as a function of temperature lead to the conclusions that a dissociative chemisorption/reaction process occurs on uranium metal while nondissociative adsorption occurs on uranium dioxide. Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extra-atomic relaxation processes. 42 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  17. Chemical state analysis of trace-level alkali metals sorbed in micaceous oxide by total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Y.; Shimoyama, I.; Hirao, N.

    2016-10-01

    In order to determine the chemical states of radioactive cesium (137Cs or 134Cs) sorbed in clay minerals, chemical states of cesium as well as the other alkali metals (sodium and rubidium) sorbed in micaceous oxides have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Since the number of atoms in radioactive cesium is extremely small, we specially focused on chemical states of trace-level alkali metals. For this purpose, we have measured XPS under X-ray total reflection (TR) condition. For cesium, it was shown that ultra-trace amount of cesium down to about 100 pg cm-2 can be detected by TR-XPS. This amount corresponds to about 200 Bq of 137Cs (t1/2 = 30.2 y). It was demonstrated that ultra-trace amount of cesium corresponding to radioactive cesium level can be measured by TR-XPS. As to the chemical states, it was found that core-level binding energy in TR-XPS for trace-level cesium shifted to lower-energy side compared with that for thicker layer. A reverse tendency is observed in sodium. Based on charge transfer within a simple point-charge model, it is concluded that chemical bond between alkali metal and micaceous oxide for ultra-thin layer is more polarized that for thick layer.

  18. Investigations on surface chemical analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical properties of Dy3+-doped LiNa3P2O7 phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirathnam, K.; Dillip, G. R.; Chaurasia, Shivanand; Joo, S. W.; Deva Prasad Raju, B.; John Sushma, N.

    2016-08-01

    Near white-light emitting LiNa3P2O7:Dy3+ phosphors were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The orthorhombic crystal structure of the phosphors was confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the valence states of the surface elements were determined from the binding energies of Li 1s, O 1s, Na 1s, P 2p, and Dy 3d by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) - Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was employed to identify the pyrophosphate groups in the phosphors. Diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) show the absorption bands of the Dy3+ ions in the host material. Intense blue (481 nm) and yellow (575 nm) emissions were obtained at an excitation wavelength of 351 nm and are attributed to the 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 transitions of Dy3+ ions, respectively. The combination of these two intense bands generates light emission in the near-white region of the chromaticity diagram.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of TlInGaAsN semiconductor system and their annealing-induced structural changes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Min; Kim, Woo-Byoung; Krishnamurthy, Daivasigamani; Ishimaru, Manabu; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Hasegawa, Shigehiko; Asahi, Hajime

    2010-12-15

    TlInGaAsN thin films grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to analyze the Tl incorporation and to study the annealing-induced transformation of the atomic configurations. XPS analysis revealed that the Tl composition in the grown TlInGaAsN is around 1.5% and that the dominant atomic configuration of the TlInGaAsN changes from the In-As and Ga-N bonds to the In-N and Ga-As bonds by 700 deg. C rapid thermal annealing. High-resolution x-ray diffraction and reciprocal space mapping measurements showed that no significant out-diffusion of the elements occurs in the TlInGaAsN/TlGaAsN quantum wells (QWs) even after the same annealing. It is concluded that the blueshift in the photoluminescence peak for the TlInGaAsN/TlGaAsN QWs after annealing is attributed to the transformation of the atomic configuration in TlInGaAsN.

  20. Direct measurement of band offset at the interface between CdS and Cu2ZnSnS4 using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Shin; Kataoka, Keita; Takahashi, Naoko; Kimoto, Yasuji; Fukano, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Masaki; Hazama, Hirofumi

    2013-12-01

    We directly and non-destructively measured the valence band offset at the interface between CdS and Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), which can measure the electron state of the buried interface because of its large analysis depth. These measurements were made using the following real devices; CZTS(t = 700 nm), CdS(t = 100 nm)/CZTS(t = 700 nm), and CdS(t = 5 nm)/CZTS(t = 700 nm) films formed on Mo coated glass. The valence band spectra were measured by HAXPES using an X-ray photon energy of 8 keV. The value of the valence band offset at the interface between CdS and CZTS was estimated as 1.0 eV by fitting the spectra. The conduction band offset could be deduced as 0.0 eV from the obtained valence band offset and the band gap energies of CdS and CZTS.

  1. Oxidation and deprotonation of synthetic Fe{sup II}-Fe{sup III} (oxy)hydroxycarbonate Green Rust: An X-ray photoelectron study

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, M. Guillemin, Y.; Ruby, C.

    2008-01-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rusts (GRs). GRs with variable composition, i.e. Fe{sup II}{sub 6(1-x)}Fe{sup III}{sub 6x}O{sub 12}H{sub 2(7-3x)} CO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O where the Fe{sup III} molar fraction of the positively charged hydroxide sheets, x=[Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] belongs to [1/3, 1], were synthesised under an inert atmosphere. The broadened Fe(2p{sub 3/2}) spectra were fitted using Gupta and Sen multiplets peaks and additional satellite and surface features. The [Fe(III)]/[Fe(total)] surface atomic ratios closely agree with the x ratios expected from the bulk composition, which gives a high degree of confidence on the validity of the proposed fitting procedure. The valence band spectra are also reported and show dependencies on iron speciation. The O(1s) spectra revealed the presence of O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -} species and adsorbed water. The hydroxyl component decreases with increasing x values, i.e. with the amount of ferric iron, while the oxide component increases. This study provides direct spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyl groups that occurs simultaneously with the oxidation of ferrous iron within the GR structure. - Graphical abstract: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to investigate chemical bonding and distribution of iron and oxygen species at the surface of Green Rust (GR) compounds. First spectroscopic evidence of the deprotonation of hydroxyls groups occurring simultaneously to the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) species is provided.

  2. Interaction of bovine serum albumin and lysozyme with stainless steel studied by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Killian, Manuela S; Blomberg, Eva; Virtanen, Sannakaisa; Schmuki, Patrik; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2012-11-27

    An in-depth mechanistic understanding of the interaction between stainless steel surfaces and proteins is essential from a corrosion and protein-induced metal release perspective when stainless steel is used in surgical implants and in food applications. The interaction between lysozyme (LSZ) from chicken egg white and bovine serum albumin (BSA) and AISI 316L stainless steel surfaces was studied ex situ by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) after different adsorption time periods (0.5, 24, and 168 h). The effect of XPS measurements, storage (aging), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and elevated temperature (up to 200 °C) on the protein layers, as well as changes in surface oxide composition, were investigated. Both BSA and LSZ adsorption induced an enrichment of chromium in the oxide layer. BSA induced significant changes to the entire oxide, while LSZ only induced a depletion of iron at the utmost layer. SDS was not able to remove preadsorbed proteins completely, despite its high concentration and relatively long treatment time (up to 36.5 h), but induced partial denaturation of the protein coatings. High-temperature treatment (200 °C) and XPS exposure (X-ray irradiation and/or photoelectron emission) induced significant denaturation of both proteins. The heating treatment up to 200 °C removed some proteins, far from all. Amino acid fragment intensities determined from ToF-SIMS are discussed in terms of significant differences with adsorption time, between the proteins, and between freshly adsorbed and aged samples. Stainless steel-protein interactions were shown to be strong and protein-dependent. The findings assist in the understanding of previous studies of metal release and surface changes upon exposure to similar protein solutions.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis for the chemical impact of solvent addition rate on electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of HCl-doped polyaniline nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawy, Hesham Ramzy; Aston, D. Eric; Kengne, Blaise-Alexis F.; McIlroy, David N.; Qiang, You; Nguyen, Tai; Heo, Deukhyoun

    2015-11-07

    An in-depth analysis of the chemical functionality in HCl-doped polyaniline (PANI) nanopowders is discussed through interpretations of x-ray photoelectron spectra. The distinctions between three PANI sample types, produced under varied synthesis conditions, are compared on the basis correlations between newly collected electron spectra for chemical analysis (or also x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and electromagnetic (EM) shielding effectiveness (SE) within two frequency bands (100–1500 MHz and ∼2–14 GHz). The findings are discussed with reference to previous data analysis of electrical conductivities and Raman and UV-vis spectra analyzed from replicates of the same PANI nanopowders, where only the 8–12 GHz range for SE was tested. They further corroborate previous results for limited-solvent conditions that enhance EM shielding. The three nanopowder types show distinctive differences in polaron, bipolaron, and polar lattice contributions. The collective findings describe the chemical connections between controlling and, most importantly, limiting the available solvent for polymerization with simultaneously doping and how it is that the newly developed solvent-limited approach for HCl-PANI nanopowders provides better shielding than traditionally solvent-rich methods by having more extended and perhaps even faster polaron delocalization than other PANI-based products. The maximum oxidation (50%) and doping (49%) levels obtained in the solvent-free nanopowders also produced the highest SE values of 37.3 ± 3.7 dB (MHz band) and 68.6 ± 4.6 dB (GHz band)

  4. Correlations Between Variations in Solar EUV and Soft X-Ray Irradiance and Photoelectron Energy Spectra Observed on Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F(10.7) index currently used.

  5. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the morphology and chemistry of a PdCl{sub 2}/SnCl{sub 2} electroless plating catalysis system adsorbed onto shape memory alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Silvain, J.F.; Fouassier, O.; Lescaux, S.

    2004-11-01

    A study of the different stages of the electroless deposition of copper on micronic NiTi shape memory alloy particles activated by one-step and two-step methods has been conducted from both a chemical and a morphological point of view. The combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has allowed detection of the distribution of the formed compounds and depth quantification and estimation of the surface topographic parameters. For the two-step method, at the sensitization of the early stages, it is observed by AFM that Sn is absorbed in form of clusters that tend to completely cover the surface and form a continuous film. XPS analysis have shown that Sn and Pd are first absorbed in form of oxide (SnO{sub 2} and PdO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH){sub 4}]. After the entire sensitization step, the NiTi substrate is covered with Sn-based compounds. After the sensitization and the activation steps the powder roughness increases. Behavior of the Sn and Pd growth for the one-step method does not follow the behavior found for the two-step method. Indeed, XPS analysis shows a three-dimensional (3D) growth of Pd clusters on top of a mixture of metallic tin, oxide (SnO) and hydroxide [Sn(OH){sub 2}]. These Pd clusters are covered with a thin layer of Pd-oxide contamination induced by the electroless process. The mean roughness for the one-step and two-step processes are equivalent. After copper deposition, the decrease of mean roughness is attributed to a filling of surface valleys, observed after the Sn-Pd coating step.

  6. X-Ray Photoelectron and Anger Electron Spectroscopic Studies of Chemical Shifts in Amorphous Ge-Se System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Tokihiro

    1983-09-01

    The chemical shifts of the Ge 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 and Se 3d, 3p3/2,1/2 photoelectron lines were measured for the amorphous Ge-Se system and those of the Ge photoelectron lines are corrected for Auger parameter shifts. According to the valence shell potential model, the ratio of the chemical shift in the amorphous Ge-Se system to that in stoichiometric GeSe2 can be approximated by the ratio of the Ge-Se bond number in the Ge-Se system to that in GeSe2. The chemical shift ratios evaluated from the experimental results reveal bond structures at non-stoichiometric compositions. In the excess-Ge range, GeSe is composed of atomic clusters of three-fold co-ordinated Ge and Se atoms, and Ge2Se3 contains atomic clusters of Se3Ge-GeSe3 units. In the excess-Se range, GeSe3 includes GeSe4 tetrahedral units, and Se-Se chains and/or Se8 rings.

  7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure study of copper sites hosted at the internal surface of ZSM-5 zeolite: A comparison with quantitative and energetic data on the CO and NH3 adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolis, V.; Maggiorini, S.; Meda, L.; D'Acapito, F.; Palomino, G. Turnes; Bordiga, S.; Lamberti, C.

    2000-11-01

    The oxidation state of Cu species dispersed in a Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite obtained by a nonconventional gas-phase CuCl exchange, and nominally containing only Cu(I) species, was studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. The oxidation of Cu(I) species to Cu(II) by simple exposure to the atmosphere and subsequent reduction by thermal activation in vacuo was monitored. The quantitative and energetic aspects of the formation of carbonyl-like and amino-complexes at the metallic sites was studied by means of adsorption microcalorimetry. CO and NH3 were used as probe molecules in order to assess the coordinative unsaturation of the Cu(I) cations. Adsorption heats comprised in the 130-40 kJ mol-1 interval were obtained for the formation of both type of complexes. The perturbation induced on the Cu centers and/or on the zeolite matrix by the adsorption of the probe molecules was monitored by parallel experiments of XPS, IR, and XANES. A significant fraction of CO and NH3 molecules are irreversibly held on Cu(I) sites even after outgassing at room temperature (RT) at a final dynamic vacuum of 10-5 Torr. On the contrary, no evidence of Cu(I)/CO or of Cu(I)/NH3 complexes was observed by XPS, indicating that such adducts are totally destroyed upon outgassing at 10-9 Torr. This fact implies a reconsideration of what was previously considered as a "stable adduct." XPS allowed to reveal the existence of ammonia adsorbed on defective Al(III) species, and to explain the chemical nature of species formed at the earliest stages of NH3 dosage and characterized by a heat of adsorption as high as 180 kJ mol-1. By comparing the quantitative XPS and volumetric-calorimetric data it was inferred that a significant gradient of defects amount is present in the system. Finally, from the whole set of XPS measurements here reported and from parallel blank experiments on the ZSM-5 zeolite before Cu-exchange, a calibration scale for the N(1

  8. Direct observation of bias-dependence potential distribution in metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under device operation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Chikyo, T.

    2014-01-28

    Although gate stack structures with high-k materials have been extensively investigated, there are some issues to be solved for the formation of high quality gate stack structures. In the present study, we employed hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in operating devices. This method allows us to investigate bias dependent electronic states, while keeping device structures intact. Using this method, we have investigated electronic states and potential distribution in gate metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures under device operation. Analysis of the core levels shifts as a function of the bias voltage indicated that a potential drop occurred at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Pt/HfO{sub 2} gate structure, while a potential gradient was not observed at the Ru/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Ru/HfO{sub 2} gate structure. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a thicker SiO{sub 2} layer was formed at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface, indicating that the origin of potential drop at Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface is formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the interface. The formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the metal/high-k interface might concern the Fermi level pinning, which is observed in metal/high-k gate stack structures.

  9. Internal structure of InP/ZnS nanocrystals unraveled by high-resolution soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Demadrille, Renaud; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Reiss, Peter; Renault, Olivier

    2010-08-24

    High-energy resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (DeltaE < 200 meV) is used to investigate the internal structure of semiconductor quantum dots containing low Z-contrast elements. In InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals synthesized using a single-step procedure (core and shell precursors added at the same time), a homogeneously alloyed InPZnS core structure is evidenced by quantitative analysis of their In3d(5/2) spectra recorded at variable excitation energy. When using a two-step method (core InP nanocrystal synthesis followed by subsequent ZnS shell growth), XPS analysis reveals a graded core/shell interface. We demonstrate the existence of In-S and S(x)-In-P(1-x) bonding states in both types of InP/ZnS nanocrystals, which allows a refined view on the underlying reaction mechanisms. PMID:20666468

  10. Operando x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy for studying forward and reverse biased silicon p-n junctions.

    PubMed

    Barrett, N; Gottlob, D M; Mathieu, C; Lubin, C; Passicousset, J; Renault, O; Martinez, E

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress in the understanding of surfaces and interfaces of materials for new technologies requires operando studies, i.e., measurement of chemical, electronic, and magnetic properties under external stimulus (such as mechanical strain, optical illumination, or electric fields) applied in situ in order to approach real operating conditions. Electron microscopy attracts much interest, thanks to its ability to determine semiconductor doping at various scales in devices. Spectroscopic photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is particularly powerful since it combines high spatial and energy resolution, allowing a comprehensive analysis of local work function, chemistry, and electronic structure using secondary, core level, and valence band electrons, respectively. Here we present the first operando spectroscopic PEEM study of a planar Si p-n junction under forward and reverse bias. The method can be used to characterize a vast range of materials at near device scales such as resistive oxides, conducting bridge memories and domain wall arrays in ferroelectrics photovoltaic devices. PMID:27250431

  11. Operando x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy for studying forward and reverse biased silicon p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, N.; Gottlob, D. M.; Mathieu, C.; Lubin, C.; Passicousset, J.; Renault, O.; Martinez, E.

    2016-05-01

    Significant progress in the understanding of surfaces and interfaces of materials for new technologies requires operando studies, i.e., measurement of chemical, electronic, and magnetic properties under external stimulus (such as mechanical strain, optical illumination, or electric fields) applied in situ in order to approach real operating conditions. Electron microscopy attracts much interest, thanks to its ability to determine semiconductor doping at various scales in devices. Spectroscopic photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is particularly powerful since it combines high spatial and energy resolution, allowing a comprehensive analysis of local work function, chemistry, and electronic structure using secondary, core level, and valence band electrons, respectively. Here we present the first operando spectroscopic PEEM study of a planar Si p-n junction under forward and reverse bias. The method can be used to characterize a vast range of materials at near device scales such as resistive oxides, conducting bridge memories and domain wall arrays in ferroelectrics photovoltaic devices.

  12. Symmetry of valence states of Heusler compounds explored by linear dichroism in hard-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ouardi, Siham; Fecher, Gerhard H; Kozina, Xeniya; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Balke, Benjamin; Felser, Claudia; Ikenaga, Eiji; Sugiyama, Takeharu; Kawamura, Naomi; Suzuki, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2011-07-15

    This study reports on the linear dichroism in angular-resolved photoemission from the valence band of the Heusler compounds NiTi0.9Sc0.1Sn and NiMnSb. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy was performed with an excitation energy of hν = 7.938  keV. The linear polarization of the photons was changed using an in-vacuum diamond phase retarder. The valence band spectra exhibit the typical structure expected from first-principles calculations of the electronic structure of these compounds. Noticeable linear dichroism is found in the valence band of both materials, and this allows for a symmetry analysis of the contributing states. The differences in the spectra are found to be caused by symmetry-dependent angular asymmetry parameters, and these occur even in polycrystalline samples without preferential crystallographic orientation.

  13. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopic study of the association of As(III) with nanoparticulate FeS and FeS-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Soo; Jeong, Hoon Y; Demond, Avery H; Hayes, Kim F

    2011-11-01

    Iron sulfide (FeS) has been demonstrated to have a high removal capacity for arsenic (As) in reducing environments. However, FeS may be present as a coating, rather than in nanoparticulate form, in both natural and engineered systems. Frequently, the removal capacity of coatings may be different than that of nanoparticulates in batch systems. To assess the differences in removal mechanisms between nanoparticulate FeS and FeS present as a coating, the solid phase products from the reaction of As(III) with FeS-coated sand and with suspensions of nanoparticulate (NP) FeS were determined using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In reaction with NP FeS at pH 5, As(III) was reduced to As(II) to form realgar (AsS), while at pH 9, As(III) adsorbed as an As(III) thioarsenite species. In contrast, in the FeS-coated sand system, As(III) formed the solid phase orpiment (As(2)S(3)) at pH 5, but adsorbed as an As(III) arsenite species at pH 9. These different solid reaction products are attributed to differences in FeS concentration and the resultant redox (pe) differences in the FeS-coated sand system versus suspensions of NP FeS. These results point to the importance of accounting for differences in concentration and redox when making inferences for coatings based on batch suspension studies.

  14. Band alignment of atomic layer deposited MgO/Zn0.8Al0.2O heterointerface determined by charge corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Yang, Yuzhen; Heng, Yuekun

    2016-05-01

    Pure magnesium (MgO) and zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (Zn0.8Al0.2O) were prepared via atomic layer deposition. We have studied the structure and band gap of bulk Zn0.8Al0.2O material by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Tauc method, and the band offsets and alignment of atomic layer deposited MgO/Zn0.8Al0.2O heterointerface were investigated systematically using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in this study. Different methodologies, such as neutralizing electron gun, the use of C 1s peak recalibration and zero charging method, were applied to recover the actual position of the core levels in insulator materials which were easily influenced by differential charging phenomena. Schematic band alignment diagram, valence band offset (ΔEV) and conduction band offset (ΔEC) for the interface of the MgO/Zn0.8Al0.2O heterostructure have been constructed. An accurate value of ΔEV = 0.72 ± 0.11 eV was obtained from various combinations of core levels of heterojunction with varied MgO thickness. Given the experimental band gaps of 7.83 eV for MgO and 5.29 eV for Zn0.8Al0.2O, a type-II heterojunction with a ΔEC of 3.26 ± 0.11 eV was found. Band offsets and alignment studies of these heterojunctions are important for gaining deep consideration to the design of various optoelectronic devices based on such heterointerface.

  15. Effects of sulfation level on the desulfation behavior of pre-sulfated Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts: a combined H2 Temperature-Programmed Reaction, in-situ sulfur K-edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF

    2009-04-03

    Desulfation by hydrogen of pre-sulfated Pt(2wt%) BaO(20wt%)/Al2O3 with various sulfur loading (S/Ba = 0.12, 0.31 and 0.62) were investigated by combining H2 temperature programmed reaction (TPRX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in-situ sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), and synchrotron time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TR-XRD) techniques. We find that the amount of H2S desorbed during the desulfation in the H2 TPRX experiments is not proportional to the amount of initial sulfur loading. The results of both in-situ sulfur K-edge XANES and TR-XRD show that at low sulfur loadings, sulfates were transformed to a BaS phase and remained in the catalyst, rather than being removed as H2S. On the other hand, when the deposited sulfur level exceeded a certain threshold (at least S/Ba = 0.31) sulfates were reduced to form H2S, and the relative amount of the residual sulfide species in the catalyst was much less than at low sulfur loading. Unlike samples with high sulfur loading (e.g., S/Ba = 0.62), H2O did not promote the desulfation for the sample with S/Ba of 0.12, implying that the formed BaS species originating from the reduction of sulfates at low sulfur loading are more stable to hydrolysis. The results of this combined spectroscopy investigation provide clear evidence to show that sulfates at low sulfur loadings are less likely to be removed as H2S and have a greater tendency to be transformed to BaS on the material, leading to the conclusion that desulfation behavior of Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts is markedly dependent on the sulfation levels.

  16. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. III. Simulated spectra of model core–shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Cedric J.; Chudzicki, Maksymilian; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2015-09-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis has been used to simulate Cu 2p photoelectron spectra for four types of spherical copper–gold nanoparticles (NPs). These simulations were made to extend the work of Tougaard [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 1415 (1996)] and of Powell et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 31, 021402 (2013)] who performed similar simulations for four types of planar copper–gold films. The Cu 2p spectra for the NPs were compared and contrasted with analogous results for the planar films and the effects of elastic scattering were investigated. The new simulations were made for a monolayer of three types of Cu/Au core–shell NPs on a Si substrate: (1) an Au shell of variable thickness on a Cu core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm; (2) a Cu shell of variable thickness on an Au core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm; and (3) an Au shell of variable thickness on a 1 nm Cu shell on an Au core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm. For these three morphologies, the outer-shell thickness was varied until the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} peak intensity was the same (within 2%) as that found in our previous work with planar Cu/Au morphologies. The authors also performed similar simulations for a monolayer of spherical NPs consisting of a CuAu{sub x} alloy (also on a Si substrate) with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm. In the latter simulations, the relative Au concentration (x) was varied to give the same Cu 2p{sub 3/2} peak intensity (within 2%) as that found previously. For each morphology, the authors performed simulations with elastic scattering switched on and off. The authors found that elastic-scattering effects were generally strong for the Cu-core/Au-shell and weak for the Au-core/Cu-shell NPs; intermediate elastic-scattering effects were found for the Au-core/Cu-shell/Au-shell NPs. The shell thicknesses required to give

  17. The growth of epitaxial iron oxides on platinum (111) as studied by X-ray photoelectron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.

    1995-05-01

    Three complementary surface structure probes, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) have been combined in a single instrument. This experimental system has been utilized to study the structure and growth mechanisms of iron oxide films on Pt(111); these films were formed by first depositing a single overlayer of Fe with a certain coverage in monolayers (ML`s), and then thermally oxidizing it in an oxygen atmosphere. For films up to {approximately}1 ML in thickness, a bilayer of Fe and O similar to those in FeO(111) is found to form. In agreement with prior studies, STM and LEED show this to be an incommensurate oxide film forming a lateral superlattice with short- and long-range periodicities of {approximately}3.1 {Angstrom} and {approximately}26.0 {Angstrom}. XPD in addition shows a topmost oxygen layer to be relaxed inward by -0.6 {Angstrom} compared to bulk FeO(111), and these are new structural conclusions. The oxygen stacking in the FeO(111) bilayer is dominated by one of two possible binding sites. For thicker iron oxide films from 1.25 ML to 3.0 ML, the growth mode is essentially Stranski-Krastanov: iron oxide islands form on top of the FeO(111) bilayer mentioned above. For iron oxide films of 3.0 ML thickness, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) yields an Fe 2p{sub 3/2} binding energy and an Fe:O stoichiometry consistent with the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Our XPD data further prove this overlayer to be Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(111)-magnetite in two almost equally populated domains with a 180{degrees} rotation between them. The structural parameters for this Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} overlayer generally agree with those of a previous LEED study, except that we find a significant difference in the first Fe-O interplanar spacing. This work demonstrates the considerable benefits to be derived by using this set of complementary surface structure probes in such epitaxial growth studies.

  18. Toward new techniques to measure heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol: Electrodynamic Balance-Mass Spectrometry (EDB-MS) and Aerosol X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Heine, N.; Xu, B.; Davies, J. F.; Kirk, B. B.; Kostko, O.; Alayoglu, S.; Wilson, K. R.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and physical properties of aerosol can be changed via heterogeneous oxidation with the OH radical. However, the physical state of the aerosol influences the kinetics of this reaction; liquid particles with a high diffusion coefficient are expected to be well mixed and homogenously oxidized, while oxidation of solid, diffusion-limited aerosol is expected to occur primarily on the surface, creating steep chemical gradients within the particle. We are working to develop several new techniques to study the heterogeneous oxidation of different types of aerosol. We are developing a "modular" electrodynamic balance (EDB) that will enable us to study heterogeneous oxidation at aqueous interfaces using a mass-spectrometer (and potentially other detection techniques). Using a direct analysis in real time (DART) interface, preliminary droplet train measurements have demonstrated single-droplet mass spectrometry to be possible. With long reaction times in our EDB, we will be able to study heterogeneous oxidation of a wide variety of organic species in aqueous droplets. Additionally, we are working to use aerosol photoemission and velocity map imaging (VMI) to study the surface of aerosol particles as they undergo heterogeneous oxidation. With VMI, we're able to collect electrons with a 4π collection efficiency over conventional electron energy analyzers. Preliminary results looking at the ozonolysis of squalene using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) show that heterogeneous oxidation kinetic data can be extracted from photoelectron spectra. By moving to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we will determine elemental and chemical composition of the aerosol surface. Thus, aerosol XPS will provide information on the steep chemical gradients that form as diffusion-limited aerosol undergo heterogeneous oxidation.

  19. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis of RuO2-Ta2O5 thick film pH sensors.

    PubMed

    Manjakkal, Libu; Cvejin, Katarina; Kulawik, Jan; Zaraska, Krzysztof; Socha, Robert P; Szwagierczak, Dorota

    2016-08-10

    The paper reports on investigation of the pH sensing mechanism of thick film RuO2-Ta2O5 sensors by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Interdigitated conductimetric pH sensors were screen printed on alumina substrates. The microstructure and elemental composition of the films were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The XPS studies revealed the presence of Ru ions at different oxidation states and the surface hydroxylation of the sensing layer increasing with increasing pH. The EIS analysis carried out in the frequency range 10 Hz-2 MHz showed that the electrical parameters of the sensitive electrodes in the low frequency range were distinctly dependent on pH. The charge transfer and ionic exchange occurring at metal oxide-solution interface were indicated as processes responsible for the sensing mechanism of thick film RuO2-Ta2O5 pH sensors.

  20. Temperature effects on Li4Ti5O12 electrode/electrolyte interfaces at the first cycle: A X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Auger Microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieu, J.-B.; Courrèges, C.; El Ouatani, L.; Tessier, C.; Martinez, H.

    2016-06-01

    Li4Ti5O12-based negative electrodes for Lithium-ion batteries are of interest because of the high reversibility of Li+ insertion/extraction. In this study, the surface of cycled electrodes is analysed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) to investigate the effects of cycling temperature (room temperature, 60 °C and 85 °C) upon the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation, which plays a major role in batteries electrochemical performances. Half-cells, with a vinylene carbonate containing electrolyte, are galvanostatically cycled at different steps of the first cycle: the mid-plateau during the first discharge, the end of the first discharge at 1.2 V and the end of the first charge at 2.0 V. XPS analysis evidences that higher temperatures promote the formation of a thicker SEI, which can explain the increase of the irreversible capacity with temperature. SAM mappings (allowing high spatial resolution ∼10-100 nm) evidence that this SEI homogeneously covers the electrode surface, regardless of the cycling temperature. During charge, the SEI is partially dissolved at room temperature, more slightly at 60 °C whereas at 85 °C, no clear evidence of layer thinning is observed. The SEI chemical composition is also investigated and reveals a majority of organic species and an increasing proportion of LiF with the temperature.

  1. Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-03-31

    The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

  2. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001): A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie D. W.; Neal, James R.; Shen, Tiehan H.; Morton, Simon A.; Tobin, James G.; Dan Waddill, G.; Matthew, Jim A. D.; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-15

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 A results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  3. The evolution of Ga and As core levels in the formation of Fe/GaAs (001):A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Shen, Tiehan; Morton, Simon; Tobin, James; Waddill, George Dan; Matthew, Jim; Greig, Denis; Hopkinson, Mark

    2008-07-14

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 Angstrom results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two additional As environments of metallic character: one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three additional environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical makeup of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on Fe and Co catalysts during the first stages of ethanol chemical vapor deposition for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Oida, Satoshi; McFeely, Fenton R.; Bol, Ageeth A.

    2011-03-15

    Optimized chemical vapor deposition processes for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can lead to the growth of dense, vertically aligned, mm-long forests of SWCNTs. Precise control of the growth process is however still difficult, mainly because of poor understanding of the interplay between catalyst, substrate and reaction gas. In this paper we use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the interplay between Fe or Co catalysts, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates and ethanol during the first stages of SWCNT forest growth. With XPS we observe that ethanol oxidizes Fe catalysts at carbon nanotube (CNT) growth temperatures, which leads to reduced carbon nanotube growth. Ethanol needs to be decomposed by a hot filament or other technique to create a reducing atmosphere and reactive carbon species in order to grow vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from Fe catalysts. Furthermore, we show that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, unlike SiO{sub 2}, plays an active role in CNT growth using ethanol CVD. From our study we conclude that metallic Fe on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most optimal catalyst/substrate combination for high-yield SWCNT forest growth, using hot filament CVD with ethanol as the carbon containing gas.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of GaN/(0001)AlN and AlN/(0001)GaN growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. W.; Carlson, E. P.; Therrien, R. J.; Christman, J. A.; Nemanich, R. J.; Davis, R. F.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanisms of growth of GaN on AlN and AlN on GaN via gas source-molecular beam epitaxy with NH3 as the nitrogen source have been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The growth of GaN on AlN at low temperatures (650-750 °C) occurs via a Stranski-Krastanov 2D→3D type mechanism with the transition to 3D growth occurring at ≈10-15 Å. The mechanism changes to Frank van der Merwe (FM)/layer-by-layer growth above 800 °C. The growth of AlN on GaN occurred via a FM layer-by-layer mechanism within the 750-900 °C temperature range investigated. We propose a model based on the interaction of ammonia and atomic hydrogen with the GaN/AlN surfaces which indicates that the surface kinetics of hydrogen desorption and ammonia decomposition are the factors that determine the GaN growth mechanism.

  6. Kinetics of the sulfur oxidation on palladium: A combined in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Gotterbarm, Karin; Hoefert, Oliver; Lorenz, Michael P. A.; Streber, Regine; Papp, Christian; Luckas, Nicola; Vines, Francesc; Steinrueck, Hans-Peter; Goerling, Andreas

    2012-03-07

    We studied the reaction kinetics of sulfur oxidation on the Pd(100) surface by in situ high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio density functional calculations. Isothermal oxidation experiments were performed between 400 and 500 K for small amounts ({approx}0.02 ML) of preadsorbed sulfur, with oxygen in large excess. The main stable reaction intermediate found on the surface is SO{sub 4}, with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} being only present in minor amounts. Density-functional calculations depict a reaction energy profile, which explains the sequential formation of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and eventually SO{sub 4}, also highlighting that the in-plane formation of SO from S and O adatoms is the rate limiting step. From the experiments we determined the activation energy of the rate limiting step to be 85 {+-} 6 kJ mol{sup -1} by Arrhenius analysis, matching the calculated endothermicity of the SO formation.

  7. Thin oxide-free phosphate films of composition formed on the surface of vanadium metal and characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Asunskis, D.J.; Sherwood, P.M.A.

    2006-07-15

    This article reports the preparation of thin (less than 100 A) oxide-free phosphate films of various compositions on vanadium metal. These films are interesting because of their potential for corrosion inhibition, adhesion promotion, and biocompatibility. Valence and core-level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the films. The valence band spectra obtained were compared with spectra generated from band structure calculations for various vanadium phosphates and from previously reported spectra of vanadium phosphates. Vanadium phosphate coatings were created by the reaction of vanadium metal and different phosphorus-oxygen containing acids: H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, H{sub 3}PO{sub 3}, H{sub 3}PO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This article focuses upon the valence band region which shows significant differences between the four vanadium phosphate films formed as well as clear differences between the these phosphates and vanadium oxides. The valence band spectra are effectively interpreted by band structure calculations.

  8. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: A comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Doucet, Mathieu; Browning, Jim; Baldwin, J. K.; Winiarz, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Helmut; Taub, H.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2016-04-15

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 x 10-2 mS/cm-1). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling was observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggestsmore » the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, required to remove electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterizations in situ.« less

  9. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: a comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Fears, T M; Doucet, M; Browning, J F; Baldwin, J K S; Winiarz, J G; Kaiser, H; Taub, H; Sacci, R L; Veith, G M

    2016-05-18

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 × 10(-2) mS cm(-1)). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling were observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggests the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, which is required to remove the electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterization in situ. PMID:27149427

  10. The Effect of Carrier Injection Stress on Boron-Doped Amorphous Silicon Suboxide Layers Investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunhwa; Park, Seungman; Park, Jinjoo; Kim, Youngkuk; Yoon, Kichan; Shin, Chonghoon; Baek, Seungsin; Kim, Joondong; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2011-09-01

    In amorphous silicon solar cells, reducing degradation is one of the key issues in improving cell performance. The degradation of the p-layer can play an important role since it is directly related to the open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) in the cells. In this study, we investigated the changes in boron-doped p-type silicon suboxide (SiOx) layers after carrier injection stress. The boron doping level was varied by controlling B2H6 gas flow rate. When these layers were degraded, the dark conductivity decay decreased from 53% to less than 5%, and the increase in activation energy decreased from 11 to 0.5% depending on the B2H6 gas flow rate increase. Our improvements are explained in conjunction with the three- and four-fold coordinated boron atoms by the shift of the B 1s X-ray photoelectron spectrum. In this paper we present how to improve the stability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film solar cells.

  11. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy ofGaP_{1-x}N_x Photocorroded as a Result of Hydrogen Productionthrough Water Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Marie A.; /Illinois U., Urbana /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells produce hydrogen gas through the sunlight driven electrolysis of water. By extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and storing solar energy in the H-H bond, they offer a promising renewable energy technology. Addition of dilute amounts of nitrogen to III-V semiconductors has been shown to dramatically increase the stability of these materials for hydrogen production. In an effort to learn more about the origin of semiconductor photocorrosion in PEC cells, three samples of p-type GaP with varying levels of nitrogen content (0%, 0.2%, 2%) were photocorroded and examined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). GaPN samples were observed to be more efficient during the hydrogen production process than the pure GaP samples. Sample surfaces contained gallium oxides in the form of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ga(OH){sub 3} and phosphorus oxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}), as well as surface oxides from exposure to air. A significant shift in intensity from bulk to surface peaks dramatic nitrogen segregation to the surface during photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Further investigations, including using a scanning electron microscope to investigate sample topography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis for solution analyses, are under way to determine the mechanism for these changes.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of negative electrodes from high-power lithium-ion cells showing various levels of power fade

    SciTech Connect

    Herstedt, Marie; Abraham, Daniel P.; Kerr, John B.

    2004-02-28

    High-power lithium-ion cells for transportation applications are being developed and studied at Argonne National Laboratory. The current generation of cells containing LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}-based cathodes, graphite-based anodes, and LiPF6-based electrolytes show loss of capacity and power during accelerated testing at elevated temperatures. Negative electrode samples harvested from some cells that showed varying degrees of power and capacity fade were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples exhibited a surface film on the graphite, which was thicker on samples from cells that showed higher fade. Furthermore, solvent-based compounds were dominant on samples from low power fade cells, whereas LiPF{sub 6}-based products were dominant on samples from high power fade cells. The effect of sample rinsing and air exposure is discussed. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of compounds suggested by the XPS data.

  13. A study of the O/Ag(111) system with scanning tunneling microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at ambient pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Christian; Eren, Baran; Lechner, Barbara A. J.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of O2 with the Ag(111) surface was studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the pressure range from 10- 9 Torr to 1 atm at room temperature and with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) up to 0.3 Torr O2 in the temperature range from RT to 413 K. STM images show that the Ag(111) surface topography is little affected in regions with large flat terraces, except for the appearance of mobile features due to oxygen atoms at pressures above 0.01 Torr. In regions where the step density is high, the surface became rough under 0.01 Torr of O2, due to the local oxidation of Ag. Various chemical states of oxygen due to chemisorbed, oxide and subsurface species were identified by XPS as a function of pressure and temperature. The findings from the STM images and XPS measurements indicate that formation of an oxide phase, the thermodynamically stable form at room temperature under ambient O2 pressure, is kinetically hindered in the flat terrace areas but proceeds readily in regions with high-step density.

  14. In situ SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on the pH-dependant adsorption of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on silver electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Jia, Shaojie; Fodjo, Essy Kouadio; Xu, Hu; Wang, Yuhong; Deng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) are used to investigate the redox reaction and adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on an Ag electrode at different pH values. The obtained results indicate that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed tilted on the Ag electrode through O-atom of ring carbonyl in a potential range from -0.3 to -0.5 V vs. SCE, but the orientation turns to more tilted orientation with both O-atom of the ring carbonyl and carboxylate group in positive potential region for pH 6.0 and 7.4. However, at pH 10.0, the orientation adopts tilted conformation constantly on the Ag electrode with both O-atom of the anthraquinone ring and carboxylate group in the potential range from -0.3 to -0.5 V vs. SCE or at positive potentials. Moreover, the adsorption behavior of AQ-2-COOH has been further confirmed by AR-XPS on the Ag surface. Proposed reasons for the observed changes in orientation are presented.

  15. Structural investigation on Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90−x} glasses using x-ray photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wen-Hou; Xiang, Shen; Xu, Si-Wei; Wang, Rong-Ping; Fang, Liang

    2014-05-14

    The structure of Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 90−x} glasses (x = 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 27.5, 30, and 32.5 at. %) has been investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Different structural units have been extracted and characterized by decomposing XPS core level spectra, the evolution of the relative concentration of each structural unit indicates that, the relative contributions of Se-trimers and Se-Se-Ge(Sb) structure decrease with increasing Ge content until they become zero at chemically stoichiometric glasses of Ge{sub 25}Sb{sub 10}Se{sub 65}, and then the homopolar bonds like Ge-Ge and Sb-Sb begin to appear in the spectra. Increase of homopolar bonds will extend band-tails into the gap and narrow the optical band gap. Thus, the glass with a stoichiometric composition generally has fewer defective bonds and larger optical bandgap.

  16. Impact of water vapour and carbon dioxide on surface composition of C{sub 3}A polymorphs studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dubina, E.; Plank, J.; Black, L.

    2015-07-15

    The surface specific analytical method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), has been used to study the effects of water vapour and CO{sub 2} on the cubic and orthorhombic polymorphs of C{sub 3}A. Significant differences between the two polymorphs were observed in the XPS spectra. Upon exposure to water vapour, both polymorphs produced C{sub 4}AH{sub 13} on their surfaces. Additionally, the sodium-doped o-C{sub 3}A developed NaOH and traces of C{sub 3}AH{sub 6} on its surface. Subsequent carbonation yielded mono carboaluminate on both polymorphs. Large amounts of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} also formed on the surface of o-C{sub 3}A as a result of carbonation of NaOH. Furthermore, the extent of carbonation was much more pronounced for o-C{sub 3}A{sub o} than for c-C{sub 3}A.

  17. Voltage contrast X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals graphene-substrate interaction in graphene devices fabricated on the C- and Si- faces of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, Pinar; Suzer, Sefik; Arslan, Engin; Cakmakyapan, Semih; Ozbay, Ekmel; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2015-09-21

    We report on an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of two graphene based devices that were analyzed by imposing a significant current under +3 V bias. The devices were fabricated as graphene layers(s) on hexagonal SiC substrates, either on the C- or Si-terminated faces. Position dependent potential distributions (IR-drop), as measured by variations in the binding energy of a C1s peak are observed to be sporadic for the C-face graphene sample, but very smooth for the Si-face one, although the latter is less conductive. We attribute these sporadic variations in the C-face device to the incomplete electrical decoupling between the graphene layer(s) with the underlying buffer and/or substrate layers. Variations in the Si2p and O1s peaks of the underlayer(s) shed further light into the electrical interaction between graphene and other layers. Since the potential variations are amplified only under applied bias (voltage-contrast), our methodology gives unique, chemically specific electrical information that is difficult to obtain by other techniques.

  18. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, depth profiling, and elemental imaging of metal/polyimide interfaces of high density interconnect packages subjected to temperature and humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, David R.; Ibidunni, Bola; Ashraf, Muhammad

    1998-11-24

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze surfaces and buried interfaces of a tape ball grid array (TBGA) interconnect package that was exposed to temperature and humidity testing (the pressure cooker test or PCT). Two metallization structures, employing 3.5 and 7.5 nm Cr adhesion layers, respectively, showed dramatically different results in the PCT. For the metallization with 3.5 nm Cr, spontaneous failure occurred on the polymer side of the metal/polyimide interface. Copper and other metals were detected by XPS on and below this polymer surface. For the metallization with 7.5 nm Cr, which did not delaminate in the PCT, the metallization was manually peeled away and also showed failure at the polymer side of the interface. Conventional XPS taken from a 1 mm diameter area showed the presence of metals on and below this polymer surface. Detailed spatially-resolved analysis using small area XPS (0.1 mm diameter area) and imaging XPS (7 {mu}m resolution) showed that this metal did not migrate through and below the metal/polymer interface, but around and outside of the metallized area.

  19. Aging of Zerovalent Iron in Synthetic Groundwater: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Depth Profiling Characterization and Depassivation with Uniform Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hanyang; Sun, Yuankui; Li, Jinxiang; Li, Fengmin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling were employed to characterize the aged zerovalent iron (AZVI) samples incubated in synthetic groundwater. The AZVI samples prepared under different conditions exhibited the passive layers of different morphologies, amounts, and constituents. Owing to the accumulation of iron oxides on their surface, all the prepared AZVI samples were much less reactive than the pristine ZVI for Se(IV) removal. However, the reactivity of all AZVI samples toward Se(IV) sequestration could be significantly enhanced by applying a uniform magnetic field (UMF). Moreover, the flux intensity of UMF necessary to depassivate an AZVI sample was strongly dependent on the properties of its passive layer. The UMF of 1 mT was strong enough to restore the reactivity of the AZVI samples with Fe3O4 as the major constituent of the passive film or with a thin layer of α-Fe2O3 and γ-FeOOH in the external passive film. The flux intensity of UMF necessary to depassivate the AZVI samples would increase to 2 mT or even 5 mT if the AZVI samples were covered with passive films being thicker, denser, and contained more γ-FeOOH and α-Fe2O3. Furthermore, increasing the flux intensity of UMF facilitated the reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0) by AZVI samples. PMID:27384928

  20. Auger and X-ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy Study of the Density ofOxygen States in Bismuth, Aluminum, Silicon, and Uranium Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Teterin, Yu A.; Ivanov, K.E.; Teterin, A. Yu; Lebedev, A.M.; Utkin, I.O.; Vukchevich, L.

    1998-08-03

    The correlation of relative partial electron density at the oxygen ions with the intensity of Auger O KLL lines in Bi2O3, Al2O3, SiO2 and UO2 has been determined by Auger and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic methods. The dependence of the relative intensities of Auger O KL2-3L2-3 and O KL1L2-3-lines was characterized from the binding energy of O 1s electrons. The electron density of the outer valence levels of oxygen increases as the relative intensities of Anger OKL2-3L2-3 and O KL1L2-3-lines increase. The fine structure observed in the O KL1L2-3 Auger and the O 2s XPS spectra has been explained by the formation of inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO) from the interaction of electrons of the O 2s and filled metal ns shells.

  1. Band bending at the heterointerface of GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires monitored by synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbabaee, B.; Bussone, G.; Knutsson, J. V.; Geijselaers, I.; Pryor, C. E.; Rieger, T.; Demarina, N.; Grützmacher, D.; Lepsa, M. I.; Timm, R.; Pietsch, U.

    2016-10-01

    Unique electronic properties of semiconductor heterostructured nanowires make them useful for future nano-electronic devices. Here, we present a study of the band bending effect at the heterointerface of GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires by means of synchrotron based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Different Ga, In, and As core-levels of the nanowire constituents have been monitored prior to and after cleaning from native oxides. The cleaning process mainly affected the As-oxides and was accompanied by an energy shift of the core-level spectra towards lower binding energy, suggesting that the As-oxides turn the nanowire surfaces to n-type. After cleaning, both As and Ga core-levels revealed an energy shift of about -0.3 eV for core/shell compared to core reference nanowires. With respect to depth dependence and in agreement with calculated strain distribution and electron quantum confinement, the observed energy shift is interpreted by band bending of core-levels at the heterointerface between the GaAs nanowire core and the InAs shell.

  2. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks onmore » the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.« less

  3. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P.; Denlinger, J.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  4. Surface properties of Streptococcus salivarius HB and nonfibrillar mutants: measurement of zeta potential and elemental composition with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    van der Mei, H C; Léonard, A J; Weerkamp, A H; Rouxhet, P G; Busscher, H J

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the functional cell surface, the zeta potentials and elemental surface composition of Streptococcus salivarius HB and a range of mutants with known molecular surface structures were determined. Zeta potentials of fully hydrated cells were measured as a function of pH in dilute potassium phosphate solutions, yielding isoelectric points of the strains. Elemental composition (O, C, N, and P) of the outer 2 to 5 nm of the freeze-dried cell surfaces were measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. An increasing loss of proteinaceous fibrillar surface antigens of the mutants was found to be accompanied by a progressive decrease in the N/C ratio from 0.104 in the parent strain HB to 0.053 in mutant HBC12. Simultaneously, the value of the isoelectric point shifted from 3.0 to 1.3. In a previous study (A.H. Weerkamp, H.C. van der Mei, and J. W. Slot, Infect. Immun. 55:438-455, 1987) on the cell surfaces of the same strains, it was shown that removal of fibrils led to increased exposure of (lipo)teichoic acid at the surface, which explains the low isoelectric point caused by the low pKa of the phosphate groups. PMID:3372474

  5. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O epitaxial thin films with a high lithium content

    SciTech Connect

    Kumara, L. S. R. Yang, Anli; Sakata, Osami; Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Akifumi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru; Taguchi, Munetaka

    2014-07-28

    The core-level and valence-band electronic structures of Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O epitaxial thin films with x = 0, 0.27, and 0.48 were studied by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A double peak structure, consisting of a main peak and a shoulder peak, and a satellite structure were observed in the Ni 2p{sub 3/2} core-level spectra. The intensity ratio of the shoulder to main peak in this double peak structure increased with increasing lithium content in Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O. This lithium doping dependence of the Ni 2p{sub 3/2} core-level spectra was investigated using an extended cluster model, which included the Zhang–Rice (ZR) doublet bound states arising from a competition between O 2p – Ni 3d hybridization and the Ni on-site Coulomb interaction. The results indicated that the change in the intensity ratio in the main peak is because of a reduction in the ZR doublet bound states from lithium substitutions. This strongly suggests that holes compensating Li doping in Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}O are of primarily ZR character.

  6. Chemistry of L-proline on Pd(1 1 1): Temperature-programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Burkholder, Luke; Tysoe, W. T.

    2007-09-01

    The surface chemistry of proline is explored on Pd(1 1 1) using a combination of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Proline adsorbs on Pd(1 1 1) at temperatures of 250 K and below into second and subsequent layers prior to the saturation of the first layer, where approximately 70% of the adsorbed proline is present in its zwitterionic form. Molecular proline desorbs between ˜315 K and ˜333 K depending on coverage. When adsorbed at ˜300 K, only the first monolayer is formed, and the proline is present as zwitterions, oriented such that all of the carbons are detected equally by XPS. Proline decomposes by scission of the C-COO bond, where the carboxylate moiety desorbs as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, while the nitrogen-containing moiety desorbs as to HCN, and evolves pyrrole at ˜390 K, pyrrolidine at ˜410 K, and final species that desorbs at ˜450 K that cannot be unequivocally assigned but may be 2-butenenitrile (CH 3-CH dbnd CH-CN), 3-butenenitrile (CH 2dbnd CH-CH 2-CN), 2-methyl-2-propenenitrile (CH 2dbnd C(CH 3)-CN) or cyclopropanecarbonitrile.

  7. X-ray photoelectron spectrum and electronic properties of a noncentrosymmetric chalcopyrite compound HgGa(2)S(4): LDA, GGA, and EV-GGA.

    PubMed

    Reshak, Ali Hussain; Khenata, R; Kityk, I V; Plucinski, K J; Auluck, S

    2009-04-30

    An all electron full potential linearized augmented plane wave method has been applied for a theoretical study of the band structure, density of states, and electron charge density of a noncentrosymmetric chalcopyrite compound HgGa(2)S(4) using three different approximations for the exchange correlation potential. Our calculations show that the valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) are located at Gamma resulting in a direct energy gap of about 2.0, 2.2, and 2.8 eV for local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and Engel-Vosko (EVGGA) compared to the experimental value of 2.84 eV. We notice that EVGGA shows excellent agreement with the experimental data. This agreement is attributed to the fact that the Engel-Vosko GGA formalism optimizes the corresponding potential for band structure calculations. We make a detailed comparison of the density of states deduced from the X-ray photoelectron spectra with our calculations. We find that there is a strong covalent bond between the Hg and S atoms and Ga and S atoms. The Hg-Hg, Ga-Ga, and S-S bonds are found to be weaker than the Hg-S and Ga-S bonds showing that a covalent bond exists between Hg and S atoms and Ga and S atoms.

  8. Application of near ambient pressure gas-phase X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to the investigation of catalytic properties of copper in methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosvirin, Igor P.; Bukhtiyarov, Andrey V.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2016-02-01

    Application of near ambient pressure (NAP) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for characterization of catalytic properties of a heterogeneous catalyst through measurement and analysis of the core-level spectra from gas phase constituents, which become measurable in submillibar pressure range, has been demonstrated for the reaction of methanol oxidation over polycrystalline copper foil. To improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis of the gas phase signals for the routine XPS spectrometer with double Al/Mg anode used in these experiments, the sample was removed from XPS analysis zone, but it was still located in high-pressure gas cell. As consequence, only gas phase peaks from reagents and reaction products have been observed in XPS spectra. Quantitative analysis of the spectra has allowed us to calculate conversions of the reagents and yields of the reaction products, or, other words, to characterize the catalytic properties of the catalyst and to track their changes with temperature. Further comparison of the catalytic properties with concentration of the surface species measured by in situ XPS in separate experiments, but under the same conditions, gives a possibility to discuss the reaction mechanisms.

  9. The Evolution of Ga and As Core Levels in the Formation of Fe/GaAs(001): A High Resolution Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J W; Neal, J R; Shen, T H; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Waddill, G D; Matthew, J D; Greig, D; Hopkinson, M

    2006-12-08

    A high resolution soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of Ga and As 3d core levels has been conducted for Fe/GaAs (001) as a function of Fe thickness. This work has provided unambiguous evidence of substrate disrupting chemical reactions induced by the Fe overlayer--a quantitative analysis of the acquired spectra indicates significantly differing behavior of Ga and As during Fe growth, and our observations have been compared with existing theoretical models. Our results demonstrate that the outdiffusing Ga and As remain largely confined to the interface region, forming a thin intermixed layer. Whereas at low coverages Fe has little influence on the underlying GaAs substrate, the onset of substrate disruption when the Fe thickness reaches 3.5 {angstrom} results in major changes in the energy distribution curves (EDCs) of both As and Ga 3d cores. Our quantitative analysis suggests the presence of two new As environments of metallic character; one bound to the interfacial region and another which, as confirmed by in-situ oxidation experiments, surface segregates and persists over a wide range of overlayer thickness. Analysis of the corresponding Ga 3d EDCs found not two, but three new environments--also metallic in nature. Two of the three are interface-resident whereas the third undergoes outdiffusion at low Fe coverages. Based on the variations of the integrated intensities of each component, we present a schematic of the proposed chemical make-up of the Fe/GaAs (001) system.

  10. Influence of polymolybdate adsorbates on electrooxidation of ethanol at PtRu nanoparticles: Combined electrochemical, mass spectrometric and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralec, Barbara; Lewera, Adam; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2016-05-01

    The role Keggin-type phosphomolybdate (PMo12O403-) ions (adsorbed on carbon-supported PtRu, PtRu/C) on electrooxidation of ethanol is addressed here. The combined results obtained using Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltammetry are consistent with the view that presence of the Keggin-type polyoxometallate, phosphomolybdate, ions (adsorbates) leads to enlargement of the current densities associated with electrooxidation of ethanol at potentials greater than 700 mV vs. RHE. This increase of the anodic currents is correlated with the higher acetaldehyde yield which is likely to reflect changes in the reaction kinetics (e.g. more dynamic dehydrogenation of ethanol leading to acetaldehyde) or in the reaction mechanism defined by the preferential surface modification resulting not only in faster kinetics but also in higher selectivity with respect to acetaldehyde production. It is apparent from the spectroscopic data that modification of PtRu/C nanoparticles with phosphomolybdate ions leads to suppression of the formation of Ru surface oxides.

  11. Degradation of all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) investigated by electrochemical impedance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Part 2 electrochemical degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derr, Igor; Bruns, Michael; Langner, Joachim; Fetyan, Abdulmonem; Melke, Julia; Roth, Christina

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical degradation (ED) of carbon felt electrodes was investigated by cycling of a flow through all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) and conducting half-cell measurements with two reference electrodes inside the test bench. ED was detected using half-cell and full-cell electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different states of charge (SOC). Reversing the polarity of the battery to recover cell performance was performed with little success. Renewing the electrolyte after a certain amount of cycles restored the capacity of the battery. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that the amount of surface functional increases by more than a factor of 3 for the negative side as well as for the positive side. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a peeling of the fiber surface after cycling the felts, which leads to a loss of electrochemically active surface area (ECSA). Long term cycling shows that ED has a stronger impact on the negative half-cell [V(II)/V(III)] than the positive half-cell [V(IV)/V(V)] and that the negative half-cell is the rate-determining half-cell for the VRFB.

  12. Analysis of passivated A-286 stainless steel surfaces for mass spectrometer inlet systems by Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo, Henry; Blankenship, Donnie; Clark, Elliot

    2014-07-25

    In this study, various commercially available surface treatments are being explored for use on stainless steel components in mass spectrometer inlet systems. Type A-286 stainless steel coupons, approximately 12.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick, were passivated with one of five different surface treatments; an untreated coupon served as a control. The surface and near-surface microstructure and chemistry of the coupons were investigated using sputter depth profiling using Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the surface treatments studied appeared to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples in SEM images. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7–0.9 nm thick), as well as to the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E’s silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  13. Study on the chemical stability of catalyst counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells using a simple X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Chung, Jongwon; Park, SungHoon; Baek, WoonJoong; Kim, Yongsu; Kim, Seongheon; Kwon, Young-Nam; Chung, JaeGwan; Kyoung, Yongkoo; Kim, Ki-Hong; Heo, Sung

    2014-12-01

    Since the chemical/electrical stability and catalytic activity are essential conditions for catalyst counter electrodes (CCEs) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a simple dipping method is employed for evaluating the chemical stability of CCE candidates in an iodine-based liquid electrolyte (I-electrolyte). The chemical stabilities and transition mechanisms of the CCEs are successfully analyzed by studying the chemical transitions in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core levels after dipping in the I-electrolyte. All films including the Pt film undergo degradation depending on the type of material. While dipping in the I-electrolyte, Cu and Au films scarcely dissolves as their respective metal sulfides, and the Al film gradually loss its metallic properties owing to Al2O3 growth. On the other hand, a previously unknown transition mechanism of organic conducting CCEs is determined based on the proposed method. Compared to the other metal films, the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/PEDOT:PSS films undergo an entirely unique transition mechanism, which results from the chemical adsorption of organic molecules onto PEDOT:PSS molecules in the I-electrolyte. Consequently, these chemical structure transitions correspond well to the degrees of alternation in the electrical properties of DSSCs with all the investigated CCEs.

  14. Electronic and geometric properties of Au nanoparticles on Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

    PubMed

    Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Lim, Dong Chan; Dietsche, Rainer; Bertram, Nils; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-01-26

    Au nanoparticles grown on mildly sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) surfaces were studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The results were compared with those of Ag nanoparticles on the same substrate. By varying the defect densities of HOPG and the Au coverages, one can create Au nanoparticles in various sizes. At high Au coverages, the structures of the Au films significantly deviate from the ideal truncated octahedral form: the existence of many steps between different Au atomic layers can be observed, most likely due to a high activation barrier of the diffusion of Au atoms across the step edges. This implies that the particle growth at room temperature is strongly limited by kinetic factors. Hexagonal shapes of Au structures could be identified, indicating preferential growth of Au nanostructures along the (111) direction normal to the surface. In the case of Au, XPS studies reveal a weaker core level shift with decreasing particle size compared to the 3d level in similarly sized Ag particles. Also taking into account the Auger analysis of the Ag particles, the core level shifts of the metal nanoparticles on HOPG can be understood in terms of the metal/substrate charge transfer. Ag is (partially) positively charged, whereas Au negatively charged on HOPG. It is demonstrated that XPS can be a useful tool to study metal-support interactions, which plays an important role for heterogeneous catalysis, for example.

  15. [SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) study of titanium implant surfaces coated with anodic titanium-oxide layer].

    PubMed

    Suba, Csongor; Velich, Norbert; Vida, György; Kovács, Lajos; Kiss, Gábor; Szabó, György

    2003-10-01

    The demands that must be satisfied by titanium implants applied in medical practice include chemical and physical durability. An anodic oxide protective layer formed on the surface of titanium implants serves for the better attainment of this aim. The composition of the passivizing layer and the changes in its thickness and binding state can be studied by method of material science, e.g. by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this way a possibility arises for the material technological classification of the Ti-TiO2 layer structure and for the observation of the physical and chemical reactions that occur between the implants and the tissues in the organism. The present XPS examinations revealed that the binding state of the titanium forming the surface of the plates involve neither significant quantities of titanium oxide nor impurities. In the SIMS investigation the thickness of the titanium oxide layer was found to be 120-150 nm. Determination of the thickness of the surface, the binding state of the titanium and the exact proportions of the impurities and additives furnishes a possibility for a subsequent comparison with the surface structure of plates removed from the organism. It is important for the assessment of the practical value of the protective layer.

  16. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: a comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Fears, T M; Doucet, M; Browning, J F; Baldwin, J K S; Winiarz, J G; Kaiser, H; Taub, H; Sacci, R L; Veith, G M

    2016-05-18

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 × 10(-2) mS cm(-1)). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling were observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggests the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, which is required to remove the electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterization in situ.

  17. Surface chemistry of a Cu(I) beta-diketonate precursor and the atomic layer deposition of Cu{sub 2}O on SiO{sub 2} studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Dileep; Waechtler, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas; Lang, Heinrich; Mothes, Robert; Tuchscherer, André

    2014-07-01

    The surface chemistry of the bis(tri-n-butylphosphane) copper(I) acetylacetonate, [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)] and the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Cu{sub 2}O using this Cu precursor as reactant and wet oxygen as coreactant on SiO{sub 2} substrates are studied by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Cu precursor was evaporated and exposed to the substrates kept at temperatures between 22 °C and 300 °C. The measured phosphorus and carbon concentration on the substrates indicated that most of the [{sup n}Bu{sub 3}P] ligands were released either in the gas phase or during adsorption. No disproportionation was observed for the Cu precursor in the temperature range between 22 °C and 145 °C. However, disproportionation of the Cu precursor was observed at 200 °C, since C/Cu concentration ratio decreased and substantial amounts of metallic Cu were present on the substrate. The amount of metallic Cu increased, when the substrate was kept at 300 °C, indicating stronger disproportionation of the Cu precursor. Hence, the upper limit for the ALD of Cu{sub 2}O from this precursor lies in the temperature range between 145 °C and 200 °C, as the precursor must not alter its chemical and physical state after chemisorption on the substrate. Five hundred ALD cycles with the probed Cu precursor and wet O{sub 2} as coreactant were carried out on SiO{sub 2} at 145 °C. After ALD, in-situ XPS analysis confirmed the presence of Cu{sub 2}O on the substrate. Ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry indicated an average film thickness of 2.5 nm of Cu{sub 2}O deposited with a growth per cycle of 0.05 Å/cycle. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations depicted a homogeneous, fine, and granular morphology of the Cu{sub 2}O ALD film on SiO{sub 2}. AFM investigations suggest that the deposited Cu{sub 2}O film is continuous on the SiO{sub 2} substrate.

  18. Electronic structure and optical properties of Cs2HgCl4: DFT calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Parasyuk, O. V.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2016-10-01

    A high-quality single crystal of cesium mercury tetrabromide, Cs2HgCl4, was synthesized by using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method and its electronic structure was studied from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. In particular, X-ray photoelectron spectra were measured for both pristine and Ar+ ion-bombarded Cs2HgCl4 single crystal surfaces. The present XPS measurements indicate that the Cs2HgCl4 single crystal surface is sensitive with respect to Ar+ ion-bombardment: such a treatment changes substantially its elemental stoichiometry. With the aim of exploring total and partial densities of states within the valence band and conduction band regions of the Cs2HgCl4 compound, band-structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) using the augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + lo) method as incorporated within the WIEN2k package are performed. The calculations indicate that the Cl 3p states are the principal contributors in the upper portion of the valence band, while the Hg 5d and Cs 5p states dominate in its lower portion. In addition, the calculations allow for concluding that the unoccupied Cl p and Hg s states are the main contributors to the bottom of the conduction band. Furthermore, main optical characteristics of Cs2HgCl4, namely dispersion of the absorption coefficient, real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, electron energy-loss spectrum, refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical reflectivity, are elucidated based on the DFT calculations.

  19. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at. % (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at. % (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  20. Validity of automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy algorithm to determine the amount of substance and the depth distribution of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Tougaard, Sven

    2013-05-15

    The author reports a systematic study of the range of validity of a previously developed algorithm for automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, which takes into account the variation in both peak intensity and the intensity in the background of inelastically scattered electrons. This test was done by first simulating spectra for the Au4d peak with gold atoms distributed in the form of a wide range of nanostructures, which includes overlayers with varying thickness, a 5 A layer of atoms buried at varying depths and a substrate covered with an overlayer of varying thickness. Next, the algorithm was applied to analyze these spectra. The algorithm determines the number of atoms within the outermost 3 {lambda} of the surface. This amount of substance is denoted AOS{sub 3{lambda}} (where {lambda} is the electron inelastic mean free path). In general the determined AOS{sub 3{lambda}} is found to be accurate to within {approx}10-20% depending on the depth distribution of the atoms. The algorithm also determines a characteristic length L, which was found to give unambiguous information on the depth distribution of the atoms for practically all studied cases. A set of rules for this parameter, which relates the value of L to the depths where the atoms are distributed, was tested, and these rules were found to be generally valid with only a few exceptions. The results were found to be rather independent of the spectral energy range (from 20 to 40 eV below the peak energy) used in the analysis.

  1. Competition between organics and bromide at the aqueous solution-air interface as seen from ozone uptake kinetics and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Brown, Matthew A; Kato, Shunsuke; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2015-05-14

    A more detailed understanding of the heterogeneous chemistry of halogenated species in the marine boundary layer is required. Here, we studied the reaction of ozone (O3) with NaBr solutions in the presence and absence of citric acid (C6H8O7) under ambient conditions. Citric acid is used as a proxy for oxidized organic material present at the ocean surface or in sea spray aerosol. On neat NaBr solutions, the observed kinetics is consistent with bulk reaction-limited uptake, and a second-order rate constant for the reaction of O3 + Br(-) is 57 ± 10 M(-1) s(-1). On mixed NaBr-citric acid aqueous solutions, the uptake kinetics was faster than that predicted by bulk reaction-limited uptake and also faster than expected based on an acid-catalyzed mechanism. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on a liquid microjet of the same solutions at 1.0 × 10(-3)-1.0 × 10(-4) mbar was used to obtain quantitative insight into the interfacial composition relative to that of the bulk solutions. It revealed that the bromide anion becomes depleted by 30 ± 10% while the sodium cation gets enhanced by 40 ± 20% at the aqueous solution-air interface of a 0.12 M NaBr solution mixed with 2.5 M citric acid in the bulk, attributed to the role of citric acid as a weak surfactant. Therefore, the enhanced reactivity of bromide solutions observed in the presence of citric acid is not necessarily attributable to a surface reaction but could also result from an increased solubility of ozone at higher citric acid concentrations. Whether the acid-catalyzed chemistry may have a larger effect on the surface than in the bulk to offset the effect of bromide depletion also remains open.

  2. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and density-functional studies of Si atoms adsorbed on a C60 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Hara, Toshiki

    2004-12-01

    The interaction between C60 and Si atoms has been investigated for Si atoms adsorbed on a C60 film using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density-functional (DFT) calculations. Analysis of the Si 2p core peak identified three kinds of Si atoms adsorbed on the film: silicon suboxides (SiOx), bulk Si crystal, and silicon atoms bound to C60. Based on the atomic percent ratio of silicon to carbon, we estimated that there was approximately one Si atom bound to each C60 molecule. The Si 2p peak due to the Si-C60 interaction demonstrated that a charge transfer from the Si atom to the C60 molecule takes place at room temperature, which is much lower than the temperature of 670 K at which the charge transfer was observed for C60 adsorbed on Si(001) and (111) clean surfaces [Sakamoto et al., Phys. Rev. B 60, 2579 (1999)]. The number of electrons transferred between the C60 molecule and Si atom was estimated to be 0.59 based on XPS results, which is in good agreement with the DFT result of 0.63 for a C60Si with C2v symmetry used as a model cluster. Furthermore, the shift in binding energy of both the Si 2p and C 1s core peaks before and after Si-atom deposition was experimentally obtained to be +2.0 and -0.4 eV, respectively. The C60Si model cluster provides the shift of +2.13 eV for the Si 2p core peak and of -0.28 eV for the C 1s core peak, which are well corresponding to those experimental results. The covalency of the Si-C60 interaction was also discussed in terms of Mulliken overlap population between them.

  3. Influence of electron irradiation and heating on secondary electron yields from non-evaporable getter films observed with in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiwaki, Michiru; Kato, Shigeki

    2007-07-15

    Nonevaporable getter (NEG) film has been used for the beam ducts of particle accelerators as a pump having a large area. NEG film has been considered to have a low outgas rate induced by energetic particle irradiation and a low secondary electron yield (SEY). In this article, we focused on SEY measurements and in situ surface characterization of four NEG film samples using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The NEG samples were TiZrV thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering at 100 or 300 deg. C on stainless steel. In addition, NEG samples saturated by CO gas exposure were prepared. SEY and XPS measurements of the surfaces of NEG samples were carried out under the conditions of as received, after electron beam irradiation, and after heating at 200 deg. C for 24 h. The maximum SEY values of the primary electron energy dependence, {delta}{sub max}, of all NEG samples decreased to around 1 by electron beam irradiation owing to a change in the carbon impurities, such as carbon oxide, carbon hydroxide, and hydrocarbon, to graphite state (graphitization) during the irradiation. After heating, {delta}{sub max} values of the NEG samples without CO gas exposure were also around 1 owing to the carbonization of Ti, Zr, and V. The {delta}{sub max}{approx_equal}1 was remarkably lower than that of copper baked under the same conditions. However, in saturated NEG samples, metal carbides were not produced to a significant extent by heating, and the {delta}{sub max} values did not decrease, showing values of 1.5-1.7.

  4. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of surface changes on brominated and sulfur-treated activated carbon sorbents during mercury capture: performance of pellet versus fiber sorbents.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arindom; Abram, David N; Kuhl, Kendra P; Paradis, Jennifer; Crawford, Jenni L; Sasmaz, Erdem; Chang, Ramsay; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    This work explores surface changes and the Hg capture performance of brominated activated carbon (AC) pellets, sulfur-treated AC pellets, and sulfur-treated AC fibers upon exposure to simulated Powder River Basin-fired flue gas. Hg breakthrough curves yielded specific Hg capture amounts by means of the breakthrough shapes and times for the three samples. The brominated AC pellets showed a sharp breakthrough after 170-180 h and a capacity of 585 μg of Hg/g, the sulfur-treated AC pellets exhibited a gradual breakthrough after 80-90 h and a capacity of 661 μg of Hg/g, and the sulfur-treated AC fibers showed no breakthrough even after 1400 h, exhibiting a capacity of >9700 μg of Hg/g. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze sorbent surfaces before and after testing to show important changes in quantification and oxidation states of surface Br, N, and S after exposure to the simulated flue gas. For the brominated and sulfur-treated AC pellet samples, the amount of surface-bound Br and reduced sulfur groups decreased upon Hg capture testing, while the level of weaker Hg-binding surface S(VI) and N species (perhaps as NH4(+)) increased significantly. A high initial concentration of strong Hg-binding reduced sulfur groups on the surface of the sulfur-treated AC fiber is likely responsible for this sorbent's minimal accumulation of S(VI) species during exposure to the simulated flue gas and is linked to its superior Hg capture performance compared to that of the brominated and sulfur-treated AC pellet samples.

  5. Direct determination of the band offset in atomic layer deposited ZnO/hydrogenated amorphous silicon heterojunctions from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy valence band spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, L. Rößler, R.; Pettenkofer, C.

    2014-05-28

    The chemical composition and band alignment at the heterointerface between atomic layer deposition-grown zinc oxide (ZnO) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is investigated using monochromatized X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A new approach for obtaining the valence band offset ΔE{sub V} is developed, which consists in fitting the valence band (VB) spectrum obtained for a-Si:H with a thin ZnO overlayer as the sum of experimentally obtained VB spectra of a bulk a-Si:H film and a thick ZnO film. This approach allows obtaining ΔE{sub V} = 2.71 ± 0.15 eV with a minimum of assumptions, and also yields information on the change in band bending of both substrate and ZnO film. The band offset results are compared to values obtained using the usual approach of comparing valence band edge-to-core level energy differences, ΔE{sub B,CL} − ΔE{sub B,VB}. Furthermore, a theoretical value for the VB offset is calculated from the concept of charge neutrality level line-up, using literature data for the charge neutrality levels and the experimentally determined ZnO/a-Si:H interface dipole. The thus obtained value of ΔE{sub V}{sup CNL} = 2.65 ± 0.3 eV agrees well with the experimental ΔE{sub V}.

  6. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and density-functional studies of Si atoms adsorbed on a C60 film.

    PubMed

    Onoe, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Hara, Toshiki

    2004-12-01

    The interaction between C(60) and Si atoms has been investigated for Si atoms adsorbed on a C(60) film using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density-functional (DFT) calculations. Analysis of the Si 2p core peak identified three kinds of Si atoms adsorbed on the film: silicon suboxides (SiO(x)), bulk Si crystal, and silicon atoms bound to C(60). Based on the atomic percent ratio of silicon to carbon, we estimated that there was approximately one Si atom bound to each C(60) molecule. The Si 2p peak due to the Si-C(60) interaction demonstrated that a charge transfer from the Si atom to the C(60) molecule takes place at room temperature, which is much lower than the temperature of 670 K at which the charge transfer was observed for C(60) adsorbed on Si(001) and (111) clean surfaces [Sakamoto et al., Phys. Rev. B 60, 2579 (1999)]. The number of electrons transferred between the C(60) molecule and Si atom was estimated to be 0.59 based on XPS results, which is in good agreement with the DFT result of 0.63 for a C(60)Si with C(2v) symmetry used as a model cluster. Furthermore, the shift in binding energy of both the Si 2p and C 1s core peaks before and after Si-atom deposition was experimentally obtained to be +2.0 and -0.4 eV, respectively. The C(60)Si model cluster provides the shift of +2.13 eV for the Si 2p core peak and of -0.28 eV for the C 1s core peak, which are well corresponding to those experimental results. The covalency of the Si-C(60) interaction was also discussed in terms of Mulliken overlap population between them.

  7. In situ investigation of M/CuO interface (M is Ti, V, Cr or Mn) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourasia, A. R.; Stahl, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    The technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to investigate the chemical reactivity at the metal/CuO interfaces. Thin films of the metallic overlayer (0.5 nm, 1.0 nm and 2.0 nm thickness) were deposited on copper oxide substrates at room temperature. In situ characterization of the interfaces has been performed. The 2p core level regions of the metals have been investigated. The spectral features show considerable reactivity at the interfaces. The core level peaks of the metal are observed to be shifted to the high BE energy side with the appearance of satellites. The spectral data confirm the formation of the metallic oxide at the interface. The satellite structure in the copper region is observed to disappear and the spectral features are found to approach those of elemental copper. The room temperature deposition of the metal on copper oxide therefore results in the reduction of copper oxide to elemental copper followed by the oxidation of the metal. The interface is found to consist of a mixture of metal oxide and elemental copper. The 2.0 nm samples were annealed. These samples show the diffusion of copper oxide through the overlayer. The metal reacts with this diffusing oxide to form metallic oxide. The interface is found to consist of a mixture of unreacted metal, the metal oxide, and elemental copper. The amount of the unreacted metal varied between 0% and 40% and can be controlled by the processing conditions. The investigation shows room temperature chemical reactivity at the metal/CuO interface and provides a new method of preparing sub-nano-oxide films.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of high-k CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacked dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jieqiong; Wong, Hei; Yu, Danqun; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2014-11-15

    This work presents a detailed study on the chemical composition and bond structures of CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacked gate dielectrics based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements at different depths. The chemical bonding structures in the interfacial layers were revealed by Gaussian decompositions of Ce 3d, La 3d, Si 2s, and O 1s photoemission spectra at different depths. We found that La atoms can diffuse into the CeO{sub 2} layer and a cerium-lanthanum complex oxide was formed in between the CeO{sub 2} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. Ce{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 4+} states always coexist in the as-deposited CeO{sub 2} film. Quantitative analyses were also conducted. The amount of CeO{sub 2} phase decreases by about 8% as approaching the CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. In addition, as compared with the single layer La{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample, the CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} stack exhibits a larger extent of silicon oxidation at the La{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si interface. For the CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate stack, the out-diffused lanthanum atoms can promote the reduction of CeO{sub 2} which produce more atomic oxygen. This result confirms the significant improvement of electrical properties of CeO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} gated devices as the excess oxygen would help to reduce the oxygen vacancies in the film and would suppress the formation of interfacial La-silicide also.

  9. Near-Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Methane-Induced Carbon Deposition on Clean and Copper-Modified Polycrystalline Nickel Materials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In order to simulate solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC)-related coking mechanisms of Ni, methane-induced surface carbide and carbon growth was studied under close-to-real conditions by synchrotron-based near-ambient-pressure (NAP) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the temperature region between 250 and 600 °C. Two complementary polycrystalline Ni samples were used, namely, Ni foam—serving as a model structure for bulk Ni in cermet materials such as Ni/YSZ—and Ni foil. The growth mechanism of graphene/graphite species was found to be closely related to that previously described for ethylene-induced graphene growth on Ni(111). After a sufficiently long “incubation” period of the Ni foam in methane at 0.2 mbar and temperatures around 400 °C, cooling down to ∼250 °C, and keeping the sample at this temperature for 50–60 min, initial formation of a near-surface carbide phase was observed, which exhibited the same spectroscopic fingerprint as the C2H4 induced Ni2C phase on Ni(111). Only in the presence of this carbidic species, subsequent graphene/graphite nucleation and growth was observed. Vice versa, the absence of this species excluded further graphene/graphite formation. At temperatures above 400 °C, decomposition/bulk dissolution of the graphene/graphite phase was observed on the rather “open” surface of the Ni foam. In contrast, Ni foil showed—under otherwise identical conditions—predominant formation of unreactive amorphous carbon, which can only be removed at ≥500 °C by oxidative clean-off. Moreover, the complete suppression of carbide and subsequent graphene/graphite formation by Cu-alloying of the Ni foam and by addition of water to the methane atmosphere was verified. PMID:26692914

  10. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of BF3 adsorption on positively and negatively poled LiNbO3 (0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdiech, M. W.; Mönig, H.; Altman, E. I.

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption of the strong Lewis acid BF3 was investigated to probe the sensitivity of the Lewis basicity of surface oxygens on LiNbO3 (0001) to the ferroelectric polarization direction. Adsorption and desorption were characterized by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to monitor the intensity and binding energy of the F 1s core level as a function of BF3 exposure and temperature. The results indicate that both BF3 uptake and desorption are very similar on the positively and negatively poled surfaces. In particular, BF3 only weakly adsorbs with the majority of the adsorbed BF3 desorbing below 200 K. Despite the similarities in the uptake and desorption behavior, the binding energy of the F 1s peak relative to the substrate Nb 3d5/2 peak was sensitive to the polarization direction, with the F 1s peak occurring at a binding energy up to 0.3 eV lower on positively poled than negatively poled LiNbO3 for equivalent BF3 exposures. Rather than reflecting a difference in bonding to the surface, however, this shift could be associated with oppositely oriented dipoles at the positively and negatively poled surfaces creating opposite band offsets between the adsorbate and the substrate. A similar effect was observed with lead zirconate titanate thin films where the Pb 4f XPS peak position changes as a function of temperature as a result of the pyroelectric effect which changes the magnitude of the surface and interface dipoles.

  11. Transformation of amyloid-like fibers, formed from an elastin-based biopolymer, into a hydrogel: an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Flamia, R; Salvi, A M; D'Alessio, L; Castle, J E; Tamburro, A M

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the propensity of elastin-based biopolymers to form amyloid-like fibers when dissolved in water. These are of interest when considered as "ancestral units" of elastin in which they represent the simplest sequences in the hydrophobic regions of the general type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu). We normally refer to these biopolymers based on elastin or related to elastin units as "elastin-like polypeptides". The requirement of water for the formation of amyloids seems quite interesting and deserves investigation, the water representing the natural transport medium in human cells. As a matter of fact, the "natural" supramolecular organization of elastin is in the form of beaded-string-like filaments and not in the form of amyloids whose "in vivo" deposition is associated with some important human diseases. Our work is directed, therefore, to understanding the mechanism by which such hydrophobic sequences form amyloids and any conditions by which they might regress to a non-amyloid filament. The elastin-like sequence here under investigation is the ValGlyGlyValGly pentapeptide that has been previously analyzed both in its monomer and polymer form. In particular, we have focused our investigation on the apparent stability of amyloids formed from poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), and we have observed these fibers evolving to a hydrogel after prolonged aging in water. We will show how atomic force microscopy can be combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to gain an insight into the spontaneous organization of an elastin-like polypeptide driven by interfacial interactions. The results are discussed also in light of fractal-like assembly and their implications from a biomedical point of view. PMID:17206798

  12. Competition between organics and bromide at the aqueous solution-air interface as seen from ozone uptake kinetics and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Brown, Matthew A; Kato, Shunsuke; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2015-05-14

    A more detailed understanding of the heterogeneous chemistry of halogenated species in the marine boundary layer is required. Here, we studied the reaction of ozone (O3) with NaBr solutions in the presence and absence of citric acid (C6H8O7) under ambient conditions. Citric acid is used as a proxy for oxidized organic material present at the ocean surface or in sea spray aerosol. On neat NaBr solutions, the observed kinetics is consistent with bulk reaction-limited uptake, and a second-order rate constant for the reaction of O3 + Br(-) is 57 ± 10 M(-1) s(-1). On mixed NaBr-citric acid aqueous solutions, the uptake kinetics was faster than that predicted by bulk reaction-limited uptake and also faster than expected based on an acid-catalyzed mechanism. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on a liquid microjet of the same solutions at 1.0 × 10(-3)-1.0 × 10(-4) mbar was used to obtain quantitative insight into the interfacial composition relative to that of the bulk solutions. It revealed that the bromide anion becomes depleted by 30 ± 10% while the sodium cation gets enhanced by 40 ± 20% at the aqueous solution-air interface of a 0.12 M NaBr solution mixed with 2.5 M citric acid in the bulk, attributed to the role of citric acid as a weak surfactant. Therefore, the enhanced reactivity of bromide solutions observed in the presence of citric acid is not necessarily attributable to a surface reaction but could also result from an increased solubility of ozone at higher citric acid concentrations. Whether the acid-catalyzed chemistry may have a larger effect on the surface than in the bulk to offset the effect of bromide depletion also remains open. PMID:25530167

  13. Electronic structure of rare-earth chromium antimonides RECrSb{sub 3} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy, Yb) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Crerar, Shane J.; Mar, Arthur; Grosvenor, Andrew P.

    2012-12-15

    The electronic structure of the ternary rare-earth chromium antimonides RECrSb{sub 3} (RE=La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Dy, Yb) has been examined by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the first time. The RE 3d or 4d core-line spectra are substantially complicated by the presence of satellite peaks but their general resemblance to those of RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} tends to support the presence of trivalent RE atoms in RECrSb{sub 3}. However, the Yb 4d spectrum of YbCrSb{sub 3} also shows peaks that are characteristic of divalent ytterbium. The Cr 2p core-line spectra exhibit asymmetric lineshapes and little change in binding energy (BE) relative to Cr metal, providing strong evidence for electronic delocalization. The Sb 3d core-line spectra reveal slightly negative BE shifts relative to elemental antimony, supporting the presence of anionic Sb species in RECrSb{sub 3}. The experimental valence band spectrum of LaCrSb{sub 3} matches well with the calculated density of states, and it can be fitted to component peaks belonging to individual atoms to yield an average formulation that agrees well with expectations ('La{sup 3+}Cr{sup 3+}(Sb{sup 2-}){sub 3}'). On progressing from LaCrSb{sub 3} to NdCrSb{sub 3}, the 4f-band in the valence band spectra grows in intensity and shifts to higher BE. The valence band spectrum for YbCrSb{sub 3} also supports the presence of divalent ytterbium. - Graphical Abstract: In their valence band spectra, the 4f-band intensifies and shifts to higher BE on progressing from LaCrSb{sub 3} to NdCrSb{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-resolution core-line and valence band XPS spectra were measured for RECrSb{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Divalent Yb is present in YbCrSb{sub 3}, in contrast to trivalent RE in other members. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Asymmetric Cr 2p spectral lineshape confirms delocalization of Cr valence electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small negative Sb 3d BE shifts support assignment of

  14. Hard X-ray Standing-Wave Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of Cobalt-Iron-Boron/Magnesium Oxide Magnetic Tunnel Junction Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Albert Anthony

    As one key aspect of the area of spin-based electronics or spintronics, the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) holds special promise for magnetic memory, and possibly also logic devices. In an MTJ, two ferromagnetic layers are separated by a very thin nonmagnetic insulating layer and the key effect is based on the spin-dependent tunneling of electrons through the insulating layer and is called tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). Resistance is lower when the two ferromagnetic layers are oriented parallel to one another, and higher when they are anti-parallel. Recent work reveals that MTJs with a Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Ta structure show three optimal characteristics: 1) high thermal stability on the nanoscale, 2) a high TMR ratio, and 3) low switching current for current-induced switching of magnetization across the interface. Studies suggest that B diffusion from the initially amorphous CoFeB layer into the MgO causes CoFeB crystallization such that TMR-increasing perpendicular anisotropy (PMA) arises at the MgO/CoFeB interface. Furthermore, the TMR ratio is likewise regulated by B diffusion into the Ta layer. Scientists are currently exploring the structure/properties relationships of these buried interfaces in magnetic nanostructures. One effective method for probing the composition, structure, and properties of buried layers is the newly-developed technique of standing-wave, hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy or SW-HAXPES. In this method, a standing wave is generated by Bragg reflection from a synthetic multilayer mirror upon which the sample is deposited. This standing wave can be scanned vertically through the sample by varying the incidence angle around the Bragg angle, giving a rocking curve (RC) scan. Using SW-HAXPES, we studied the B distribution in a Ta/Co0.2Fe0.6B0.2/MgO sample. We obtained hard x-ray standing-wave data, as well as conventional variable takeoff angle XPS (angle-resolved XPS or ARXPS) data at SPring-8 in Japan, as well as complimentary soft x-ray

  15. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Beam Damage of HS (CH2)15 COOH Terminated Self Assembled Monolayer (SAM) as Observed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Baer, Donald R.

    2011-10-25

    XPS spectra of HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 15} COOH terminated a self assembled monolayer (SAM)sample was collected over a period of 242 minutes to determine specimen damage during long exposures to monochromatic Al Ka x-rays. For this COOH terminated SAM we measured the loss of oxygen as a function of time by rastering a focused 100 W, 100 um diameter x-ray beam over a 1.4 mm x 0.2 mm area of the sample.

  17. In situ oxidation study of copper, tin, and copper-tin intermetallics at low temperatures by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Ning

    The initial oxidation behavior of metallic copper, tin, and three single-phase Cu-Sn alloys (an alpha phase solid solution alloy, and the intermetallic compounds varepsilon-Cusb3Sn and eta-Cusb6Snsb5) has been investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) at temperatures of 150sp°C, 200sp°C, and 350sp°C. The oxidation studies are performed in an XPS chamber with pure oxygen. Tin metal oxidizes to produce a combination of SnO and SnOsb2 at both 150sp°C and 200sp°C. The oxide layer consists mainly of SnO with a small fraction of SnOsb2 concentrated near the top of the surface. The oxide growth on tin metal follows a logarithmic law at 150sp°C and a parabolic law at 200sp°C. Copper metal oxidizes to Cusb2O at temperatures below 350sp°C. At 350sp°C, a graded structure of Cusb2O as the inner layer and CuO near the surface forms after 50 minutes. The copper growth kinetics follows the cubic law at all three temperatures, and the calculated activation energy of copper oxide growth is 61 kJ/mol. For all of the Cu-Sn alloys, the tin is preferentially oxidized at all temperatures; oxidation of the copper component in the two intermetallics (varepsilon-Cusb3Sn and eta-Cusb6Snsb5) is strongly suppressed. Copper oxidation is observed in the varepsilon phase oxidation only after 30 minutes at 350sp°C; no copper oxidation is seen in the eta-Cusb6Snsb5 phase under the time-temperature conditions studied. At all three temperatures, the oxide layer on the eta-Cusb6Snsb5 phase consists of the mixed tin oxides, similar to that observed for oxidation of tin metal. However, the SnOsb2/SnO ratio on the eta-Cusb6Snsb5 phase is higher than that on the tin metal. For the varepsilon-Cusb3Sn phase, at temperatures lower than 350sp°C, the oxide layer also consists of both of the tin oxides, with a higher SnOsb2/SnO ratio than the tin metal. At 350sp°C, after 30 minutes the copper component in the varepsilon phase starts to oxidize. As a result, the oxide layer changes from

  18. Assigning Oxidation States to Organic Compounds via Predictions from X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: A Discussion of Approaches and Recommended Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Vipul; Ganegoda, Hasitha; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    The traditional assignment of oxidation states to organic molecules is problematic. Accordingly, in 1999, Calzaferri proposed a simple and elegant solution that is based on the similar electronegativities of carbon and hydrogen: hydrogen would be assigned an oxidation state of zero when bonded to carbon. Here, we show that X-ray photoelectron…

  19. Correlation between Charge State of Insulating NaCl Surfaces and Ionic Mobility Induced by Water Adsorption: A Combined Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Force Microscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Verdaguer, Albert; Jose Segura, Juan; Fraxedas, Jordi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-09-03

    In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES) and scanning force microscopy were used to characterize the surface discharge induced by water layers grown on (001) surfaces of sodium chloride single crystals. The APPES studies show that both kinetic energy (KE) and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Na 2s and Cl 2p core level peaks, monitored as a function of relative humidity (RH), mimic surface conductivity curves measured using scanning force microscopy. The KE position and FWHM of the core level peaks therefore are directly related to the solvation and diffusion of ions at the NaCl(100) surface upon adsorption of water.

  20. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and capacitance voltage characterization of plasma treatments for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Xiaoye; Lucero, Antonio; Azcatl, Angelica; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M.

    2014-07-07

    We investigate the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor structure pretreated by O{sub 2} anneals, N{sub 2} remote plasma, and forming gas remote plasma prior to atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and capacitance- voltage measurements. Plasma pretreatments reduce the Ga-oxide/oxynitride formation and the interface state density, while inducing a threshold voltage instability.

  1. Electronic structure of YbGa1.15Si0:85 and YbGaxGe2-x probed by resonant x-ray emission and photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Jarrige, Ignace; Tsujii, Naohito; Imai, Motoharu; Lin, Jung-Fu; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Taguchi, Munetaka; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Ishii, Hirofumi; Tsuei, Ku-Ding

    2011-03-31

    We performed an x-ray spectroscopic study combining resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) and photoelectron spectroscopy on the superconducting ternary silicide YbGa 1.15 Si 0.85 and nonsuperconducting ternary germanide YbGax Ge2-x (x = 1.0 and 1.1). The Yb valence for all three compounds is found to be about 2.3. In YbGa1.15 Si0.85 no temperature dependence of the Yb valence is observed in the RXES spectra in the temperature range of 7–300 K, while the valence shows a drastic increase under pressure from the Yb2+ state partially including itinerant electrons to the localized Yb3+ state. Differences are observed in the valence-band spectra of the photoelectron spectroscopy between YbGa1.15 Si0.85 and YbGax Ge2-x , which may be attributed to the difference of crystal structure. We conclude that both the crystal structure of the planar GaSi layer in YbGa1.15 Si0.85 and the resultant electronic structure may have a crucial role in the occurrence of superconductivity.

  2. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  4. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  5. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  6. A study of reversible gamma-induced structural transformations in vitreous Ge23.5Sb11.8S64.7 by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kovalskiy, Andriy; Jain, Himanshu; Miller, Alfred C; Golovchak, Roman Ya; Shpotyuk, Oleh I

    2006-11-16

    The structural origin of reversible gamma-induced effects in vitreous Ge(23.5)Sb(11.8)S(64.7) has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes in valence band spectrum from gamma-irradiation suggest a decrease of sulfur lone pair electron concentration accompanied by changes in bonding states of S and Ge. The appearance of additional doublets in the core-level XPS spectra of Ge, Sb, and S atoms for gamma-irradiated sample is described by the formation of over- and under-coordinated charged defect pairs (Ge(3)(-)-S(3)(+)) as a result of radiation treatment. The results verify the switching of Ge-S covalent bonds into S-S bonds as the main microstructural mechanism for gamma-induced optical effects in this glass.

  7. Room-temperature oxidation of a GaAs(001) surface induced by the interaction of hyperthermal atomic oxygen and studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolan, John T.; Mount, Charles K.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1998-03-01

    In this study a hyperthermal oxygen atom source has been used to form an oxide layer on an Ar+-sputtered GaAs(001) surface at room temperature, and this layer has been examined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS). XPS data indicate that the Ga in the near-surface region is oxidized predominantly to Ga2O3 with a significant contribution from GaAsO4 while the As is oxidized predominantly to an AsOx species with significant contributions from As2O3 and GaAsO4 and/or As2O5. The oxide layer thickness is estimated to be about 25 Å, and the XPS Ga:As atom ratio increases from 1.1 to 1.6 during the oxidation. The ISS data indicate that the resulting oxide layer formed is more electrically insulating than a native oxide layer on this surface.

  8. Synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of Ti/Al ohmic contacts to n-type GaN: Key role of Al capping layers in interface scavenging reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Mikito; Ito, Joyo; Asahara, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Ishida, Masahiro; Ueda, Tetsuzo; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2016-10-01

    Interface reactions between Ti-based electrodes and n-type GaN epilayers were investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Metallic Ga and thin TiN alloys were formed at the interface by subsequently depositing Al capping layers on ultrathin Ti layers even at room temperature. By comparing results from stacked Ti/Al and single Ti electrodes, the essential role of Al capping layers serving as an oxygen-scavenging element to produce reactive Ti underlayers was demonstrated. Further growth of the metallic interlayer during annealing was observed. A strategy for achieving low-resistance ohmic contacts to n-GaN with low-thermal-budget processing is discussed.

  9. Oxidation state of mercury in HgBa{sub 2}(Ca{sub 0.86}Sr{sub 0.14}){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8+{delta}} studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gopinath, C.S.; Hur, N.H.; Subramanian, S.

    1995-10-01

    Hg 4{ital f} core levels of HgBa{sub 2}(Ca{sub 0.86}Sr{sub 0.14}){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Hg-1223) and HgO were measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to demonstrate the oxidation state of mercury ions in the superconducting oxide. The binding energy of the Hg 4{ital f}{sub 7/2} level is found to be at 99.9 eV in HgO and 101.0 and 103.4 eV in Hg-1223. This result reveals that the oxidation state of Hg is definitely more than +2 and it exists in a mixed-valent state. The creation of charge carriers in Hg-1223 is discussed in terms of a charge transfer between Hg-O{sub {delta}} and Cu-O layers.

  10. Understanding the role of buried interface charges in a metal-oxide-semiconductor stack of Ti/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J. R.; Opila, R. L.; Weiland, C.

    2015-04-27

    Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) analyses were carried out on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) samples consisting of Si, thick and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a Ti metal cap. Using Si 1s and C 1s core levels for an energy reference, the Al 1s and Si 1s spectra were analyzed to reveal information about the location and roles of charges throughout the MOS layers. With different oxide thicknesses (2 nm and 23 nm), the depth sensitivity of HAXPES is exploited to probe different regions in the MOS structure. Post Ti deposition results indicated unexpected band alignment values between the thin and thick films, which are explained by the behavior of mobile charge within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer.

  11. Development of a multifunctional surface analysis system based on a nanometer scale scanning electron beam: Combination of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning electron microscopy, scanning reflection electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a multifunctional surface analysis system based on a scanning electron beam for nanofabrication and characterization of surface reactions for fabrication processes. The system performs scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Nanometer scale resolution is obtained for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-SEM while the mechanical pumping instruments are operated. Single atomic steps on Si(111) surfaces are observed through SREM. Surface sensitive AES measurement is achieved with SREM geometry; this has a great advantage for investigating atomic step related surface reactions. High spatial resolution AES analysis is also achieved by using a nanometer scale probe beam. Auger electron signals from a hundred Ag atoms on a Si(111) surface are successfully detected with high sensitivity.

  12. Comparative study of GeO2/Ge and SiO2/Si structures on anomalous charging of oxide films upon water adsorption revealed by ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Daichi; Oka, Hiroshi; Hosoi, Takuji; Kawai, Kentaro; Morita, Mizuho; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Liu, Zhi; Watanabe, Heiji; Arima, Kenta

    2016-09-01

    The energy difference between the oxide and bulk peaks in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra was investigated for both GeO2/Ge and SiO2/Si structures with thickness-controlled water films. This was achieved by obtaining XPS spectra at various values of relative humidity (RH) of up to ˜15%. The increase in the energy shift is more significant for thermal GeO2 on Ge than for thermal SiO2 on Si above ˜10-4% RH, which is due to the larger amount of water molecules that infiltrate into the GeO2 film to form hydroxyls. Analyzing the origins of this energy shift, we propose that the positive charging of a partially hydroxylated GeO2 film, which is unrelated to X-ray irradiation, causes the larger energy shift for GeO2/Ge than for SiO2/Si. A possible microscopic mechanism of this intrinsic positive charging is the emission of electrons from adsorbed water species in the suboxide layer of the GeO2 film to the Ge bulk, leaving immobile cations or positively charged states in the oxide. This may be related to the reported negative shift of flat band voltages in metal-oxide-semiconductor diodes with an air-exposed GeO2 layer.

  13. Direct measurement of band offset at the interface between CdS and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Shin; Kataoka, Keita; Takahashi, Naoko; Kimoto, Yasuji; Fukano, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Masaki; Hazama, Hirofumi

    2013-12-09

    We directly and non-destructively measured the valence band offset at the interface between CdS and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), which can measure the electron state of the buried interface because of its large analysis depth. These measurements were made using the following real devices; CZTS(t = 700 nm), CdS(t = 100 nm)/CZTS(t = 700 nm), and CdS(t = 5 nm)/CZTS(t = 700 nm) films formed on Mo coated glass. The valence band spectra were measured by HAXPES using an X-ray photon energy of 8 keV. The value of the valence band offset at the interface between CdS and CZTS was estimated as 1.0 eV by fitting the spectra. The conduction band offset could be deduced as 0.0 eV from the obtained valence band offset and the band gap energies of CdS and CZTS.

  14. Effect of Cl{sub 2}- and HBr-based inductively coupled plasma etching on InP surface composition analyzed using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchoule, S.; Vallier, L.; Patriarche, G.; Chevolleau, T.; Cardinaud, C.

    2012-05-15

    A Cl{sub 2}-HBr-O{sub 2}/Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process has been adapted for the processing of InP-based heterostructures in a 300-mm diameter CMOS etching tool. Smooth and anisotropic InP etching is obtained at moderate etch rate ({approx}600 nm/min). Ex situ x-ray energy dispersive analysis of the etched sidewalls shows that the etching anisotropy is obtained through a SiO{sub x} passivation mechanism. The stoichiometry of the etched surface is analyzed in situ using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching results in a significantly P-rich surface. The phosphorous layer identified on the top surface is estimated to be {approx}1-1.3-nm thick. On the other hand InP etching in HBr/Ar plasma results in a more stoichiometric surface. In contrast to the etched sidewalls, the etched surface is free from oxides with negligible traces of silicon. Exposure to ambient air of the samples submitted to Cl{sub 2}-based chemistry results in the complete oxidation of the P-rich top layer. It is concluded that a post-etch treatment or a pure HBr plasma step may be necessary after Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching for the recovery of the InP material.

  15. Investigation of the Silicon Solid Electrolyte Interface in Lithium Ion Batteries using the Technique of Hard X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Benjamin; Heskett, David; Nie, Mengyun; Lucht, Brett; Woicik, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Formation of a stable Solid Electrolyte Interface (SEI) between the anode and electrolyte material of a lithium ion battery (LIB) is essential to battery performance. Silicon anodes represent a theoretical tenfold increase in energy density over more thoroughly investigated carbonaceous anodes, but experience large volume changes during normal cycling which represents a challenge to stable SEI formation. Overcoming this challenge demands more thorough understanding of SEI formation which can be achieved through the technique of Hard X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (HAXPES). This work is focused on addition of ethylene carbonate (EC) and fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) solvents to the base electrolyte LiPF6 material in coin cell LIBs using binder-free silicon nanoparticle anodes. The results of HAXPES experiments carried out at beamline X24-A of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented, revealing depth dependent composition information at various points of SEI development. US Department of Energy EPSCoR Grant DE-SC0007074. Use of the NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was supported by the USDOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  16. Hunting liquid micro-pockets in snow and ice: Phase transition in salt solutions at the bulk and interface with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Orlando, Fabrizio; Kong, Xiangrui; Waldner, Astrid; Artiglia, Luca; Ammann, Markus; Huthwelker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sea salt, and in particular chloride, is an important reactant in the atmosphere. Chloride in air-borne sea salt aerosol is - once chemically converted to a molecular halogen (Cl2, BrCl) and released to the atmosphere - well known as important atmospheric reactant, driving large-scale changes to the atmospheric composition and in particular to ozone levels in remote areas, but also in coastal mega cities. Similar chemistry has been proposed for sea salt deposits in polar snow covers. A crucial factor determining the overall reactivity is the local physical environment of the chloride ion. For example, the reactivity of liquid aerosols decreases significantly upon crystallization. Surprisingly, the phases of NaCl-containing systems are still under debate, partially due to the limited availability of in situ measurements directly probing the local environment at the surface of frozen NaCl-water binary systems. Using core electron spectroscopy of the oxygen atoms in water, we previously showed that these systems follow the phase rules at the air-ice interface. This finding contrasts some earlier observations, where the presence of liquid below the eutectic point of bulk solutions was postulated. In the present study, we present new electron yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) data obtained at near-ambient pressures up to 20 mbar of NaCl frozen solutions. The method is sensitive to small changes in the local environment of the chlorine atom. The measurements were performed at the PHOENIX beamline at SLS. The study indicates frapant differences in the phases of NaCl - water mixtures at temperatures blow the freezing point for the surface of the ice vs. the bulk. This has significant impact on modelling chemical reactions in snow or ice and it's environmental consequences.

  17. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.; Ables, Elden

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  18. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  19. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  20. GEMS X-ray Polarimeter Performance Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Strohmayer, Tod; Kallman, Tim; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne; Swank, Jean

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small explorer (GEMS) is an X-ray polarization telescope selected as a NASA small explorer satellite mission. The X-ray Polarimeter on GEMS uses a Time Projection Chamber gas proportional counter to measure the polarization of astrophysical X-rays in the 2-10 keV band by sensing the direction of the track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray. We have simulated the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter to polarized X-rays. We use the simulation package Penelope to model the physics of the interaction of the initial photoelectron with the detector gas and to determine the distribution of charge deposited in the detector volume. We then model the charge diffusion in the detector,and produce simulated track images. Within the track reconstruction algorithm we apply cuts on the track shape and focus on the initial photoelectron direction in order to maximize the overall sensitivity of the instrument, using this technique we have predicted instrument modulation factors nu(sub 100) for 100% polarized X-rays ranging from 10% to over 60% across the 2-10 keV X-ray band. We also discuss the simulation program used to develop and model some of the algorithms used for triggering, and energy measurement of events in the polarimeter.

  1. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  2. Investigations on the low voltage cathodoluminescence stability and surface chemical behaviour using Auger and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on LiSrBO{sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Pitale, Shreyas S.; Nagpure, I.M.; Kumar, Vinay; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Terblans, J.J.; Swart, H.C.

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Stable orange-red cathodoluminescence observed from LiSrBO{sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor. {yields} In situ Auger electron spectroscopy, while monitoring the CL output reduction, reveals surface concentration modification of Li, Sr, B and O atoms. {yields} X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the formation of SrO{sub 2} layer due to the electron stimulated surface chemical reactions (ESSCRs). This layer is possibly contributing to the surface chemical stability and prevents further degradation. -- Abstract: Orange-red emissive LiSrBO{sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized through the solid-state reaction method. Under UV radiation (221 nm) and low-voltage electron beam (2 keV, 12 mA/cm{sup 2}) excitation, the Sm{sup 3+} doped LiSrBO{sub 3} phosphor shows emission corresponding to the characteristic {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}-{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} transitions of Sm{sup 3+} with the strongest emission at 601 nm. A high stability of cathodoluminescence (CL) emission during prolong electron bombardment with low-energy electrons was observed. Surface sensitive diagnostic tools such as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study the surface chemistry. AES results revealed modifications in the surface concentrations of Li, Sr, B, O and C on the surface of the LiSrBO{sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor as indicated by the changes in their Auger peak to peak heights (APPH) as a function of electron dose. Observed changes in the high resolution XPS spectra of the LiSrBO{sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+} surface irradiated with the low energy electron beam provide evidence of compositional and structural changes as a result of the electron beam stimulated surface chemical reactions (ESSCRs). Additional SrO{sub 2} was identified by XPS on the phosphor surface after it received an electron dose of 300 C/cm{sup 2} together with the increase in the concentrations of chemical species containing the B-C-O bonding. The new surface chemical

  3. Bandpass x-ray diode and x-ray multiplier detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1982-09-27

    An absorption-edge of an x-ray absorption filter and a quantum jump of a photocathode determine the bandpass characteristics of an x-ray diode detector. An anode, which collects the photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode, has enhanced amplification provided by photoelectron-multiplying means which include dynodes or a microchannel-plate electron-multiplier. Suppression of undesired high frequency response for a bandpass x-ray diode is provided by subtracting a signal representative of energies above the passband from a signal representative of the overall response of the bandpass diode.

  4. Deduction of the chemical state and the electronic structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core-level and valence-band spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Lanting E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Sun, Limin E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn; Hirano, Shinichi

    2014-10-28

    Characterization of chemical state and electronic structure of the technologically important Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is attractive for understanding the physical nature of its excellent magnetic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of such rare-earth compound is important and also challenging due to the easy oxidation of surface and small photoelectron cross-sections of rare-earth 4f electrons and B 2p electrons, etc. Here, we reported an investigation based on XPS spectra of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound as a function of Ar ion sputtering time. The chemical state of Fe and that of B in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound can be clearly determined to be 0 and −3, respectively. The Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is found to have the chemical state of close to +3 instead of +3 as compared with the Nd in Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, by comparing the valence-band spectrum of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound to that of the pure Fe, the contributions from Nd, Fe, and B to the valence-band structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is made more clear. The B 2p states and B 2s states are identified to be at ∼11.2 eV and ∼24.6 eV, respectively, which is reported for the first time. The contribution from Nd 4f states can be identified both in XPS core-level spectrum and XPS valence-band spectrum. Although Nd 4f states partially hybridize with Fe 3d states, Nd 4f states are mainly localized in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound.

  5. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  6. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  7. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  8. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  9. Investigation of Lithium Insertion Mechanisms of a Thin-Film Si Electrode by Coupling Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Focused-Ion-Beam/SEM.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Arnaud; De Vito, Eric; Haon, Cédric; Secouard, Christophe; Montani, Alexandre; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-12-23

    Silicon is a serious candidate to replace graphite in electrodes because it offers a specific capacity almost 10 times higher than that of carbonaceous materials. However, cycling performances of Si electrodes remain very limited because of the huge volume changes upon alloying and dealloying with lithium. A fine understanding of the lithiation mechanism of silicon electrodes will help to design more robust architectures. In this work, an amorphous silicon thin film has been used as a model for a better understanding of lithiation mechanism. Lithium distribution in the Si layer has been thoroughly investigated by coupling powerful characterization tools: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In particular, cross-analysis of different lithiation states has been carried out. A lithiation front moving forward over the state of charge has been highlighted. The quantification of the LixSi alloy indicates a lithium amount much higher than that of the Li/Si ratio estimated in previous studies. This anomaly leads to a description of the lithiation mechanism based on the presence of fast diffusion paths for Li throughout the Si layer. These paths would be a second driving force for silicon alloying and lithium segregation at the collector interface. SEM observations of a FIB cut corroborate this mechanism.

  10. Formation of a ZnO/ZnS interface passivation layer on (NH4)2S treated In0.53Ga0.47As: Electrical and in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Antonio T.; Byun, Young-Chul; Qin, Xiaoye; Cheng, Lanxia; Kim, Hyoungsub; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Jiyoung

    2016-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition is used to convert an (NH4)2S cleaned p-In0.53Ga0.47As with diethylzinc (DEZ) and water, resulting in the formation of a ZnO/ZnS interfacial passivation layer (IPL). The process is studied using in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DEZ reacts with sulfur and oxygen present on the surface, chemically reducing arsenic 3+ and gallium 3+ to lower oxidation states. The sulfur concentration remains constant during the deposition process while the oxygen concentration on the surface remains small, confirming that the IPL is composed of both ZnO and ZnS. Measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with HfO2 for the dielectric show that the ZnO/ZnS IPL can nearly eliminate frequency dispersion (<1% per frequency decade) in accumulation and results in small hysteresis (<60 mV) with a D it in the 1011 eV-1 cm-2 range in the midgap. Frequency dispersion is observed in the depletion region and is attributed to minority carrier generation from the ZnO present in the IPL.

  11. Determination of the limit of detection by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for As, Zn and Pb oxides in SiO2 matrix as model systems for environmental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzei, Davide; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Brundu, Fabio; Rossi, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    In this work the detection limits of arsenic, zinc and lead in silica matrix by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis were evaluated. These elements were selected since they are particularly relevant in environmental investigations. Pure oxides and several binary mixtures with silica at different concentrations of As (III), Zn (II) and Pb (II) oxides obtained by ball milling were analysed by XPS. Inductive-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was also exploited for determining their bulk concentration. The linear response of XPS intensity vs weighed (at%) was confirmed. Three different models were here applied to estimate the limit of detection (LOD) of arsenic, zinc and lead and the results were in good agreement. Under the experimental conditions here adopted, the calculated LODs (at%) of arsenic, zinc, and lead as pure oxides and in silica matrix were found to range between 0.1 and 0.3, between 0.04 and 0.1 and between 0.03 and 0.04 respectively.

  12. Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/multilayer MoS{sub 2} interface determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Effect of CHF{sub 3} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xinke; He, Jiazhu; Tang, Dan; Jia, Fang; Lu, Youming Zhu, Deliang; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Sun; Liu, Qiang; Wen, Jiao; Yu, Wenjie; Pan, Jisheng; He, Zhubing; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2015-09-07

    The energy band alignment between HfO{sub 2}/multilayer (ML)-MoS{sub 2} was characterized using high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The HfO{sub 2} was deposited using an atomic layer deposition tool, and ML-MoS{sub 2} was grown by chemical vapor deposition. A valence band offset (VBO) of 1.98 eV and a conduction band offset (CBO) of 2.72 eV were obtained for the HfO{sub 2}/ML-MoS{sub 2} interface without any treatment. With CHF{sub 3} plasma treatment, a VBO and a CBO across the HfO{sub 2}/ML-MoS{sub 2} interface were found to be 2.47 eV and 2.23 eV, respectively. The band alignment difference is believed to be dominated by the down-shift in the core level of Hf 4d and up-shift in the core level of Mo 3d, or the interface dipoles, which caused by the interfacial layer in rich of F.

  13. Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N determined by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Man Hon Samuel E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Bhuiyan, Maruf Amin; Yeo, Yee-Chia E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Ji Sheng; Tok, Eng Soon

    2014-07-21

    The band-alignment of atomic layer deposited (ALD)-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N was studied by high resolution angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band bending near the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface was investigated, and the potential variation across the interface was taken into account in the band alignment calculation. It is observed that the binding energies for N 1s and Al 2p in In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N decreases and the corresponding extracted valence band offsets increases with increasing θ (i.e., closer to the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface), as a result of an upward energy band bending towards the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface. The resultant valence band offset and the conduction band offset for the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface calculated was found to be 0.69 eV and 1.01 eV, respectively.

  14. A hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the solid electrolyte interphase of a lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)imidazolide based electrolyte for Si-electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Fredrik; Xu, Chao; Maibach, Julia; Andersson, Anna M.; Marcinek, Marek; Niedzicki, Leszek; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Björefors, Fredrik; Edström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on the relatively new salt, lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI), and its functionality together with a silicon based composite electrode in a half-cell lithium ion battery context. LiTDI is a promising alternative to the commonly used LiPF6 salt because it does not form HF which can decompose the oxide layer on Si. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) as well as the development of the active Si-particles are investigated during the first electrochemical lithiation and de-lithiation. Characterizations are carried out at different state of charge with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) at two different photon energies. This enables a depth resolved picture of the reaction processes and gives an idea of the chemical buildup of the SEI. The SEI is formed by solvent and LiTDI decomposition products and its composition is similar to SEI formed by other carbonate based electrolytes. The LiTDI salt or its decomposition products are not in itself reactive towards the active Si-material and no unwanted side reactions occurs with the active Si-particles. Despite some decomposition of the LiTDI salt, it is a promising alternative for electrolytes aimed towards Si-based electrodes.

  15. Epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3}(100) films on Pt(100): A low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Stefan; Huth, Michael; Schindler, Karl-Michael; Widdra, Wolf

    2011-09-14

    The growth of epitaxial ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3} films on a Pt(100) substrate has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The films have been prepared by radio-frequency-assisted magnetron sputter deposition at room temperature and develop a long-range order upon annealing at 900 K in O{sub 2}. By adjusting the Ar and O{sub 2} partial pressures of the sputter gas, the stoichiometry was tuned to match that of a BaTiO{sub 3}(100) single crystal as determined by XPS. STM reveals the growth of continuous BaTiO{sub 3} films with unit cell high islands on top. With LEED already for monolayer thicknesses, the formation of a BaTiO{sub 3}(100)-(1 x 1) structure has been observed. Films of 2-3 unit cell thickness show a brilliant (1 x 1) LEED pattern for which an extended set of LEED I-V data has been acquired. At temperatures above 1050 K the BaTiO{sub 3} thin film starts to decay by formation of vacancy islands. In addition (4 x 4) and (3 x 3) surface reconstructions develop upon prolonged heating.

  16. X-ray photoelectron diffraction study of dopant effects in La{sub 0.7}X{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (X = La, Sr, Ca, Ce) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Raisch, C.; Glaser, M.; Chasse, T.; Langheinrich, C.; Chasse, A.; Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2013-02-14

    We present and discuss element-specific x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns of La, Mn, O and the dopant ions Ca, Sr and Ce of various La{sub 0.7}X{sub 0.3}MnO (LXMO) films grown epitaxially on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrates. The recorded XPD polar scans are explained in the framework of multiple-scattering cluster calculations, where in general a very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data has been found. Results for all thin films are compatible with a tetragonally distorted cubic perovskite structure with similar MnO{sub 6} network. Strong evidence for Mn-site termination was found in all thin films. Dopant locations on A-type sites were clearly confirmed for Sr in LSMO and Ca in LCMO films by means of XPD polar scans. The absence of surface-sensitive Ce3d diffraction features for Ce in LCeMO points to non-equivalent Ce sites and related near-surface disorder.

  17. Electrical conductivity anomaly and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Qing; Chang, Aimin E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu; Li, Yiyu; Liu, Yin; Wu, Yiquan E-mail: wuy@alfred.edu

    2014-03-10

    Electrical conductivity anomaly of perovskite-type YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} negative temperature coefficient (NTC) ceramics produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) has been investigated by using defect chemistry theory combination with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. From the results of the lnρ-1/T curves and the XPS analysis, it can be considered that YCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} ceramics exhibit the hopping conductivity. The major carriers in YCrO{sub 3} are holes, which are compensated by the oxygen vacancies produced due to the introduction of Mn ions. The Mn{sup 4+} ion contents increase monotonically in the range of 0.2 ≤ x ≤ 0.5. The resistivity increases at first and then decreases with increasing Mn contents, which has the same varying tendency with activation energy. The electrical conductivity anomaly appearing in these ceramics may be due to the variation of Cr{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 4+} ions concentration as Mn content changes.

  18. In-operando hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the impact of current compliance and switching cycles on oxygen and carbon defects in resistive switching Ti/HfO{sub 2}/TiN cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowinska, Malgorzata Bertaud, Thomas; Walczyk, Damian; Calka, Pauline; Walczyk, Christian; Thiess, Sebastian; Alff, Lambert; Schroeder, Thomas

    2014-05-28

    In this study, direct experimental materials science evidence of the important theoretical prediction for resistive random access memory (RRAM) technologies that a critical amount of oxygen vacancies is needed to establish stable resistive switching in metal-oxide-metal samples is presented. In detail, a novel in-operando hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique is applied to non-destructively investigates the influence of the current compliance and direct current voltage sweep cycles on the Ti/HfO{sub 2} interface chemistry and physics of resistive switching Ti/HfO{sub 2}/TiN cells. These studies indeed confirm that current compliance is a critical parameter to control the amount of oxygen vacancies in the conducting filaments in the oxide layer during the RRAM cell operation to achieve stable switching. Furthermore, clear carbon segregation towards the Ti/HfO{sub 2} interface under electrical stress is visible. Since carbon impurities impact the oxygen vacancy defect population under resistive switching, this dynamic carbon segregation to the Ti/HfO{sub 2} interface is suspected to negatively influence RRAM device endurance. Therefore, these results indicate that the RRAM materials engineering needs to include all impurities in the dielectric layer in order to achieve reliable device performance.

  19. Formation of a ZnO/ZnS interface passivation layer on (NH4)2S treated In0.53Ga0.47As: Electrical and in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Antonio T.; Byun, Young-Chul; Qin, Xiaoye; Cheng, Lanxia; Kim, Hyoungsub; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Jiyoung

    2016-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition is used to convert an (NH4)2S cleaned p-In0.53Ga0.47As with diethylzinc (DEZ) and water, resulting in the formation of a ZnO/ZnS interfacial passivation layer (IPL). The process is studied using in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DEZ reacts with sulfur and oxygen present on the surface, chemically reducing arsenic 3+ and gallium 3+ to lower oxidation states. The sulfur concentration remains constant during the deposition process while the oxygen concentration on the surface remains small, confirming that the IPL is composed of both ZnO and ZnS. Measurements of metal–oxide–semiconductor capacitors with HfO2 for the dielectric show that the ZnO/ZnS IPL can nearly eliminate frequency dispersion (<1% per frequency decade) in accumulation and results in small hysteresis (<60 mV) with a D it in the 1011 eV‑1 cm‑2 range in the midgap. Frequency dispersion is observed in the depletion region and is attributed to minority carrier generation from the ZnO present in the IPL.

  20. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-28

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  1. Accurate argon cluster-ion sputter yields: Measured yields and effect of the sputter threshold in practical depth-profiling by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Barlow, Anders J.; Sano, Naoko

    2013-09-01

    Argon Gas Cluster-Ion Beam sources are likely to become widely used on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments in the next few years. At typical energies used for sputter depth profiling the average argon atom in the cluster has a kinetic energy comparable with the sputter threshold, meaning that for the first time in practical surface analysis a quantitative model of sputter yields near threshold is needed. We develop a simple equation based on a very simple model. Though greatly simplified it is likely to have realistic limiting behaviour and can be made useful for estimating sputter yields by fitting its three parameters to experimental data. We measure argon cluster-ion sputter yield using a quartz crystal microbalance close to the sputter threshold, for silicon dioxide, poly(methyl methacrylate), and polystyrene and (along with data for gold from the existing literature) perform least-squares fits of our new sputter yield equation to this data. The equation performs well, with smaller residuals than for earlier empirical models, but more importantly it is very easy to use in the design and quantification of sputter depth-profiling experiments.

  2. Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Effect of SiH{sub 4} surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Owen, Man Hon E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Amin Bhuiyan, Maruf; Zhou, Qian; Yeo, Yee-Chia E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Zhang, Zheng; Sheng Pan, Ji

    2014-03-03

    The band-alignment of atomic layer deposited (ALD)-HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N was studied by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements for both the non-passivated and SiH{sub 4} passivated AlGaN surfaces. The valence band offset and the conduction band offset for the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N interface were found to be 0.43 eV and 1.47 eV, respectively, for the non-passivated sample, and 0.59 eV and 1.31 eV, respectively, for the SiH{sub 4}-passivated sample. The difference in the band alignment is dominated by the band bending or band shift in the AlGaN substrate as a result of the different interlayers formed by the two surface preparations.

  3. Structural, surface, and catalytic properties of bismuth molybdovanadates containing foreign atoms. IV. Surface characterization and redox behaviour of iron-containing bismuth molybdovanadate catalysts by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzoli, D.; Anichini, A.; De Rossi, S.; Inversi, M.; Lo Jacono, M.; Porta, P.; Valigi, M. )

    1989-10-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the surface composition and the redox behavior of multicomponent oxide catalysts having the scheelite structure and general formula Bi{sub 1-x/3}{open square}{sub x/3-y}Me{sub y}(V{sub 1-x}Mo{sub x-y}Fe{sub y})O{sub 4} (Me = Fe or Bi, {open square} = cation vacancies), before and after exposure to hydrogen, propene, and a propene + oxygen mixture. The results point to a different reactivity toward the various reactants. By interaction with hydrogen, an extensive reduction is obtained with considerable change of the catalyst surface composition. The reduction behaviour depends on the sample composition, the iron-containing catalysts being reduced at low temperature (140 C). As regards propene treatment, a preferential reactivity of bismuth with propene has been found, regardless of the sample composition. Bismuth is reduced at low temperature (175 C) with ensuing migration to the surface. Under conditions leading to the catalytic oxidation of propene, a high surface stability is exhibited by these compounds. The catalysts remain oxidized and the surface composition reflects that of the bulk. A correlation with the catalytic properties has also been made on the basis of the different mobility of the oxygen ions among the samples examined.

  4. Investigation of Lithium Insertion Mechanisms of a Thin-Film Si Electrode by Coupling Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Focused-Ion-Beam/SEM.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Arnaud; De Vito, Eric; Haon, Cédric; Secouard, Christophe; Montani, Alexandre; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-12-23

    Silicon is a serious candidate to replace graphite in electrodes because it offers a specific capacity almost 10 times higher than that of carbonaceous materials. However, cycling performances of Si electrodes remain very limited because of the huge volume changes upon alloying and dealloying with lithium. A fine understanding of the lithiation mechanism of silicon electrodes will help to design more robust architectures. In this work, an amorphous silicon thin film has been used as a model for a better understanding of lithiation mechanism. Lithium distribution in the Si layer has been thoroughly investigated by coupling powerful characterization tools: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In particular, cross-analysis of different lithiation states has been carried out. A lithiation front moving forward over the state of charge has been highlighted. The quantification of the LixSi alloy indicates a lithium amount much higher than that of the Li/Si ratio estimated in previous studies. This anomaly leads to a description of the lithiation mechanism based on the presence of fast diffusion paths for Li throughout the Si layer. These paths would be a second driving force for silicon alloying and lithium segregation at the collector interface. SEM observations of a FIB cut corroborate this mechanism. PMID:26618212

  5. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  6. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  7. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  8. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  9. Valence and origin of metal-insulator transition in Mn doped SrRuO{sub 3} studied by electrical transport, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and LSDA+U calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ranjan K.; Pandey, Sudhir K.; Pathak, L.C.

    2011-03-15

    We have studied the valence and electronic properties of Mn doped SrRuO{sub 3} using electrical transport measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and local (spin) density approximation plus Coulomb interaction strength calculation (LSDA+U). The resistivity data revealed that the system undergoes transition from metal to insulator at the critical Mn doping level, x{approx}0.2, which is accompanied by the structural transition from orthorhombic to tetragonal crystal symmetry. Besides, the significant reduction of the spectral weight at the coherent zone (0.8 eV) of the valence band is observed for x>0.2. The core XPS spectra suggest that both the transition elements exist in the mixed ionic pair, Ru{sup +4}/Ru{sup +5{r_reversible}}Mn{sup +3}/Mn{sup +4}. The detail analysis of the results suggests that the Coulomb correlation effect in conjugation with localization of the charge carriers predominate over the mixed ionic pair effect and responsible for the metal-insulator transition in the series. -- Graphical Abstract: XPS data and electrical transport data show that doping of Mn in metallic SrRuO{sub 3} induces mixed ionic pair Ru(IV)/Ru(V){r_reversible}Mn(III)/Mn(IV) and the system undergoes a transition from metal to insulator at the critical Mn doping level, x{approx}0.2. The origin for the metal-insulator transition has been discussed. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} We have investigated the electronic properties of SrRu{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} spectroscopically, which shows metal-insulator transition at the critical Mn doping concentartion x{approx}0.2. {yields} We report the valence states of Ru and Mn in the series. {yields} We also report the responsible mechanism for the metal-insulator transition in the series.

  10. Visible light absorbance enhanced by nitrogen embedded in the surface layer of Mn-doped sodium niobate crystals, detected by ultra violet - visible spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electric conductivity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molak, A.; Pilch, M.

    2016-05-01

    Sodium niobate crystals doped with manganese ions, Na(NbMn)O3, were annealed in a nitrogen N2 flow at 600, 670, and 930 K. It was verified that simultaneous doping with Mn ions and annealing in nitrogen enhanced the photocatalytic features of sodium niobate. The transmission in the ultraviolet-visible range was measured at room temperature. The absorbance edge is in the range from 3.4 to 2.3 eV. The optical band gap Egap = 1.2-1.3 eV was evaluated using the Tauc relation. Crystals annealed at 670 K and 930 K exhibited an additional shift of the absorption edge of ˜20-40 nm toward longer wavelengths. The optical energy gap narrowed as a result of the superimposed effect of Mn and N co-doping. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy test showed that N ions incorporated into the surface layer. The valence band consisted of O 2p states hybridized with Nb 4d, Mn 3d, and N 2s states. The disorder detected in the surroundings of Nb and O ions decreased due to annealing. The binding energy of oxygen ions situated within the surface layer was EB ≈ 531 eV. The other contributions were assigned to molecular contamination. The contribution centered at 535.5 eV vanished after annealing at 600 K and 670 K. The contribution centered at 534 eV vanished after annealing at 930 K. The N2 annealing partly removed carbonates from the surfaces of the samples. In the 480-950 K range, the electric conductivity activation energy, Ea = 0.7-1.2 eV, was comparable with the optical Egap. The electric permittivity showed dispersion in the 0.1-800 kHz range that corresponds to the occurrence of defects.

  11. Electronic structure of the (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) system studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Le; Yang, Bin; Sun, Li-min; Zhang, Lan-ting; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-15

    Systematic characterization of electronic structures in the (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B system, especially the 4f behavior, provides an insight to the physical nature of the evolution of magnetic properties. A series of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core-level and valence-band spectra were used to study the electronic structures. It was found that substitution of Dy for Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B results in a nonlinear variation in the evolution of electronic structures. Only the finite coupling between the Nd 4f states and the Fe 3d states is found at both the Nd-rich regime and the Dy-rich regime. When the Dy concentration and the Nd concentration approach to be equal, a strong coupling between the Nd 4f states and the Fe 3d states is found, which results in a bonding state between them. Additionally, the 4f components in the (Nd{sub 1−x}Dy{sub x}){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B system are ascribed to three parts: 1) the individual contribution of the Dy 4f states, which emerges just after the Dy-substitution; 2) the contribution of the coupling between the Nd 4f states and the Dy 4f states, which arises only when 0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.6; 3) the associated contributions of the Nd 4f states and the Dy 4f states, where the contribution of the Nd 4f states and that of the Dy 4f states are prominent in the Nd-rich regime and Dy-rich regime, respectively.

  12. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  13. Band offsets in complex-oxide thin films and heterostructures of SrTiO3/LaNiO3 and SrTiO3/GdTiO3 by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, G.; Kaiser, A. M.; Gray, A. X.; Nemšák, S.; Pálsson, G. K.; Son, J.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Conlon, C. S.; Eiteneer, D.; Greer, A. A.; Keqi, A.; Rattanachata, A.; Saw, A. Y.; Bostwick, A.; Stolte, W. C.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Ueda, S.; Kobata, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Stemmer, S.; Schneider, C. M.; Fadley, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The experimental determination of valence band offsets (VBOs) at interfaces in complex-oxide heterostructures using conventional soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS, hν ≤ 1500 eV) and reference core-level binding energies can present challenges because of surface charging when photoelectrons are emitted and insufficient probing depth to clearly resolve the interfaces. In this paper, we compare VBOs measured with SXPS and its multi-keV hard x-ray analogue (HXPS, hν > 2000 eV). We demonstrate that the use of HXPS allows one to minimize charging effects and to probe more deeply buried interfaces in heterostructures such as SrTiO3/LaNiO3 and SrTiO3/GdTiO3. The VBO values obtained by HXPS for these interfaces are furthermore found to be close to those determined by first-principles calculations.

  14. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  16. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  17. X-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is very low. Most experts feel that the benefits of appropriate x-ray imaging greatly outweigh any risks. Young children and babies in the womb are more sensitive to the risks of x-rays. Tell your health care provider if you think you might be pregnant.

  18. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  19. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  20. Laboratory x ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. L.

    1989-08-01

    One of the most innovative spinoffs of ICF technology and physics was the development of the x ray wavelength laser. The first incontrovertible demonstration of this type of laser came from LLNL in 1984 using the Novette laser to pump a selenium foil target. The power and energy of Novette were then needed to produce a column of plasma of sufficient length to achieve a sufficient gainlength product (approximately 5.5, this corresponds to an amplification of approximately 250X) that could unquestionably illustrate the lasing effect. LLNL ICF expertise was also required to develop time-resolved spectrometers used to view the lasing transitions at approximately 20 nm, a region of the XUV spectrum normally dominated by high backgrounds. The design of the x ray laser amplifier, which required maintaining nonequilibrium level populations in a tailored plasma having the proper conditions for gain and x ray laser beam propagation, was accomplished with modified versions of ICF kinetics and hydrodynamics codes. Since the first demonstration, progress in the development of the x ray laser was rapid. New achievements include production of megawatt power levels at 20 nm, amplified spontaneous emission levels approaching saturation intensity GL of approximately 17 at 20 nm, efficiency (x ray laser energy/pump energy) approximately 10(exp 6), the demonstration of double and triple pass amplification (hinting at the possibility of producing x ray wavelength resonators), the focusing of x ray lasers to pump other types of lasers and the first demonstration of an x ray hologram produced by an x ray laser. The generation of amplification at ever shorter wavelength is possible using various types of inversion schemes. We depict below this progress benchmarked against production of gain in the water window (2.2 to 4.4 nm,), where applications to biological imaging may be facilitated.

  1. Detecting X-rays with an optical imaging chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The different morphologies of photoelectron tracks and minimum ionizing tracks can be used for charged particle rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  2. Optical imaging chamber for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The differing morphologies of photoelectron tracks and high-energy charged particle tracks can be used for background rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  3. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  4. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  5. Multilayer approach to the quantitative analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results: Applications to ultrathin SiO{sub 2} on Si and to self-assembled monolayers on gold

    SciTech Connect

    Marel, C. van der; Yildirim, M.; Stapert, H.R.

    2005-09-15

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is widely applied for the chemical characterization of surfaces and multilayers of thin films. In order to obtain quantitative results, XPS peak areas generally are divided by sensitivity factors and normalized to 100 at. % to obtain so-called raw concentrations. For homogeneous materials, materials with randomly distributed atoms within the analyzed surface layer, these concentrations may be a useful quantity. Yet, for a material consisting of a substrate on top of which a number of chemically different layers are present, the raw concentrations depend on measuring details like the takeoff angle during the XPS analyses and clearly are not a satisfactory way to describe the sample. The main purpose of this article is to present a calculation method that converts raw concentrations into more meaningful quantities. The method is applicable to a restricted but technologically relevant class of samples: substrates on top of which one or more homogeneous layers are present. Examples are: gate dielectrics on Si or GaAs, self-assembling monolayers on a metallic substrate, thin oxide films on metals with an organic contamination on top. The method is based upon standard exponential attenuation of the photoelectron intensity as a function of traveled distance. For each element or chemical state in the system it has to be known to which layer(s) it belongs. Sensitivity factors are corrected for matrix effects and for intrinsic excitations. Starting from the raw concentrations, the method calculates in a self-consistent way the composition of all layers in the system and the thickness of each layer. Only one measurement at one measuring angle is required to obtain these results. To obtain insight into the accuracy of the calculation method, XPS results obtained on ultrathin SiO{sub 2} layers on Si that were slightly contaminated with hydrocarbons have been analyzed with the method. The obtained thicknesses were in good agreement with

  6. Hard X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project is to study the hard x-ray emission from x-ray bursters. One target of opportunity observation was made for this investigation during 1997. We obtained 38ks of data on the source 4UI705-44. The project is closely related to "Monitoring x-ray emission from x-ray bursters", and "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters."

  7. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a form of electromagnetic radiation, just like visible light. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will block most of the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight ...

  8. Pelvis x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - pelvis ... Tumors Degenerative conditions of bones in the hips, pelvis, and upper legs ... hip joint Tumors of the bones of the pelvis Sacroiliitis (inflammation of the area where the sacrum ...

  9. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  10. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  11. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  12. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  13. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien

    2014-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  14. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  15. X-ray and neutron reflectometry study of glow-discharge plasma polymer films.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew; Muir, Benjamin W; Oldham, James; Fong, Celesta; McLean, Keith M; Hartley, Patrick G; Oiseth, Sofia K; James, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Radio-frequency glow-discharge plasma polymer thin films of allylamine (AA) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) were prepared on silicon wafers and analyzed by a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectometry (XRR), and neutron reflectometry (NR). AFM and XRR measurements revealed uniform, smooth, defect-free films of 20-30 nm thickness. XPS measurements gave compositional data on all elements in the films with the exception of hydrogen. In combination with XRR and NR, the film composition and mass densities (1.46 and 1.09 g cm(-)(3) for AA and HMDSO, respectively) were estimated. Further NR measurements were conducted with the AA and HMDSO films in contact with water at neutral pH. Three different H(2)O/D(2)O mixtures were used to vary the contrast between the aqueous phase and the polymer. The amount of water penetrating the film, as well as the number of labile protons present, was determined. The AA film in contact with water was found to swell by approximately 5%, contain approximately 3% water, and have approximately 24% labile protons. The HDMSO polymer was found to have approximately 6% labile protons, no thickness increase when in contact with water, and essentially no solvent penetration into the film. The difference in the degree of proton exchange within the films was attributed to the substantially different surface and bulk chemistries of the two films. PMID:16378459

  16. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  17. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  18. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  19. X-ray absorption microscopy of aqueous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Brad; Gilbert, Benjamin; De Stasio, Gelsomina

    2002-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (X-PEEM) is used for numerous applications in surface microchemical analysis of material science and biological specimens. We have reconfigured the MEPHISTO X-PEEM instrument that is installed at the University of Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center to measure true x-ray transmission spectra by converting transmitted photons to photoelectrons via a thin photocathode layer of gold. We have also developed a method by which to introduce aqueous samples into ultrahigh vacuum. Hence x-ray spectroscopy can be performed on biologically relevant elements (such as K, Ca, etc.) in a physiological environment, i.e., in solution. More important, when coupled with X-PEEM imaging this technique may offer the unique and exciting possibility of studying living cells. We present initial x-ray absorption spectra of solutions of aqueous ionic and chelated Ca, with the aim of distinguishing bound and free ionic calcium in vivo.

  20. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  1. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  2. Dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Albert; Aaron, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Dual X-ray absorptiometry is widely used in analyzing body composition and imaging. Both the method and its limitations are related to the Compton and photoelectric contributions to the X-ray attenuation coefficients of materials.

  3. The C-S-H gel of Portland cement mortars: Part I. The interpretation of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyses from scanning electron microscopy, with some observations on C-S-H, AFm and AFt phase compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Famy, C.; Brough, A.R.; Taylor, H.F.W

    2003-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microanalyses of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel in Portland cement pastes rarely represent single phases. Essential experimental requirements are summarised and new procedures for interpreting the data are described. These include, notably, plots of Si/Ca against other atom ratios, 3D plots to allow three such ratios to be correlated and solution of linear simultaneous equations to test and quantify hypotheses regarding the phases contributing to individual microanalyses. Application of these methods to the C-S-H gel of a 1-day-old mortar identified a phase with Al/Ca=0.67 and S/Ca=0.33, which we consider to be a highly substituted ettringite of probable composition C{sub 6}A{sub 2}S-bar{sub 2}H{sub 34} or {l_brace}Ca{sub 6}[Al(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O{r_brace}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}[Al(OH){sub 4}]{sub 2}. If this is true for Portland cements in general, it might explain observed discrepancies between observed and calculated aluminate concentrations in the pore solution. The C-S-H gel of a similar mortar aged 600 days contained unsubstituted ettringite and an AFm phase with S/Ca=0.125.

  4. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  5. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  6. Magnetic x-ray dichroism in ultrathin epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Cummins, T.R.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have used Magnetic X-ray Linear Dichroism (MXLD) and Magnetic X-ray Circular Dichroism (MXCD) to study the magnetic properties of epitaxial overlayers in an elementally specific fashion. Both MXLD and MXCD Photoelectron Spectroscopy were performed in a high resolution mode at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the ALS. Circular Polarization was obtained via the utilization of a novel phase retarder (soft x-ray quarter wave plate) based upon transmission through a multilayer film. The samples were low temperature Fe overlayers, magnetic alloy films of NiFe and CoNi, and Gd grown on Y. The authors results include a direct comparison of high resolution angle resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy performed in MXLD and MXCD modes as well as structural studies with photoelectron diffraction.

  7. X-ray position detector and implementation in a mirror pointing servo system

    DOEpatents

    Rabedeau, Thomas A.; Van Campen, Douglas G.; Stefan, Peter M.

    2016-04-05

    An X-ray beam position and stability detector is provided having a first metal blade collinear with a second metal blade, where an edge of the first metal blade is opposite an edge of the second metal blade, where the first metal blade edge and the second metal blade edge are disposed along a centerline with respect to each other, where the metal blades are capable of photoelectron emission when exposed to an x-ray beam, a metal coating on the metal blades that is capable of enhancing the photoelectron emission, or suppressing energy-resonant contaminants, or enhancing the photoelectron emission and suppressing energy-resonant contaminants, a background shielding element having an electrode capable of suppressing photoelectron emission from spurious x-rays not contained in an x-ray beam of interest, and a photoelectron emission detector having an amplifier capable of detecting the photoelectron emission as a current signal.

  8. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  9. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  10. Hard and soft x-ray standing-wave photoelectron spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of LaNiO3/SrTiO 3 superlattice and its interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiteneer, Daria N.

    Abstract Many classes of materials that exhibit interesting characteristics in the modulation of the electronic and magnetic properties when they are made of more than one compound, often arranged in multilayers and superlattices. In such cases, the electronic, electric, and magnetic properties of the multilayer, as well as their densities-of-states, are vastly different from the properties of the constituent materials, with the most important features often located at the interfaces. Specifically, perovskite nickelates are examples of materials that lie at the heart of correlated electron physics. Prior studies have been done on superlattices that contain multilayers of two perovskites. Specifically, it has been shown that LaNiO3 (LNO) undergoes a Mott metal-insulator transition when sandwiched between the layers of SrTiO3 (STO). However, even with prior theoretical simulations and experimental studies, no conclusion has been reached so far as to the exact reason for such a transition. To further the investigation of these ideas, we are undertaking a detailed study of the electronic structure of a LaNiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice with 10 repeats of [4 unit-cell LNO/3 unit-cell STO] bilayer grown on an (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 substrate. To provide a complete characterization of this superlattice, it is crucial to characterize the core levels of the atoms at the interface, as well as to measure the depth-dependent density of states and the element-specific magnetization through the interface. The standing-wave photoemission technique provides a unique capability for characterizing the LNO/STO interfaces by depth-resolving the electronic structure of the superlattice, particularly in its momentum-resolving form of standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission using soft x-rays in the ca. 1 keV regime. The main advantages of SW-XPS are its non-destructiveness, large effective attenuation length, and the enhanced depth resolution for buried interfaces via standing

  11. Hard and soft x-ray standing-wave photoelectron spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of LaNiO3/SrTiO 3 superlattice and its interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiteneer, Daria N.

    Abstract Many classes of materials that exhibit interesting characteristics in the modulation of the electronic and magnetic properties when they are made of more than one compound, often arranged in multilayers and superlattices. In such cases, the electronic, electric, and magnetic properties of the multilayer, as well as their densities-of-states, are vastly different from the properties of the constituent materials, with the most important features often located at the interfaces. Specifically, perovskite nickelates are examples of materials that lie at the heart of correlated electron physics. Prior studies have been done on superlattices that contain multilayers of two perovskites. Specifically, it has been shown that LaNiO3 (LNO) undergoes a Mott metal-insulator transition when sandwiched between the layers of SrTiO3 (STO). However, even with prior theoretical simulations and experimental studies, no conclusion has been reached so far as to the exact reason for such a transition. To further the investigation of these ideas, we are undertaking a detailed study of the electronic structure of a LaNiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice with 10 repeats of [4 unit-cell LNO/3 unit-cell STO] bilayer grown on an (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 substrate. To provide a complete characterization of this superlattice, it is crucial to characterize the core levels of the atoms at the interface, as well as to measure the depth-dependent density of states and the element-specific magnetization through the interface. The standing-wave photoemission technique provides a unique capability for characterizing the LNO/STO interfaces by depth-resolving the electronic structure of the superlattice, particularly in its momentum-resolving form of standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission using soft x-rays in the ca. 1 keV regime. The main advantages of SW-XPS are its non-destructiveness, large effective attenuation length, and the enhanced depth resolution for buried interfaces via standing

  12. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  13. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  15. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Kaaret, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The scientific goal of this project was to monitor a selected sample of x-ray bursters using data from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer together with data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to study the long-term temporal evolution of these sources in the x-ray and hard x-ray bands. The project was closely related to "Long-Term Hard X-Ray Monitoring of X-Ray Bursters", NASA project NAG5-3891, and and "Hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters", NASA project NAG5-4633, and shares publications in common with both of these. The project involved preparation of software for use in monitoring and then the actual monitoring itself. These efforts have lead to results directly from the ASM data and also from Target of Opportunity Observations (TOO) made with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer based on detection of transient hard x-ray outbursts with the ASM and BATSE.

  16. Development of high resolution imaging detectors for x ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. S.; Schwartz, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes our past activities and discusses the work performed over the period of 1 April 1990 through 1 April 1991 on x-ray optics, soft x-ray (0.1 - 10 KeV) imaging detectors, and hard x-ray (10 - 300 KeV) imaging detectors. If microchannel plates (MCPs) can be used to focus x-rays with a high efficiency and good angular resolution, they will revolutionize the field of x-ray optics. An x-ray image of a point source through an array of square MCP pores compared favorably with our ray tracing model for the MCP. Initial analysis of this image demonstrates the feasibility of MCPs for soft x-rays. Our work continues with optimizing the performance of our soft x-ray MCP imaging detectors. This work involves readout technology that should provide improved MCP readout devices (thin film crossed grid, curved, and resistive sheets), defect removal in MCPs, and photocathode optimization. In the area of hard x-ray detector development we have developed two different techniques for producing a CsI photocathode thickness of 10 to 100 microns, such that it is thick enough to absorb the high energy x-rays and still allow the photoelectrons to escape to the top MCP of a modified soft x-ray imaging detector. The methods involve vacuum depositing a thick film of CsI on a strong back, and producing a converter device that takes the place of the photocathode.

  17. Effects of O{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O oxidants on C and N-related impurities in atomic-layer-deposited La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films observed by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Tae Joo; Sivasubramani, Prasanna; Coss, Brian E.; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Bongki; Wallace, Robert M.; Kim, Jiyoung; Rousseau, Mike; Liu Xinye; Li Huazhi; Lehn, Jean-Sebastien; Hong, Daewon; Shenai, Deo

    2010-08-30

    The effect of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 3} oxidants on the behavior of residual C and N-related impurities as well as Si out-diffusion and interfacial layer formation in atomic-layer-deposited La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown at 250 deg. C were examined using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The silicate formation was suppressed in a La{sub 2}O{sub 3} film grown using O{sub 3} compared to that deposited using H{sub 2}O, but interfacial layer growth was enhanced. The accumulation of C and N-related residues with low binding energy, which originated from incomplete reactions, was suppressed in La{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown using O{sub 3}. However, the use of O{sub 3} resulted in La-carbonate phase in film.

  18. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of this proposal was to perform an accurate measurement of the broadband x-ray spectrum of a neutron-star low-mass x-ray binary found in a hard x-ray state. This goal was accomplished using data obtained under another proposal, which has provided exciting new information on the hard x-ray emission of neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. In "BeppoSAX Observations of the Atoll X-Ray Binary 4U0614+091", we present our analysis of the spectrum of 4U0614+091 over the energy band from 0.3-150 keV. Our data confirm the presence of a hard x-ray tail that can be modeled as thermal Comptonization of low-energy photons on electrons having a very high temperature, greater than 220 keV, or as a non-thermal powerlaw. Such a very hard x-ray spectrum has not been previously seen from neutron-star low-mass x-ray binaries. We also detected a spectral feature that can be interpreted as reprocessing, via Compton reflection, of the direct emission by an optically-thick disk and found a correlation between the photon index of the power-law tail and the fraction of radiation reflected which is similar to the correlation found for black hole candidate x-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. A secondary goal was to measure the timing properties of the x-ray emission from neutronstar low-mass x-ray binaries in their low/hard states.

  19. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  20. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  1. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  2. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  3. Investigation of Micropatent Gaseous Detector for X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongbang; Liang, En-Wei; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the Micropatent Gaseous Detector (THGEM and MicroMegas) for the X-ray polarimeter. THGEMs with different thickness and diameter have been studied with vary electrical parameter. The energy resolution of 15.9% with 5.9 keV X-rays was obtained for the thinner-THGEM. MicroMegas with ITO glass has been assembled and tested in Ne-5%CF _{4} which emits light during the electron multiplication. The track of the primary photoelectron excited by the incident X-ray was imaged on an intensified CCD. For the expected sensitivity of the polarimeter, we used the Monte Carlo package Geant4 and Garfield to simulate the charge distribution of the photoelectron, diffusion of the charge track during drift and track image of the detector. The associated Monte Carlo calculation of energy resolution dependence on drift electric field and induction field has been compared with the experimental results.

  4. The infrared continuum spectrum of x ray illuminated molecular gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. Mark

    1990-01-01

    In starburst galaxies, active galaxies, and the mysterious ultraluminous infrared galaxies, x rays are likely to interact with molecular gas and dust, thereby inducing infrared emission. X ray heated thermal dust will emit the IR continuum, and x ray photoelectrons will excite an IR emission-line spectrum. Here, researchers model the IR continuum emission characteristic of some selected x ray spectral fluxes, in particular the x ray bremsstrahlung characteristic of supernova and stellar wind bubble shocks in dense media and the power law spectra characteristic of active galactic nuclei. These models are part of a larger project to determine the complete IR spectra, lines plus continuum, of x ray sources embedded in molecular gas. They modeled the thermal emission from grains by calculating a grain temperature/size/composition distribution function, f(T,a,Comp.), which accounts for temperature fluctuations by averaging over all grain thermal histories. In determining the grain thermal distribution, researchers account for both direct grain heating (by x ray absorption and subsequent electron energy deposition) and indirect grain heating (by absorption of the UV emission stimulated by non-thermal photo- and Auger electrons in the gas phase). We let the grain size distribution be proportional to a(exp -3.5), and they consider two types of grain composition: graphites, which we assume to be pure carbon, and silicates, which contain all other depleted heavy elements. They derive the grain composition distribution function from solar abundances and interstellar depletion data.

  5. X-ray beam pointer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive, readily assembled pointer aims X-ray machine for welded assembly radiographs. Plumb bob used for vertical alinement and yardstick used to visualize X-ray paths were inconvenient and inaccurate. Pointer cuts alinement time by one-half and eliminates necessity of retakes. For 3,000 weld radiographs, pointer will save 300 worker-hours and significant materials costs.

  6. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  7. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  8. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  9. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  10. A New NIST Database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA): Application to Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 Films on Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.J.; Smekal, W.; Werner, W.S.M.

    2005-09-09

    We describe a new NIST database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA). This database provides data for the many parameters needed in quantitative Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, AES and XPS spectra can be simulated for layered samples. The simulated spectra, for layer compositions and thicknesses specified by the user, can be compared with measured spectra. The layer compositions and thicknesses can then be adjusted to find maximum consistency between simulated and measured spectra. In this way, AES and XPS can provide more detailed characterization of multilayer thin-film materials. We report on the use of SESSA for determining the thicknesses of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 films on Si by angle-resolved XPS. Practical effective attenuation lengths (EALs) have been computed from SESSA as a function of film thickness and photoelectron emission angle (i.e., to simulate the effects of tilting the sample). These EALs have been compared with similar values obtained from the NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (SRD 82). Generally good agreement was found between corresponding EAL values, but there were differences for film thicknesses less than the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons in the overlayer film. These differences are due to a simplifying approximation in the algorithm used to compute EALs in SRD 82. SESSA, with realistic cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering in the film and substrate materials, is believed to provide more accurate EALs than SRD 82 for thin-film thickness measurements, particularly in applications where the film and substrate have different electron-scattering properties.

  11. A New NIST Database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA): Application to Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 Films on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. J.; Smekal, W.; Werner, W. S. M.

    2005-09-01

    We describe a new NIST database for the Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA). This database provides data for the many parameters needed in quantitative Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, AES and XPS spectra can be simulated for layered samples. The simulated spectra, for layer compositions and thicknesses specified by the user, can be compared with measured spectra. The layer compositions and thicknesses can then be adjusted to find maximum consistency between simulated and measured spectra. In this way, AES and XPS can provide more detailed characterization of multilayer thin-film materials. We report on the use of SESSA for determining the thicknesses of HfO2, ZrO2, HfSiO4, and ZrSiO4 films on Si by angle-resolved XPS. Practical effective attenuation lengths (EALs) have been computed from SESSA as a function of film thickness and photoelectron emission angle (i.e., to simulate the effects of tilting the sample). These EALs have been compared with similar values obtained from the NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length Database (SRD 82). Generally good agreement was found between corresponding EAL values, but there were differences for film thicknesses less than the inelastic mean free path of the photoelectrons in the overlayer film. These differences are due to a simplifying approximation in the algorithm used to compute EALs in SRD 82. SESSA, with realistic cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering in the film and substrate materials, is believed to provide more accurate EALs than SRD 82 for thin-film thickness measurements, particularly in applications where the film and substrate have different electron-scattering properties.

  12. Hard X-Ray Emission of X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Phillip

    1997-01-01

    The main results from this investigation were serendipitous. The long observation approved for the study of the hard X-ray emission of X-ray bursters lead, instead, to one of the largest early samples of the behavior of fast quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOS) in an atoll sources. Our analysis of this data set lead to the several important discoveries including the existence of a robust correlation between QPO frequency and the flux of a soft blackbody component of the X-ray spectrum in the atoll source 4U 0614+091.

  13. An ARXPS and ERXPS study of quaternary ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids: utilising a high energy Ag Lα' X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Rebecca K; Delorme, Astrid E; Smith, Emily F; Licence, Peter

    2016-02-17

    A series of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids have been probed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with a high energy Ag Lα' X-ray source. The capability of the Ag Lα' X-ray source for ionic liquid analysis is confirmed alongside the characterisation of previously undetected high energy core photoelectron emissions. Additionally, the utilisation of the Ag Lα' X-ray source as a depth profiling technique (ERXPS) to investigate the structure of the ionic liquid/vacuum interface has been demonstrated, with comparison made to angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS).

  14. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-11-15

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  15. X-ray microimaging of elemental composition and microstructure for materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    X rays have many advantages over electrons and other charged particles for the microcharacterization of materials. X rays are more efficient in photoejecting inner shell electrons which results in characteristic x-ray fluorescence. X rays also produce less Bremsstrahlung which yields far higher signal-to-background than obtained with electrons. Minimum detectable limits (MDL) for X ray excited fluorescence can be a few parts per billion; 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}5} less than for electron excitation. The third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source will for the first time provide x-ray sources as brilliant as the most advanced electron probes. It will therefore soon be possible to develop a submicron x-ray probe with unprecedented low levels of detection in diffraction, EXAFS, Auger, Photoelectron and fluorescence spectroscopies for structural and chemical characterization. Some applications to materials science are shown.

  16. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum

  17. X-Ray photonics: X-rays inspire electron movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The advent of high-energy, short-pulse X-ray sources based on free-electron lasers, laser plasmas and high-harmonic generation is now making it possible to probe the dynamics of electrons within molecules.

  18. Be/X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    The interest in X/ γ-ray Astronomy has grown enormously in the last decades thanks to the ability to send X-ray space missions above the Earth’s atmosphere. There are more than half a million X-ray sources detected and over a hundred missions (past and currently operational) devoted to the study of cosmic X/ γ rays. With the improved sensibilities of the currently active missions new detections occur almost on a daily basis. Among these, neutron-star X-ray binaries form an important group because they are among the brightest extra-solar objects in the sky and are characterized by dramatic variability in brightness on timescales ranging from milliseconds to months and years. Their main source of power is the gravitational energy released by matter accreted from a companion star and falling onto the neutron star in a relatively close binary system. Neutron-star X-ray binaries divide into high-mass and low-mass systems according to whether the mass of the donor star is above ˜8 or below ˜2 M⊙, respectively. Massive X-ray binaries divide further into supergiant X-ray binaries and Be/X-ray binaries depending on the evolutionary status of the optical companion. Virtually all Be/X-ray binaries show X-ray pulsations. Therefore, these systems can be used as unique natural laboratories to investigate the properties of matter under extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called “Be phenomenon”, such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/ R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass

  19. X-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1986-01-01

    There are about 100 bright X-ray sources in the Galaxy that are accretion-driven systems composed of a neutron star and a low mass companion that fills its critical Roche lobe. Many of these systems generate recurring X-ray bursts that are the result of thermonuclear flashes in the neutron star's surface layers, and are accompanied by a somewhat delayed optical burst due to X-ray heating of accretion disk. The Rapid Burster discovered in 1976 exhibits an interval between bursts that is strongly correlated with the energy in the preceding burst. There is no optical identification for this object.

  20. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  1. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  2. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  3. X-ray fiducial foils

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, C.; Serduke, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Jankowski, A.; Wall, M.

    1991-03-13

    An x-ray spectrum from a laser fusion experiment was passed through an Al, Si, Y multilayer foil. The position of the absorption edges of the Al, Si, and Y was used to calibrate the x-ray energy spectrum recorded on photographic film. The foil consisted of 4000 {angstrom} of Al, 6000 {angstrom} of Si and 4000 {angstrom} of Y sputter deposited on a 1.5 {mu}m thick Mylar{reg sign} film. It was necessary to layer the structure in order to achieve the required mechanical strength and dimensional stability. The results include analysis of the x-ray energy spectrum and microstructural characterization of the foil using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone x-ray is used to: diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony fragments following treatment of a fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, ...

  5. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Model 60007A InnerView Real-time X-ray Imaging System, produced by National Imaging Systems, a division of FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc. (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), Northbrook, IL, is a third generation spinoff from x-ray astronomy technology. Goddard Space Flight Center developed the original technology into the Lixiscope, a small, portable, minimal radiation x-ray instrument that could be used at the scene of an accident. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc., adapted this technology to develop the FlouroScan, a low-intensity, x-ray system that could be used without the lead aprons, film badges and lead-lined walls that conventional systems require. The InnerView is a spinoff of non-destructive testing and product inspection.

  6. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  7. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Results A radiologist, a doctor specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray images, will look at ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  12. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  13. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  15. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  16. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  17. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? ... of tooth decay. Updated: January 2012 Related Articles: X-Rays The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) Sets the ...

  18. Nanometer x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Khan Malek, Chantal G.

    1999-10-01

    New developments for x-ray nanomachining include pattern transfer onto non-planar surfaces coated with electrodeposited resists using synchrotron radiation x-rays through extremely high-resolution mask made by chemically assisted focused ion beam lithography. Standard UV photolithographic processes cannot maintain sub-micron definitions over large variation in feature topography. The ability of x-ray printing to pattern thin or thick layers of photoresist with high resolution on non-planar surfaces of large and complex topographies with limited diffraction and scattering effects and no substrate reflection is known and can be exploited for patterning microsystems with non-planar 3D geometries as well as multisided and multilayered substrates. Thin conformal coatings of electro-deposited positive and negative tone photoresist have been shown to be x-ray sensitive and accommodate sub-micro pattern transfer over surface of extreme topographical variations. Chemically assisted focused ion beam selective anisotropic erosion was used to fabricate x-ray masks directly. Masks with feature sizes less than 20 nm through 7 microns of gold were made on bulk silicon substrates and x-ray mask membranes. The technique is also applicable to other high density materials. Such masks enable the primary and secondary patterning and/or 3D machining of Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems over large depths or complex relief and the patterning of large surface areas with sub-optically dimensioned features.

  19. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  20. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  1. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  2. X-ray spectra of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the various classes of Galactic X-ray sources are discussed, with particular emphasis on binary sources containing an accreting compact object, where post-emission scattering in an accretion disk often prevents the initially produced X-radiation from being observed directly. Theoretical interpretations and X-ray observations are considered for the cataclysmic variables, binary systems with a white dwarf as the compact object and which suffer relatively less from Thomson scattering, and the similar phenomenological spectral characteristics of the bulge sources, including soft transients, bursters and steady X-ray sources with thermal spectra, thought to represent an accreting neutron star, are pointed out. The spectral characteristics of X-ray pulsars in accreting binary systems (rather than the Crab pulsar, which is losing rotational kinetic energy with time) are then presented and interpreted in terms of accretion in the polar regions, and mechanisms for the newly discovered X-ray emission from late-type RS CVn stars are considered.

  3. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice. PMID:25552555

  4. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice.

  5. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources

  6. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains. PMID:26967404

  7. X-rays surgical revolution.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Wilhelm Roentgen (1845-1923) created a surgical revolution with the discovery of the X-rays in late 1895 and the subsequent introduction of this technique for the management of surgical patients. No other physician or scientist had ever imagined such a powerful and worthwhile discovery. Other scientists paved the way for Roentgen to approach the use of these new X-rays for medical purposes. In this way, initially, and prior to Roentgen, Thompson, Hertz, and Lenard applied themselves to the early developments of this technology. They made good advances but never reached the clearly defined understanding brought about by Roentgen. The use of a Crookes tube, a barium platinocyanide screen, with fluorescent light and the generation of energy to propagate the cathode rays were the necessary elements for the conception of an X-ray picture. On November 8, 1895, Roentgen began his experiments on X-ray technology when he found that some kind of rays were being produced by the glass of the tube opposite to the cathode. The development of a photograph successfully completed this early imaging process. After six intense weeks of research, on December 22, he obtained a photograph of the hand of his wife, the first X-ray ever made. This would be a major contribution to the world of medicine and surgery.

  8. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  9. Clocking Femtosecond X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Mills, D M; Pahl, R; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Lowney, D P; MacPhee, A G; Weinstein, D; Falcone, R W; Als-Nielsen, J; Blome, C; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Tschentscher, T; Schneider, J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Synnergren, O; Larsson, J; Techert, S; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Calleman, C; Huldt, G; der Spoel, D v; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Bong, E; Emma, P; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Gaffney, K J; Lindenberg, A M; Hastings, J B

    2004-10-08

    The Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) produces the brightest ultrafast x-ray pulses in the world, and is the first to employ compressed femtosecond electron bunches for the x-ray source. Both SPPS and future X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL's) will use precise measurements of individual electron bunches to time the arrival of x-ray pulses for time-resolved experiments. At SPPS we use electro-optic sampling (EOS) to perform these measurements. Here we present the first results using this method. An ultrafast laser pulse (135 fs) passes through an electro-optic crystal adjacent to the electron beam. The refractive index of the crystal is distorted by the strong electromagnetic fields of the ultra-relativistic electrons, and this transient birefringence is imprinted on the laser polarization. A polarizer decodes this signal, producing a time-dependent image of the compressed electron bunch. Our measurements yield the relative timing between an ultrafast optical laser and an ultrafast x-ray pulse to within 60 fs, making it possible to use the SPPS to observe atomic-scale ultrafast dynamics initiated by laser-matter interaction.

  10. Polarization from Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sourses: The PRAXyS Small Explorer Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy R.; Jahoda, Keith; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; The PRAXyS Team

    2016-04-01

    Polarization is a sensitive probe of geometry near compact objects, but remains largely unexplored in the X-ray band. Polarization is expected from cosmic X-ray sources, yielding insight into the geometry of black hole emission, and the origin and nature of X-ray emission in neutron stars and magnetars. Recent progress with detectors capable of imaging the track of a photoelectron generated by a detection of a cosmic X-ray have made sensitive X-ray polarization observatories possible within the constraints of a NASA Small Explorer mission. We report on the observational capabilities and the scientific goals of the "Polarization from Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources" (PRAXyS) Observatory. PRAXyS is a small explorer which has been selected by NASA for a phase A study.

  11. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  12. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Stacey Giles briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  13. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Lance Weiss briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  14. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  15. Portable X-Ray Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  16. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  17. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Ozkan, C.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Klepka, M. T.; Dłużewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y. [RIKEN and others

    2015-06-15

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  18. Fluence thresholds for grazing incidence hard x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquila, A.; Sobierajski, R.; Ozkan, C.; Hájková, V.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Juha, L.; Störmer, M.; Bajt, S.; Klepka, M. T.; DłuŻewski, P.; Morawiec, K.; Ohashi, H.; Koyama, T.; Tono, K.; Inubushi, Y.; Yabashi, M.; Sinn, H.; Tschentscher, T.; Mancuso, A. P.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) have the potential to contribute to many fields of science and to enable many new avenues of research, in large part due to their orders of magnitude higher peak brilliance than existing and future synchrotrons. To best exploit this peak brilliance, these XFEL beams need to be focused to appropriate spot sizes. However, the survivability of X-ray optical components in these intense, femtosecond radiation conditions is not guaranteed. As mirror optics are routinely used at XFEL facilities, a physical understanding of the interaction between intense X-ray pulses and grazing incidence X-ray optics is desirable. We conducted single shot damage threshold fluence measurements on grazing incidence X-ray optics, with coatings of ruthenium and boron carbide, at the SPring-8 Angstrom compact free electron laser facility using 7 and 12 keV photon energies. The damage threshold dose limits were found to be orders of magnitude higher than would naively be expected. The incorporation of energy transport and dissipation via keV level energetic photoelectrons accounts for the observed damage threshold.

  19. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E.

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  20. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.