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Sample records for africa began erupting

  1. Eruption parameters elicitation for volcanoes in Ethiopia and Kenya Informing a World Bank GFDRR project on volcanic threat in sub-Saharan Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Susanna; Lark, Murray; Loughlin, Sue; Fontijn, Karen; Mather, Tamsin; Pyle, David; Lewi, Elias; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Sparks, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Despite large numbers of very visible active volcanoes in sub-Saharan Africa, data about eruptions are limited compared to elsewhere in the world. We present the method and findings from elicitations carried out to characterise likely future eruptions in the region as part of a World Bank GFDRR risk profiling project for sub-Saharan Africa. The purpose of the elicitations was to better understand the characteristics and frequencies of explosive eruptions at volcanoes in Ethiopia and Kenya. The elicitations will provide source parameters for tephra fall modelling at select volcanoes in Ethiopia (Aluto, Corbetti, Fentale) and Kenya (Menegai, Longonot, Suswa). There were two stages of elicitation: 1) a 'sanity check' of initial assumptions around likely eruption style, magnitude and frequency for the six selected volcanoes; 2) a formal SHELF (SHeffield ELicitation Framework) elicitation that centred round establishing frequency-magnitude relationships for the volcanoes. The elicitation suggested that explosive eruptions at Aluto and Corbetti were less likely than at the other volcanoes, although the uncertainty was significant. Menengai and Rungwe volcano in Tanzania (elicited as an analogue for Fentale, Longonot and Suswa volcanoes) were characterised by approximately similar probabilities of eruption. However, Rungwe was considered more likely to produce larger explosive (VEI ≥ 4) eruptions than Menengai. Elicitation discussions highlighted the knowledge and data gaps for African volcanoes and raised important questions around whether gaps in the eruption record were real and related to changing regimes at the volcanoes over time or if they were a function of under-recording or lack of preservation. Further investigation is therefore needed to validate the findings of the elicitation. It is hoped that continued collaboration with local partners and studies within the ongoing NERC-funded RiftVolc project will address these issues and help to improve our knowledge

  2. Solar radiation climate change over southern Africa and an assessment of the radiative impact of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, H. C.; Mills, D. M.

    2005-03-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in global, diffuse, and horizontal direct irradiance and sunshine duration has been evaluated at eight stations in South Africa and two stations in Namibia where the time series range between 21 and 41 years. Global and direct irradiance and sunshine duration decrease from northwest to southeast; diffuse irradiance increases toward the east. Annually averaged global irradiance Ga decreased between 1.3% (2.8 W m-2) and 1.7% (4.4 W m-2) per decade at Bloemfontein, Cape Town, Durban, Pretoria, and Upington. Annually averaged diffuse irradiance Da decreased 5.2% (3.0 W m-2) per decade at Grootfontein and 4.2% (3.1 W m-2) per decade at Port Elizabeth. Annual direct irradiance Ba decreased 2.1% (3.5 W m-2) per decade at Cape Town and 2.8% (5.7 W m-2) per decade at Alexander Bay. A simultaneous decrease in annually averaged daily sunshine duration Sa may have contributed to the decrease in Ba at Alexander Bay and the decrease in Ga at Pretoria. Increases in aerosols may have contributed to the observed decrease in Ga at Cape Town and Durban, and the decrease in Da at Grootfontein may be due to a decrease in aerosols. On average, variability in Sa explains 89.0%, 50.4%, and 89.5% of the variance in Ga, Da, and Ba respectively. The radiative response to changes in sunshine duration is greater for direct irradiance than for global and diffuse. In the 2 years following the 1963 Mount Agung eruption in Indonesia, changes in global irradiance over southern Africa were small and inconsistent. At eight stations, diffuse irradiance increased 21.9% (13.3 W m-2) on average and direct irradiance decreased 8.7% (15.5 W m-2). After the 1982 El Chichón eruption in Mexico, global irradiance

  3. On the Age, Duration and Eruptive History of the Karoo Flood Basalt: new results from the Oxbow-Moteng Pass Sections (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, M.; Fluteau, F.; Courtillot, V.; Marsh, J.; Delpech, G.; Quidelleur, X.; Gerard, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Karoo traps in southern Africa have been linked to the (relatively small) Pliensbachian-Toarcian extinctions. In an attempt to understand why the extinction was far less severe than the one at the KT boundary (related to the Deccan traps and Chicxulub impact), we have undertaken a large sampling program for mainly paleomagnetism and geochronology. A first 800 m thick section of the traps at Naude's Nek (NN), near the southern border of Lesotho, has been published (Moulin et al, 2011). We have next investigated the Moteng Pass and Oxbow sections some 200 km to the North, where lava thickness reaches almost 1500 m. Our age determinations (40K-40Ar Cassignol-Gillot and 40Ar/39Ar techniques) show that the whole lava pile was emplaced in a relatively short time around the Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundary. Detailed flow-by-flow magnetostratigraphy shows that the eruptive sequences can be divided into several volcanic pulses and interbedded individual lava flows. Based on archeomagnetic estimates of the velocity of secular variation, we estimate that total eruption time may have been as short as a few thousand years. However, we cannot determine the amount of time elapsed between successive volcanic pulses, which is of course required to fully reconstruct the eruptive sequence. Combined with previously published sections covering much of Lesotho (NN, Bushmen's Pass - Prévot et al, 2003 -, Mafika Lisiu and Sani Pass - Kosterov and Perrin, 1996), these new results allow the correlation of numerous directional groups and allow one to partly reconstruct and constrain the eruptive history of the Drakensberg group of the Karoo LIP.

  4. Phytoliths Used to Investigate the Effects of the Indonesian Mount Toba Super-Eruption (~75 kyr) in East Africa: A Subdecadal Record from Lake Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, C. L.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    The recent discovery of cryptotephra visually and chemically matched to the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT, 75.0 ± 0.9 kyr) in Lake Malawi drill core sediments has spurred renewed interest in this period of time in East Africa. The YTT is the most recent and largest of the four Mount Toba eruptions, and is the only super-eruption to have taken place during the Quaternary. The timing of the YTT approximately coincides with a hypothesized human genetic bottleneck. Several climate models have proposed an episode of global cooling following the YTT; however, the magnitude and duration of the cooling is much debated, ranging from just a few degrees of cooling to a state of volcanic winter. Cored sediments from Lake Malawi provide an excellent record of local variability in the lake's watershed that may be linked to specific climatic events. To investigate the possible effects of the YTT in East Africa, we continuously sampled Lake Malawi drill core 2A-10H-2 at 2-4 mm (~6 yr) intervals above and below the first occurrence of the YTT. Poaceae phytoliths were grouped into plant functional types (C3, C4, xerophytic, mesophytic, arboreal, etc.), revealing mostly subtle changes in terrestrial vegetation over the ~400 yr time period examined. Abrupt increases in concentration values for phytoliths derived from riverine Podostemaceae plants appear to signal increased discharge from rivers draining the surrounding uplands. Perhaps most significant is the increasing trend in burned phytoliths and decreasing trend in tree phytoliths post-YTT. Although there appears to be a very weak cooling signal synchronous with the YTT, the most abrupt terrestrial vegetation changes appear to be better correlated with the deposition of a slightly older cryptotephra horizon derived from the local Rungwe Volcanic Province. A potential complication with this record is the existence of a turbidite pre-YTT that encompasses the Rungwe horizon.

  5. Eruptive history of the Barombi Mbo Maar, Cameroon Volcanic Line, Central Africa: Constraints from volcanic facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchamabé, Boris; Youmen, Dieudonné; Owona, Sébastien; Issa; Ohba, Takeshi; Németh, Károly; Ngapna, Moussa; Asaah, Asobo; Aka, Festus; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    his study presents the first and detail field investigations of exposed deposits at proximal sections of the Barombi Mbo Maar (BMM), NE Mt Cameroon, with the aim of documenting its past activity, providing insight on the stratigraphic distribution, depositional process, and evolution of the eruptive sequences during its formation. Field evidence reveals that the BMM deposit is about 126m thick, of which about 20m is buried lowermost under the lake level and covered by vegetation. Based on variation in pyroclastic facies within the deposit, it can be divided into three main stratigraphic units: U1, U2 and U3. Interpretation of these features indicates that U1 consists of alternating lapilli-ash-lapilli beds series, in which fallout derived individual lapilli-rich beds are demarcated by surges deposits made up of thin, fine-grained and consolidated ash-beds that are well-defined, well-sorted and laterally continuous in outcrop scale. U2, a pyroclastic fall-derived unit, shows crudely lenticular stratified scoriaceous layers, in which many fluidal and spindle bombs-rich lapilli-beds are separated by very thin, coarse-vesiculatedash-beds, overlain by a mantle xenolith- and accidental lithic-rich explosive breccia, and massive lapilli tuff and lapillistone. U3 displays a series of surges and pyroclastic fall layers. Emplacement processes were largely controlled by fallout deposition and turbulent diluted pyroclastic density currents under "dry" and "wet" conditions. The eruptive activity evolved in a series of initial phreatic eruptions, which gradually became phreatomagmatic, followed by a phreato-Strombolian and a violent phreatomagmatic fragmentation. A relatively long-time break, demonstrated by a paleosol between U2 and U3, would have permitted the feeding of the root zone or the prominent crater by the water that sustained the next eruptive episode, dominated by subsequent phreatomagmatic eruptions. These preliminary results require complementary studies, such as

  6. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This publication explores issues related to Africa. It examines the U.S. response to the Barbary pirate states (Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli) in the early 19th century; the current AIDS crisis in Africa; and 14th century Mali and other Islamic lands through the eyes of Ibn Battuta, who traveled throughout the Muslim world. Each article…

  7. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Happel, Sue; Loeb, Joyce

    Although the activities in this unit are designed primarily for students in the intermediate grades, the document's text, illustrations, and bibliographic references are suitable for anyone interested in learning about Africa. Following a brief introduction and map work, the document is arranged into six sections. Section 1 traces Africa's history…

  8. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crofts, Marylee

    1986-01-01

    Reviews myths, misconceptions, and unintentional biases about Africa in United States K-12 social studies textbooks. Summarizes common topics and recommends additions. Provides the names, addresses and phone numbers of 10 university-based African Studies centers. Concludes that improvements to textbooks must continue. (JDH)

  9. The 1991 eruptions of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.

    1992-01-01

    Recognition of the volcanic unrest at Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines began when steam explosions occurred on April 2, 1991. The unrest culminated ten weeks later in the world's largest eruption in more than half a century. 

  10. The Anthropogenic Era Began Thousands of Years Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, W. F.

    2003-12-01

    The anthropogenic era is generally thought to have begun about 150 years ago when the industrial revolution began producing CO2 and CH4 at rates sufficient to alter atmospheric compositions. The hypothesis proposed here is that anthropogenic emissions first altered atmospheric gas concentrations (and climate) thousands of years ago. This hypothesis rests on three arguments: (1) Cyclic variations in CO2 and CH4 driven by Earth-orbital changes during the last 400,000 years predict decreases of both gases throughout the Holocene, but CO2 began an anomalous increase near 8000 years ago and CH4 about 5000 years ago. (2) Published explanations attributing these Holocene gas increases to natural forcing can be rejected based on available paleoclimatic evidence. (3) Archeological, cultural, historical, and geologic sources provide viable explanations tied to anthropogenic changes that emerged from early agriculture in Eurasia, including forest clearance after 8000 years ago and lowland irrigation for rice farming by 5000 years ago. Prior to the industrial era, these emissions caused a mean-annual warming effect of ~0.8oC globally and 1.5-2oC at high latitudes. The early-anthropogenic warming counteracted most of a natural cooling that would otherwise have occurred, and it may have prevented a glaciation in northeastern Canada predicted by two kinds of climatic models. CO2 decreases as large as 10 ppm during the last 1000 years cannot be explained by solar-volcanic forcing without violating constraints imposed by reconstructions of northern hemisphere temperature. The CO2 decreases can be explained by bubonic plague pandemics that the caused widespread abandonment of western Eurasian farms documented in historical records. Rapid regrowth of forests on millions of abandoned farms could have sequestered enough carbon to explain the observed CO2 decreases. Plague-driven CO2 decreases were a significant causal factor in the cooler temperatures of the Little Ice Age from 1300 to

  11. How life began on Earth: a status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    There are two fundamental requirements for life as we know it, liquid water and organic polymers, such as nucleic acids and proteins. Water provides the medium for chemical reactions and the polymers carry out the central biological functions of replication and catalysis. During the accretionary phase of the Earth, high surface temperatures would have made the presence of liquid water and an extensive organic carbon reservoir unlikely. As the Earth's surface cooled, water and simple organic compounds, derived from a variety of sources, would have begun to accumulate. This set the stage for the process of chemical evolution to begin in which one of the central facets was the synthesis of biologically important polymers, some of which had a variety of simple catalytic functions. Increasingly complex macromolecules were produced and eventually molecules with the ability to catalyze their own imperfect replication appeared. Thus began the processes of multiplication, heredity and variation, and this marked the point of both the origin of life and evolution. Once simple self-replicating entities originated, they evolved first into the RNA World and eventually to the DNA/Protein World, which had all the attributes of modern biology. If the basic components water and organic polymers were, or are, present on other bodies in our solar system and beyond, it is reasonable to assume that a similar series of steps that gave rise of life on Earth could occur elsewhere.

  12. Two Amazing Rocket Launches That Began My Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    I began my X-ray astronomy career by being given the responsibility for the Goddard rocket program by Frank MacDonald in the early 70's. I am forever grateful to him and Elihu Boldt for the opportunity. The rocket's observing program was three compact binary X-ray sources that could not have been more different: Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3, and Her X-1. A sounding rocket launch is nothing like a satellite launch with its large booster, Cape Canaveral experience, and lots of procedures and no touching of the hardware. First of all, one can walk up to the sounding rocket tower (at least you used to be able to) and go up in it to fix or adjust something with the yet-to-be-fueled rocket, booster, and payload just sitting there. At launch, you can see it up close 100 m) and personal, and it is spectacular. There is an explosion (the Nike booster igniting), a bright flash of light, and it is gone in a second or two. And back in the block house, I watched Her X-1 pulse in real time, after Chuck Glasser calmed me down and explained that the detectors were not arcing but it was Her X-1. The Cyg X-1 observations resulted in the discovery of millisecond temporal structure in the flux from a cosmic source -- 13 1-ms bursts over a total of two minutes of observing in the 2 flights. Cyg X-3 was seen in a high state in the first flight and in a lower harder state in the second, where we detected the iron line for the first time in a Galactic source. The Her X-1 observation clearly showed the high energy roll-over of the spectrum for the first time. The light curves of the first flight found their way into many presentations, including Ricardo Giacconi's Nobel lecture. The Goddard rocket program was an amazing beginning to my career.

  13. Variations in eruption style during the 1931A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, R.S.; Gardner, J.E.; Neal, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 1931A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V..

  14. Variations in eruption style during the 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, Robert S.; Gardner, James E.; Neal, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931 A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600 km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9 km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3 km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style.

  15. Eruptive History of Ikeda Caldera, Southern Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inakura, H.; Naruo, H.; Okuno, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Tamura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ikeda caldera is a small-scale caldera (about 4 km in diameter), located in the southern tip of the Satsuma Peninsula, southern Kyushu, Japan. The information on the onset of the caldera-forming eruption is gone due to the catastrophic eruption, but Ikeda caldera is a relatively small-scale eruption that the information before the eruption may have been conserved. We conducted a geological research to understand the eruptive history of Ikeda caldera, including a study of the processes leading to the catastrophic eruption. Pre-caldera activity began at about 20 cal kBP by Iwamoto ash and the effusion of Senta lava, which may have similar composition as the caldera-forming eruption. The caldera-forming eruption began at 6.4 cal kBP with a phreatic explosion that produced the Ikezaki tephra. The phreatic eruption was followed by Osagari scoria, Mizusako scoria and Ikeda pumice plinian eruption. During the climactic stage, Ikeda ignimbrite was erupted and reclaimed the coastal area at that time, and formed the ignimbrite plateau along the coast. Immediately after this event, four maars were formed to the southeast of the caldera. Yamagawa maar, which is the largest and is located at the southeastern end of the fissure vent, erupted pumiceous base surge (Yamagawa base surge), but other maars ejected small amount of accidental materials. During the late stage of the Ikeda eruption, phreatomagmatic eruption occurred at the bottom of the caldera floor, and erupted the Ikedako ash which covered a wide area. The Central lava dome was generated at the late stage of this eruption. After Ikedako ash deposition, secondary explosion of Ikeda ignimbrite occurred mainly along the coastal area, generating small-scale base surge deposits. About two thousand years after the caldera-forming eruption at 4.8 cal kBP, new magmatic activity began on the margin of the caldera rim, and generated Nabeshimadake lava dome.

  16. Popocatepetl Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Popocatepetl Volcano, almost 30 miles south of Mexico City, erupted yesterday (December 18, 2000) in what authorities are calling its most spectacular eruption since 800 A.D. This morning, Popocatepetl (pronounced poh-poh-kah-TEH-peh-til) continued spewing red-hot rocks as well as a column of smoke and ash about 2.5 miles high into the atmosphere. This true-color image of the volcano was acquired today by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite. In this image, Popocatepetl's plume (greyish pixels) can be seen blowing southward, away from Mexico City. There is a large cloud bank (bright white pixels) just to the east of the volcanic plume. Although Popocatepetl has been active since 1994-when it awoke from a 70-year slumber-this most recent eruption is most concerning to the greater Mexico City region's 20 million residents. The volcano demonstrated what it can do in 800 A.D. when it belched forth enough lava to fill many of the valleys in the surrounding region. Earlier, scientists warned the citizens of Mexico that there is a dome of lava at the base of the volcano that is causing pressure to build inside. They are concerned that, if it continues to build unabated, this pressure could cause even larger eruptions in the future. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  17. FOGO-2014: Monitoring the Fogo 2014 Eruption, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rui; Faria, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Fogo volcano, located in the Cape Verde Archipelago offshore Western Africa, is a complete stratovolcano system that was created by the Cape Verde hotspot, forming the island of Fogo. The top (Pico do Fogo) reaches ~2830m above sea level, and raises ~1100m above Chã das Caldeiras, an almost flat circular area with approximately 10 kilometres in the north-south direction and 7 kilometres in the east-west direction. Chã das Caldeiras, surrounded towards the West by the ~1000m high Bordeira rampart, has been inhabited since the early 20th Century, because it is one of the most productive agricultural areas in this semi-arid country. Fogo volcano erupted on November 23, 2014 (~10:00UTC) on a subsidiary vent of the main cone, after 19 years of inactivity. C4G (Collaboratory for Geosciences), a distributed research infrastructure created in 2014 in the framework of the Portuguese Roadmap for Strategic Research Infrastructures, immediately offered support to the Cape Verdean authorities, with the goal of complementing the permanent geophysical monitoring network operated in Fogo island by INMG, the Cape Verdean Meteorological and Geophysical Institute. This permanent network is composed of seven seismographic stations and three tiltmeter stations, and the data is transmitted in real time to the INMG geophysical laboratory in São Vicente Island, where it is analysed on a routine basis. Pre-eruptive activity started to be detected by the permanent monitoring network on October 2014, with earthquakes occurring at depths larger than 15 km. These events led to a first volcanic warning to the Cape Verdean Civil Protection Agency. On November 22 several volcano-tectonic earthquakes were recorded at shallow depths, indicating shallow fracturing. On the basis of this activity, INMG issued a formal alert of an impending eruption to the Civil Protection Agency, ~24 hours before the onset of the eruption. Volcanic tremor and clear tiltmeter signals were recorded about one hour

  18. Jupiter Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover

    Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers.

    This visible-light image is from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope taken on May 11, 2007. It shows the turbulent pattern generated by the two plumes on the upper left part of Jupiter.

    Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena.

    According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vi gorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  19. Why Understanding When and How Plate Tectonics Began Is Essential for a Robust Theory of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Gerya, T.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding when and how Plate Tectonics (PT) began and what came before has profound implications for understanding the Earth because the transition to PT from the previous tectonic regime - some variant of deformable lid tectonics (DLT)- resulted in faster cooling and enhanced recycling of surface materials to depth. The transition to PT also would have impacted ocean chemistry, climate and life evolution. There is no consensus about when PT began on Earth; estimates range from >4.2 Ga to ~0.85 Ga. Three pillars of a robust Theory of the Earth illustrate the importance of answering this question: (1) the solid Earth volatile cycle; (2) the Urey ratio; and (3) the kimberlite enigma. For (1), it is now clear that subduction injects more H2O (and probably CO2) into Earth's mantle- where it is stored - than is released to the surface by igneous activity. Presumably the volatile flux from the surface into the mantle was lower during DLT episodes, although delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor drippings would have sent some. Constraining PT H2O and CO2 fluxes requires knowing when PT began and interior soaking accelerated. Regarding (2), estimating Earth's Urey ratio (Ur; heat production/heat loss) evolution requires avoiding the "thermal catastrophe" implying that if Earth has been cooling off as fast as presently (Ur ~0.2) then it must have been totally molten 1-2 Ga; a transition from DLT (high Ur) to PT (low Ur) may resolve the paradox. Finally (3), why are the vast majority of kimberlites of Phaneozoic age? Is it because erosion has removed the evidence or because sufficient H2O-CO2 rich fluids that drive such eruptions have only been delivered below cratonic lithosphere since deep subduction associated with PT began? Determining when did PT start, what was Earth's DLT-regime before this, and how did the transition occur will require the insights of the entire geoscientific community, providing a worthy set of 21st Century geoscientific research priorities.

  20. The 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Southern Chile: a tectonically controlled eruption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, L. E.; Pallister, J. S.; Ewert, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The May, 2008 - present eruption at Chaitén caldera is the only example of a geophysically monitored rhyolite eruption. Geologic and seismic monitoring was conducted by the Chilean Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN) with assistance from the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP, a joint program of USGS and OFDA). In addition, global remote sensing assets were focused on the eruption and provide extensive data on the eruptive plume and ash cloud. An initial analysis of seismic and observational monitoring and remote sensing data lead us to suggest that the Chaitén eruption was tectonically controlled, as described below. The Chaitén eruption began abruptly with Plinian ash columns (May 2-8), and then transitioned into lava dome effusion accompanied by continuous low-level ash plumes. Heights and durations of the Plinian phase of the eruption initially suggested magmatic volumes of up to as much as 1 km3, ranking this as a large VEI 4 or possibly a small VEI 5 eruption. However, reports of relatively modest thicknesses of downwind tephra indicate a smaller explosivity, probably in the moderate VEI 4 range. Extrusion of the lava dome continues at a high rate as of this time (mid-September, 2008). We estimate a lava volume of >0.3 km3 and eruption rates that have frequently exceeded 20 m3s-1, anomalously high rates for a sustained lava dome eruption. Little detailed on-site study of the proximal deposits of the eruption has been possible because of continued hazards from the eruption and austral winter weather conditions. However, several inferences about the nature of the eruption are evident. The apparent lack of historic eruptions, absence of a hydrothermal system, rapid onset of the eruption, crystal-poor rhyolite composition, lack of decompression reaction rims on amphibole crystals, and relatively high magmatic temperatures (about 860°C, as reported elsewhere in this session) all argue for rapid ascent of magma from depth. The

  1. Recent Two Distinct Eruptions at Sinabung and Kelud, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, S.; Yoshimoto, M.; Maeno, F.; Iguchi, M.; Zaenudin, A.; Hendrasto, M.

    2014-12-01

    Two distinct eruptions occurred in 2014 at Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes in Indonesia. Lava dome-forming eruption started at Sinabung volcano, N Sumatra, in the end of 2013, which was preceded by the phreatic events since 2010 and shallow inflation with high seismicity since 3 months before eruption. The 2010 eruption was the first historic eruption, and the latest eruption geologically recorded occurred in the 9 to 10th Century. The eruption had continued in a nearly constant rate of magma effusion as of the summer of 2014. The lava complex extended on the SE slope (~2.5 km long from the source), frequently generating pyroclastic flows. The volume of erupted magma reached about 0.1 km3 in the 2014 summer. The lava is porphyritic andesite (SiO2 ~57%). The existence of mafic blobs in rocks and plagioclase microlites more calcic than the phenocryst rims, and the absence of breakdown rim on hornblende phenocrysts suggest magma mixing prior to eruption and relatively fast magma ascent. On the other hand, the Plinian eruption began at Kelud volcano, W Java on the evening of February 13, 2014, which had declined almost within about 6 hours. The eruption cloud rose to 18-25 km in altitude, and tephra deposited on extensive areas. The precursory seismic activity started two weeks before eruption and the intensity increased with time. This short but explosive eruption was one of recent large eruptions (VEI 4) at Kelud, which had repeated every ~20 years. A lava dome of 0.035 km3 was accidentally (?) formed within the crater in 2007-2008. The total volume of tephra of the 2014 eruption is 0.2-0.3 km3 in DRE. The magma is crystal-rich basaltic andesite (SiO2 ~56%; phenocryst proportion of ~60%). The petrological characteristics are close to the 2007-2008 dome lava except higher crystallinity in the latter. Mobilization of crystal-rich chamber magma probably was brought by intrusion of new magma. Thus, these recent examples in Indonesia are less-explosive and explosive

  2. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    (Rampino and Self 1984, Pyle et al 1996, Self and Rampino 2012). But as yet, there is little evidence for the consequences of this scale of eruption for the climate system (Miles et al 2004), and few data against which to test simulations of stratospheric sulfur-injection 'geoengineering' scenarios of a similar scale and frequency (e.g. English et al 2012). A hint of the new volcano-observing capability came during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland. For a few days in April 2010 meteorological conditions, coupled with a dramatic increase in volcanic ash production, led to the wide dispersal of fine volcanic particles across northern Europe; an event which was widely tracked by ground-based and satellite-borne instruments, augmented by in situ measurements from balloons and aircraft (Bennett et al 2010, Flentje et al 2010, Harrison et al 2010, Stohl et al 2011). Despite the interest in Eyjafjallajökull at the time, this was, geologically, only a very modest eruption with limited sulfur emissions and an impact restricted mainly to the regional troposphere (e.g. Thomas and Prata 2011, Walker et al 2012). Then, in June 2011, a previously dormant volcano in north-east Africa began to erupt violently. Little is known about Nabro, which is a partially collapsed volcano that straddles the Eritrea-Ethiopia border, and has had no known historical activity (Wiart and Oppenheimer 2005). Despite the remote location, and lack of prior warning, the event and its aftermath were remarkably well captured by remote-sensing instruments, as demonstrated in the new letter by Sawamura et al (2012). Using both ground-based and satellite-borne laser-ranging (lidar) data, Sawamura et al (2012) were able to extract detailed information about the nature of the volcanic aerosol layer, and its spread around the globe. The eruption started strongly, with substantial ash plumes for the first 48 h, rising to 9-14 km altitude (Smithsonian Institution 2011, Bourassa et al 2012), that carried at

  3. Filament Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    We have been investigating filament eruptions in recent years. Use filament eruptions as markers of the coronal field evolution. Data from SoHO, Yohkoh, TRACE, Hinode, and other sources. We and others have observed: (1)Filaments often show slow rise, followed by fast rise, (2) Brightenings, preflares, microflares during slow rise (3) Magnetic evolution in hours prior to eruption onset. We investigated What do Hinode and SDO show for filament eruptions?

  4. An erupted compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anil; Vij, Hitesh; Vij, Ruchieka; Malhotra, Ritika

    2014-04-12

    Odontomas are familiar entities but their eruption into the oral cavity is an extraordinary occurrence, which may be associated with pain, infection, malocclusion, etc. Not many cases of erupted odontomas have been reported in the literature. This paper puts forth a case of erupting odontoma in an attempt to add to the list of reported cases of this unique pathology.

  5. Nyiragongo Volcano before the Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyiragongo is an active stratovolcano situated on the Eastern African Rift; it is part of Africa's Virunga Volcanic Chain. In a massive eruption that occurred on January 17, 2002, Nyiragongo sent a vast plume of smoke and ash skyward, and three swifly-moving rivers of lava streaming down its western and eastern flanks. Previous lava flows from Nyiragongo have been observed moving at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour (60 kph). The lava flows from the January 17 eruption destroyed more than 14 villages in the surrounding countryside, forcing tens of thousands to flee into the neighboring country of Rwanda. Within one day the lava ran to the city of Goma, situated on the northern shore of Lake Kivu about 12 miles (19 km) south of Nyiragongo. The lava cut a 200 foot (60 meter) wide swath right through Goma, setting off many fires, as it ran into Lake Kivu. Goma, the most heavily populated city in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, is home to about 400,000 people. Most of these citizens were forced to flee, while many have begun to return to their homes only to find their homes destroyed. This true-color scene was captured by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite, on December 11, 2001, just over a month before the most recent eruption. Nyiragongo's large crater is clearly visible in the image. As recently as June 1994, there was a large lava lake in the volcano's crater which had since solidified. The larger Nyamuragira Volcano is located roughly 13 miles (21 km) to the north of Nyiragongo. Nyamuragira last erupted in February and March 2001. That eruption was also marked by columns of erupted ash and long fluid lava flows, some of which are apparent in the image as dark greyish swaths radiating away from Nyamuragira. Both peaks are also notorious for releasing large amounts of sulfur dioxide, which presents another health hazard to people and animals living in close proximity. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data supplied

  6. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    (Rampino and Self 1984, Pyle et al 1996, Self and Rampino 2012). But as yet, there is little evidence for the consequences of this scale of eruption for the climate system (Miles et al 2004), and few data against which to test simulations of stratospheric sulfur-injection 'geoengineering' scenarios of a similar scale and frequency (e.g. English et al 2012). A hint of the new volcano-observing capability came during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland. For a few days in April 2010 meteorological conditions, coupled with a dramatic increase in volcanic ash production, led to the wide dispersal of fine volcanic particles across northern Europe; an event which was widely tracked by ground-based and satellite-borne instruments, augmented by in situ measurements from balloons and aircraft (Bennett et al 2010, Flentje et al 2010, Harrison et al 2010, Stohl et al 2011). Despite the interest in Eyjafjallajökull at the time, this was, geologically, only a very modest eruption with limited sulfur emissions and an impact restricted mainly to the regional troposphere (e.g. Thomas and Prata 2011, Walker et al 2012). Then, in June 2011, a previously dormant volcano in north-east Africa began to erupt violently. Little is known about Nabro, which is a partially collapsed volcano that straddles the Eritrea-Ethiopia border, and has had no known historical activity (Wiart and Oppenheimer 2005). Despite the remote location, and lack of prior warning, the event and its aftermath were remarkably well captured by remote-sensing instruments, as demonstrated in the new letter by Sawamura et al (2012). Using both ground-based and satellite-borne laser-ranging (lidar) data, Sawamura et al (2012) were able to extract detailed information about the nature of the volcanic aerosol layer, and its spread around the globe. The eruption started strongly, with substantial ash plumes for the first 48 h, rising to 9-14 km altitude (Smithsonian Institution 2011, Bourassa et al 2012), that carried at

  7. Evidence for different eruptive conditions for two simultaneous, late Miocene, rhyolitic phreatomagmatic eruptions: Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, K.R.; Smith, G.A. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Peralta Tuff Member of the Bearhead Rhyolite records episodic, rhyolitic volcanism during the late Miocene. It is composed of primary and reworked pyroclastic-flow (PF), tephra-fall (TF), and pyroclastic-surge (PS) deposits intercalated with braided-stream deposits. Two eruptive units have been informally named the Tuffs of West Mesa (TWM) and the Tuffs of Lower Peralta Canyon (TLPC). The TWM consist of 20 m of PF and minor PS deposits erupted from a vent in the Bearhead Park dome complex. In most places the TLPC consist of 50 m of PF, PS, and TF and were erupted from a vent located 7 km SE of Bearhead Peak. The absence of inter-eruptive sediments, erosional surfaces, or paleosols, along with the intercalated nature of the two units, indicates that the two eruptions were simultaneous. Granulometric, vesiculation, petrographic, and stratigraphic data indicate that the TWM eruption began with a phreatomagmatic (PM) component, resulting in the formation of a tuff ring at least 70 m thick, and ended with [ge]20 m of drier PF that traveled at least 6 km from the vent. The TLPC eruption began with several PM eruptive cycles of wet, ash-rich, low-angle x-bedded PS to drier, pumiceous, lapilli-rich PS. Abundant fragments of underlying rift-fill sediments decrease upward in the cycles. The cyclic deposits were followed by 20 m of pumice-rich, x-bedded PS, containing only rare sedimentary fragments. The TLPC eruption concluded with a 2 m TF. The greater phreatomagmatic component to the TLPC eruption, despite its proximity to the simultaneously active TWM vent, is apparently related to the mixing of magma with basin-fill sediments at a topographically lower ([ge]300 m) position and at a site that probably has less subjacent, relatively dry, older volcanic rocks.

  8. Former director of RCN Wales Liz Hewett began at Ty Maeth in 1998.

    PubMed

    Lenzy, Tracy

    2016-06-01

    Great story in Nursing Standard about the book Nursing Matters, which delves into the 50th anniversary of the RCN headquarters in Wales, Ty Maeth (features, May 18). However, Liz Hewett began working at the RCN in Wales in 1998 - not in 1988 as stated in the article.

  9. The 2007 Eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula began to erupt on August 15, 2007 after a 10.7 year repose. Precursor signals consisted of low-frequency earthquakes that began on August 14 and thermal anomalies that were likely coincident with the beginning of the eruption. The mainly strombolian eruptions are occurring from a new vent high on the SE flank of the volcano, separate from the NNE vent that had been active over the last several decades. Seismic activity, monitored by a network of 6 local instruments, consists of low-frequency events, explosion earthquakes, volcanic tremor, and lahar-generated signals. One station, PVV, is located only 220 m from a lahar channel, and lahars generate an easily distinguished high-frequency seismic signal. A commonly observed sequence is an increase in eruptive activity at the vent, accompanied by stronger tremor visible on all stations, and followed 12-30 minutes later by a lahar at PVV. This suggests that the eruption pulse ejects fresh hot material, which melts additional ice and snow to form new lahars. Steam and ash plumes have generally been below 15,000 ft, but rose as high as 20,000 ft on August 29 and 30. AVHRR remote sensing data showed an ash signal on these days, consistent with pilot reports. On August 30 lightning was observed in the plume from Cold Bay, 59 km SW. In response to the eruptions, AVO has been conducting 24 hr per day surveillance. Fieldwork to date has fortified seismic stations, and installed a new webcam, pressure sensor, and electric field meter. Collaborating scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks have installed aerosol sampling equipment at four locations, and collaborating scientists from New Mexico Tech have installed lightning detection equipment at four stations surrounding the volcano. Based on recent eruptions of Pavlof in 1981, 1986, 1996, etc., the eruptive activity is likely to last several months and may include one or more episodes of ash columns to heights of 30,000 ft or

  10. Mt. Spurr's 1992 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    On 27 June, 1992, the Crater Peak vent on the south side of Mt. Spurr awoke from 39 years of dormancy and burst into sub-plinian eruption after 10 months of elevated seismicity. Two more eruptions followed in August and September. The volcano lies 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska's largest city and an important international hub for air travel. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was able to warn communities and the aviation industry well in advance of these eruptions.

  11. Iceland's Grímsvötn volcano erupts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    About 13 months after Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano began erupting on 14 April 2010, which led to extensive air traffic closures over Europe, Grímsvötn volcano in southeastern took its turn. Iceland's most active volcano, which last erupted in 2004 and lies largely beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, began its eruption activity on 21 May, with the ash plume initially reaching about 20 kilometers in altitude, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office. Volcanic ash from Grímsvötn has cancelled hundreds of airplane flights and prompted U.S. president Barack Obama to cut short his visit to Ireland. As Eos went to press, activity at the volcano was beginning to subside.

  12. Caldera development during the Minoan eruption, Thira, Cyclades, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; McCoy F. Jr.

    1984-09-30

    The well-known caldera of Thira (Santorini), Greece, was not formed during a single eruption but is composed of two overlapping calderas superimposed upon a complex volcanic field that developed along a NE trending line of vents. Before the Minoan eruption of 1400 B.C., Thira consisted of three lava shields in the northern half of the island and a flooded depression surrounded by tuff deposits in the southern half. Andesitic lavas formed the overlapping shields of the north and were contemporaneous with and, in many places, interbedded with the southern tuff deposits. Although there appears to be little difference between the composition of magmas erupted, differences in eruption style indicate that most of the activity in the northern half of the volcanic field was subaerial, producing lava flows, whereas in the south, eruptions within a flooded depression produced a sequence of mostly phreatomagmatic tuffs. Many of these tuffs are plastered onto the walls of what appears to have been an older caldera, most probably associated with an eruption of rhyodiacitic tephra 100,000 years ago. The Minoan eruption of about 1400 B.C. had four distinct phases, each reflecting a different vent geometry and eruption mechanism. The Minoan activity was preceded by minor eruptions of fine ash. (1) The eruption began with a Plinian phase, from subaerial vent(s) located on the easternmost of the lave shields. (2) Vent(s) grew toward the SW into the flooded depression. Subsequent activity deposited large-scale base surge deposits during vent widening by phreatomagnetic activity. (3) The third eruptive phase was also phreatomagmatic and produced 60% of the volume of the Minoan Tuff. This activity was nearly continuous and formed a large featureless tuff ring with poorly defined bedding.

  13. Regional-scale forcing of precipitation in selected modern volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, W. W.-S.

    2009-04-01

    Major volcanic eruptions are known to lower the Earth's surface temperature but their regional-scale forcing of precipitation is poorly understood. In this presentation, three modern volcanic eruptions have been selected for investigation. The three eruptions are the February 1963 Agung eruption in Indonesia, the March 1982 El Chichón eruption in Mexico and the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines. Abnormally low annual rainfall was found in the southern China region during 1963 and 1991 respectively. Based on the total annual rainfall recorded at the Hong Kong Station, the rainfall was the driest and the tenth driest since record began in 1884 respectively. In contrast, abnormally high annual rainfall was found in southern China in 1982 with the Hong Kong Station recording the second wettest year since record began. Based on the pattern of rainfall observed, near-field major volcanic eruptions located in the Indonesian-Pacific gateway may lead to abnormally dry conditions in southern China through a shift of wind direction to predominantly offshore. On the other hand, major far-field volcanic eruptions in the eastern Pacific may give rise to abnormally wet conditions through the spread of the volcanic cloud across the globe. In the El Chichón eruption, the spread of volcanic cloud across the Pacific Ocean was tracked by satellite images. Heavy rainfall occurred when the volcanic cloud reached the coastal regions of southern China. Volcanic eruptions are therefore a possible causative factor in monsoonal variability.

  14. Nyiragongo Volcano Erupts in the Congo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Nyiragongo, located in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, erupted today (January 17, 2002), ejecting a large cloud of smoke and ash high into the sky and spewing lava down three sides of the volcano. Mount Nyiragongo is located roughly 10 km (6 miles) north of the town of Goma, near the Congo's border with Rwanda. According to news reports, one river of lava is headed straight toward Goma, where international aid teams are evacuating residents. Already, the lava flows have burned through large swaths of the surrounding jungle and have destroyed dozens of homes. This false-color image was acquired today (January 17) by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) roughly 5 hours after the eruption began. Notice Mount Nyiragongo's large plume (bright white) can be seen streaming westward in this scene. The plume appears to be higher than the immediately adjacent clouds and so it is colder in temperature, making it easy for MODIS to distinguish the volcanic plume from the clouds by using image bands sensitive to thermal radiation. Images of the eruption using other band combinations are located on the MODIS Rapid Response System. Nyiragongo eruptions are extremely hazardous because the lava tends to be very fluid and travels down the slopes of the volcano quickly. Eruptions can be large and spectacular, and flows can reach up to 10s of kilometers from the volcano very quickly. Also, biomass burned from Nyriagongo, and nearby Mount Nyamuragira, eruptions tends to create clouds of smoke that adversely affect the Mountain Gorillas living in the adjacent mountain chain. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  15. MtDNA analysis of global populations support that major population expansions began before Neolithic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Yan, Shi; Qin, Zhen-Dong; Jin, Li

    2012-10-01

    Agriculture resulted in extensive population growths and human activities. However, whether major human expansions started after Neolithic Time still remained controversial. With the benefit of 1000 Genome Project, we were able to analyze a total of 910 samples from 11 populations in Africa, Europe and Americas. From these random samples, we identified the expansion lineages and reconstructed the historical demographic variations. In all the three continents, we found that most major lineage expansions (11 out of 15 star lineages in Africa, all autochthonous lineages in Europe and America) coalesced before the first appearance of agriculture. Furthermore, major population expansions were estimated after Last Glacial Maximum but before Neolithic Time, also corresponding to the result of major lineage expansions. Considering results in current and previous study, global mtDNA evidence showed that rising temperature after Last Glacial Maximum offered amiable environments and might be the most important factor for prehistorical human expansions.

  16. Initiation of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We consider processes occurring just prior to and at the start of the onset of flare- and CME-producing solar eruptions. Our recent work uses observations of filament motions around the time of eruption onset as a proxy for the evolution of the fields involved in the eruption. Frequently the filaments show a slow rise prior to fast eruption, indicative of a slow expansion of the field that is about co explode. Work by us and others suggests that reconnection involving emerging or canceling flux results in a lengthening of fields restraining the filament-carrying field, and the consequent upward expansion of the field in and around the filament produces the filament's slow rise: that is, the reconnection weakens the magnetic "tethers" ("tether-weakening" reconnection), and results in the slow rise of the filament. It is still inconclusive, however, what mechanism is responsible for the switch from the slow rise to the fast eruption.

  17. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  18. A FILAMENT ERUPTION ON 2010 OCTOBER 21 FROM THREE VIEWPOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, Boris

    2013-08-10

    A filament eruption on 2010 October 21 observed from three different viewpoints by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and the Solar Dynamic Observatory is analyzed by also invoking data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Kanzelhoehe Solar Observatory. The position of the filament just before the eruption at the central meridian not far from the center of the solar disk was favorable for photospheric magnetic field measurements in the area below the filament. Because of this, we were able to calculate with high precision the distribution of the coronal potential magnetic field near the filament. We found that the filament began to erupt when it approached the height in the corona where the magnetic field decay index was greater than 1. We also determined that during the initial stage of the eruption the filament moved along the magnetic neutral surface.

  19. Monitoring a restless volcano: The 2004 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, C.

    2005-01-01

    Although the precise course of volcanic activity is difficult to predict, volcanologists are pretty adept at interpreting volcanic signals from well-monitored volcanoes in order to make short-term forecasts. Various monitoring tools record effects to give us warning before eruptions, changes in eruptive behavior during eruptions, or signals that an eruption is ending. Foremost among these tools is seismic monitoring. The character, size, depth and rate of earthquakes are all important to the interpretation of what is happening belowground. The first inkling of renewed activity at Mount St. Helens began in the early hours of Sept. 23, when a seismic swarm - tens to hundreds of earthquakes over days to a week - began beneath the volcano. This article details the obervations made during the eruptive sequence.

  20. Comment on "The Latest on Volcanic Eruptions and Climate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas C.; Lane, Christine S.

    2014-09-01

    Alan Robock (Eos, 94(35), 305-306, doi:10.1002/2013EO350001) nicely summarizes past volcanic eruptions and climate, but we wish to correct his assessment of our recent discovery of the Youngest Toba ash in the sediments of Lake Malawi in East Africa [Lane et al., 2013].

  1. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for F2 rapid acceleration and have some relation with the largest solar storm. The comparison between the successful and failed filament eruptions suggests that the confining magnetic field plays an important role in the preconditions for an eruption.

  2. Solar Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    The prominence that erupts in a prominence eruption is a magnetic structure in the chromosphere and corona. It is visible in chromospheric images by virtue of chromospheric-temperature plasma suspended in the magnetic field, and belongs to that large class of magnetic structures appropriately called filaments because of their characteristic sinewy sigmoidal form. Hence, the term "filament eruption" is used interchangeably with the term "prominence eruption". The magnetic field holding a filament is prone to undergo explosive changes in configuration. In these upheavals, because the filament material is compelled by its high conductivity to ride with the magnetic field that threads it, this material is a visible tracer of the field motion. The part of the magnetic explosion displayed by the entrained filament material is the phenomenon known as a filament eruption, the topic of this article. This article begins with a description of basic observed characteristics of filament eruptions, with attention to the magnetic fields, flares, and coronal mass ejections in which erupting filaments are embedded. The present understanding of these characteristics in terms of the form and action of the magnetic field is then laid out by means of a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the field. The article ends with basic questions that this picture leaves unresolved and with remarks on the observations needed to probe these questions.

  3. An Erupted Silent Tumour.

    PubMed

    Kudva, Adarsh; Chithra, A; Rao, Nirmala N; Cariappa, K M

    2016-07-01

    Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumors of the oral cavity which are nonaggressive, hamartomatous in nature consisting of enamel, dentin and cementum. They are called as composite because they contain more than one type of tissue. They are generally asymptomatic, hence recognised on routine radiologic examination. The compound odontoma is composed of multiple small tooth like structures, whereas the complex odontoma consists of a conglomerate mass of enamel and dentine, which bears no anatomical similarity to the tooth. The eruption and infection of odontoma are uncommon, only few cases of erupted complex odontoma are reported in the literature. We report a case of silent erupting complex odontoma. PMID:27408461

  4. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  5. New Aspects of a Lid-Removal Mechanism in the Onset of a SEP-Producing Eruption Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Knox, Javon M.

    2014-01-01

    We examine a sequence of two ejective eruptions from a single active region on 2012 January 23, using magnetograms and EUV images from SDO/HMI and SDO/AIA, and EUV images from STEREO. Cheng et al. (2013) showed that the first eruption's ("Eruption 1'') flux rope was apparent only in "hotter'' AIA channels, and that it removed overlying field that allowed the second eruption (``Eruption 2'') to begin via ideal MHD instability; here we say Eruption 2 began via a ``lid removal'' mechanism. We show that during Eruption-1's onset, its flux rope underwent ``tether weakening'' (TW) reconnection with the field of an adjacent active region. Standard flare loops from Eruption 1 developed over Eruption-2's flux rope and enclosed filament, but these overarching new loops were unable to confine that flux rope/filament. Eruption-1's flare loops, from both TW reconnection and standard-flare-model internal reconnection, were much cooler than Eruption-2's flare loops (GOES thermal temperatures of approx. 9 MK compared to approx. 14 MK). This eruption sequence produced a strong solar energetic particle (SEP) event (10 MeV protons, >10(exp 3) pfu for 43 hrs), apparently starting when Eruption-2's CME blasted through Eruption-1's CME at 5-10 R_s. This occurred because the two CMEs originated in close proximity and in close time sequence: Eruption-1's fast rise started soon after the TW reconnection; the lid removal by Eruption-1's ejection triggered the slow onset of Eruption 2; and Eruption-2's CME, which started approx. 1 hr later, was three times faster than Eruption-1's CME.

  6. Drivers of explosivity and elevated hazard in basaltic fissure eruptions: The 1913 eruption of Ambrym Volcano, Vanuatu (SW-Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.

    2011-04-01

    Fissure-eruptions along linear structures can extend for several tens of kilometres with distinct separate manifestations of volcanism along their length. They typically involve low-viscosity mafic magmas forming long lava flows and cinder cones. Eruptions in 1894 and 1913 on Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu, showed how these mildly explosive eruptions can rapidly transform into violent explosive events, producing significant hazard and widespread volcanic ash clouds. During the 1913 episode, a fissure began in the central caldera and basaltic magmas broke out in a series of locations down the island's western flank. In all sites over 100 m in elevation, fissure outbreaks produced vigorous lava fountains and highly fluid lava flows that travelled rapidly to the shoreline. When the outbreaks propagated along the island's axis into coastal plain areas, a climactic series of explosive eruptions occurred, producing a 1.2 km long by 600 m wide maar and tephra ring. A further small tuff ring was formed later, creating a temporary island 400 m offshore. The onshore tephra ring destroyed a hospital and associated buildings. Its last evacuating occupants were close witnesses to the eruption processes. Deposits exposed in the lower portion of the tephra ring show that this part of the eruption began with a mild phreatomagmatic explosive eruption from a narrow vent, followed by a magmatic scoria-producing phase. Subsequently a complex sequence of highly explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions occurred, producing pyroclastic surges, along with repeated distinctive breccia-horizons, rich in coral and lava country rock. These features tally with eye-witness accounts to indicate that the main eruption phase was produced by a periodically shifting locus of phreatomagmatic fragmentation and eruption along a single E-W fissure. The glassy and vesicle-poor pyroclasts produced during this eruption phase were dominantly fragmented in a brittle manner by magma water interaction. Low volatile content

  7. Snake Filament Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    A very long solar filament that had been snaking around the Sun erupted on Dec. 6, 2010 with a flourish. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) caught the action in dramatic detail in extreme ultr...

  8. Triple Solar Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar activity surged on the morning of Dec 12, 2010 when the sun erupted three times in quick succession, hurling a trio of bright coronal mass ejections (CMEs) into space. Coronagraphs onboard th...

  9. Compositional variation through the Surtsey eruption, 1963-1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D. L.; Jakobsson, S. P.; Schipper, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanic island of Surtsey is the best-known product of a 3.5-year-long eruption that began in November 1963. During the course of the eruption four volcanic edifices grew from the seafloor along a discontinuous fissure extending 4.5 km, with three of them forming islands. Two of the islands washed quickly away - Syrtlingur lasted 5 months, and Jolnir 11 months. Surtla grew to within meters of the sea surface before its eruption ceased without forming an island. These separate eruptive centers along the Surtsey fissure produced edifices totalling ~0.15 km3 (Syrtlingur and Jolnir ~ 0.07 km3 each; Surtla ~0.01 km3), nearly half the volume of Surtsey below sea level (~0.3 km3). Although Surtsey's explosive activity ceased after 6 months, it was more than 3 years into the eruption when the last pyroclastic activity at Jolnir ceased, and during most of the time that Syrtlingur and Jolnir were erupting, there was no subaerial eruption at Surtsey. Here we present previously unpublished historic data on chemical diversity through the Surtsey eruption, bolstered with new analyses, and address specifically the other centers that were active during the eruption. Whole-rock compositions became progressively more magnesian as the eruption progressed (rising from 7 to 12% MgO), with a subtle concomitant reduction in potassium (0.7% to 0.4%). Glass compositions show considerable variation early in the eruption at Surtsey (~4.5-6.2 % MgO; 46.5-48.2% SiO2), but changed little through the remainder of the eruption (~7% MgO; 48% SiO2) at all sites. Glasses from Jolnir and Syrtlingur have overlapping compositions that form a separate cluster from those of Surtsey (more calcic, less potassic). Surtla, represented by only one sample and erupted at the greatest distance from Surtsey, has slightly more-evolved glass (lower MgO, higher FeOt), but this may reflect post-fragmentation crystal growth. Using this information we present a new assessment of magma-supply dynamics for this

  10. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. G.; Pyle, D. M.; Dade, W. B.; Jupp, T.

    2004-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity during the last three hundred years reveals that volcanic eruptions exhibit seasonality to a statistically significant degree. This remarkable pattern is observed primarily along the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and locally at some individual volcanoes. Globally, seasonal fluctuations amount to 18% of the historical average monthly eruption rate. In some regions, seasonal fluctuations amount to as much as 50% of the average eruption rate. Seasonality principally reflects the temporal distribution of the smaller, dated eruptions (volcanic explosivity index of 0-2) that dominate the eruption catalog. We suggest that the pattern of seasonality correlates with the annual Earth surface deformation that accompanies the movement of surface water mass during the annual hydrological cycle and illustrate this with respect to global models of surface deformation and regional measurements of annual sea level change. For example, seasonal peaks in the eruption rate of volcanoes in Central America, the Alaskan Peninsula, and Kamchatka coincide with periods of falling regional sea level. In Melanesia, in contrast, peak numbers of volcanic eruptions occur during months of maximal regional sea level and falling regional atmospheric pressure. We suggest that the well-documented slow deformation of Earth's surface that accompanies the annual movements of water mass from oceans to continents acts to impose a fluctuating boundary condition on volcanoes, such that volcanic eruptions tend to be concentrated during periods of local or regional surface change rather than simply being distributed randomly throughout the year. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment and volcanoclimate feedback mechanisms.

  11. GENERALIZED ERUPTIVE SYRINGOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Jamalipour, Mahnaz; Heidarpour, Mitra; Rajabi, Parvin

    2009-01-01

    Generalized eruptive syringoma is a rare clinical presentation of a benign adnexal tumor that derives from the intraepidermal portion of the eccrine sweat ducts. It presents as successive crops of small flesh-colored papules on the anterior body surfaces. It generally occurs in the peripubertal period. Treatment of this benign condition is cosmetic only. A case of a 28-year-old female with an eight-year history of eruptive syringoma is presented. PMID:20049275

  12. Failed eruptions of two intertwining small-scale filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhike; Yan, Xiaoli; Zhao, Li; Xiang, Yongyuan; Yang, Liheng; Guo, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Using multi-wavelength observations of the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we study the topology and evolutions of two filaments observed in NOAA active region (AR) 12031 on 2014 April 7. Before their eruptions, the two filaments (F1 and F2) were sinistral filaments, and the left part of F1 (LP) was located above F2, the right part of F1 (RP) under F2. They show an overall intertwining structure. LP erupted first and rotated clockwise. The total rotation angle was about 470° (≈2.61π). With its rotation, most of the plasma fell back, and thus it was a failed eruption. Meanwhile, when LP erupted to a higher altitude, the overlying magnetic loops were partially pushed from the northeast to the southwest with projected speeds from 36 to 105 km s-1. Next, F2 began to erupt and, when reaching a certain height, the plasma of F2 started to fall down to their footpoints. Using the potential-field source-surface (PFSS) model, the decay indexes at five positions along the polarity inversion line of AR 12031 were calculated to be from 1.03 to 1.25 with an average value of 1.20 that was lower than the critical value for torus instability. These results imply that the kink instability was the main triggering mechanism for the eruption of F1, and the eruption of F2 was due to the decreasing of overlying magnetic loops caused by the eruption of F1. The eruptions of two filaments were confined by the large-scale overlying magnetic loops.

  13. First recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, Eritrea, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goitom, Berhe; Oppenheimer, Clive; Hammond, James O. S.; Grandin, Raphaël; Barnie, Talfan; Donovan, Amy; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Yohannes, Ermias; Kibrom, Goitom; Kendall, J.-Michael; Carn, Simon A.; Fee, David; Sealing, Christine; Keir, Derek; Ayele, Atalay; Blundy, Jon; Hamlyn, Joanna; Wright, Tim; Berhe, Seife

    2015-10-01

    We present a synthesis of diverse observations of the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, Eritrea, which began on 12 June 2011. While no monitoring of the volcano was in effect at the time, it has been possible to reconstruct the nature and evolution of the eruption through analysis of regional seismological and infrasound data and satellite remote sensing data, supplemented by petrological analysis of erupted products and brief field surveys. The event is notable for the comparative rarity of recorded historical eruptions in the region and of caldera systems in general, for the prodigious quantity of SO2 emitted into the atmosphere and the significant human impacts that ensued notwithstanding the low population density of the Afar region. It is also relevant in understanding the broader magmatic and tectonic significance of the volcanic massif of which Nabro forms a part and which strikes obliquely to the principal rifting directions in the Red Sea and northern Afar. The whole-rock compositions of the erupted lavas and tephra range from trachybasaltic to trachybasaltic andesite, and crystal-hosted melt inclusions contain up to 3,000 ppm of sulphur by weight. The eruption was preceded by significant seismicity, detected by regional networks of sensors and accompanied by sustained tremor. Substantial infrasound was recorded at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometres from the vent, beginning at the onset of the eruption and continuing for weeks. Analysis of ground deformation suggests the eruption was fed by a shallow, NW-SE-trending dike, which is consistent with field and satellite observations of vent distributions. Despite lack of prior planning and preparedness for volcanic events in the country, rapid coordination of the emergency response mitigated the human costs of the eruption.

  14. Dating the period when intensive anthropogenic activity began to influence the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Jinxin; Gao, Chuanyu; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Shaoqing; He, Jiabao; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Dating the start of intensive anthropogenic influence on ecosystems is important for identifying the conditions necessary for ecosystem recovery. However, few studies have focused on determining when anthropogenic influences on wetland began through sedimentary archives. To fill this critical gap in our knowledge, combustion sources and emission intensities, reconstructed via black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in two wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain in Northeast China. 14C provided age control for the sedimentary records. By combining previous sedimentary and archaeological studies, we attempt to date the beginning of intensive anthropogenic influences on the Sanjiang Plain. Our results showed that BC deposition fluxes increased from 0.02 to 0.7 g C/m2.yr during the last 10,000 years. An upward trend was apparent during the last 500 years. Before 1200 cal yr BP, human activities were minor, such that the wetland ecosystem in the Sanjiang Plain before this period may represent the reference conditions that for the recovery of these wetlands. As the human population increased after 1200 cal yr BP, combustion sources changed and residential areas became a major source of BC and PAHs. In this way, the wetland ecosystem gradually became more heavily influenced by human activities. PMID:26907560

  15. Why is understanding when Plate Tectonics began important for understanding Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, J.

    2015-12-01

    Almost all kinds of geological activities on Earth depend critically on the operation of plate tectonics, but did plate tectonics initiate right after the solidification of a putative magma ocean, or did it start much later, e.g., sometime during the Archean? This problem of the initiation of plate tectonics in the Earth history presents us a unique combination of observational and theoretical challenges. Finding geological evidence for the onset of plate tectonics is difficult because plate tectonics is a dynamic process that continuously destroys a remnant of the past. We therefore need to rely on more secondary traces, the interpretation of which often involves theoretical considerations. At the same time, it is still hard to predict, on a firm theoretical ground, when plate tectonics should have prevailed, because there is no consensus on why plate tectonics currently takes place on Earth. Knowing when plate tectonics began is one thing, and understanding why it did so is another. The initiation of plate tectonics is one of the last frontiers in earth science, which encourages a concerted effort from both geologists and geophysicists to identify key geological evidence and distinguish between competing theories of early Earth evolution. Such an endeavor is essential to arrive at a self-contained theory for the evolution of terrestrial planets.

  16. pp iii How life began on Earth: a status report [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-09-01

    There are two fundamental requirements for life as we know it, liquid water and organic polymers, such as nucleic acids and proteins. Water provides the medium for chemical reactions and the polymers carry out the central biological functions of replication and catalysis. During the accretionary phase of the Earth, high surface temperatures would have made the presence of liquid water and an extensive organic carbon reservoir unlikely. As the Earth's surface cooled, water and simple organic compounds, derived from a variety of sources, would have begun to accumulate. This set the stage for the process of chemical evolution to begin in which one of the central facets was the synthesis of biologically important polymers, some of which had a variety of simple catalytic functions. Increasingly complex macromolecules were produced and eventually molecules with the ability to catalyze their own imperfect replication appeared. Thus began the processes of multiplication, heredity and variation, and this marked the point of both the origin of life and evolution. Once simple self-replicating entities originated, they evolved first into the RNA World and eventually to the DNA/Protein World, which had all the attributes of modern biology. If the basic components water and organic polymers were, or are, present on other bodies in our solar system and beyond, it is reasonable to assume that a similar series of steps that gave rise of life on Earth could occur elsewhere.

  17. Volcanic eruptions on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.; Schneider, N. M.; Terrile, R. J.; Cook, A. F.; Hansen, C.

    1981-09-01

    Nine eruption plumes which were observed during the Voyager 1 encounter with Io are discussed. During the Voyager 2 encounter, four months later, eight of the eruptions were still active although the largest became inactive sometime between the two encounters. Plumes range in height from 60 to over 300 km with corresponding ejection velocities of 0.5 to 1.0 km/s and plume sources are located on several plains and consist of fissures or calderas. The shape and brightness distribution together with the pattern of the surface deposition on a plume 3 is simulated by a ballistic model with a constant ejection velocity of 0.5 km/s and ejection angles which vary from 0-55 deg. The distribution of active and recent eruptions is concentrated in the equatorial regions and indicates that volcanic activity is more frequent and intense in the equatorial regions than in the polar regions. Due to the geologic setting of certain plume sources and large reservoirs of volatiles required for the active eruptions, it is concluded that sulfur volcanism rather than silicate volcanism is the most likely driving mechanism for the eruption plumes.

  18. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bull, Katharine F.; Cameron, Cheryl; Coombs, Michelle L.; Diefenbach, Angie; Lopez, Taryn; McNutt, Steve; Neal, Christina; Payne, Allison; Power, John A.; Schneider, David J.; Scott, William E.; Snedigar, Seth; Thompson, Glenn; Wallace, Kristi; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Webley, Peter; Werner, Cynthia A.; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2012-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano, an ice-covered stratovolcano on the west side of Cook Inlet, erupted in March 2009 after several months of escalating unrest. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano shares many similarities with eruptions documented most recently at Redoubt in 1966–68 and 1989–90. In each case, the eruptive phase lasted several months, consisted of multiple ashproducing explosions, produced andesitic lava and tephra, removed significant amounts of ice from the summit crater and Drift glacier, generated lahars that inundated the Drift River valley, and culminated with the extrusion of a lava dome in the summit crater. Prior to the 2009 explosive phase of the eruption, precursory seismicity lasted approximately six months with the fi rst weak tremor recorded on September 23, 2008. The first phreatic explosion was recorded on March 15, and the first magmatic explosion occurred seven days later, at 22:34 on March 22. The onset of magmatic explosions was preceded by a strong, shallow swarm of repetitive earthquakes that began about 04:00 on March 20, 2009, less than three days before an explosion. Nineteen major ash-producing explosions generated ash clouds that reached heights between 17,000 ft and 62,000 ft (5.2 and 18.9 km) ASL. During ash fall in Anchorage, the Ted Stevens International Airport was shut down for 20 hours, from ~17:00 on March 28 until 13:00 on March 29. On March 23 and April 4, lahars with fl ow depths to 10 m in the upper Drift River valley inundated parts of the Drift River Terminal (DRT). The explosive phase ended on April 4 with a dome collapse at 05:58. The April 4 ash cloud reached 50,000 ft (15.2 km) and moved swiftly to the southeast, depositing up to 2 mm of ash fall in Homer, Anchor Point, and Seldovia. At least two and possibly three lava domes grew and were destroyed by explosions prior to the final lava dome extrusion that began after the April 4 event. The fi nal lava dome ceased growth by July 1, 2009, with an estimated volume of 72

  20. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  1. Ritodrine-induced pustular eruptions distinctly resembling impetigo herpetiformis.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshimitsu; Sato, Atsuki; Abe, Hiroko; Abe, Sumino; Kawai, Naoki; Takeshita, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 27-year-old nulligravida woman without a history of dermatosis was hospitalized for threatened preterm labor at 29 weeks' gestation; therefore, continuous infusion of ritodrine hydrochloride was started. At 31 weeks' gestation, erythematous plaques appeared and spread over the body surface; therefore, a topical steroid preparation was applied. At 32 weeks' gestation, the eruptions developed into irregular annular areas of erythema with multiple pustules accompanied by severe itching, and oral prednisolone treatment was started. Bacterial cultures of the pustules were negative, and a crural cutaneous biopsy revealed Kogoj's spongiform pustules. Based on the clinicopathological findings, the most likely diagnosis was impetigo herpetiformis, which causes cutaneous symptoms closely resembling pustular psoriasis in pregnant females without a history of psoriasis. To rule out ritodrine-induced pustular eruptions, the ritodrine infusion was stopped and treatment with an MgSO(4) preparation was started at 33 weeks' 3 days' gestation; however, the uterine contractions could not be suppressed. Because of the patient's highly edematous, severely painful feet, a cesarean section was performed the same day. Within several days of delivery, the eruptions began to resolve, and no recurrence was observed after treatment with oral prednisolone was stopped 31 days after delivery. On the basis of a positive patch test for ritodrine, we diagnosed pustular drug eruptions caused by ritodrine hydrochloride. Although ritodrine-induced pathognomonic cutaneous eruptions are rare, we would like to emphasize that ritodrine can cause drug-induced pustular eruptions distinctly resembling life-threatening impetigo herpetiformis.

  2. Ritodrine-induced pustular eruptions distinctly resembling impetigo herpetiformis.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshimitsu; Sato, Atsuki; Abe, Hiroko; Abe, Sumino; Kawai, Naoki; Takeshita, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 27-year-old nulligravida woman without a history of dermatosis was hospitalized for threatened preterm labor at 29 weeks' gestation; therefore, continuous infusion of ritodrine hydrochloride was started. At 31 weeks' gestation, erythematous plaques appeared and spread over the body surface; therefore, a topical steroid preparation was applied. At 32 weeks' gestation, the eruptions developed into irregular annular areas of erythema with multiple pustules accompanied by severe itching, and oral prednisolone treatment was started. Bacterial cultures of the pustules were negative, and a crural cutaneous biopsy revealed Kogoj's spongiform pustules. Based on the clinicopathological findings, the most likely diagnosis was impetigo herpetiformis, which causes cutaneous symptoms closely resembling pustular psoriasis in pregnant females without a history of psoriasis. To rule out ritodrine-induced pustular eruptions, the ritodrine infusion was stopped and treatment with an MgSO(4) preparation was started at 33 weeks' 3 days' gestation; however, the uterine contractions could not be suppressed. Because of the patient's highly edematous, severely painful feet, a cesarean section was performed the same day. Within several days of delivery, the eruptions began to resolve, and no recurrence was observed after treatment with oral prednisolone was stopped 31 days after delivery. On the basis of a positive patch test for ritodrine, we diagnosed pustular drug eruptions caused by ritodrine hydrochloride. Although ritodrine-induced pathognomonic cutaneous eruptions are rare, we would like to emphasize that ritodrine can cause drug-induced pustular eruptions distinctly resembling life-threatening impetigo herpetiformis. PMID:22041881

  3. Comparison of Galunggung1982-83 and Eyjafjalla-2010 Eruptions: definition of eruption dynamics from 3D Ash Surface Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydar, E.; Höskuldsson, A.; Ersoy, O.; Gourgaud, A.

    2012-04-01

    We consider that all works, concepts on aviation safety, security codes, establishment of warning systems etc begin in 1982, when two commercial jumbo jets en route to Australia across Indonesia suffered loss of engine thrust from ingesting volcanic ash from the erupting Galunggung Volcano, Java, and descended more than 20,000 ft before the engines could be restarted (Casadevall, 1991). It is not the only incident of this kind but this Galunggung eruption had a pionner character attracting attention on aviation safety against volcanic eruptions in international community. As the needs for precautions on aviation safety against volcanic ash encounters began with Galunggung 1982 eruption and as we all concerned by the measures taken by ICAO due to Eyjafjallajökull-2010 eruption, we aimed to investigate this last huge airspace perturbing eruption and compare the volcanic ashes produced by those two eruptions. Volcanic ash characterization should be most important parameter to understand how the eruption concerned unrolled. Galunggung 1982-83 eruption was exceptionally long, lasting about nine months between 5 April 1982-8 January 1983). During this well known eruption, the composition of the erupted magma evolved from andesite (58% SiO2) to Mg-rich basalt (47% SiO2), while the style of the eruption changed drastically through time (Katili and Sudrdajat, 1984; Sudrajat and Tilling, 1984; Gourgaud et al., 1989 gourgaud etal 2000). Paralel to chemical changes and water consumption, eruption dynamic was also changed and occured in three eruption phases with different eruptive styles as an initial Vulcanian phase (5 April-13 May), a phreatomagmatic phase (17 May-28 October) and a Strombolian phase (3 November-8 January), have been recognized (Katili and Sudradjat,1984). We examined the surficial morphological features of proximal tephra collected from Galunggung and Eyjafjalla volcanoes. Surface texture and morphology of volcanic ash particles change according to various

  4. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  5. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  6. Eruption on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, shows a new blue-colored volcanic plume extending about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) into space from Jupiter's moon Io (see inset at lower left). The blue color of the plume is consistent with the presence of sulfur dioxide gas and 'snow' condensing from the gas as the plume expands and cools. Galileo images have also shown that the Ra Patera plume glows in the dark, perhaps due to the fluorescence of sulfur and oxygen ions created by the breaking apart of sulfur dioxide molecules by energetic particles in the Jovian magnetosphere. The images at right show a comparison of changes seen near the volcano Ra Patera since the Voyager spacecraft flybys of 1979 (windows at right show Voyager image at top and Galileo image at bottom). This eruptive plume is an example of a new type of volcanic activity discovered during Voyager's flyby in 1979, believed to be geyser-like eruptions driven by sulfur dioxide or sulfur gas erupting and freezing in Io's extremely tenuous atmosphere. Volcanic eruptions on Earth cannot throw materials to such high altitudes. Ra Patera is the site of dramatic surface changes. An area around the volcano of about 40,000 square kilometers, area about the size of New Jersey, has been covered by new volcanic deposits. The image was taken in late June 28, 1996 from a distance of 972,000 kilometers (604,000 miles). The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. Kimberlite ascent and eruption.

    PubMed

    Sparks, R S J; Brown, R J; Field, M; Gilbertson, M

    2007-12-13

    Wilson and Head model kimberlite ascent and eruption by considering the propagation of a volatile-rich dyke. Wilson and Head's model has features in common with Sparks et al., but it is inconsistent with geological observations and constraints on volatile solubility. Here we show that this may be due to erroneous physical assumptions.

  8. Kimberlite ascent and eruption.

    PubMed

    Sparks, R S J; Brown, R J; Field, M; Gilbertson, M

    2007-12-13

    Wilson and Head model kimberlite ascent and eruption by considering the propagation of a volatile-rich dyke. Wilson and Head's model has features in common with Sparks et al., but it is inconsistent with geological observations and constraints on volatile solubility. Here we show that this may be due to erroneous physical assumptions. PMID:18075522

  9. An investigation of pre-eruptive deformation for the 2004 eruption of Mount St. Helens using persistent scatterer interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanoes of the Cascade Range pose a legitimate threat to people living in the Pacific Northwest. Mt St Helens, which erupted in 2004 as a part of a dome building event, is a notable example of this danger. Deformation and seismicity are known indicators of volcanic activity and can provide warning of an imminent eruption. In the weeks leading up to the 2004 eruption, a shallow earthquake swarm was detected under St. Helens, suggesting ongoing deformation with its source beneath the edifice. A campaign GPS survey conducted in 2000 found no evidence of deformation. The sole continuous GPS station that was operational prior to the eruption (located ~9 km away from the crater) began moving only with the onset of the earthquake swarm. Because of the lack of ground based geodetic instruments in the near-field of Mt St Helens at the time of the 2004 eruption, it is unknown whether pre-eruptive deformation occurred on the edifice or solely within crater. InSAR is the only method available to conclusively determine whether the 2004 eruption was preceded by deformation of the edifice. Previous work explored this question using standard 2-pass interferometry, but the results were inconclusive. The main obstacle to implementing InSAR methods in the Cascades region is phase decorrelation due to the presence of both dense forest and snow for most of the year. We revisit the available InSAR data for St. Helens by experimenting with the application of the Persistent Scatterers and Distributed Scatterers processing techniques in order to overcome the decorrelation problem. By using these techniques on the question of Mt St Helens pre-eruptive deformation, we will demonstrate the viability of their application to the entire Northwest region as a low cost, low maintenance, monitoring tool.

  10. The transition from explosive to effusive eruptive regime: The example of the 1912 Novarupta eruption, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, N.K.; Houghton, B.F.; Fagents, S.A.; Hildreth, W.

    2006-01-01

    The shift from explosive to effusive silicic volcanism seen in many historical eruptions reflects a change in the style of degassing of erupted magma. This paper focuses on such a transition during the largest eruption of the twentieth century, the 1912 eruption of Novarupta. The transition is recorded in a dacite block bed, which covers an elliptical area of 4 km2 around the vent. Approximately 700 studied blocks fall into four main lithologic categories: (1) pumiceous, (2) dense, (3) flow-banded dacites, and (4) welded breccias. Textural analyses of the blocks indicate portions of the melt underwent highly variable degrees of outgassing. Vesicle populations show features characteristic of bubble coalescence and collapse. A decrease in measured vesicularity and increased evidence for bubble collapse compared with pumice from earlier Plinian episodes mark the transition from closed- to open-system degassing. Block morphology and textures strongly suggest the magma was first erupted as a relatively gas-rich lava dome/plug, but incomplete out-gassing led to explosive disruption. Heterogeneous degassing of ascending magma began in Plinian Episode III and resulted in instability during Episode IV dome growth and a (series of) Vulcanian explosion(s). Modeling of the dynamics of explosion initiation and ejecta dispersal indicates that a significant concentration in gas is required to produce the explosions responsible for the observed block field dispersal. The amount of gas available in the hot pumiceous dome material appears to have been inadequate to drive the explosion(s); therefore, external water most likely contributed to the destruction. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  11. Explosive Eruptions of Kamchatkan Volcanoes in 2012 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Demyanchuk, Yury; Petrova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and 6 active volcanoes in the Northern Kuriles, and 4 of them continuously active. In 2012 seven strong explosive eruptions of the Kamchatkan and the Northern Kuriles volcanoes Sheveluch, Bezymianny, Kizimen, Tolbachik, Klyuchevskoy, and Karymsky took place. In addition, higher fumarolic activity of Gorely volcano was observed. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2012: on January 22-23; on March 16-17; March 25-30 - June 03; and on September 18: ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended about 200-2000 km to the different directions of the volcano. The eruptive activity of Bezymianny volcano began since 1955, and is continuing at present as growth of the lava dome. Two paroxysmal explosive phases of the eruption occurred on March 08 and September 01: ash plumes rose up to 8-12 km a.s.l. and extended about 1500 km to the east-north-east of the volcano. Eruption of Kizimen volcano began on December 09, 2010, and continues. Strong explosive eruption began in mid-December, 2010, - ash plumes rose up to 10 km a.s.l. and extended > 800 km from the volcano. There are several stages of the eruption: explosive (from 09 December 2010 to mid-January 2011); explosive-effusive (mid-January to mid-June 2011); effusive (mid-January 2011 to September 2012). Extrusive-effusive phase of eruption

  12. The First Historic Eruption of Nabro, Eritrea: Insights from Thermal and UV Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sealing, C. R.; Carn, S. A.; Harris, A. J. L.

    2015-12-01

    In June 2011, the first recorded eruption of Nabro volcano, took place at the border of Eritrea and Ethiopia. This eruption was the largest in what could be considered an ongoing sequence of eruptions in the Afar-Red Sea region since 2005. It halted air travel in northern Africa, contaminated food and water sources, and displaced thousands from their homes. Geographic isolation, previous quiescence, and regional civil unrest meant that this volcano was effectively unmonitored at the time of eruption, and opportunities for field study were limited. The purpose of this study is to explore the quantity of erupted products and the timing and mechanisms of their emplacement using predominantly free, publicly available satellite data. We use MODIS and OMI data to examine rates of lava effusion and SO2 emission, and quantify the amount of erupted products. We also examine published images from other satellites, such as ALI and SEVIRI in order to understand the temporal evolution of the eruption. Synthesizing these data, we then attempt to infer the mechanisms through which the eruption progressed. Examination of satellite data reveals a bimodal eruption, beginning with explosive activity marked by high SO2 emission totalling 1824 - 2299 KT, and extensive ash fall of 270 - 440 km2. This was followed by a period of rapid effusion, producing a ~17 km long lava flow, and a volume of ~22.1 x 106 m3. Mass balance between the SO2 and lava flows reveals no sulfur 'excess', suggesting that nearly all of the degassed magma was extruded. This eruption of Nabro continued for nearly 6 weeks, and may be considered the second largest historic eruption in Africa. This type of work highlights the effectiveness and importance of accessible satellite remote sensing data for the study of active volcanoes, particularly those in remote regions that may be otherwise inaccessible.

  13. Quiet-Region Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Moore, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We report characteristics of quiescent filament eruptions that did not produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs). It is known that there is a dichotomy of quiescent filament eruptions: those that produce CMEs and those that do not. We examined the quiescent filament eruptions, each of which was located far from disk center (greater than or equal to 0.7 R(sub Sun)) in diffuse remnant magnetic fields of decayed active regions, was well observed in Ha observations and Fe XII, and had good coronagraph coverage. We present the similarity and differences of two classes of filament eruptions. From their lack of CME production and the appearance of their eruptive motion in Fe XII movies, we conclude that the non-CME-producing filament eruptions are confined eruptions like the confined filament eruptions in active regions. We take the similarity of the confined and eruptive quiescent filament eruptions with their active-region counterparts to favor runaway tether-cutting connection for unleashing the magnetic explosion in all these eruptions.

  14. Interdisciplinary studies of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, John S.; Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Holitt, Richard P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Eichelberger, John C.; Luis, Lara; Moreno, Hugo; Muñoz, Jorge; Castro, Jonathan M.; Iroumé, Andrés; Andreoli, Andrea; Jones, Julia; Swanson, Fred; Crisafulli, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    High-silica rhyolite magma fuels Earth's largest and most explosive eruptions. Recurrence intervals for such highly explosive eruptions are in the 100- to 100,000-year time range, and there have been few direct observations of such eruptions and their immediate impacts. Consequently, there was keen interest within the volcanology community when the first large eruption of high-silica rhyolite since that of Alaska's Novarupta volcano in 1912 began on 1 May 2008 at Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, a 3-kilometer-diameter caldera volcano with a prehistoric record of rhyolite eruptions [Naranjo and Stern, 2004semi; Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), 2008semi; Carn et al., 2009; Castro and Dingwell, 2009; Lara, 2009; Muñoz et al., 2009]. Vigorous explosions occurred through 8 May 2008, after which explosive activity waned and a new lava dome was extruded.

  15. Interdisciplinary Studies of Eruption at Chaitén Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, John S.; Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Hoblitt, Richard P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Eichelberger, John C.; Lara, Luis; Moreno, Hugo; Muñoz, Jorge; Castro, Jonathan M.; Iroumé, Andrés; Andreoli, Andrea; Jones, Julia; Swanson, Fred; Crisafulli, Charlie

    2010-10-01

    High-silica rhyolite magma fuels Earth's largest and most explosive eruptions. Recurrence intervals for such highly explosive eruptions are in the 100- to 100,000­year time range, and there have been few direct observations of such eruptions and their immediate impacts. Consequently, there was keen interest within the volcanology community when the first large eruption of high-silica rhyolite since that of Alaska's Novarupta volcano in 1912 began on 1 May 2008 at Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, a 3-kilometer­diameter caldera volcano with a prehistoric record of rhyolite eruptions [Naranjo and Stern, 2004; Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), 2008; Carn et al., 2009; Castro and Dingwell, 2009; Lara, 2009; Muñoz et al., 2009]. Vigorous explosions occurred through 8 May 2008, after which explosive activity waned and a new lava dome was extruded.

  16. Failed Eruptive Precursors at Popocatepetl, 2006-2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. L.; Martinez, A.; Cifuentes, G.; Mendiola, F.

    2008-12-01

    In the second semester of 2006, increasing cumulative seismic energy, descending spring water pH and negative magnetic anomalies were interpreted as related with magma injection. The large amplitude harmonic tremor for 16 hours on August 3 and 17 hours on November 2, 3 and 4 and 5, 2006 as well as the negative magnetic anomalies, -3 to -15nT, were attributed to magma ascent, and considered would end in eruption which did not occur. Other periods of large amplitude harmonic tremor occurred on February 2, 3 and 4, 2007 and February 13 and 21, 2008 and only minor dome growth and small explosions with little ash have occurred. The largest eruption of the recent period of activity which began in 1994, was the January 22, 2001 eruption which was preceded by negative magnetic anomalies several months before and 33 hours of large amplitude harmonic tremor from December 15-19 which produced a fairly large dome in the crater which was destroyed by this eruption. Several small domes were formed from March 2001 to July 2003 but since August 2003, seismicity declined sharply and only minor emissions and small explosions occurred until late 2005-2006. The change in the eruptive pattern could be due to partial plugging. It is probable that the fairly open conduit now is partially filled and only lets a small amount of magma come out .Changes in the stress field since 2003 are also evident from the smaller number of seismic events and their distribution.

  17. SDO/AIA observations of a partially erupting prominence

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Reeves, Katharine K.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Joshi, Navin C.

    2013-12-01

    We report an observation of a partially erupting prominence and its associated dynamical plasma processes based on observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The prominence first went through a slow rise (SR) phase followed by a fast rise (FR) phase. The SR phase began after a couple of small brightenings were seen toward the footpoints. When the prominence had transitioned from SR to FR, it had already become kinked. The prominence shows strong brightening at the central kink location during the start of FR. We interpret this as an internal magnetic reconnection occurring at a vertical current sheet forming between the two legs of the erupting prominence (flux rope). The brightening at the central kink location is seen in all EUV channels of AIA. The contributions of differential emission at higher temperatures are larger compared to that for typical coronal temperatures supporting a reconnection scenario at the central kink location. The plasma above the brightening location is ejected as a hot plasmoid-like structure embedded in a coronal mass ejection, and those below the brightening move down in the form of blobs moving toward the Sun's surface. The unique time resolution of the AIA has allowed these eruptive aspects, including SR-to-FR, kinking, central current sheet formation, plasmoid-like eruption, and filament 'splitting', to be observed in a single event, providing strong and comprehensive evidence in favor of the model of partially erupting flux ropes.

  18. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  19. Geology and eruptive mechanisms of Masaya Caldera Complex, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.N.

    1983-01-01

    Results of detailed geologic field mapping and analysis of eruptive mechanisms at Masaya Caldera Complex, Nicaragua are presented. Eruptions began at least 50,000 and possibly 460,000 y.b.p. The Las Sierras Formation, regarded as Plio-Pleistocene in age, forms the local basement. A central vent of group or vents in the developing Masaya volcanic complex produced diverse deposits, all of basaltic composition. Eruption of a pyroclastic flow-surge sequence at 2250-6500 y.b.p. culminated in wholesale collapse of a caldera with a volume of 15.3 km/sup 3/. The bulk volume of the ignimbrite is 2.2-3.4 kkm/sup 3/ and the surge deposit is 4.9-5.5 km/sup 3/. Pre-historic lava production rates of 1.9-5.5 x 10/sup 6/ m/sup 3//year are similar to rates at other volcanoes but 26-76 times greater than the historic rate of production. The average lava effusion rate of 32 m/sup 3//sec during the 1772 eruption is at least an order of magnitude greater than observed effusion rates at other Central American volcanoes, and helps explain the unusual shield-like morphology of the volcano. Pyroclastic eruptions of several types have played an important role in the evolution of the volcano. Fissure-type eruptions, unknown elsewhere in Central America, have created numerous ash and scoria deposits. Two widespread scoria-fall deposits, locally known as the Fontana Lapilli an San Judas Formation, are the first documented plinian airfall deposts of basaltic composition. The Masaya-type caldera is redefined as a caldera associated with voluminous explosive eruptions of much less than 100 km/sup 3/ of mafic magma from a summit vent.

  20. The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska: a spatter eruption at an ice- and snow-clad volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Haney, Matthew M.; Fee, David; Schneider, David J.; Wech, Aaron G.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska began on 13 May and ended 49 days later on 1 July. The eruption was characterized by persistent lava fountaining from a vent just north of the summit, intermittent strombolian explosions, and ash, gas, and aerosol plumes that reached as high as 8 km above sea level and on several occasions extended as much as 500 km downwind of the volcano. During the first several days of the eruption, accumulations of spatter near the vent periodically collapsed to form small pyroclastic avalanches that eroded and melted snow and ice to form lahars on the lower north flank of the volcano. Continued lava fountaining led to the production of agglutinate lava flows that extended to the base of the volcano, about 3–4 km beyond the vent. The generation of fountain-fed lava flows was a dominant process during the 2013 eruption; however, episodic collapse of spatter accumulations and formation of hot spatter-rich granular avalanches was a more efficient process for melting snow and ice and initiating lahars. The lahars and ash plumes generated during the eruption did not pose any serious hazards for the area. However, numerous local airline flights were cancelled or rerouted, and trace amounts of ash fall occurred at all of the local communities surrounding the volcano, including Cold Bay, Nelson Lagoon, Sand Point, and King Cove.

  1. Eruption rates in explosive eruptions: Ground truth and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Durig, Tobias; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Larsen, Gudrún; Óladóttir, Bergrún A.; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Oddsson, Björn; Björnsson, Halldór; Gudmundsdóttir, Esther R.

    2015-04-01

    Estimations of eruption rates in explosive eruptions are difficult and error margins are invariably high. In small to moderate sized eruptions effects of wind on plume height can be large and in larger eruptions observations are often difficult due to masking of source by low cloud, pyroclastic density currents and monitoring system saturation. Several medium-sized explosive eruptions in recent years have been an important in sparking off intense research on e.g. atmosphere-plume interaction and associated effects of wind on plume height. Other methods that do not rely on plume height are e.g. infrared satellite monitoring of atmospheric loading of fine tephra, infrasound, analysis of video recordings from vents, and it has been suggested that co-eruptive tilt-meter deformation data can predict eruption intensity. The eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 and Grímsvötn in 2011 provided a wealth of data that potentially can be of use in developing constraints of eruption rates in explosive eruptions. A key parameter in all such comparisons between models and data is as detailed knowledge as possible on tephra fallout. For both Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn intensive field efforts took place to map out the deposits during and immediately after the eruptions. The resulting maps cover both individual phases as well as total fallout. Comparison of these data with plume-based and other models of mass discharge rates is presently work in progress. A desirable future aim is near real time estimates of mass eruption rates based several of the parameters mentioned above. This type of work is currently ongoing within the framework of the EU-funded supersite project FUTUREVOLC.

  2. Eruption Forecasting: Success and Surprise at Kasatochi and Okmok Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prejean, S.; Power, J.; Brodsky, E.

    2008-12-01

    seismic network on Kasatochi Island. Unlike Kasatochi, Okmok volcano, also located in the central Aleutian Islands, hosts 13 telemetered seismic stations and several telemetered GPS stations. The volcano has received considerable study by AVO, and the record of historical eruptions is well known. Despite regular scrutiny of Okmok data, the 2008 eruption was a surprise as there were fewer than 3 hours of clear pre-eruptive seismicity. The color code/alert level at Okmok went directly from Green/Normal to Red/Warning on July 12 after eruptive activity began. Interpretation of co-eruptive seismicity remained a challenge through the course of the eruption as bursts of volcanic tremor often did not correlate immediately with ash output at the vent as observed in satellite data.

  3. Silicic Submarine Eruptions: what can erupted pyroclasts tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Allen, S.; McPhie, J.; Fiske, R. S.; Tani, K.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of submarine volcanism is in its infancy with respect to subaerial eruption processes. Two fundamental differences between eruptions in seawater compared to those on land are that (1) eruptions occur at higher confining pressures, and (2) in a seawater medium, which has a higher heat capacity, density and viscosity than air. Together with JAMSTEC collaborators we have a sample suite of submarine pumice deposits from modern volcanoes of known eruption depths. This sample suite spans a spectrum of eruption intensities, from 1) powerful explosive caldera-forming (Myojin Knoll caldera); to 2) weakly explosive cone building (pre-caldera Myojin Knoll pumice and Kurose-Nishi pumice); to 3) volatile-driven effusive dome spalling (Sumisu knoll A); to 4) passive dome effusion (Sumisu knoll B and C). This sample suite has exceptional potential, not simply because the samples have been taken from well-constrained, sources but because they have similar high silica contents, are unaltered and their phenocrysts contain melt inclusions. Microtextural quantitative analysis has revealed that (i) clast vesicularities remain high (69-90 vol.%) regardless of confining pressure, mass eruption rate or eruption style , (ii) vesicle number densities scale with inferred eruption rate, and (iii) darcian and inertial permeabilities of submarine effusive and explosive pyroclasts overlap with explosively-erupted subaerial pyroclasts.

  4. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  5. The ongoing Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi: 30 years of eruptive activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.; Heliker, Christina; Patrick, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption of Kīlauea Volcano is its longest rift-zone eruption in more than 500 years. Since the eruption began in 1983, lava flows have buried 48 square miles (125 square kilometers) of land and added about 500 acres (200 hectares) of new land to the Island of Hawaiʻi. The eruption not only challenges local communities, which must adapt to an ever-changing and sometimes-destructive environment, but has also drawn millions of visitors to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists closely monitor and evaluate hazards at Hawaiʻi’s volcanoes and also work with park rangers to help ensure safe lava viewing for visitors.

  6. Characterizing the first historic eruption of Nabro, Eritrea: Insights from thermal and UV remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sealing, Christine R.

    June 2011 saw the first historic eruption of Nabro volcano, one of an ongoing sequence of eruptions in the Afar-Red Sea region since 2005. It halted air travel in northern Africa, contaminated food and water sources, and displaced thousands from their homes. Due to its remote location, little was known about this event in terms of the quantity of erupted products and the timing and mechanisms of their emplacement. Geographic isolation, previous quiescence and regional civil unrest meant that this volcano was effectively unmonitored at the time of eruption, and opportunities for field study are limited. Using free, publicly available satellite data, I examined rates of lava effusion and SO2 emission in order to quantify the amount of erupted products and understand the temporal evolution of the eruption, as well as explore what information can be gleaned about eruption mechanisms using remote sensing data. These data revealed a bimodal eruption, beginning with explosive activity marked by high SO2 emission totalling 1824 - 2299 KT, and extensive ash fall of 270 - 440 km2. This gave way to a period of rapid effusion, producing a ˜17 km long lava flow, and a volume of ˜22.1 x 106 m3. Mass balance between the SO2 and lava flows reveals no sulfur 'excess', suggesting that nearly all of the degassed magma was extruded. The 2011 eruption of Nabro lasted nearly 6 weeks, and may be considered the second largest historic eruption in Africa. Work such as this highlights the importance of satellite remote sensing for studying and monitoring volcanoes, particularly those in remote regions that may be otherwise inaccessible.

  7. Southern Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Southern Africa     View larger JPEG image ... visibility of smoke plumes and haze. The southern tip of South Africa is at the bottom of the image, and Zambia is at the top. ... MISR Team. Aug 25, 2000 - South Africa to Zambia including the Okavango Delta. project:  ...

  8. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  9. Erupted complex odontoma delayed eruption of permanent molar.

    PubMed

    Ohtawa, Yumi; Ichinohe, Saori; Kimura, Eri; Hashimoto, Sadamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas, benign tumors that develop in the jaw, rarely erupt into the oral cavity. We report an erupted odontoma which delayed eruption of the first molar. The patient was a 10-year-old Japanese girl who came to our hospital due to delayed eruption of the right maxillary first molar. All the deciduous teeth had been shed. The second premolar on the right side had erupted, but not the first molar. Slight inflammation of the alveolar mucosa around the first molar had exposed a tooth-like, hard tissue. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiopaque mass indicating a lesion approximately 1 cm in diameter. The border of the image was clear, and part of the mass was situated close to the occlusal surface of the first molar. The root of the maxillary right first molar was only half-developed. A clinical diagnosis of odontoma was made. The odontoma was subsequently extracted, allowing the crown of the first molar to erupt almost 5 months later. The dental germ of the permanent tooth had been displaced by the odontoma. However, after the odontoma had been extracted, the permanent tooth was still able to erupt spontaneously, as eruptive force still remained. When the eruption of a tooth is significantly delayed, we believe that it is necessary to examine the area radiographically. If there is any radiographic evidence of a physical obstruction that might delay eruption, that obstruction should be removed before any problems can arise. Regular dental checkups at schools might improve our ability to detect evidence of delayed eruption earlier.

  10. Erupted complex odontoma delayed eruption of permanent molar.

    PubMed

    Ohtawa, Yumi; Ichinohe, Saori; Kimura, Eri; Hashimoto, Sadamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Odontomas, benign tumors that develop in the jaw, rarely erupt into the oral cavity. We report an erupted odontoma which delayed eruption of the first molar. The patient was a 10-year-old Japanese girl who came to our hospital due to delayed eruption of the right maxillary first molar. All the deciduous teeth had been shed. The second premolar on the right side had erupted, but not the first molar. Slight inflammation of the alveolar mucosa around the first molar had exposed a tooth-like, hard tissue. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiopaque mass indicating a lesion approximately 1 cm in diameter. The border of the image was clear, and part of the mass was situated close to the occlusal surface of the first molar. The root of the maxillary right first molar was only half-developed. A clinical diagnosis of odontoma was made. The odontoma was subsequently extracted, allowing the crown of the first molar to erupt almost 5 months later. The dental germ of the permanent tooth had been displaced by the odontoma. However, after the odontoma had been extracted, the permanent tooth was still able to erupt spontaneously, as eruptive force still remained. When the eruption of a tooth is significantly delayed, we believe that it is necessary to examine the area radiographically. If there is any radiographic evidence of a physical obstruction that might delay eruption, that obstruction should be removed before any problems can arise. Regular dental checkups at schools might improve our ability to detect evidence of delayed eruption earlier. PMID:24521551

  11. Will Teide erupt again?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Joan; Geyer, Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of hazard in volcanic systems characterised by long repose period is difficult because the lack of knowledge of the past volcanic history and also because in many cases volcanism is not perceived as a potential problem, being only regarded as an attraction for tourism or a source of economic benefit, thus hiding the need to conduct hazard assessment. Teide, in the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands), is not an exception to this general rule and, despite being one of the largest composite volcanoes in the World, it is generally considered as a non-active volcano by population, visitors and even by some scientists. However, geological and geophysical evidence, including a large diversity of monitoring signals recorded during last decades, as well as a simple comparison with similar volcanoes that have erupted in recent times after hundreds or even thousands of years of quiescence, recommend to consider Teide as an active volcano and to take the necessary precaution in an island with nearly one million of permanent inhabitants and nearly 5 millions of visitors per year. What is the potential of Teide to erupt again? is the question that relies behind the fact of considering it as active, and that needs to be answered first. Based on the current volcanological, petrological and geophysical knowledge We propose a conceptual model on the magma recharge mechanisms, structure of the plumbing system, and eruption triggers and dynamics of Teide volcano that helps to understand its behaviour and to anticipate future activity. Ramón y Cajal contract (RYC-2012-11024)

  12. Volcanic forcing of monsoonal precipitation variability in selected modern volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, W. W.; Chan, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    An important characteristic of the monsoonal climate is the heavy summer precipitation and the winter drought brought about by the shift in wind circulation. For planet Earth to achieve greater future sustainability, a better understanding of precipitation variability in the densely populated monsoonal regions of the world is particularly critical. In the present study, three major modern tropical volcanic eruptions occurring over the past fifty years have been selected to investigate their influence on precipitation variability in the monsoonal region of southern China. The three eruptions are the February 1963 Agung eruption in Indonesia, the March 1982 El Chichón eruption in Mexico and the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines. Abnormally low annual precipitation was found in the southern China region during 1963 and 1991. Based on the annual precipitation at the Hong Kong Observatory Station, they were the driest and the tenth driest respectively since record began in 1884. In contrast, abnormally heavy precipitation was found in southern China in 1982 with the Hong Kong Observatory Station recording the second wettest year since record began. Based on the observed precipitation, near-field major volcanic eruptions located in the Indonesian-Pacific gateway may lead to abnormally dry conditions explained either by a shift and/or strengthening of predominantly offshore wind. Far-field major volcanic eruptions such as in the eastern Pacific may give rise to abnormally wet conditions through the global spread of the volcanic cloud. The El Chichón volcanic cloud was tracked by satellites across the Pacific Ocean and there is a match in the timing of heavy precipitation after the volcanic cloud entered the South China Sea about eleven days after the main eruption phase. Major volcanic eruptions are concluded to be a causative factor in monsoonal precipitation variability worthy of greater attention.

  13. Geological aspects of the 2003 2004 eruption of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Setsuya; Matsushima, Takeshi; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Kato, Teruyuki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Chong, Ramon; Camacho, Juan T.

    2005-08-01

    Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands, began erupting in May-June 2003. A series of subplinian explosive eruptions of andesite magma began at the Eastern Crater in the eastern part of the summit caldera on the evening of 10 May. Brown tephra was sent mainly westward by strong winds. Small-scale pyroclastic surges were discharged eastward outside the caldera in late May. An andesite lava dome that had once filled the inner crater was fragmented by phreatomagmatic explosions in the middle of June. The phreatomagmatic explosions probably occurred due to interaction of the magma head with groundwater around the crater, and abundant very fine ash ("gray tephra") was discharged within the caldera and over most of the island. The volume of eruption products of the May-June eruption was estimated to be 1.4 × 10 7 m 3 dense-rock-equivalent. Erupted pumices and lava are aphyric andesite and are variously colored depending on their vesicularity. The SiO 2 contents of erupted materials decreased slightly with time. The fine gray ash is depleted in alkalies, probably due to leaching by acid hydrothermal fluids during explosions. Seismic activity resumed in late March 2004, and small strombolian-like explosions were repeated in May and June 2004. About half of the inner crater was filled with new scoria and lava.

  14. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  15. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  16. The physics of large eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-04-01

    Based on eruptive volumes, eruptions can be classified as follows: small if the volumes are from less than 0.001 km3 to 0.1 km3, moderate if the volumes are from 0.1 to 10 km3, and large if the volumes are from 10 km3 to 1000 km3 or larger. The largest known explosive and effusive eruptions have eruptive volumes of 4000-5000 km3. The physics of small to moderate eruptions is reasonably well understood. For a typical mafic magma chamber in a crust that behaves as elastic, about 0.1% of the magma leaves the chamber (erupted and injected as a dyke) during rupture and eruption. Similarly, for a typical felsic magma chamber, the eruptive/injected volume during rupture and eruption is about 4%. To provide small to moderate eruptions, chamber volumes of the order of several tens to several hundred cubic kilometres would be needed. Shallow crustal chambers of these sizes are common, and deep-crustal and upper-mantle reservoirs of thousands of cubic kilometres exist. Thus, elastic and poro-elastic chambers of typical volumes can account for small to moderate eruptive volumes. When the eruptions become large, with volumes of tens or hundreds of cubic kilometres or more, an ordinary poro-elastic mechanism can no longer explain the eruptive volumes. The required sizes of the magma chambers and reservoirs to explain such volumes are simply too large to be plausible. Here I propose that the mechanics of large eruptions is fundamentally different from that of small to moderate eruptions. More specifically, I suggest that all large eruptions derive their magmas from chambers and reservoirs whose total cavity-volumes are mechanically reduced very much during the eruption. There are two mechanisms by which chamber/reservoir cavity-volumes can be reduced rapidly so as to squeeze out much of, or all, their magmas. One is piston-like caldera collapse. The other is graben subsidence. During large slip on the ring-faults/graben-faults the associated chamber/reservoir shrinks in volume

  17. The first five years of Kīlauea’s summit eruption in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, 2008–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, Tamar; Swanson, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u Crater that began in March 2008 is the longest summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, on the Island of Hawai‘i, since 1924. From the time the eruption began, the new "Overlook crater" inside Halema‘uma‘u has exhibited fluctuating lava lake activity, occasional small explosive events, and a persistent gas plume. The beautiful nighttime glow impresses and thrills visitors in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, but the continuous emission of sulfur dioxide gas produces "vog" (volcanic smog) that can severely affect communities and local agriculture downwind. U.S. Geological Survey scientists continue to closely monitor the eruption and assess ongoing hazards.

  18. Carbon sequestration and eruption hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    In order to reduce the buildup of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, proposals have been made to sequestrate carbon in ocean, or in coal mines and other underground formations. High gas concentration in ocean or underground formations has to potential to power gas-driven eruptions. In this presentation, possible eruption hazards are explored. Whenever carbon dioxide is sequestrated in the form of carbon dioxide gas, or dissolved and/or absorbed carbon dioxide, it is necessary to exercise caution to avoid gas-driven eruption hazard. It is long known that explosive volcanic eruptions are driven by H2O gas in magma. Lake eruptions powered by dissolved CO2 in lake bottom water were discovered in the 1980's (Kling et al., 1987; Zhang, 1996). Gas-driven ocean eruptions with mechanism similar to lake eruptions have been hypothesized (Zhang, 2003; Zhang and Kling, 2006) although not confirmed. Mud volcanos are commonly thought to be driven by methane-rich fluids in sediment (Milkov, 2000). Recently, Zhang et al. (2007) have proposed that coal outbursts in underground coal mines are driven by dissolved high CO2 concentration in coal, causing coal fragmentation and outburst. That is, coal outbursts may be regarded as a new type of gas-driven eruptions. Therefore, high concentrations of free gas or dissolved/absorbed gas may power eruptions of magma, lake water, ocean water, sediment, and coal. Gas- driven volcanic, lake and ocean eruptions are due to volume expansion from bubble growth, whereas gas-driven coal and sediment eruptions are due to high gas-pressure, leading to fragmentation of coal and sediment. (In explosive volcanism, magma fragmentation is also a critical point.) The threshold conditions for many of these eruptions are not known yet. In planning large (industrial) scale injection of CO2 into a natural reservoir, it is important to know the eruption threshold and design the injection scheme accordingly. More safe sequestration in terms of eruption hazards would

  19. Crust-ocean interactions during midocean ridge eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.

    2011-12-01

    Eruptions are the "quantum event" of crustal accretion, occurring daily to monthly (depending on spreading rate) along the global midocean ridge system. The number of eruptions detected and responded to remain very few, however, so our knowledge of the magnitude and rate of crust-ocean interaction at the instant of an eruption is almost entirely circumstantial. The discovery of uniquely different plumes over a 2008 eruption on the NE Lau spreading center greatly broadened the known range of eruption-initiated transfer of heat, chemicals, and perhaps biota from the crust to the ocean. Serendipitous observations and rapid response cruises have now documented that the "event (mega-) plumes" accompanying eruptions range over a factor of 100 in volume (1-150 km3), yet maintain a distinctive and consistent chemical signature (much lower 3He/heat and Mn/heat and higher H2/heat than typical black smokers). Confirmed event plumes have formed at spreading rates from 55-~90 mm/yr, with some incompletely sampled but "event-like" plumes observed at even slower rates (11-30 mm/yr; Gakkel and Carlsberg Ridges). Presently, only four event plumes can be associated with specific eruptions. Large event plumes in the NE Pacific were found over thick (up to ~75 m), voluminous, and slowly extruded pillow mounds. The 2008 eruption on the fast-spreading NE Lau spreading center demonstrated that thin (a few meters), small, and rapidly emplaced sheet flows can generate smaller event plumes. Available evidence suggests that massive fluid discharge occurs virtually simultaneously with an eruption. At Gorda Ridge in 1996, eruption-indicative seismicity began on the same day and location an event plume was found. At Axial Volcano in 1998, moorings 2 km apart both recorded the appearance of a >100-m-thick plume within minutes of the start of a 72-min-long sheet flow eruption. These observations support inferences from plume modeling and chemistry that event plume generation time is hours, not

  20. Investigating Preschool Education and Care in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Den Berg, Owen C.; Vergnani, Tania

    Recognizing the complexities of apartheid with its implications for conducting systems-related research within the vortex of South Africa, a study investigated the implementation of a national system of preschool provision for South Africa. The investigation began by studying two earlier reports: the Reilly-Hofmeyr report of 1983 and the report of…

  1. The June 2014 eruption at Piton de la Fournaise: Robust methods developed for monitoring challenging eruptive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, N.; Ferrazzini, V.; Di Muro, A.; Peltier, A.; Beauducel, F.; Roult, G. C.; Lecocq, T.; Brenguier, F.; Vlastelic, I.; Gurioli, L.; Guyard, S.; Catry, T.; Froger, J. L.; Coppola, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Favalli, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Liuzzo, M.; Giudice, G.; Boissier, P.; Brunet, C.; Catherine, P.; Fontaine, F. J.; Henriette, L.; Lauret, F.; Riviere, A.; Kowalski, P.

    2014-12-01

    After almost 3.5 years of quiescence, Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) produced a small summit eruption on 20 June 2014 at 21:35 (GMT). The eruption lasted 20 hours and was preceded by: i) onset of deep eccentric seismicity (15-20 km bsl; 9 km NW of the volcano summit) in March and April 2014; ii) enhanced CO2 soil flux along the NW rift zone; iii) increase in the number and energy of shallow (<1.5 km asl) VT events. The increase in VT events occurred on 9 June. Their signature, and shallow location, was not characteristic of an eruptive crisis. However, at 20:06 on 20/06 their character changed. This was 74 minutes before the onset of tremor. Deformations then began at 20:20. Since 2007, PdF has emitted small magma volumes (<3 Mm3) in events preceded by weak and short precursory phases. To respond to this challenging activity style, new monitoring methods were deployed at OVPF. While the JERK and MSNoise methods were developed for processing of seismic data, borehole tiltmeters and permanent monitoring of summit gas emissions, plus CO2 soil flux, were used to track precursory activity. JERK, based on an analysis of the acceleration slope of a broad-band seismometer data, allowed advanced notice of the new eruption by 50 minutes. MSNoise, based on seismic velocity determination, showed a significant decrease 7 days before the eruption. These signals were coupled with change in summit fumarole composition. Remote sensing allowed the following syn-eruptive observations: - INSAR confirmed measurements made by the OVPF geodetic network, showing that deformation was localized around the eruptive fissures; - A SPOT5 image acquired at 05:41 on 21/06 allowed definition of the flow field area (194 500 m2); - A MODIS image acquired at 06:35 on 21/06 gave a lava discharge rate of 6.9±2.8 m3 s-1, giving an erupted volume of 0.3 and 0.4 Mm3. - This rate was used with the DOWNFLOW and FLOWGO models, calibrated with the textural data from Piton's 2010 lava, to run lava flow

  2. Source evolution and longevity of the Lusi mud eruption, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, M. L.; Shirzaei, M.; Manga, M.; Fukushima, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The ongoing eruption of the Lusi mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia), which began on May 29, 2006, has displaced more than 60,000 people and cost billions of US dollars in economic losses. We measured ground deformation near Lusi using interferometric processing of 46 L-band synthetic aperture radar images acquired by the ALOS satellite between 2006 and 2011. We analyzed the ground deformation using principal component analysis (PCA) and found that the dominant spatial mode of ground deformation is decreasing exponentially in amplitude with a timescale of 2.1+0.5-0.3 years, implying that the eruption rate will decrease by an order of magnitude, to less than 1000 m3/day, by 2016±1 year, much sooner than previously anticipated (Istadi et al. 2009, Davies et al. 2011, Rudolph et al. 2011). We also modeled the observed ground deformation to determine the mud chamber radius and pressure time history subject to geologic constraints on depth and thickness. The co-evolution of the mud chamber geometry and pressure suggest progressive mobilization of mud during the eruption, a process analogous to one that may occur in large explosive silicic volcanic eruptions.

  3. Worldwide environmental impacts from the eruption of Thera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, P. E.

    1995-10-01

    The eruptions of Thera (Santorini) between 1628 and 1450 BC constituted a natural catastrophe unparalleled in all of history. The last major eruption in 1450 BC destroyed the entire Minoan Fleet at Crete at a time when the Minoans dominated the Mediterranean world. In addition, there had to be massive loss of life from ejecta gases, volcanic ash, bombs, and flows. The collapse of a majestic mountain into a caldera 15 km in diameter caused a giant ocean wave, a tsunami, that at its source was estimated in excess of 46 m high. The tsunami destroyed ships as far away as Crete (105 km) and killed thousands of people along the shorelines in the eastern Mediterranean area. At distant points in Asia Minor and Africa, there was darkness from ash fallout, lightning, and destructive earthquakes. Earthquake waves emanating from the epicenter near the ancient volcano were felt as far away as the Norwegian countries. These disturbances caused great physical damage in the eastern Mediterranean and along the rift valley system from Turkey to the south into central Africa. They caused major damage and fires in north Africa from Sinai to Alexandria, Egypt. Volcanic ash spread upward as a pillar of fire and clouds into the atmosphere and blocked out the sun for many days. The ash reached the stratosphere and moved around the world where the associated gases and fine particulate matter impacted the atmosphere, soils, and waters. Ground-hugging, billowing gases moved along the water surface and destroyed all life downwind, probably killing those who attempted to flee from Thera. The deadly gases probably reached the shores of north Africa. Climatic changes were the aftermath of the eruption and the atmospheric plume was to eventually affect the bristlecone pine of California; the bog oaks of Ireland, England, and Germany, and the grain crops of China. Historical eruptions at Krakatau, Tambora, Vesuvius, and, more currently, eruptions at Nevado del Ruiz, Pinatubo, and Mount Saint

  4. Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    It s long been known that the Sun plays host to the most energetic explosions in the solar system. But key insights into the forms that energy takes have only recently become available. Solar flares have been phenomena of both academic and practical interest since their discovery in 1859. From the academic point of view, they are the nearest events for studying the explosive release of energy in astrophysical magnetized plasmas. From the practical point of view, they disrupt communication channels on Earth, from telegraph communications in 1859 to radio and television signals today. Flares also wreak havoc on the electrical power grid, satellite operations, and GPS signals, and energetic charged particles and radiation are dangerous to passengers on high-altitude polar flights and to astronauts. Flares are not the only explosive phenomena on the Sun. More difficult to observe but equally energetic are the large coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the ejection of up to ten billion tons of magnetized plasma into the solar wind at speeds that can exceed 1000 km/s. CMEs are primarily observed from the side, with coronagraphs that block out the bright disk of the Sun and lower solar atmosphere so that light scattered from the ejected mass can be seen. Major geomagnetic storms are now known to arise from the interaction of CMEs with Earth's magnetosphere. Solar flares are observed without CMEs, and CMEs are observed without flares. The two phenomena often occur together, however, and almost always do in the case of large flares and fast CMEs. The term solar eruptive event refers to the combination of a flare and a CME. Solar eruptive events generate a lot of heat: They can heat plasma to temperatures as high at 50 million Kelvin, producing radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. But that s not all. A fascinating aspect of solar eruptive events is the acceleration of electrons and ions to suprathermal often relativistic energies. The accelerated particles are primarily

  5. Recovery from a Giant Eruption: The Case of Eta Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Martin, John C.; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or SN Impostors are far more mysterious than "real" supernovae, because they are scarcer and because they have received far less theoretical effort. One rather special problem is the disequilibrium state of the post-eruption object. It may be partially observable by watching the star's gradual recovery; which, in principle, may offer clues to the basic instability mechanisms. So far, the only example that can be observed well enough is eta Carinae. This object's history offers tantalizing clues and counter-clues. For instance: (1) Before 2000, the recovery timescale seemed to be of order 150 years; but (2) around 2000, many attributes began to change much more rapidly; and (3) the 150-year recovery process has been punctuated by about three abrupt changes of state. This strange combination of facts has received almost no theoretical attention.

  6. An Eruption on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The first images returned to Earth by New Horizons during its close encounter with Jupiter feature the Galilean moon Io, snapped with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 0840 UTC on February 26, while the moon was 2.5 million miles (4 million kilometers) from the spacecraft.

    Io is intensely heated by its tidal interaction with Jupiter and is thus extremely volcanically active. That activity is evident in these images, which reveal an enormous dust plume, more than 150 miles high, erupting from the volcano Tvashtar. The plume appears as an umbrella-shaped feature of the edge of Io's disk in the 11 o'clock position in the right image, which is a long-exposure (20-millisecond) frame designed specifically to look for plumes like this. The bright spots at 2 o'clock are high mountains catching the setting sun; beyond them the night side of Io can be seen, faintly illuminated by light reflected from Jupiter itself.

    The left image is a shorter exposure -- 3 milliseconds -- designed to look at surface features. In this frame, the Tvashtar volcano shows as a dark spot, also at 11 o'clock, surrounded by a large dark ring, where an area larger than Texas has been covered by fallout from the giant eruption.

    This is the clearest view yet of a plume from Tvashtar, one of Io's most active volcanoes. Ground-based telescopes and the Galileo Jupiter orbiter first spotted volcanic heat radiation from Tvashtar in November 1999, and the Cassini spacecraft saw a large plume when it flew past Jupiter in December 2000. The Keck telescope in Hawaii picked up renewed heat radiation from Tvashtar in spring 2006, and just two weeks ago the Hubble Space Telescope saw the Tvashtar plume in ultraviolet images designed to support the New Horizons flyby.

    Most of those images will be stored onboard the spacecraft for downlink to Earth in March and April.

  7. [Terminology and manifestations of eruption disturbances].

    PubMed

    Janssen, K I; Raghoebar, G M; Visser, A; Vissink, A

    2014-04-01

    Eruption disturbances of teeth are not unusual; many variations are encountered and eruption disturbances can negatively influence the development of the tooth and jaw system. Causes of eruption disturbances can be categorized into general and local factors. The clinical spectrum of eruption disturbances involves syndromic and non-syndromic problems for both kinds of factors, varying from delayed eruption to primary failure of eruption. The following types of eruption disturbances should be distinguished: impaction, primary retention, secondary retention and primary failure of eruption. Early detection of eruption disturbances and timely and appropriate treatment of the various eruption disturbances play an important role in preventing the negative effects of eruption disturbances on the development of the dentition and the craniofacial skeleton.

  8. Seismic array observations for monitoring phreatic eruptions in Iwojima Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Kawaguchi, R.; Chiba, K.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2015-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The volcanic activity is characterized by intensive earthquake activity associated with an island-wide uplift with high uplift rate (30~40 cm/year) and hydrothermal activity. In the last 10 years, phreatic eruptions took place in and near the island in 2012, 2013, and 2015. In such restless volcano, predictions and detections of occurrence points of phreatic eruptions are important for ensuring safety of residents. In the previous studies, we found that the earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, but the precursory activity of the phreatic eruption in 2012 was deviated from the correlation (Ueda et al. 2013 AGU Fall Meeting). For prediction of occurrence points of phreatic eruptions and investigation of the eruption mechanism, we began observation by seismic arrays at two areas in December 2014. The seismic arrays enable to locate epicenters of volcanic tremors, which are not well located by existing seismic stations. In May and June 2015, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force stayed in Iwojima and a live camera of Japan Meteorological Agency found very small phreatic eruptions occurred at the northern beach. Existing seismic stations could not detect seismic signals related with the eruptions. The seismic array could detect weak seismic signals related with the eruptions. Although the seismic arrays could not detect precursory signals because of too small eruption, we expect the seismic arrays can detect precursory seismic signals suggesting occurrence points of small or medium-sized phreatic eruptions. The seismic arrays also detected epicenters of harmonic and monotonic tremors took place at an active fumarolic field in the north earthen part of Iwojima. The apparent velocity of seismic waves (~1km/s) strongly suggests that the tremors relate with hydrothermal activity near ground surface.

  9. Remote Sensing for Ground Deformation Analysis during the Eruptive Event of July 2001 at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, A.; Colesanti, C.; Ferretti, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Palano, M.; Prati, C.; Puglisi, G.; Rocca, F.

    2004-06-01

    The July - August 2001 Mt Etna eruption has been studied using the DinSAR technique and monitored through both continuous GPS measurements on a network of permanent and static stations, as well as daily static and kinematic GPS measurements, made by INGV-CT, on geodetic networks. This eruption, one of the most important lateral eruptive events in the last 30 years, was characterized by an unusual eruptive style, with lava flow emissions at different altitudes along a complex fracture system. A seismic swarm started on July 12th 2001, with most of events located beneath the upper southern flank of the volcano. The number of the daily events gradually decreased until July 18th. The eruption began with the opening of the eruptive vents occurred between 2700, 2500 and 2100 m of altitude, from July 17th to 19th. Lava flows came out from these vents and covered the upper and middle southern flanks of the volcano. A little flow came out also on the north-eastern flank, from an eruptive fracture opened later in the Valle del Leone area.

  10. Overview of the 2004-2008 Eruption of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    Well-monitored and observed volcanic eruptions provide critical data sets needed to understand sub-surface properties, timescales of geophysical and geochemical processes and the conditions necessary to initiate or cease eruptive activity. Mount St. Helens' second eruptive episode within 30 years began on 1 October 2004 with a low-temperature vapor-and-ash emission and ended approximately 40 months later after extrusion of nearly 100 million m3 (DRE) of dacitic lava (roughly equivalent to the volume of the 1980s lava dome) into the 1980s crater. Unlike the episodic explosive and lava-dome-building events that characterized the 1980s eruption, the 2004-2008 episode consisted of continuous lava-dome extrusion punctuated by only two minor explosive events. Seismic unrest heralding the new eruptive episode began in late September 2004 after unseasonally heavy August rains and during a year of overall low seismic activity and no anomalous trends in either deformation or volcanic gas emissions. Soon after the start of increased seismic activity, visible near-field deformation occurred on the south side of the 1980s lava dome, with detectable volcanic gas following several days later. Lava-dome extrusion began in mid-October 2004. Monitoring parameters exhibited gradually diminishing trends such that: (1) significant seismicity accompanied high extrusion rates (>6 to < 2 m3/s) and lava spines with well-developed gouge surfaces during the first year+ of the eruption, but by the last year, when extrusion rates were below 0.5 m3/sec and the gouge surface was smaller and more poorly developed, seismicity had decreased markedly such that the eruption was nearly aseismic; (2) volcanic gas emission rates, which were barely above background by the end of the first year, were barely above instrumental limits during the last year of the eruption; and (3) flank and far-field deflation centered on the crater starting in late September 2004, dropped monotonically to below noise level

  11. Water, CO2, Cl, and F in melt inclusions in phenocrysts from three Holocene explosive eruptions, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Newman, S.; Stolper, E.

    1992-01-01

    Rare melt inclusions ~100 ??m in diameter trapped near the boundaries of corroded patchy zones in plagioclase phenocrysts from Plinian pumice of three Holocene eruptions were analyzed by IR spectroscopy for molecular H2O, OH groups, and CO2 and by electron microprobe for Cl and F. The three rhyodacitic eruptions, each of which began with a Plinian phase, occurred over ~200 yr. The Llao Rock and Cleetwood eruptions ended with degassed lava flows and the subsequent climatic eruption with voluminous ignimbrite. Location of melt inclusions near boundaries of patchy zones, which are mantled by oscillatory-zoned overgrowths, suggests that their H2O concentrations represent magmatic values significantly before eruption. -from Authors

  12. Merapi 2010 eruption-Chronology and extrusion rates monitored with satellite radar and used in eruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, John S.; Schneider, David J.; Griswold, Julia P.; Keeler, Ronald H.; Burton, William C.; Noyles, Christopher; Newhall, Christopher G.; Ratdomopurbo, Antonius

    2013-07-01

    Despite dense cloud cover, satellite-borne commercial Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) enabled frequent monitoring of Merapi volcano's 2010 eruption. Near-real-time interpretation of images derived from the amplitude of the SAR signals and timely delivery of these interpretations to those responsible for warnings, allowed satellite remote sensing for the first time to play an equal role with in situ seismic, geodetic and gas monitoring in guiding life-saving decisions during a major volcanic crisis. Our remotely sensed data provide an observational chronology for the main phase of the 2010 eruption, which lasted 12 days (26 October-7 November, 2010). Unlike the prolonged low-rate and relatively low explosivity dome-forming and collapse eruptions of recent decades at Merapi, the eruption began with an explosive eruption that produced a new summit crater on 26 October and was accompanied by an ash column and pyroclastic flows that extended 8 km down the flanks. This initial explosive event was followed by smaller explosive eruptions on 29 October-1 November, then by a period of rapid dome growth on 1-4 November, which produced a summit lava dome with a volume of ~ 5 × 106 m3. A paroxysmal VEI 4 magmatic eruption (with ash column to 17 km altitude) destroyed this dome, greatly enlarged the new summit crater and produced extensive pyroclastic flows (to ~ 16 km radial distance in the Gendol drainage) and surges during the night of 4-5 November. The paroxysmal eruption was followed by a period of jetting of gas and tephra and by a second short period (12 h) of rapid dome growth on 6 November. The eruption ended with low-level ash and steam emissions that buried the 6 November dome with tephra and continued at low levels until seismicity decreased to background levels by about 23 November. Our near-real-time commercial SAR documented the explosive events on 26 October and 4-5 November and high rates of dome growth (> 25 m3 s- 1). An event tree analysis for the previous

  13. Comparing Dynamics in Eruptive and Non-Eruptive Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Slater, Gregory L.; Frank, Zoe Anne

    2016-05-01

    Close comparison of EUV and coronagraph data suggests that there may not be clear distinction between eruptive and non-eruptive flares as far as the coronal and chromospheric signatures are concerned. Here we define eruptive and non-eruptive flares in terms of the presence and absence of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). We have studied several flares in both categories using Hinode/SOT and IRIS data. The pointing of the Hinode/SOT data has been updated by correlating them with AIA 1700 A images. We show our initial results about how the flare development compares in eruptive and non-eruptive flares, including the reconnection rate as derived from the magnetic field swept over by flare ribbons (in SOT Ca images), and the line-of-sight velocities at different locations and temperatures (in IRIS spectral data). We also discuss large-scale disturbances and related CMEs in SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO data as context information.

  14. Remote sensing and petrological observations on the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka: Implications for reconstruction of the eruption chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Dmitry; Volynets, Anna O.

    2015-12-01

    We present a reconstruction of the chronological sequence of events that took place during the first days of the 2012-2013 Tolbachik fissure eruption using petrological data and remote sensing methods. We were forced to use this approach because bad weather conditions did not allow direct observations during the first two days of the eruption. We interpreted infrared images from the scanning radiometer VIIRS Suomi NPP and correlated the output with the results of the geochemical study, including comparison of the ash, deposited at the period from 27 to 29 November, with the samples of lava and bombs erupted from the Menyailov and Naboko vents. We argue that the compositional change observed in the eruption products (the decrease of SiO2 concentration and K2O/MgO ratio, increase of MgO concentration and Mg#) started approximately 24 h after the eruption began. At this time the center of activity moved to the southern part of the fissure, where the Naboko group of vents was formed; therefore, this timeframe also characterizes the timing of the Naboko vent opening. The Naboko group of vents remained active until the end of eruption in September 2013.

  15. Episode 49 of the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea volcano-breakdown of a steady-state eruptive era

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Heliker, C.C.; Mattox, T.N.; Kauahikaua, J.P.; Helz, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    The Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption (1983-present) is the longest lived rift eruption of either Kilauea or neighboring Mauna Loa in recorded history. The initial fissure opening in January 1983 was followed by three years of episodic fire fountaining at the Pu'u 'O'o vent on Kilauea's east rift zone ???19km from the summit (episodes 4-47). These spectacular events gave way in July 1986 to five and a half years of nearcontinuous, low-level effusion from the Kupaianaha vent, ??? 3km to the cast (episode 48). A 49th episode began in November 1991 with the opening of a new fissure between Pu'u 'O'o and Kupaianaha. this three week long outburst heralded an era of more erratic eruptive behavior characterized by the shut down of Kupaianaha in February 1992 and subsequent intermittent eruption from vents on the west flank of Pu'u 'O'o (episodes 50 and 51). The events occurring over this period are due to progressive shrinkage of the rift-zone reservoir beneath the eruption site, and had limited impact on eruption temperatures and lava composition. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Kamchatkan Volcanoes Explosive Eruptions in 2014 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Manevich, Alexander; Melnikov, Dmitry; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    There are 30 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka, and several of them are continuously active. In 2014, three of the Kamchatkan volcanoes - Sheveluch, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky - had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruption of volcanoes is the most dangerous for aircraft because in a few hours or days in the atmosphere and the stratosphere can produce about several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch Volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2014: on January 08 and 12, May 12, September 24, October 02 and 28, November 16, 22 and 26, and December 05, 17, 26 and 29: ash plumes rose up to 9-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the eastern and western directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Klyuchi Village (on January 12, June 11, and November 16). Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Karymsky volcano has been in a state of explosive eruption since 1996. The moderate ash explosions of this volcano were noting during 2014: from March 24 till April 02; and from September 03 till December 10. Ash plumes rose up to 5 km a.s.l. and extended more 300 km mainly to the eastern directions of the volcano. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to local aviation. Explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano began on June 06, 2014 and continues in January 2015 too. Ash explosions rose up to 8-10 km a.s.l. on June 19, September 05 and 07, October 11

  17. Volcanic Eruptions in Kamchatka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Sheveluch Stratovolcano Click on the image for full resolution TIFF Klyuchevskoy Stratovolcano Click on the image for full resolution TIFF

    One of the most volcanically active regions of the world is the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Siberia, Russia. It is not uncommon for several volcanoes to be erupting at the same time. On April 26, 2007, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radioneter (ASTER) on NASA's Terra spacecraft captured these images of the Klyuchevskoy and Sheveluch stratovolcanoes, erupting simultaneously, and 80 kilometers (50 miles) apart. Over Klyuchevskoy, the thermal infrared data (overlaid in red) indicates that two open-channel lava flows are descending the northwest flank of the volcano. Also visible is an ash-and-water plume extending to the east. Sheveluch volcano is partially cloud-covered. The hot flows highlighted in red come from a lava dome at the summit. They are avalanches of material from the dome, and pyroclastic flows.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining

  18. Explosion depths for phreatomagmatic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg A.; Graettinger, Alison H.; Sonder, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface phreatomagmatic explosions can result from the interaction of ascending magma with groundwater. Experiments over a wide range of energies show that for a given energy there is a depth below which an explosion will be contained within the subsurface (not erupt), and there is a corresponding shallower depth that will optimize ejecta dispersal. We combine these relationships with constraints on the energies of phreatomagmatic explosions at maar-diatreme volcanoes and show that most eruptions are likely sourced by explosions in the uppermost ~200 m, and even shallower ones (<100 m) are likely to dominate deposition onto tephra rings. Most explosions below ~200 m will not erupt but contribute to formation of, and to the vertical mixing of materials within, a diatreme (vent structure), with only rare very high energy explosions between ~200 and 500 m erupting. Similar constraints likely apply at other volcanoes that experience phreatomagmatic explosions.

  19. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.

    As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  20. Futurvolc and the Bardarbunga eruption 2014-15 Iceland, success in the field and laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskuldsson, Armann; Jonsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thordarson, Thor

    2016-04-01

    The Bardarbunga volcanic system in Iceland started unrest in August 2014. Seismic activity gradually build up, until magma began to be extruded on surface. The first eruption occurred on the 28th of August and was small and subglacial, the second eruption took place outside the glacier, on the 29th of August and lasted for few hours. Third and largest eruption started on early morning 31st of August. This was to be the largest eruption in Iceland since Laki eruption 1783. The eruption used the same fissure that had opened up on the 28th but was much larger. The fissure was about 2 km long with a curtain of fire along the whole fissure, curtains reaching up to 150 m into the air. The area in which the eruption took place is a glacial river outwash plain, thus relatively flat. Although the eruption site is remote, being in the highlands north of the icecap Vatnajökull, at an average altitude of some 700 m, the flat sandur plain offered a unique opportunity to combine satellite and on site observations methods. The eruption ended on the 27th of February 2015, thus lasting for almost 6 months, during this time some 1.44 km3 of lava was erupted. From day one satellite data from NOAA AVHRR, MODIS, LANDSAT 7 and 8, ASTER, EO-1 ALI, EO-1 HYPERION, SENTINEL-1, RADARSAT-2 COSMO SKYMED and TERRASAR X where collected and used in combination with onsite observation. Resulting data give unique information on the effusion rates in basaltic fissure eruptions and its evolution with time. Further information on flow behavior and cooling of basaltic lava being emplaced in a relatively flat land can be used for future and past predictions. In this talk we shall show how valuable the combination of satellite data to field observation are to be able to precisely monitor on of the largest lava eruption on earth for the past 200 years. The role of Futurevolc and preparedness involved in that work greatly enhanced and facilitated synchronization of onsite and remote data during the

  1. Assessing Eruption Column Height in Ancient Flood Basalt Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Self, Stephen; Schmidt, Anja; Hunter, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    A buoyant plume model is used to explore the ability of flood basalt eruptions to inject climate-relevant gases into the stratosphere. An example from the 1986 Izu-Oshima basaltic fissure eruption validates the model's ability to reproduce the observed maximum plume heights of 12-16 km above sea level, sustained above fire-fountains. The model predicts maximum plume heights of 13-17 km for source widths of between 4-16 m when 32% (by mass) of the erupted magma is fragmented and involved in the buoyant plume (effective volatile content of 6 wt%). Assuming that the Miocene-age Roza eruption (part of the Columbia River Basalt Group) sustained fire-fountains of similar height to Izu-Oshima (1.6 km above the vent), we show that the Roza eruption could have sustained buoyant ash and gas plumes that extended into the stratosphere at approximately 45 deg N. Assuming 5 km long active fissure segments and 9000 Mt of SO2 released during explosive phases over a 10-15 year duration, the approximately 180 km of known Roza fissure length could have supported approximately 36 explosive events/phases, each with a duration of 3-4 days. Each 5 km fissure segment could have emitted 62 Mt of SO2 per day into the stratosphere while actively fountaining, the equivalent of about three 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruptions per day. Each fissure segment could have had one to several vents, which subsequently produced lava without significant fountaining for a longer period within the decades-long eruption. Sensitivity of plume rise height to ancient atmospheric conditions is explored. Although eruptions in the Deccan Traps (approximately 66 Ma) may have generated buoyant plumes that rose to altitudes in excess of 18 km, they may not have reached the stratosphere because the tropopause was substantially higher in the late Cretaceous. Our results indicate that some flood basalt eruptions, such as Roza, were capable of repeatedly injecting large masses of SO2 into the stratosphere. Thus sustained

  2. Human Footprints in Relation to the 1790 Eruption of Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D. A.; Rausch, J.

    2008-12-01

    stream, because its fallout was mainly dispersed east-southeastward by westerlies, a wind direction found only at high altitudes in Hawai'i. Surges associated with the high eruption column swept over the southwest and west rims of the caldera. These relations indicate that the accretionary lapilli (footprints) ash was an early stage of a powerful eruption involving both high columns and lithic surges. Hawaiian oral tradition says that the 1790 eruption was large, and Jaggar calculated a column height probably greater than 9 km (30,000 ft) based on observations of a pillar (eruption column) seen over Mauna Loa when viewed from the north. This is about halfway through the jet stream. Our work found two deposits of the late 1700s dispersed east of Kilauea's summit. The younger was probably erupted in 1790. A reconstruction of events in 1790 suggests that the accretionary lapilli ash fell early in the eruption, blown southwestward into areas where family groups, mainly women and children, were chipping glass from old pahoehoe for tools. They probably sought shelter while the ash was falling. but once it stopped, they slogged through the mud, leaving footprints in the 2-cm-thick deposit.. Meanwhile, the warriors and their families, camped at Kilauea's summit (supposedly for 3 days) waiting for the eruption to end, saw the sky clear following the ash eruption and started walking southwestward along the west side of the summit area. Then the most powerful stage of the eruption began, sending surges westward across the path of the doomed group, killing many. Afterwards, any survivors or rescuers who walked on the accretionary lapilli ash, by now dry, left no footprints that are preserved.

  3. Infrasound research of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are efficient sources of infrasound produced by the rapid perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosive source. Being able to propagate up to large distances from the source, infrasonic waves from major (VEI 4 or larger) volcanic eruptions have been recorded for many decades with analogue micro-barometers at large regional distances. In late 1980s, near-field observations became progressively more common and started to have direct impact on the understanding and modeling of explosive source dynamics, to eventually play a primary role in volcano research. Nowadays, infrasound observation from a large variety of volcanic eruptions, spanning from VEI 0 to VEI 5 events, has shown a dramatic variability in terms of signature, excess pressure and frequency content of radiated infrasound and has been used to infer complex eruptive source mechanisms for the different kinds of events. Improved processing capability and sensors has allowed unprecedented precise locations of the explosive source and is progressively increasing the possibility to monitor volcanoes from distant records. Very broadband infrasound observations is also showing the relation between volcanic eruptions and the atmosphere, with the eruptive mass injection in the atmosphere triggering acoustic-gravity waves which eventually might control the ash dispersal and fallout.

  4. Solar Activity and Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Our Sun is a dynamic, ever-changing star. In general, its atmosphere displays major variation on an 11-year cycle. Throughout the cycle, the atmosphere occasionally exhibits large, sudden outbursts of energy. These "solar eruptions" manifest themselves in the form of solar flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and energetic particle releases. They are of high interest to scientists both because they represent fundamental processes that occur in various astrophysical context, and because, if directed toward Earth, they can disrupt Earth-based systems and satellites. Research over the last few decades has shown that the source of the eruptions is localized regions of energy-storing magnetic field on the Sun that become destabilized, leading to a release of the stored energy. Solar scientists have (probably) unraveled the basic outline of what happens in these eruptions, but many details are still not understood. In recent years we have been studying what triggers these magnetic eruptions, using ground-based and satellite-based solar observations in combination with predictions from various theoretical models. We will present an overview of solar activity and solar eruptions, give results from some of our own research, and discuss questions that remain to be explored.

  5. Magma discharge and lava flow field growth in the Nornahraun/Bardarbunga eruption Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskuldsson, Armann; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Riishus, Morten S.; Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Thordarson, Torvaldur; Drouin, Vincent; Futurevolc IES field work Team

    2015-04-01

    Bardarbunga volcano was reactivated by an intense seismic swarm on 16/8 2014. The seismic swarm originating at the central volcano propagated north out into the associated fissure swarm during following days. As it reached the outwash plains of Jokulsa a fjollum a subaerial eruption began. Three eruptions have taken place on the outwash plane in the event, on the 29/8, 31/8 to present and on 5/9. In this presentation we discuss the second eruption that began on the 31/8 and how we do approach magma discharge parameters by combination of field observation and satellite photogrammetry. The eruption took place at the northern end of the eruptive fissure from AD 1797 and the lava was expelled out onto to relatively flat outwash plains of the glacial river Jokulsa a Fjollum thus access to eruptive products was relatively easy. It was clear from the first moments of the eruption that it had a high initial effusion rate, with lava covering the sandur plains at the rate of 25-30 m2/s. Within the first week the lava flow had covered more than 18 km2. That amounts to an average effusion rate between 195 to 280 m3/s. On the 11/9 the lava flow had grown to 25 km2, at that time effusion rate was between 140 to 247 m3/s, The lava stopped advancing and started to grow sideways and inflating. This reoccurred on the 26/9 and 12/10, with clockwise horizontal stacking of lobes to the south. From mid-November the lava growth has been controlled by tube-fed lava streams, at first generating breakouts close to the vent area and then during the last week before Christmas breaking out at the far NE end of the lava flow. As the eruption proceeded effusion rate gradually decreased and at the time of writing it is down to 9 to 76 m3/s. For assessment of areal extent of the lava field a combination of ground gps tracking and satellite photogrammetry was used. However one of the main challenges in the monitoring of the eruption was to obtain volumetric effusion rates. In the beginning of the

  6. Eruptions from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    The Sun often exhibits outbursts, launching material from its surface in powerful releases of energy. Recent analysis of such an outburst captured on video by several Sun-monitoring spacecraft may help us understand the mechanisms that launch these eruptions.Many OutburstsSolar jets are elongated, transient structures that are thought to regularly release magnetic energy from the Sun, contributing to coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the other hand, are enormous blob-like explosions, violently ejecting energy and mass from the Sun at incredible speeds.But could these two types of events actually be related? According to a team of scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China, they may well be. The team, led by Jiajia Liu, has analyzed observations of a coronal jet that they believe prompted the launch of a powerful CME.Observing an ExplosionGif of a movie of the CME, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly at a wavelength of 304. The original movie can be found in the article. [Liu et al.]An army of spacecraft was on hand to witness the event on 15 Jan 2013 including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The instruments on board these observatories captured the drama on the northern limb of the Sun as, at 19:32 UT, a coronal jet formed. Just eight minutes later, a powerful CME was released from the same active region.The fact that the jet and CME occurred in the same place at roughly the same time suggests theyre related. But did the initial motions of the CME blob trigger the jet? Or did the jet trigger the CME?Tying It All TogetherIn a recently published study, Liu and collaborators analyzed the multi-wavelength observations of this event to find the heights and positions of the jet and CME. From this analysis, they determined that the coronal jet triggered the release

  7. A unified history of the ocean around southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Colin; Master, Sharad

    2010-05-01

    The movement with respect to Africa of the hotspot marked by present-day Bouvet island is extrapolated backward in time to a position in the Lower Limpopo Valley at the time of the Karoo-Ferrar basalt event (183 Ma). In a tight reconstruction of the Precambrian fragments of Gondwana at this time, the triangular gap that remains between South Africa's Precambrian, that of Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and the eastward-extrapolated front of the Cape Fold Belt we fill with the Precambrian fragments of South Patagonia and the Falkland Islands. We postulate that the 183 Ma mantle upwelling produced a triple junction-type fracture marked by the alignments of the Lebombo, the SE margin of the Zimbabwe craton and the giant Botswana dyke swarm (178 Ma) that was rather quickly followed by the expulsion of the South Patagonia terranes from the Gondwana assembly along the alignment of the Falklands-Agulhas Fault Zone (FAFZ) as a transform margin. The space created was filled with igneous material akin to the present day Afar triangle. The magma supply generated not only oceanic crust but also overlying igneous deposits, much probably erupted subaerially. These developed progressively into the Falklands Plateau, the Mozambique Plains, the Mozambique Rise and the Explora Wedge of Antarctica. Not until the early Cretaceous did the growth of normal ocean crust start to exceed the ability of the declining mantle plume to cover the new ocean crust in a confined space with subaerial deposits that substantially thickened otherwise ‘oceanic' crust. When Antarctica and Africa began to separate before about 167 Ma, the future Mozambique Rise moved with Antarctica until, at about 125 Ma, a modest ridge reorganization east of Africa left Madagascar and the Mozambique Rise as part of the Africa Plate. An increasing westerly component to the movement of Antarctica against Africa preceded the initial opening of the South Atlantic and the fusing of the South Patagonia terranes with the

  8. West Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Hazy and Dusty Skies over Western Africa     View Larger Image ... the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the ...

  9. South Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters     ... and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached ...

  10. Introduction to Augustine Volcano and Overview of the 2006 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    This overview represents the combined efforts of scores of people, including Alaska Volcano Observatory staff from the US Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys; additional members of those agencies outside of AVO; and volcanologists from elsewhere. Augustine is a young, and therefore small island volcano in the Cook Inlet region of the eastern Aleutian arc. It is among the most active volcanoes in the arc, with six major historic eruptions, and a vigorous eruptive history going back at least 2,500 years. Eruptions typically begin explosively, and finish with the extrusion of domes and sometimes short, steep lava flows. At least 14 times (most recently in 1883) the -summit has become over-steepened and failed, producing debris avalanches which reached tidewater. Magmas within each of the well-studied eruptions are crystal-rich andesite spanning up to seven weight percent silica. Mixing and mingling are ubiquitous and occur at scales from meters to microns. In general, magmagenesis at Augustine is open, messy, and transcrustal. The 2006 eruption was broadly similar to the 20th century eruptions. Unrest began midway through 2005, with steadily increasing numbers of microearthquakes and continuous inflation of the edifice. By mid-December there were obvious morphological and thermal changes at the summit, as well as phreatic explosions and more passive venting of S-rich gasses. In mid-January 2006 phreatomagmatic explosions gave way to magmatic explosions, producing pyroclastic flows dominated by low-silica andesite, as well as lahars, followed by a small summit dome. In late January the nature of seismicity, eruptive style, and type of erupted magma all changed, and block-and-ash flows of high-silica, crystal-rich andesite were emplaced as the edifice deflated. Re-inflation well below the edifice and low-level effusion continued through February. During the second week

  11. Late Permian marine ecosystem collapse began in deeper waters: evidence from brachiopod diversity and body size changes.

    PubMed

    He, W-H; Shi, G R; Twitchett, R J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K-X; Song, H-J; Yue, M-L; Wu, S-B; Wu, H-T; Yang, T-L; Xiao, Y-F

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Permian-Triassic brachiopod diversity and body size changes from different water depths spanning the continental shelf to basinal facies in South China provides insights into the process of environmental deterioration. Comparison of the temporal changes of brachiopod diversity between deepwater and shallow-water facies demonstrates that deepwater brachiopods disappeared earlier than shallow-water brachiopods. This indicates that high environmental stress commenced first in deepwater settings and later extended to shallow waters. This environmental stress is attributed to major volcanic eruptions, which first led to formation of a stratified ocean and a chemocline in the outer shelf and deeper water environments, causing the disappearance of deep marine benthos including brachiopods. The chemocline then rapidly migrated upward and extended to shallow waters, causing widespread mass extinction of shallow marine benthos. We predict that the spatial and temporal patterns of earlier onset of disappearance/extinction and ecological crisis in deeper water ecosystems will be recorded during other episodes of rapid global warming. PMID:25412754

  12. Storage, migration, and eruption of magma at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, 1971-1972

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Christiansen, R.L.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Peterson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    The magmatic plumbing system of Kilauea Volcano consists of a broad region of magma generation in the upper mantle, a steeply inclined zone through which magma rises to an intravolcano reservoir located about 2 to 6 km beneath the summit of the volcano, and a network of conduits that carry magma from this reservoir to sites of eruption within the caldera and along east and southwest rift zones. The functioning of most parts of this system was illustrated by activity during 1971 and 1972. When a 29-month-long eruption at Mauna Ulu on the east rift zone began to wane in 1971, the summit region of the volcano began to inflate rapidly; apparently, blockage of the feeder conduit to Mauna Ulu diverted a continuing supply of mantle-derived magma to prolonged storage in the summit reservoir. Rapid inflation of the summit area persisted at a nearly constant rate from June 1971 to February 1972, when a conduit to Mauna Ulu was reopened. The cadence of inflation was twice interrupted briefly, first by a 10-hour eruption in Kilauea Caldera on 14 August, and later by an eruption that began in the caldera and migrated 12 km down the southwest rift zone between 24 and 29 September. The 14 August and 24-29 September eruptions added about 107 m3 and 8 ?? 106 m3, respectively, of new lava to the surface of Kilauea. These volumes, combined with the volume increase represented by inflation of the volcanic edifice itself, account for an approximately 6 ?? 106 m3/month rate of growth between June 1971 and January 1972, essentially the same rate at which mantle-derived magma was supplied to Kilauea between 1952 and the end of the Mauna Ulu eruption in 1971. The August and September 1971 lavas are tholeiitic basalts of similar major-element chemical composition. The compositions can be reproduced by mixing various proportions of chemically distinct variants of lava that erupted during the preceding activity at Mauna Ulu. Thus, part of the magma rising from the mantle to feed the Mauna Ulu

  13. Featured Image: Solar Prominence Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    In these images from the Solar Dynamics Observatorys AIA instrument (click for the full resolution!), two solar prominence eruptions (one from June 2011 and one from August 2012) are shown in pre- and post-eruption states. The images at the top are taken in the Fe XII 193 bandpass and the images at the bottom are taken in the He II 304 bandpass. When a team of scientists searched through seven years of solar images taken by the STEREO (Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory) spacecraft, these two eruptions were found to extend all the way out to a distance of 1 AU. They were the only two examples of clear, bright, and compact prominence eruptions found to do so. The scientists, led by Brian Wood (Naval Research Laboratory), used these observations to reconstruct the motion of the eruption and model how prominences expand as they travel away from the Sun. Theimage to the rightshowsa STEREO observation compared to the teams 3D model of theprominences shape and expansion. To learn more about theresults from this study, check out the paper below.CitationBrian E. Wood et al 2016 ApJ 816 67. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/816/2/67

  14. Stratigraphy and eruption history of pre-Green Tuff peralkaline welded ignimbrites, Pantelleria, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Nina; Branney, Mike, ,, Dr; Williams, Rebecca, ,, Dr; Norry, Mike, ,, Dr

    2013-04-01

    A revised volcanic stratigraphy is presented for the ignimbrites of Pantelleria, a peralkaline caldera volcano situated in the submerged continental rift between Africa and Sicily. The volcano has been active for ×325 ka (Mahood & Hildreth, 1986), producing eight major ignimbrites from large central eruptions, which appear to have alternated with numerous minor pumice falls and lavas from scattered local centres. The main ignimbrites can be traced along superb coastal exposures and have been logged in detail. Eruption-units have been defined by the position of palaeosols and a type section designated. Lithic breccias and pumice fall deposits associated with these major ignimbrites are interpreted as part of the same eruption overcoming correlation problems encountered by previous workers (cf Mahood & Hildreth, 1986). The ignimbrites are 2 to >20 m thick, welded to rheomorphic and cover most of the island, recording devastating, radial, high-temperature density currents. Five of the eight major ignimbrites contain lithic breccias, which have commonly been interpreted as recording caldera collapse events, but the details of individual calderas are not clear. The ignimbrites were erupted between 181 and 50 ka suggesting that the early history of the island (325 to 181 ka) differs from later stages in that only local pumice and lava-producing eruptions have occurred. This means that the amount of erupted magma increased in the later stage as the ignimbrites represent eruptions of many times the volume of the local centres. Distal peralkaline tephras have been found around the Mediterranean as far away as ~1200 km. With only this volcano erupting peralkaline compositions, it suggests that eruptions from Pantelleria have had a substantial impact on their environment. We infer that there were few Plinian events on the island, and that the distal tephras may be co-ignimbrite ashfall deposits. REFERENCES: Mahood, G.A., Hildreth, W., (1986) Bulletin of Volcanology 48, 143-172.

  15. Eruption history of the Tharsis shield volcanoes, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    The Tharsis Montes volcanoes and Olympus Mons are giant shield volcanoes. Although estimates of their average surface age have been made using crater counts, the length of time required to build the shields has not been considered. Crater counts for the volcanoes indicate the constructs are young; average ages are Amazonian to Hesperian. In relative terms; Arsia Mons is the oldest, Pavonis Mons intermediate, and Ascreaus Mons the youngest of the Tharsis Montes shield; Olympus Mons is the youngest of the group. Depending upon the calibration, absolute ages range from 730 Ma to 3100 Ma for Arsia Mons and 25 Ma to 100 Ma for Olympus Mons. These absolute chronologies are highly model dependent, and indicate only the time surficial volcanism ceased, not the time over which the volcano was built. The problem of estimating the time necessary to build the volcanoes can be attacked in two ways. First, eruption rates from terrestrial and extraterrestrial examples can be used to calculate the required period of time to build the shields. Second, some relation of eruptive activity between the volcanoes can be assumed, such as they all began at a speficic time or they were active sequentially, and calculate the eruptive rate. Volumes of the shield volcanoes were derived from topographic/volume data.

  16. 1891 Submarine eruption of Foerstner volcano (Pantelleria, Sicily) : insights into the vent structure of basaltic balloon eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. T.; Carey, S.; Bell, K. L.; Rosi, M.; Marani, M.; Roman, C.; Pistolesi, M.; Baker, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous shallow water basaltic eruptions have produced abundant floating scoria up to several meters in diameter, yet little is known about the conditions that give rise to this unusual style of volcanism. On October 17, 1891, a submarine eruption began 4 kilometers northwest of the island of Pantelleria, Sicily. The eruptive vent was located at a depth of 250 meters along the NW-SE trending Sicily Channel Rift Zone. Evidence for the eruption was provided by the occurrence of hot, scoriaceous lava "balloons" floating on the sea surface along a narrow line about 850-1000 meters long trending along the rift. These extremely vesicular fragments were spherical to ellipsoidal in shape and ranged from <50 to 250 cm in diameter. Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and existing bathymetric maps have been used to conduct the first detailed investigation of a vent site associated with this unique style of volcanism. In 2011 the ROV Hercules, deployed from the E/V Nautilus, explored the 1891 Foerstner vent using high definition video cameras and produced a high resolution bathymetric map of the area using a BlueView multibeam imaging sonar. Light backscattering and oxidation-reduction potential sensors (MAPRs) were added to Hercules to detect discharge from active venting. ROV video footage has been used in conjunction with the high resolution bathymetric data to construct a geologic map of the vent area based on a variety of facies descriptors, such as abundance of scoria bombs, occurrence of pillow or scoria flow lobes, extent of sediment cover, and presence of spatter-like deposits. Initial results of the mapping have shown that there are two main vents that erupted within the observed area of floating scoria and most likely erupted at the same time as evidenced by similar bulk chemical compositions of recovered samples. Scoria bomb beds and some scoria flow lobes largely cover the suspected main vent, located at a depth of 250 meters. Distinct pillow flow lobes cover the

  17. Hybrid Pyroclastic Deposits Accumulated From The Eruptive Transitional Regime of Plinian Eruptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Muro, Andrea; Rosi, Mauro

    In the past 15 years sedimentological studies (Valentine and Giannetti, 1995; Wilson and Hildreth, 1997; Rosi et al., 2001), physical models (Neri et al., 1988; Veitch and Woods, 2000; Kaminski and Jaupart, 2001) and laboratory experiments (Carey et al., 1988) converge at defining a new eruptive regime transitional between the fully convective and the fully collapsing end -members. Buoyant columns and density currents are contemporaneously fed in the transitional dynamic regime and fall beds are intercalated with the density current deposits in the area invested by them. The sedimentological analysis of the well exposed 800yr B.P. plinian eruption of the volcano Quilotoa (Ecuador) enabled us to i) recognize a gradual evolution of the eruptive regime, ii) characterize the fall and density current deposits emplaced during the transitional regime. The eruptive activity began with at least two phreatic explosions and the effusion of a small volume lava dome. Eruptive behaviour then switched to explosive and fed a purely convective column that accumulated a reverse graded pumice fall while rising up to an height of 30 km. A small volume, diluted and slow density current (S1 current) was emplaced in the proximal SW sector just before the column reached its maximum height. Two group s of more voluminous and faster intra-plinian density currents (S2 and S3 currents) were subsequently emplaced contemporaneously with the accumulation of the lower and upper part respectively of a normal graded pumice fall bed. S2 and S3 currents were radially distributed around the crater and deposited bedded layers with facies of decreasing energy when moving away from the crater. Massive beds of small volume were emplaced only i) inside the proximal valley channel near the topography break in slope, ii) outside the valley channel in medial area where the currents impinged against relieves. A thick sequence of pyroclastic flow deposits (S4 currents) accumulated in the valley channels around

  18. A tectonic earthquake sequence preceding the April-May 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Stihler, S.D.; Power, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    On 4 March 1999, a shallow ML 5.2 earthquake occurred beneath Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc. This earthquake was located 10-15 km west of Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite stratovolcano. A Strombolian eruption began at Shishaldin roughly 1 month after the mainshock, culminating in a large explosive eruption on 19 April. We address the question of whether or not the eruption caused the mainshock by computing the Coulomb stress change caused by an inflating dike on fault planes oriented parallel to the mainshock focal mechanism. We found Coulomb stress increases of ???0.1 MPa in the region of the mainshock, suggesting that magma intrusion prior to the eruption could have caused the mainshock. Satellite and seismic data indicate that magma was moving upwards beneath Shishaldin well before the mainshock. indicating that, in an overall sense, the mainshock cannot be said to have caused the eruption. However, observations of changes at the volcano following the mainshock and several large aftershocks suggest that the earthquakes may, in turn, have influenced the course of the eruption.

  19. Shallow pressure sources associated with the 2007 and 2014 phreatic eruptions of Mt. Ontake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Akimichi; Onizawa, Shin'ya

    2016-07-01

    We modeled pressure sources under Mount Ontake volcano, Japan, on the basis of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observations of ground deformation during the time period including the 2007 and 2014 phreatic eruptions. The total change in volume in two sources below sea level in the period including the 2007 eruption was estimated from GNSS network observations to be 6 × 106 m3. Additionally, data from a GNSS campaign survey yielded an estimated volume change of 0.28 × 106 m3 in a shallower source just beneath the volcanic vents. The 2007 eruption may have been activated by magmatic activity at depth. During the 2014 eruption, the volume change at depth was very small. However, tiltmeter data indicated inflation from a shallow source that began 7 min before the eruption, representing a volume change estimated to be 0.38 × 106 m3. We infer that the potential for subsurface hydrothermal activity may have remained high after the 2007 eruption.

  20. Textural analysis of tephra from a rhyodacitic eruption sequence, Thira (Santorini), Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.

    1983-01-01

    The Minoan eruption sequence of 1390 B.C. produced a minimum volume of 13 km/sup 3/ of rhyodacitic tephra (dense rock equivalent). The eruptions evolved from magmatic to phreatomagmatic and back to a mix of both processes. Thin section and scanning electron micrograph analysis of the tephra sequence provide information about eruption processes that is critical to interpretation of the field data. The eruptions began at a vent located above sea level and produced a coarse-grained Plinian pumice deposit. All later phases of the eruption involved propagating vent(s) into an older flooded caldera and flooding of the sea into a collapsing Minoan caldera. Interaction of magma and water produced fine-grained tephra that consist mostly of slightly curved, nearly flat shards and small pumice pyroclasts. These were derived during fragmentation of a heterogeneous, vesicular magma containing large compound vesicles and smaller, elongate vesicles. The vesiculated magma was thoroughly comminuted during magma-water interactions. The last eruptive phase is interpreted as having involved both magmatic and phreatomagmatic processes. Hot pyroclastic flows from this phase contained a bimodal mixture of pumice pyroclasts and finely comminuted shards.

  1. Can rain cause volcanic eruptions?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.

    1993-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are renowned for their violence and destructive power. This power comes ultimately from the heat and pressure of molten rock and its contained gases. Therefore we rarely consider the possibility that meteoric phenomena, like rainfall, could promote or inhibit their occurrence. Yet from time to time observers have suggested that weather may affect volcanic activity. In the late 1800's, for example, one of the first geologists to visit the island of Hawaii, J.D. Dana, speculated that rainfall influenced the occurrence of eruptions there. In the early 1900's, volcanologists suggested that some eruptions from Mount Lassen, Calif., were caused by the infiltration of snowmelt into the volcano's hot summit. Most such associations have not been provable because of lack of information; others have been dismissed after careful evaluation of the evidence.

  2. Cyclic Explosivity in High Elevation Phreatomagmatic Eruptions at Ocean Island Volcanoes: Implications for Aquifer Pressurization and Volcano Flank Destabilization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarff, R.; Day, S. J.; Downes, H.; Seghedi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater heating and pressurization of aquifers trapped between dikes in ocean island volcanoes has been proposed as a mechanism for destabilizing and triggering large-volume flank collapses. Previous modelling has indicated that heat transfer from sustained magma flow through dikes during eruption has the potential to produce destabilizing levels of pressure on time scales of 4 to 400 days, if the aquifers remain confined. Here we revisit this proposal from a different perspective. We examine evidence for pressure variations in dike-confined aquifers during eruptions at high elevation vents on ocean island volcanoes. Initially magmatic, these eruptions change to mostly small-volume explosive phreatomagmatic activity. A recent example is the 1949 eruption on La Palma, Canary Islands. Some such eruptions involve sequences of larger-volume explosive phases or cycles, including production of voluminous low-temperature, pyroclastic density currents (PDC). Here we present and interpret data from the Cova de Paul crater eruption (Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands). The phreatomagmatic part of this eruption formed two cycles, each culminating with eruption of PDCs. Compositional and textural variations in the products of both cycles indicate that the diatreme fill began as coarse-grained and permeable which allowed gas to escape. During the eruption, the fill evolved to a finer grained, poorly sorted, less permeable material, in which pore fluid pressures built up to produce violent explosive phases. This implies that aquifers adjacent to the feeder intrusion were not simply depressurized at the onset of phreatomagmatic explosivity but experienced fluctuations in pressure throughout the eruption as the vent repeatedly choked and emptied. In combination with fluctuations in magma supply rate, driving of aquifer pressurization by cyclical vent choking will further complicate the prediction of flank destabilization during comparable eruptions on ocean island volcanoes.

  3. Is Kīlauea's East Rift Zone eruption running out of gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Orr, T. R.; Patrick, M. R.; Poland, M. P.; Thornber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Gases exsolving from magma are a key force that drives eruptive activity, and emissions from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone (ERZ) dominated the volcano's gas release from the beginning of the long-running and voluminous Pu'u 'Ō'ō eruption in 1983, through February 2008. In the months prior to the March 2008 onset of eruptive activity within Halema'uma'u Crater, however, SO2 degassing at the summit climbed substantially, and summit gas release has remained elevated since. These unprecedented emissions associated with the new summit eruption effectively began robbing gas from magma destined for Kīlauea's ERZ. As a result, ERZ SO2discharge, which had averaged 1,700 +-380 t/d for the previous 15 years, declined sharply and steadily beginning in September, 2008, and reached a new steady low of 380 +- 100 t/d by early 2011. This level persisted through mid-2015. In the years since the late 2008 downturn in ERZ SO2 emissions, there has been an overall slowdown in ERZ eruptive activity. Elevated emissions and effusive activity occurred briefly during the 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption and two other outbreaks at Pu'u 'Ō'ō , but otherwise ERZ eruptive activity had waned by 2010, when effusion rates were measured at about half of the long-term rate. Also, the sulfur preserved in ERZ olivine melt-inclusions, which provides a record of pre-eruptive SO2degassing, has steadily declined along with equilibration temperatures of host olivine phenocrysts, since 2008. We suggest that the drop in gas content of magma reaching the ERZ, owing to summit pre-eruptive degassing, has contributed significantly to the downturn in ERZ activity. While SO2 emissions from the ERZ have dropped to sustained levels lower than anything seen in the past 20 years, summit emissions have remained some of the highest recorded since regular measurements began at Kīlauea in 1979. Overall, average total SO2 discharge from Kīlauea in 2014, summit and ERZ, is still about 50% higher than for the 15 years prior

  4. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  5. Widespread bullous fixed drug eruption

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad D; Dosi, Rupal V; Shah, Purav C; Joshi, Harshal S

    2014-01-01

    A 53-year-old man developed a widespread erythematous eruption which rapidly evolved into fluid-filled bulla mostly involving the distal areas of all four limbs and erosions on the oral as well as anogenital mucosa. Based on clinical presentation, chronology of drug exposure, past events and histopathology as diagnosis of widespread bullous fixed drug eruption was made over Steven Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome. Steroids were deferred and the lesions healed with minimal pigmentation within a week. Differentiating between the two entities has been historically difficult, and yet can have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:24510691

  6. Widespread bullous fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Patell, Rushad D; Dosi, Rupal V; Shah, Purav C; Joshi, Harshal S

    2014-02-07

    A 53-year-old man developed a widespread erythematous eruption which rapidly evolved into fluid-filled bulla mostly involving the distal areas of all four limbs and erosions on the oral as well as anogenital mucosa. Based on clinical presentation, chronology of drug exposure, past events and histopathology as diagnosis of widespread bullous fixed drug eruption was made over Steven Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome. Steroids were deferred and the lesions healed with minimal pigmentation within a week. Differentiating between the two entities has been historically difficult, and yet can have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  7. Erupted odontoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Raval, Nilesh; Mehta, Dhaval; Vachhrajani, Kanan; Nimavat, Abhishek

    2014-07-01

    Odontomas are nonaggressive, hamartomatous developmental malformations or lesions of odontogenic origin, which consist of enamel, dentin, cementum and pulpal tissue 'Erupted odontoma' is a term used to specifically denote odontomas, which are exposed into the oral cavity. These are rare entities with only 25-30 cases being reported so far in the dental literature. Here, we present a rare case of an erupted odontoma in an adolescent patient who came with a complaint of bad aesthetics due to the presence of multiple small teeth like structures in the upper front teeth region.

  8. An overview of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Buurman, Helena

    2013-06-01

    In March 2009, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska erupted for the first time since 1990. Explosions ejected plumes that disrupted international and domestic airspace, sent lahars more than 35 km down the Drift River to the coast, and resulted in tephra fall on communities over 100 km away. Geodetic data suggest that magma began to ascend slowly from deep in the crust and reached mid- to shallow-crustal levels as early as May, 2008. Heat flux at the volcano during the precursory phase melted ~ 4% of the Drift glacier atop Redoubt's summit. Petrologic data indicate the deeply sourced magma, low-silica andesite, temporarily arrested at 9-11 km and/or at 4-6 km depth, where it encountered and mixed with segregated stored high-silica andesite bodies. The two magma compositions mixed to form intermediate-silica andesite, and all three magma types erupted during the earliest 2009 events. Only intermediate- and high-silica andesites were produced throughout the explosive and effusive phases of the eruption. The explosive phase began with a phreatic explosion followed by a seismic swarm, which signaled the start of lava effusion on March 22, shortly prior to the first magmatic explosion early on March 23, 2009 (UTC). More than 19 explosions (or “Events”) were produced over 13 days from a single vent immediately south of the 1989-90 lava domes. During that period multiple small pyroclastic density currents flowed primarily to the north and into glacial ravines, three major lahars flooded the Drift River Terminal over 35 km down-river on the coast, tephra fall deposited on all aspects of the edifice and on several communities north and east of the volcano, and at least two, and possibly three lava domes were emplaced. Lightning accompanied almost all the explosions. A shift in the eruptive character took place following Event 9 on March 27 in terms of infrasound signal onsets, the character of repeating earthquakes, and the nature of tephra ejecta. More than nine additional

  9. Predicting Major Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    , whether an active region that produces a flare will also produce a CME. Bobra and Ilonidis then use a feature-selection algorithm to try to understand which features distinguish between flaring regions that dont produce a CME and those that do.Predictors of CMEsThe authors reach several interesting conclusions:Under the right conditions, their algorithm is able to predict whether an active region with a given set of features will produce a CME as well as a flare with a fairly high rate of success.None of the 18 features they tested are good predictors in isolation: its necessary to look at a combination of at least 6 features to have success predicting whether a flare will be accompanied by a CME.The features that are the best predictors are all intensive features ones that stay the same independent of the active regions size. Extensive features ones that change as the active region grows or shrinks are less successful predictors.Only the magnetic field properties of the photosphere were considered, so a logical next step is to extend this study to consider properties of the solar corona above active regions as well. In the meantime, these are interesting first results that may well help us better predict these major solar eruptions.BonusCheck out this video for a great description from NASA of the difference between solar flares and CMEs (as well as some awesome observations of both).CitationM. G. Bobra and S. Ilonidis 2016 ApJ 821 127. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/127

  10. Questions Concerning the Disconnection and Eruption of Filaments and CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Theresa

    2007-01-01

    Reviews examples of eruptions and failed eruptions of filaments and CMEs and review questions concerning the processes and mechanisms involved. Where and how does disconnection occur? What can we learn (if anything!) about CME eruptions by observing related filament eruptions?

  11. A MODEL FOR MAGNETICALLY COUPLED SYMPATHETIC ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Panasenco, O.; Reeves, K. K.; Velli, M.; De Toma, G.

    2011-10-01

    Sympathetic eruptions on the Sun have been observed for several decades, but the mechanisms by which one eruption can trigger another remain poorly understood. We present a three-dimensional MHD simulation that suggests two possible magnetic trigger mechanisms for sympathetic eruptions. We consider a configuration that contains two coronal flux ropes located within a pseudo-streamer and one rope located next to it. A sequence of eruptions is initiated by triggering the eruption of the flux rope next to the streamer. The expansion of the rope leads to two consecutive reconnection events, each of which triggers the eruption of a flux rope by removing a sufficient amount of overlying flux. The simulation qualitatively reproduces important aspects of the global sympathetic event on 2010 August 1 and provides a scenario for the so-called twin filament eruptions. The suggested mechanisms are also applicable for sympathetic eruptions occurring in other magnetic configurations.

  12. A Model for Magnetically Coupled Sympathetic Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, T.; Panasenco, O.; Titrov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Reeves, K. K.; Velli, M.; Linker, J. A.; DeToma, G.

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic eruptions on the Sun have been observed for several decades, but the mechanisms by which one eruption can trigger another remain poorly understood. We present a three-dimenSional MHD simulation that suggests two possible magnetic trigger mechanisms for sympathetic eruptions. We consider a configuration that contains two coronal flux ropes located within a pseudo-streamer and one rope located next to it. A sequence of eruptions is initiated by triggering the eruption of the flux rope next to the streamer. The expansion of the rope leads to two consecutive reconnection events, each of which triggers the eruption of a flux rope by removing a sufficient amount of overlying flux. The simulation qualitatively reproduces important aspects of the global sympathetic event on 2010 August 1 and provides a scenario for the so-called twin filament eruptions. The suggested mechanisms are also applicable for sympathetic eruptions occurring in other magnetic configurations.

  13. Discovery of the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Nooner, S. L.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lilley, M. D.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    to 200 m above the bottom. New vent sites on the 2011 lava had already been colonized by macro- and micro-fauna, just 3.5 months after the eruption. Seven instrumental moorings were in place during the 2011 eruption - 3 bottom pressure recorders (BPRs), 3 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBHs), and one remote access fluid sampler (RAS). One of each was engulfed by 2011 lava, but the four surviving ones (2 BPRs, 2 OBHs) were successfully recovered and provide an extraordinary in-situ monitoring record of the eruption. They show that the eruption began early on 6 April 2011, with a subsidence of ~ 2 m at the center of the caldera and a burst of hundreds of earthquakes that lasted about a week. The detection capability of SOSUS (the US Navy hydrophone network in the NE Pacific) is currently greatly diminished due to cable breaks, so no earthquake swarms were detected for the 2011 eruption.

  14. The Monte Nuovo eruption: the only historical event of the Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vito, Mauro Antonio; Arienzo, Ilenia; Buononato, Salvatore; Civetta, Lucia; Carandente, Antonio; D'Antonio, Massimo; di Renzo, Valeria; Orsi, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Monte Nuovo eruption, the last event of the Campi Flegrei caldera, has been reconstructed through geological, volcanological and petrological investigations, and analyses of historical documents. The eruption, lasted one week and characterised by three vents, included three distinct phases. The main vent (MV) was located in the present crater, whereas two minor vents were along the southern (SV) and north-eastern (NEV) slopes of the Monte Nuovo tuff cone. The sequence of deposits has been subdivided in 5 members named A through E. The eruption began on September 29, 1538, at 7 p.m., and its first and main phase, lasted until the night of September 30. This phase generated almost continuous explosions mainly phreatomagmatic, producing pyroclastic density currents (pdćs) and minor short-lived, low eruption columns, which deposited members A and B. Member A, erupted in about 12 hours through the MV, forms the largest part of the cone. Phreatomagmatic explosions at the SV produced mainly pdćs which deposited Member B only in the southern sector of Monte Nuovo. Strombolian explosions at the SV and NEV deposited Member C over a narrow area. This activity was followed by a pause lasted two days. The eruption resumed on October 3 at 4 p.m. and lasted until the next night. This second phase of the eruption was characterized by a discontinuous sequence of low-energy phreatomagmatic and magmatic explosions at the MV, which deposited Member D. On October 6, at 4 p.m. explosive activity resumed and lasted few hours, mainly with low-energy magmatic explosions of a small dome, grown during the preceding two days, which produced Member E. During this phase 24 people died while climbing the slopes of the newly formed cone. The juvenile products of the Monte Nuovo eruption are phenocryst-poor rocks containing alkali feldspars and subordinate clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides. The are light-coloured pumice and dark scoria fragments, and represent the most evolved magma erupted

  15. Explosive eruption of rhyodacitic magma at the Cordón-Caulle volcanic complex, southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. M.; Schipper, C.

    2011-12-01

    After lying dormant for decades, the Cordón-Caulle volcanic complex (CCVC) reactivated again on 4 June, 2011 with an explosive eruption that produced a sustained vertical ash column reaching roughly 14,000 m a.s.l. This explosive phase produced a tephra plume that dispersed E-SE across the Chilean Patagonia into Argentina, and within a week encircled the globe prompting widespread disruption to air traffic and several airport closures. After about 3 weeks of fluctuating explosive activity, a lava flow began effusing from the same vent as the initial activity. We analyzed pumice and ash samples of the Plinian fall from 4 June for their major and trace element makeup, mineralogical characteristics, and 3D textural relationships within pyroclasts. The light beige, phenocryst-poor (<5 vol%) pumice contains plagioclase (~1mm) as its primary phase, and magnetite, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene in sub-equal amounts. The crystals often form intergrowth clusters but may also be found separate and enclosed in highly vesicular microlite-free glass. As shown by XRF analyses on bulk pumice and ash samples collected from two localities southeast of the vent, the current eruptives comprise the following (in wt.%): SiO2 = 69.6, TiO2 = 0.70, Al2O3 = 14.3, Fe2O3 = 4.56, MnO = 0.11, MgO = 0.54, CaO = 2.3, Na2O = 5.14, K2O = 2.75, P2O5 = 0.11; and, (in ppm): Cr = 6.7, Ni = 2.3, Rb = 70.3, Sr = 163.3, Y = 51.7, Zr = 328, Ba = 702, Pb = 23.7. Interestingly, these compositions are virtually identical to those of magma erupted during 1960 and closely resemble rhyodacite erupted in 1921 from nearby vents. The primary difference between the present eruption and its recent predecessors is the much greater eruptive vigour of the current phase. Another distinction between the present and past historical eruptions is the presence of conspicuous mafic-felsic mingling textures in a small percentage (~0.5 vol%) of the current pumice. Textural and chemical analyses of the mafic blobs are

  16. Eruption cysts: A series of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Preeti; Kochhar, Gulsheen Kaur; Chachra, Sanjay; Advani, Shweta

    2012-01-01

    Eruption cysts are benign cysts that appear on the mucosa of a tooth shortly before its eruption. They may disappear by themselves but if they hurt, bleed or are infected they may require surgical treatment to expose the tooth and drain the contents. Here we present 2 case reports of eruption cysts presenting with different chief complaint. The treatment included incising the eruption cyst and draining the contents of the cyst. PMID:23559935

  17. Summertime actinic lichenoid eruption (lichen planus actinicus).

    PubMed

    Isaacson, D; Turner, M L; Elgart, M L

    1981-04-01

    A patient with an unusual lichenoid photosensitive eruption is presented. The features differentiating this entity from classic lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, and polymorphous light eruption are discussed. Phototesting confirmed the provocative influence of sunlight. We prefer the name "summertime actinic lichenoid eruption" to that of "lichen planus subtropicus" or "lichen planus actinicus," since this condition is not confined to subtropical countries, and, although light appears to initiate the eruption, its exact relationship to lichen planus is unclear.

  18. Ground deformation associated with the precursory unrest and early phases of the January 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cervelli, P.F.; Fournier, T.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Power, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    On January 11, 2006 Augustine Volcano erupted after nearly 20 years of quiescence. Global Positioning System (GPS) instrumentation at Augustine, consisting of six continuously recording, telemetered receivers, measured clear precursory deformation consistent with a source of inflation or pressurization beneath the volcano's summit at a depth of around sea level. Deformation began in early summer 2005, and was preceded by a subtle, but distinct, increase in seismicity, which began in May 2005. After remaining more or less constant, deformation rates accelerated on at least three stations beginning in late November 2005. After this date, GPS data suggest the upward propagation of a small dike into the edifice, which, based on the style of deformation and high levels of gas emission, appears to have ascended to shallow levels by mid-December 2005, about four weeks before the eruption began.

  19. Eruption conditions of spatter deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Erika; Geist, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Spatter is an eruptive product that forms within a narrow range of thermal conditions: it must be hot enough to deform and agglutinate, but not so hot that clasts completely re-fuse and remobilize as clastogenic lava. This narrow thermal window of spatter-forming conditions allows for quantitative prediction of cooling rates and accumulation rates. Cooling and accumulation rates then provide information that enables estimates of eruption parameters for inaccessible and prehistoric deposits. High-temperature experiments conducted on basaltic scoria from Devil's Garden, Oregon have revealed the eruption temperature was ~ 1130 °C. The strength welds formed between experimental clasts is shown to depend on cooling rate. Natural samples are compared to the experimental samples by measuring tensile strength and welded area between clasts. The weld strength in natural deposits yields estimates of cooling rates that range between 2.5 °C and 48 °C/min, with the majority of the samples grouping between 7 °C and 14 °C/min. Thermal models based on these cooling rates yield spatter accumulation rates of 0.5-1.8 m/h in the Devil's Garden spatter deposits. We provide a general model for cooling and accumulation rates for spatter cones, ramparts, and hornitos, which allow estimation of the factors that control basaltic eruptive products.

  20. Sorafenib induced eruptive melanocytic lesions.

    PubMed

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E; Watson, Alice C; Aronson, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor FDA-approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell and hepatocellular carcinoma. Dermatologic side effects include hand-foot skin reaction, facial and scalp erythema and desquamation, splinter subungual hemorrhages, alopecia, pruritus, xerosis, keratoacanthomas, and squamous cell carcinomas. We report sudden eruption of melanocytic nevi diffusely in a patient receiving sorafenib. PMID:24011281

  1. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  2. A volcano bursting at the seams: Inflation, faulting, and eruption at Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Geist, Dennis J.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Poland, Michael P.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Meertens, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    The results of geodetic monitoring since 2002 at Sierra Negra volcano in the Galápagos Islands show that the filling and pressurization of an ∼2-km-deep sill eventually led to an eruption that began on 22 October 2005. Continuous global positioning system (CGPS) monitoring measured >2 m of accelerating inflation leading up to the eruption and contributed to nearly 5 m of total uplift since 1992, the largest precursory inflation ever recorded at a basaltic caldera. This extraordinary uplift was accommodated in part by repeated trapdoor faulting, and coseismic CGPS data provide strong constraints for improved deformation models. These results highlight the feedbacks between inflation, faulting, and eruption at a basaltic volcano, and demonstrate that faulting above an intruding magma body can relieve accumulated strain and effectively postpone eruption.

  3. Seismo-acoustic evidence for an avalanche driven phreatic eruption through a beheaded hydrothermal system: An example from the 2012 Tongariro eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolly, A.D.; Jousset, P.; Lyons, J.J.; Carniel, R.; Fournier, R.; Fry, B.; Miller, C.

    2016-01-01

    The 6 August 2012 Te Maari eruption comprises a complex eruption sequence including multiple eruption pulses, a debris avalanche that propagated ~ 2 km from the vent, and the formation of a 500 m long, arcuate chasm, located ~ 300 m from the main eruption vent. The eruption included 6 distinct impulses that were coherent across a local infrasound network marking the eruption onset at 11:52:18 (all times UTC). An eruption energy release of ~ 3 × 1012 J was calculated using a body wave equation for radiated seismic energy. A similar calculation based on the infrasound record, shows that ~ 90% of the acoustic energy was released from three impulses at onset times 11:52:20 (~ 20% of total eruption energy), 11:52:27 (~ 50%), and 11:52:31 (~ 20%). These energy impulses may coincide with eyewitness accounts describing an initial eastward directed blast, followed by a westward directed blast, and a final vertical blast. Pre-eruption seismic activity includes numerous small unlocatable micro-earthquakes that began at 11:46:50. Two larger high frequency earthquakes were recorded at 11:49:06 and 11:49:21 followed directly by a third earthquake at 11:50:17. The first event was located within the scarp based on an arrival time location from good first P arrival times and probably represents the onset of the debris avalanche. The third event was a tornillo, characterised by a 0.8 Hz single frequency resonance, and has a resonator attenuation factor of Q ~ 40, consistent with a bubbly fluid filled resonator. This contrasts with a similar tornillo event occurring 2.5 weeks earlier having Q ~ 250–1000, consistent with a dusty gas charged resonator. We surmise from pre-eruption seismicity, and the observed attenuation change, that the debris avalanche resulted from the influx of fluids into the hydrothermal system, causing destabilisation and failure. The beheaded hydrothermal system may have then caused depressurisation frothing of the remaining gas charged system leading to the

  4. A caldera-forming eruption ~ 14,100 14C yr BP at Popocatépetl volcano, México: Insights from eruption dynamics and magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Ceballos, Giovanni; Gardner, James E.; Siebe, Claus; Macías, José L.

    2012-02-01

    Volcán Popocatépetl (México) erupted ~ 14,100 14 C yr BP (~ 17,000 cal yr BP) producing the Tutti Frutti Plinian Eruption (TFPE). The eruption tapped two different silicic magmas (GT and MT) that mixed just prior and during the eruption, resulting in the collapse of the reservoir and formation of a caldera. Two fall deposits (GT and MT) and two series of pyroclastic flows (P01 and P02) were emplaced during the eruption. These were studied at 91 sites, where thicknesses were measured, and at many sites the five coarsest lithics observed in each unit were measured. Several samples from deposits were sieved for component analysis. The eruption began with intermittent, short lived eruptions that deposited the GT unit at proximal sites around the volcano. Next, the main Plinian phase of the eruption started, and the MT unit and a pyroclastic flow were deposited to the northwest of the present-day cone. Overall, ~ 3 km3 of magma were erupted. The pyroclastic flow within MT separates two fall units characterized by different pumice color and lithic content. During deposition of the lower unit (milky pumice) eruptive intensity reached 3 × 108 kg s- 1, producing a Plinian column 37 ± 2 km in height. After emplacement of the pyroclastic flow, a lithic-rich upper unit (orange pumice) was deposited with a peak intensity of 5 × 108 kg s- 1, producing a Plinian column 44 ± 2 km in height. Lithics in the TFPE vary from only volcanic (~ 5 vol.%) in GT, to volcanic, granodiorite, and metamorphic (up to 50 vol.%) in MT. The shift in components and lithic content was produced by the collapse of the reservoir. We suggest that the reservoir was over-pressured because of mixing between GT and MT magmas, and then relaxed when all of GT, and part of MT magma were tapped, triggering collapse. The characteristics of mixing were elucidated by studying banded pumice and mixed populations of crystals found in pumice from both units. In addition, the occurrence of An-rich plagioclase, Mg

  5. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  6. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  7. NeuroAIDS in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kevin; Liner, Jeff; Hakim, James; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott; Clifford, David; Diop, Amadou Gallo; Jaye, Assan; Kanmogne, Georgette; Njamnshi, Alfred; Langford, T. Dianne; Gemechu Weyessa, Tufa; Wood, Charles; Banda, Mwanza; Hosseinipour, Mina; Sacktor, Ned; Nakasuja, Noeline; Bangirana, Paul; Paul, Robert; Joska, John; Wong, Joseph; Boivin, Michael; Holding, Penny; Kammerer, Betsy; Van Rie, Annelies; Ive, Prudence; Nath, Avindra; Lawler, Kathy; Adebamowo, Clement; Royal, Walter; Joseph, Jeymohan

    2013-01-01

    In July 2009, the Center for Mental Health Research on AIDS at the National Institute of Mental Health organized and supported the meeting “NeuroAIDS in Africa.” This meeting was held in Cape Town, South Africa, and was affiliated with the 5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention. Presentations began with an overview of the epidemiology of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the molecular epidemiology of HIV, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs), and HAND treatment. These introductory talks were followed by presentations on HAND research and clinical care in Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda, and Zambia. Topics discussed included best practices for assessing neurocognitive disorders, patterns of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the region, subtype-associated risk for HAND, pediatric HIV assessments and neurodevelopment, HIV-associated CNS opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution syndrome, the evolving changes in treatment implementation, and various opportunities and strategies for NeuroAIDS research and capacity building in the region. PMID:20500018

  8. Evaluating and Communicating Seismo-Volcanic Hazards Within and Between Countries in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Yirgu, G.; Mbede, E. I.; Calais, E.; Wright, T.

    2007-12-01

    The 2005 seismo-volcanic crisis in a remote area of Ethiopia graphically illustrated the problems faced by research scientists in East Africa, as well as the need for regional hazard mitigation programs. Over a 3-week period in 2005, 163 mb > 3.9 earthquakes and a silicic eruption occurred as a 60 km-long dike was intruded along a previously identified rift segment ; the spatial scale is larger, and the deformation more intense, than historical seafloor spreading episodes in Iceland. A similar, but smaller dike intrusion episode with volcanic eruption began in July, 2007 in northern Tanzania. In both situations, geoscientists had communicated the potential seismic and volcanic hazards to politicians and planners, but they had little success obtaining funds for permanent seismic and geodetic monitoring networks. Ethiopian scientists seized the opportunity to both communicate science to the general public, and to increase pressure to develop national and regional hazard mitigation programs. The scientific aspects are equally daunting: how to coordinate international teams, each of whom has a national funding agency expecting output; how to incorporate geophysical training opportunities into field data acquisition programs; how to share seismic and geodetic data across sometimes tense political boundaries; how to allow E African scientists to be equal partners in the data analysis and interpretation? We use the response to these two volcano-seismic rifting events to illustrate ways to use short-term blue skies research projects to improve national and regional geophysical infrastructure in developing countries, and we discuss ongoing programs to communicate science to pastoralists and planners.

  9. Use of digital aerophotogrammetry to determine rates of lava dome growth, Mount St. Helens, Washington, 2004-2005: Chapter 8 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.; Thompson, Ren A.; Messerich, James A.; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Successful application of aerophotogrammetry was possible during the critical earliest parts of the eruption because we had baseline data and photogrammetric infrastructure in place before the eruption began. The vertical aerial photographs, including the DEMs and calculations derived from them, were one of the most widely used data sets collected during the 2004-5 eruption, as evidenced in numerous contributions to this volume. These data were used to construct photogeologic maps, deformation vector fields, and profiles of the evolving dome and glacier. Extruded volumes and rates proved to be critical parameters to constrain models and hypotheses of eruption dynamics and thus helped to assess volcano hazards.

  10. NEW ASPECTS OF A LID-REMOVAL MECHANISM IN THE ONSET OF AN ERUPTION SEQUENCE THAT PRODUCED A LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE (SEP) EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Knox, Javon M. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2014-06-20

    We examine a sequence of two ejective eruptions from a single active region on 2012 January 23, using magnetograms and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Atmospheric and Imaging Assembly (AIA), and EUV images from STEREO/EUVI. This sequence produced two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and a strong solar energetic particle event (SEP); here we focus on the magnetic onset of this important space weather episode. Cheng et al. showed that the first eruption's ({sup E}ruption 1{sup )} flux rope was apparent only in ''hotter'' AIA channels, and that it removed overlying field that allowed the second eruption ({sup E}ruption 2{sup )} to begin via ideal MHD instability; here we say that Eruption 2 began via a ''lid removal'' mechanism. We show that during Eruption 1's onset, its flux rope underwent a ''tether weakening'' (TW) reconnection with field that arched from the eruption-source active region to an adjacent active region. Standard flare loops from Eruption 1 developed over Eruption 2's flux rope and enclosed filament, but these overarching new loops were unable to confine that flux rope/filament. Eruption 1's flare loops, from both TW reconnection and standard-flare-model internal reconnection, were much cooler than Eruption 2's flare loops (GOES thermal temperatures of ∼7.5 MK and 9 MK, compared to ∼14 MK). The corresponding three sequential GOES flares were, respectively, due to TW reconnection plus earlier phase Eruption 1 tether-cutting reconnection, Eruption 1 later-phase tether-cutting reconnection, and Eruption 2 tether-cutting reconnection.

  11. ASTER Observations of Recent Thermal Activity and Explosive Eruption at Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Abrams, M. J.; Kervyn, M.; Hook, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai (OL) is the only active volcano in the world that produces natro-carbonatite lava. These carbonate-rich lavas are unique in that they have relatively low temperatures (500-600 C) compared with typical silicate lavas (600-1100 C), and they have a low viscosity, behaving more like a mud flow than a lava flow. OL has been erupting on and off since 1983, mostly resulting in small lava flows, pools and spatter cones (hornitos) confined to the summit crater. Explosive, ash-producing eruptions here are rare, however, an ASTER observation from September 4, 2007 caught the first satellite image of an ash plume erupting from OL, which may be indicative of a new phase of more silica-rich products and explosive activity that has not occurred here since the 1960s. Thermal infrared satellite monitoring has detected an increasing number of thermal anomalies around OL in recent months. MODIS MODVOLC data detected >30 hot spots in the last week of August and first week of September 2007, some of which may have been brush fires started by lava flows or spatter; ASTER detected the appearance of an anomalous hot spot at the summit of OL as early as mid-June. We will present up-to date information about the progress of the eruption and results from the analysis of the spectral composition of new eruption products and thermal anomalies that occurred prior to the recent explosive eruption. OL is one of many volcanoes in the world, and especially Africa, that is not regularly monitored. It is only through sporadic reports from locals or tourists in the area, and satellite data that we know anything at all about this volcanic eruption. Continued satellite monitoring along with studies of past thermal activity will help determine how future eruptions may be forecasted.

  12. The Lusi eruption and implications for understanding fossil piercement structures in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Mazzini, Adriano; Planke, Sverre; Hadi, Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi eruption started in northeast Java, Indonesia, on May 29th 2006, and it has been erupting rocks, mud, water, and gas ever since. We have been doing field work and research on Lusi ever since the eruption commenced. This work was initially motivated from studying the initiation of a mud volcano. However, the longevity of the eruption has made it possible to describe and monitor the lifespan of this unique piercement structure. . One of the first-order questions regarding the eruption is how it should be classified and if there are any other modern or fossil analogues that can place Lusi in a relevant geological context. During the initial stages of eruption, Lusi was classified as a mud volcano, but following geochemical studies the eruption did not show the typical CH4-dominated gas composition of other mud volcanoes and the temperature was also too high. Moreover, mud volcano eruptions normally last a few days, but Lusi never stopped during the past decade. In particular, the crater fluid geochemistry suggests a connection to the neighboring volcanic complex. Lusi represent a sedimentary hosted hydrothermal system. This opens up new possibilities for understanding fossil hydrothermal systems in sedimentary basins, such as hydrothermal vent complexes and breccia-pipes found in sedimentary basins affected by the formation of Large igneous provinces. We will present examples from the Karoo Basin (South Africa) and the Vøring Basin (offshore Norway) and discuss how Lusi can be used to refine existing formation models. Finally, by comparing Lusi to fossil hydrothermal systems we may get insight into the processes operating at depth where the Lusi system interacts with the igneous rocks of the neighbouring volcanic arc.

  13. South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of South Africa was acquired on May 14, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution visible wavelength bands. As part of the opening ceremony to begin the joint U.S.-South Africa SAFARI Field Experiment, NASA presented print copies of this image as GIFts to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Science and Technology, and Honorable Advocate Ngoaka Ramathlodi, Premier of the Northern Province, South Africa. The area shown in this image encompasses seven capital cities and a number of the region's distinctive geological features can be seen clearly. Toward the northern (top) central part of the image, the browns and tans comprise the Kalahari Desert of southern Botswana. The Tropic of Capricorn runs right through the heart of the Kalahari and the Botswanan capital city of Gaborone sits on the Limpopo River, southeast of the Kalahari. Along the western coastline of the continent is the country of Namibia, where the Namib Desert is framed against the sea by the Kaokoveld Mountains. The Namibian capital of Windhoek is obscured by clouds. Looking closely in the center of the image, the Orange River can be seen running from east to west, demarcating the boundary between Namibia and South Africa. On the southwestern corner of the continent is the hook-like Cape of Good Hope peninsula and Cape Town, the parliamentary capital of South Africa. Running west to east away from Cape Town are the Great Karroo Mountains. The shadow in this image conveys a sense of the very steep grade of the cliffs along the southern coast of South Africa. Port Elizabeth sits on the southeasternmost point of South Africa, and a large phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the water about 100 miles east of there. Moving northward along the east coast, the Drakensberg Mountains are visible. The two small nations of Lesotho and Swaziland are in this region, completely

  14. A Ground Deformation Monitoring Approach to Understanding Magma Chamber Systems and Eruptive Cycles of Mount Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, S.; Clarke, A.

    2005-05-01

    Mount Cameroon is a 13,400ft basanite volcano on the passive margin of West Africa. It has erupted seven times in the past century making it one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. Most recently Mount Cameroon erupted in 1999 and 2000 first issuing strombolian explosions from vents near the summit, and later erupting effusively from a fissure running southwest from the summit (Suh et al., 2003). Prior to 2004, the only monitoring equipment on Mount Cameroon was a small seismometer network installed following the 1982 eruption. By 1999 only a single seismometer in the network was functional. Seismic activity did not rise above background levels until the few days immediately preceding the eruption. In an effort to raise awareness of the volcano's condition and provide a more efficient warning of impending eruptions we have begun constructing a ground deformation network on Mount Cameroon. The new network currently consists of two Applied Geomechanics 711-2A(4X) biaxial tiltmeters capable of resolving 0.1 microradians of tilt. One station is located approximately 500 m from the 2000 summit vent, and the other is approximately 1km away from the central fissure approximately 5km southwest of the 2000 summit vent. Three primary processes could precede eruptions at Mt. Cameroon, offering the opportunity for detection and prediction by our network. These processes are magma chamber pressurization, magma ascent via a central conduit, and/or propagation of magma along the central fissure. Magma chamber location, if a significant chamber exists, is poorly constrained, however, previous petrologic studies on Mount Cameroon (Suh et al., 2003; Fitton et al., 1983) suggest Mount Cameroon magmas originate at a depth less than 40km. Published seismic data (Ambeh, 1989) contains evidence of magmatic activity and possible chambers at depths ranging from 10km to 70km. Preliminary calculations using a simple Mogi model suggest deformation caused by pressurization of a large

  15. The Largest Holocene Eruption of the Central Andes Found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J.; Esteban, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new data and interpretation about a major eruption -spreading ˜110 km3 ashes over 440.000 km2- long thought to have occurred around 4200 years ago in the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex (CBVC) in NW Argentina. This eruption may be the biggest during the past five millennia in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes, and possibly one of the largest Holocene eruptions in the world. The environmental effects of this voluminous eruption are still noticeable, as evidenced by the high content of arsenic and other trace elements in the groundwaters of the Chacopampean Plain. The recognition of this significant volcanic event may shed new light on interpretations of critical changes observed in the mid-Holocene paleontological and archaeological records, and offers researchers an excellent, extensive regional chronostratigraphic marker for reconstructing mid-Holocene geological history over a wide geographical area of South America. More than 100 ashes were sampled in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay during different field campaigns. Ash samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), grain size distributions laser diffraction, and geochemically by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-HR-ICP-MS. New and published 14C ages were calibrated to calendar years BP. The age of the most recent CBVC eruption is 4407-4093 cal y BP, indirectly dated by 14C of associated organic sediment within the lower part of a proximal fall deposit of this event (26°53'16.05"S-67°44'48.68"W). This is the youngest record of a major volcanic event in the Southern Puna. This age is consistent with other radiocarbon dates of organic matter in palaeosols underlying or overlying distal ash fall deposits. Based on their products, all of rhyolitic composition, we have distinguished 8 main episodes during the evolution of the most recent CBVC eruption: 1) the eruption began with a white rhyolite lava dome extrusion; 2) followed by a Plinian

  16. SYMPATHETIC FILAMENT ERUPTIONS CONNECTED BY CORONAL DIMMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Hong Junchao; Bi Yi; Zheng Ruisheng

    2011-09-10

    We present for the first time detailed observations of three successive, interdependent filament eruptions that occurred one by one within 5 hr from different locations beyond the range of a single active region. The first eruption was observed from an active region and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME), during which diffuse and complex coronal dimmings formed, largely extending to the two other filaments located in quiet-Sun regions. Then, both quiescent filaments consecutively underwent the second and third eruptions, while the nearby dimmings were persistent. Comparing the result of a derived coronal magnetic configuration, the magnetic connectivity between the dimmings suggested that they were caused by the joint effect of simple expansion of overlying loop systems forced by the first eruption, as well as by its erupting field interacting or reconnecting with the surrounding magnetic structures. Note that the dimming process in the first eruption indicated a weakening and partial removal of an overlying magnetic field constraint on the two other filaments, and thus one can physically connect these eruptions as sympathetic. It appears that the peculiar magnetic field configuration in our event was largely favorable to the occurrence of sympathetic filament eruptions. Because coronal dimmings are frequent and common phenomena in solar eruptions, especially in CME events, it is very likely that they represent a universal agent that can link consecutive eruptions nearby with sympathetic eruptions.

  17. Gas-Driven Eruptions, and Speculation for Methane-Driven Ocean Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Brad Sturtevant was a central player in experimental simulations of various types of eruptions, including those driven by the exsolution of gas initially dissolved in a liquid (referred to as gas-driven eruptions, including explosive volcanic eruptions, lake eruptions and eruption of Champagne), and those driven by the evaporation of a liquid (such as geyser eruption, or evaporation waves). The experimental simulations helped to bring together the general understanding of different eruptions. Among gas-driven eruptions, explosive volcanic eruptions are the most familiar and spectacular type. Lake eruptions were recognized only in the 1980's. The underlying principles of the two types of eruptions are similar although there are some difference in the role of the conduit and buoyancy. The main purpose of this report is to speculate on a possible but yet unrecognized type of gas-driven eruptions, methane-driven water eruptions in oceans. In marine sediment, huge amount of CH4 is stored either as gas or as methane hydrate. (The gas pockets might burst, resulting in mud "volcanos".) Under some unusual circumstances such as marine landslides or earthquakes, a large amount of CH4 may be released from sediment to seawater. Depending on the local pressure-temperature conditions, and depending on the kinetics of the various chemical reactions, the released methane gas might lead to gas-driven explosive eruptions. This type of eruptions would be similar to CO2-driven lake eruptions, except that the gas is CH4 instead of CO2. Although no such eruptions have been reported and they are expected to be rare, theoretically they are possible. Because CH4 gas is less dense than air, erupted CH4 gas cloud is expected to rise high into the atmosphere instead of forming ground-hugging flows for CO2 gas flows. Hence the danger to life on the ground is smaller. Satellite imaging might be able to detect such eruptions.

  18. Eruptive outflow phases of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    I review recent progress on understanding eruptions of unstable massive stars, with particular attention to the diversity of observed behavior in extragalatic optical transient sources that are generally associated with giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs). These eruptions are thought to represent key mass loss episodes in the lives of massive stars. I discuss the possibility of dormant LBVs and implications for the duration of the greater LBV phase and its role in stellar evolution. These eruptive variables show a wide range of peak luminosity, decay time, expansion speeds, and progenitor luminosity, and in some cases they have been observed to suffer multiple eruptions. This broadens our view of massive star eruptions compared to prototypical sources like Eta Carinae, and provides important clues for the nature of the outbursts. I will also review and discuss some implications about the possible physical mechanisms involved, although the cause of the eruptions is not yet understood.

  19. Evidence for Gradual External Reconnection Before Explosive Eruption of a Solar Filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    evolution is consistent with gradual breakout that led to (and perhaps caused) the fast eruption. Tether-cutting reconnection below the filament begins early in the rapid ejection. but our data are not complete enough to determine whether this reconnection began early enough to be the cause of the fast-phase onset. Thus, our observations are consistent with gradual breakout reconnection causing the long slow rise of the filament, but allow the cause of the sudden onset of the explosive fast phase to be either a jump in the breakout reconnection rate or the onset of runaway tether-cutting reconnection. or both.

  20. The 2005 eruption of Sierra Negra volcano, Galápagos, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Dennis J.; Harpp, Karen S.; Naumann, Terry R.; Poland, Michael P.; Chadwick, William W.; Hall, Minard; Rader, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Sierra Negra volcano began erupting on 22 October 2005, after a repose of 26 years. A plume of ash and steam more than 13 km high accompanied the initial phase of the eruption and was quickly followed by a ~2-km-long curtain of lava fountains. The eruptive fissure opened inside the north rim of the caldera, on the opposite side of the caldera from an active fault system that experienced an mb 4.6 earthquake and ~84 cm of uplift on 16 April 2005. The main products of the eruption were an `a`a flow that ponded in the caldera and clastigenic lavas that flowed down the north flank. The `a`a flow grew in an unusual way. Once it had established most of its aerial extent, the interior of the flow was fed via a perched lava pond, causing inflation of the `a`a. This pressurized fluid interior then fed pahoehoe breakouts along the margins of the flow, many of which were subsequently overridden by `a`a, as the crust slowly spread from the center of the pond and tumbled over the pahoehoe. The curtain of lava fountains coalesced with time, and by day 4, only one vent was erupting. The effusion rate slowed from day 7 until the eruption’s end two days later on 30 October. Although the caldera floor had inflated by ~5 m since 1992, and the rate of inflation had accelerated since 2003, there was no transient deformation in the hours or days before the eruption. During the 8 days of the eruption, GPS and InSAR data show that the caldera floor deflated ~5 m, and the volcano contracted horizontally ~6 m. The total eruptive volume is estimated as being ~150×106 m3. The opening-phase tephra is more evolved than the eruptive products that followed. The compositional variation of tephra and lava sampled over the course of the eruption is attributed to eruption from a zoned sill that lies 2.1 km beneath the caldera floor.

  1. Evidence for Gradual External Reconnection Before Explosive Eruption of a Solar Filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2003-01-01

    . The pre-eruption evolution is consistent with gradual breakout that led to (and perhaps caused) the fast eruption. Tether-cutting reconnection below the filament begins early in the rapid ejection, but our data are not complete enough to determine whether this reconnection began early enough to be the cause of the fast-phase onset. Thus, our observations are consistent with gradual breakout reconnection causing the long slow rise of the filament, but allow the cause of the sudden onset of the explosive fast phase to be either a jump in the breakout reconnection rate or the onset of runaway tether-cutting reconnection, or both.

  2. The daily rhythm of tooth eruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, C F; Proffit, W R

    1995-01-01

    A video microscope system, which can resolve tooth movements to 1 to 2 microns, was used to monitor the eruption of 17 human maxillary second premolars in the prefunctional phase. Eruptive movement was detected by the change in position of an optical ruling on the erupting tooth relative to a reference ruling on the occluding adjacent teeth. Eruption was observed as the teeth erupted toward the occlusal plane over approximately a 41-hour period, from late Friday afternoon until Sunday noon. Half hourly observations were made during a 6 to 8-hour continuous laboratory session, which was during the day (9 AM to 5 PM) for nine of the subjects, and during the evening (5 to 11 PM) for eight. A similar pattern of eruption was seen for all subjects. The tooth intruded from before to after dinner on the first day, erupted significantly overnight, ceased eruption and approximately maintained its position during the next day, and erupted again during the second night. On the average, a slight intrusion was observed during the day, and statistically significant intrusion was associated with breakfast and dinner. Eruption occurred during the evening observation period, and the rate of evening eruption was significantly greater in children who were supine and relaxed than those who were upright and active. The 24-hour eruption rate was slower for teeth that were within 1.5 mm of the occlusal plane. The circadian eruption rhythm may be related to fluctuations of hormonal levels that affect metabolic activities within the periodontal ligament. It is also possible that a transient reduction in pressures by the cheeks, lips, and tongue during periods of rest allows eruption to occur then.

  3. Mass eruptions from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Lucie

    2015-08-01

    This review talk will address the recent developments and current understanding of the physical mechanisms that underlie the ejection of matter and magnetic field from the atmosphere of the Sun, known as coronal mass ejections. These eruptions are intitiated within and between active regions throughout an active region's entire lifetime; from the emergence phase, when strong and concentrated magnetic fields are present, through the long decay phase during which time the active region magnetic field fragments and disperses over a larger and larger area, eventually fading into the background quiet sun magnetic field. All coronal mass ejection models invoke the presence of a twisted magnetic field configuration known as a magnetic flux rope either before or after eruption. The observational identification of these structures using remote sensing data of the lower solar atmosphere will be discussed. Do such magnetic field configurations exist in the solar atmosphere prior to the eruption? And if so what can they tell us about the physical mechanisms that trigger and drive coronal mass ejections and the timescales over which an eruptive magnetic field configuration forms? However, not all coronal mass ejections are easily identifiable at the Sun. For example, in situ observations of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space reveal small magnetic flux rope coronal mass ejections which are not detected leaving the Sun using the remote sensing data. And so-called stealth coronal mass ejections which also have no lower atmosphere signatures. Are there different populations of flux ropes that have different origins? And what might this say about the physical mechanisms behind coronal mass ejections and the consequences for the Sun's evolving global magnetic field?

  4. The 1883 eruption of Krakatau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Self, S.; Rampino, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The 1883 eruption of Krakatau was a modest ignimbrite-forming event. The deposits are primarily coarse-grained dacitic, non-welded ignimbrite. Large explosions produced pyroclastic flows that entered the sea, generating destructive tsunami. Grain-size studies of the ignimbrite suggest that these explosions were not driven by magma-seawater interaction. The total bulk volume of pyroclastic deposits, including co-ignimbrite ash, is estimated to be 18-21 cu km.

  5. Patterns of historical eruptions at Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    Hawaiian eruptions are largely random phenomena displaying no periodicity; that is, future eruptions are relatively independent of the date of the last eruption. Several simultaneous processes probably govern eruption timing so that it appears random. I have performed statistical tests for nonrandomness on the repose times between eruptions and on the sequence of event types. Statistical differences that have physical consequences exist between large and small eruptions, summit and flank eruptions, and intrusive and extrusive events. Thus, large-volume eruptions tend to be followed by longer reposes as shallow magma reservoirs refill. On Kilauea, both summit eruptions and rapid intrusions tend to cluster at times associated with other physical events on the volcano. The longest recorded reposes of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa apparently are not random phenomena, for they appear to be associated with increased activity at the other volcano. Both eruption rates and volumes are consistent with a constant but alternating magma supply to the two volcanoes and an approximately five-fold larger magma reservoir at Mauna Loa than at Kilauea. ?? 1982.

  6. Continuous overnight observation of human premolar eruption.

    PubMed

    Risinger, R K; Proffit, W R

    1996-01-01

    Such observation was made possible by transmitting the image of a mobile ceramic ruling on the erupting maxillary second premolar to a video-microscope via a coaxial fibreoptic cable. The cable was inserted into a reference bar secured to the adjacent first molar and first premolar. The image of the ruling was superimposed with the image from a surveillance camera focused on the patient and continuously recorded on video-tape along with the participant's blood pressure, pulse rate, electromyographic activity and occlusal contact sounds. Overnight data from 12 individuals clearly revealed a circadian rhythm in eruption during the prefunctional spurt. On average, the maxillary second premolar erupted 41 microns during an 11-h overnight observation, with almost all the eruption occurring in the late evening from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. After 1 a.m., eruption typically ceased, with a tendency for intrusion to occur until 7 a.m. Sleep increased the rate of eruption during the late evening, but did not influence the eruption rate during the early morning. Haemodynamic changes, including blood pressure and pulse rate, did not have a significant impact on the rhythm of eruption. The observed eruption rhythm is most probably caused by changing hormone levels and their effect on the periodontal ligament. The late-evening eruption of human premolars coincides with the late-evening secretion of growth hormone and thyroid hormone typically found in humans. PMID:9022915

  7. Eruptions of Hawaiian Volcanoes - Past, Present, and Future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; Heliker, Christina; Swanson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Viewing an erupting volcano is a memorable experience, one that has inspired fear, superstition, worship, curiosity, and fascination since before the dawn of civilization. In modern times, volcanic phenomena have attracted intense scientific interest, because they provide the key to understanding processes that have created and shaped more than 80 percent of the Earth's surface. The active Hawaiian volcanoes have received special attention worldwide because of their frequent spectacular eruptions, which often can be viewed and studied with relative ease and safety. In January 1987, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), located on the rim of Kilauea Volcano, celebrated its 75th Anniversary. In honor of HVO's Diamond Jubilee, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published Professional Paper 1350 (see list of Selected Readings, page 57), a comprehensive summary of the many studies on Hawaiian volcanism by USGS and other scientists through the mid-1980s. Drawing from the wealth of data contained in that volume, the USGS also published in 1987 the original edition of this general-interest booklet, focusing on selected aspects of the eruptive history, style, and products of two of Hawai'i's active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. This revised edition of the booklet-spurred by the approaching Centennial of HVO in January 2012-summarizes new information gained since the January 1983 onset of Kilauea's Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption, which has continued essentially nonstop through 2010 and shows no signs of letup. It also includes description of Kilauea's summit activity within Halema'uma'u Crater, which began in mid-March 2008 and continues as of this writing (late 2010). This general-interest booklet is a companion to the one on Mount St. Helens Volcano first published in 1984 and revised in 1990 (see Selected Readings). Together, these publications illustrate the contrast between the two main types of volcanoes: shield volcanoes, such as those in Hawai'i, which generally

  8. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  9. An ergodic approach to eruption hazard scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The complexity and indeterminacy of volcanic processes demand the use of statistical methods to analyze the expectations of the occurrence and size of future eruptions. The probability of a volcano producing potentially destructive eruptions in a given time interval may be estimated analyzing the sequence of past eruptions assuming a physically plausible process. Since the threat posed by eruptions depends on their mass or energy release (magnitude) and on their emission rate (intensity), the Volcanic Explosivity Index is a suitable measure to quantify the eruptive events, particularly considering that the largest available global catalogues use that measure. The definition of volcanic hazard is thus posed here in terms of the expected annual release of energy by eruptions in each VEI category. This concept is based on the ergodic property of a large set of volcanoes to release about the same amount of energy in each VEI category over a sufficiently large time interval. This property is however constrained to the VEI range of eruptions that constitute complete catalogues (VEI >2) in the lower end, and to the extreme eruptions that may destroy or significantly alter a volcanic system, such as the large caldera-forming eruptions (VEI < 7). In such conditions, a simple power law for eruptions at the global level relating the global rate of energy release to the eruption magnitude has been proposed as a statistical basis for eruptive event model development. Following the above mentioned arguments, we assume that a similar scaling law rules the annual rate at which energy is released by eruptions at individual volcanoes as log(EmRm)=bM+a, where Em is the energy released by eruptions in the VEI magnitude class M, and Rm is the occurrence rate of such eruptions over times ranges in which catalogues may be considered complete. The parameters b and a depend on the eruptive history of individual volcanoes, the former determining the preferred mode of the volcano to release

  10. Forces in Erupting Flux Ropes: CMEs and Failed Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2016-05-01

    A range of dynamical behaviors that can be exhibited by a quasi-statically evolving flux rope is studied. Starting with a CME-like flux rope in equilibrium balanced by the ambient coronal pressure (non-force-free) and an overlying coronal magnetic field (Bc), the poloidal flux is slowly increased, on a timescale much longer than the eruptive timescale of several to tens of minutes. In this configuration, the overlying field Bc provides an external downward restraining force, constituting an effective potential barrier. Slowly increasing poloidal flux causes the flux rope to gradually rise, following a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope rises past a critical height Z*, slightly higher than the peak of the potential barrier Bc(Z), it expands on a faster, dynamical (Alfvenic) timescale determined by the magnetic field and geometry of the flux rope. The expanding flux rope may reach a new equilibrium at height Z1. Observationally, this behavior would be recognized as a ``failed eruption.'' The new equilibrium flux rope is established if the magnetic tension force due to the toroidal magnetic field component Bt can balance the outward hoop force due to the poloidal component Bp. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficiennt amount of poloidal flux is injected on a dynamical timescale so that the tension force cannot balance the hoop force. This scenario would result in a CME eruption. The influence of the poloidal flux injection, the Bc(Z) profile, and boundary conditions on the quantitative balance of the forces in an expanding flux rope is elucidated. Potentially observable consequences of the difference scenarios/models are discussed.Work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Research Program

  11. Ice-volcano interactions during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, as revealed by airborne imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, E.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Roberts, M. J.; Sigurã°Sson, G.; HöSkuldsson, F.; Oddsson, B.

    2012-07-01

    During the eruption of the ice-covered Eyjafjallajökull volcano, a series of images from an airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) were obtained by the Icelandic Coast Guard. Cloud obscured the summit from view during the first three days of the eruption, making the weather-independent SAR a valuable monitoring resource. Radar images revealed the development of ice cauldrons in a 200 m thick ice cover within the summit caldera, as well as the formation of cauldrons to the immediate south of the caldera. Additionally, radar images were used to document the subglacial and supraglacial passage of floodwater to the north and south of the eruption site. The eruption breached the ice surface about four hours after its onset at about 01:30 UTC on 14 April 2010. The first SAR images, obtained between 08:55 and 10:42 UTC, show signs of limited supraglacial drainage from the eruption site. Floodwater began to drain from the ice cap almost 5.5 h after the beginning of the eruption, implying storage of meltwater at the eruption site due to initially constricted subglacial drainage from the caldera. Heat transfer rates from magma to ice during early stages of cauldron formation were about 1 MW m-2 in the radial direction and about 4 MW m-2 vertically. Meltwater release was characterized by accumulation and drainage with most of the volcanic material in the ice cauldrons being drained in hyperconcentrated floods. After the third day of the eruption, meltwater generation at the eruption site diminished due to an insulating lag of tephra.

  12. Reprint of "Seismic monitoring of the Plosky Tolbachik eruption in 2012-2013 (Kamchatka Peninsula Russia)"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyukov, S. L.; Nuzhdina, I. N.; Droznina, S. Ya.; Garbuzova, V. T.; Kozhevnikova, T. Yu.; Sobolevskaya, O. V.; Nazarova, Z. A.; Bliznetsov, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The active basaltic volcano Plosky Tolbachik (Pl. Tolbachik) is located in the southern part of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group on the Kamchatka Peninsula. The previous 1975-1976 Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (1975-1976 GTFE) occurred in the southern sector of Pl. Tolbachik. It was preceded by powerful earthquakes with local magnitudes between 2.5 and 4.9 and it was successfully predicted with a short-term forecast. The Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Survey (KBGS) of the Russian Academy of Science (RAS) began to publish the results of daily seismic monitoring of active Kamchatka volcanoes on the Internet in 2000. Unlike the 1975-1976 GTFE precursor, (1) seismicity before the 2012-2013 Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (2012-2013 TFE) was relatively weak and earthquake magnitudes did not exceed 2.5. (2) Precursory earthquake hypocenters at 0-5 km depth were concentrated mainly under the southeastern part of the volcano. (3) The frequency of events gradually increased in September 2012, and rose sharply on the eve of the eruption. (4) According to seismic data, the explosive-effusive 2012-2013 TFE began at ~ 05 h 15 min UTC on November 27, 2012; the outbreak occurred between the summit of the Pl. Tolbachik and the Northern Breakthrough of the 1975-1976 GTFE. (5) Because of bad weather, early interpretations of the onset time and the character of the eruption were made using seismological data only and were confirmed later by other monitoring methods. The eruption finished in early September 2013. This article presents the data obtained through real-time seismic monitoring and the results of retrospective analysis, with additional comments on the future monitoring of volcanic activity.

  13. How and Why Do Geysers Erupt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    Geysers are features that produce episodic eruptions of water, steam and sometimes non-condensable gases. Natural geysers are rare, with fewer than 1,000 worldwide. They are more than curiosities and popular tourist attractions: they offer a direct window into geothermal processes, and may serve as a natural small-scale laboratory to study larger-scale eruptive process such as those at volcanoes, and other self-organized, intermittent processes that result from phase separation and localized input of energy and mass. Despite > 200 years of scientific study, basic questions remain: Do eruptions begin from the bottom or top of the geyser? What controls eruption duration? Why do eruptions end? What are the required special subsurface geometries? Why are some geysers periodic, and others irregular? How and why do they respond to external influences such as weather, tides, and earthquakes? This presentation will review new insights from field studies at Lone Star geyser, Yellowstone National Park, geysers in the El Tatio geyser field, Chile, and laboratory models. At Lone Star we infer that dynamics are controlled by thermal and mechanical coupling between the conduit and a deeper, laterally-offset reservoir (called a "bubble trap" in previous studies). At El Tatio, we measured pressure and temperature within geysers over multiple eruption cycles: this data document the heating of liquid water by steam delivered from below. The laboratory experiments reveal how episodic release of steam from a bubble trap prepares a conduit for eruption and can generate a range of eruption intensities. In all cases, the eruption initiation, duration and termination are controlled by the interaction between the accumulation and transport of steam and liquid, and modulated by the geometry of the geyser's plumbing. Time series of thousands of eruptions confirm that internal processes control eruptions, with only pool geysers showing a sensitivity to air temperature; only very large stress

  14. The antibody response in seabather's eruption.

    PubMed

    Burnett, J W; Kumar, S; Malecki, J M; Szmant, A M

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-six of 44 patients with seabather's eruption had specific IgG antibodies against Linuche unguilata (thimble jelly) medusae antigen. ELISA detected antibodies in serum stored for 10 years. The extent of the cutaneous eruption or sting severity was correlated with antibody titer. Antibodies were detected in patients acquiring the eruption in Florida, the Bahamas and Aruba, reflecting the habitat of these jellyfish. This serological assay can be useful to confirm the clinical diagnosis. PMID:7778134

  15. When do Volcanic Eruptions make Lightning? Observations from Sakurajima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; McNutt, S. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Smith, C. M.; Edens, H. E.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Cimarelli, C.; Cigala, V.; Michel, C. W.; Miki, D.; Iguchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Previous radio frequency (RF) observations of volcanic lightning have revealed that electrical activity frequently occurs concurrent with the onset of an explosive volcanic event. Typically, a myriad of electrical impulses originating from directly above the vent are observed first and the ensemble has durations of several seconds. The impulses are distinct from those produced by typical types of thunderstorm lightning, and have earned the moniker "continuous RF" due to their high rate and long-lasting nature . Several seconds after the onset of these impulses, small (100s of meters to several kilometers) lightning discharges occur in the plume and near the vent, and have electrical signatures similar to typical thunderstorm lightning. In eruptions with plume heights reaching 8-10 km or more, large scale (10s of kilometers) lightning discharges are observed throughout the plume several minutes after the onset of an explosive event.In May 2015, a campaign began to study the various types of small-scale electrical activity, including continuous RF, during explosive eruptions of Sakurajima volcano in Kyushu, Japan. The volcano was instrumented with two seismometers, two infrasound arrays, a high sensitivity video camera, an infrared camera, two high speed video cameras, still cameras, a 10-station Lightning Mapping Array, slow and fast electric field change sensors, and a broadband very high frequency (VHF) antenna. With these instruments, a robust data set of both the volcanic activity and electrical activity was collected. The preliminary data have revealed brief (1-2 seconds) bursts of continuous RF simultaneous with the onset of the more energetic explosions. Occurrence of continuous RF may be linked to mass eruption rate, explosivity, or grain size. Due to its unique nature, detection of continuous RF is an unambiguous indicator of explosive volcanic activity and is therefore useful for real-time volcano monitoring.

  16. The Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April-May 2010; course of events, ash generation and ash dispersal (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, M. T.; Thordarson, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Larsen, G.; Jónsdóttir, I.; Oddsson, B.; Magnusson, E.; Hognadottir, T.; Sverrisdottir, G.; Oskarsson, N.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Bjornsson, H.; Pedersen, G. N.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Roberts, M. J.; Gudmundsson, G. B.; Zophoniasson, S.; Hoskuldsson, F.

    2010-12-01

    The explosive eruption of the 1660 m high ice-capped Eyjafjallajökull volcano in April-May 2010 was of moderate size but due to high proportions of very fine-grained ash, its 39-day duration, and prevailing southeasterly jetstream, the ash was widely dispersed and caused unprecedented disruption to air traffic over Europe. After a prolonged period of intrusive activity, a small basaltic flank eruption took place on the northeast side of the volcano, lasting from March 20 to April 12, producing 25 million m3 of basalt. The trachyandesite summit eruption began at 1:30 on April 14. Despite thin glacier (200 m), the eruption was subglacial in the first few hours suggesting very low initial magma discharge. An eruption plume rose through the cloudcover above the volcano at 6 AM. Shortly before 7 AM meltwater from the craters in the 2.5 km wide ice-filled caldera emerged from the outlet glacier Gígjökull. Jokulhlaups occurred on April 14 and 15, but none were of sufficient magnitude to cause widespread damage. The intensity of the eruption increased steadily during April 14. Activity was phreatomagmatic, featured a distinctive Vulcanian character and sustained a 6-9 km high (a.s.l.) eruption plume for almost four days. This phase produced high proportions of extremely fine ash, such that the fallout on the surrounding lowlands contained up to 20 wt% of the <10 µm size fraction. In the first two days, a sizeable proportion of the eruption energy went into melting ice, but by April 16 ice melting had become insignificant. On April 17th fallout was especially heavy in the Eyjafjöll district 10-15 km south of the active vents. During this initial four-day period, ash was transported towards south-east and south, resulting in minor ash fallout in Europe. In the days that followed, magma discharge dropped and access of water to the vent was restricted, resulting to mixed magmatic eruption producing both lava and tephra. This phase of mild explosive activity and limited

  17. Tornados and Transverse Oscillations during Prominence Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Chandrashekhar, K.; Morton, Richard; Pant, Vaibhav; Datta, Ajanta

    2016-07-01

    We report and analyse different phases of a prominence eruption. The winding-unwinding of two footpoints and a tornado like swirling motion is studied. The prominence eruption is observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This prominence eruption is associated with a CME at a central principal angle of 340 degree, according to the SOHO/LASCO CME catalogue. We can observe the prominence threads and the time distance maps reveal that the loop threads are entangled. We also study the transverse oscillations in the threads. Swirling motions after the eruptions are also quantified and its possible link with the CME kinematics is also studied

  18. Winter warming from large volcanic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, A.; Mao, J.

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95 percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  19. West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With its vast expanses of sand, framed by mountain ranges and exposed rock, northwestern Africa makes a pretty picture when viewed from above. This image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The Canary Islands can be seen on the left side of the image just off Africa's Atlantic shore. The light brown expanse running through the northern two thirds of the image is the Sahara Desert. The desert runs up against the dark brown Haut Atlas mountain range of Morocco in the northwest, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the semi-arid (light brown pixels) Sahelian region in the South. The Sahara, however, isn't staying put. Since the 1960s, the desert has been expanding into the Sahelian region at a rate of up to 6 kilometers per year. In the 1980s this desert expansion, combined with over cultivation of the Sahel, caused a major famine across west Africa. Over the summer months, strong winds pick up sands from the Sahara and blow them across the Atlantic as far west as North America, causing air pollution in Miami and damaging coral reefs in the Bahamas and the Florida Keys. The white outlines on the map represent country borders. Starting at the top-most portion of the map and working clockwise, the countries shown are Morocco, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Fasso, Nigeria, Mali (again), and Algeria. Image by Reto Stockli, Robert Simmon, and Brian Montgomery, NASA Earth Observatory, based on data from MODIS

  20. Why do Martian Magmas erupt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balta, J. B.; McSween, H. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Eruption of silicate lava, whether on Earth or another planet, requires that at some depth the melt has lower density than the surrounding rocks. As the densities of silicate liquids change during crystallization, whether a particular silicate liquid will erupt or be trapped at a level of neutral buoyancy is a complex yet fundamental issue for planetary dynamics. In general, 3 factors drive surface eruptions: inherent buoyancy relative to mantle phases, compositional evolution, and volatile contents. These factors manifest on Earth as terrestrial basalts commonly have compositions close to a density minimum [1]. Recent work has produced estimates of Martian parental magma compositions [2-5] based on shergottite meteorites and from Gusev crater. Using the MELTS algorithm [6] and other density calibrations, we simulated evolution of these liquids, focusing on density changes. For much of the crystallization path, density is controlled by FeO. All of the liquids begin with ρ ~ 2.8 g/cc at 1 bar, and the evolution of liquid density is controlled by the liquidus phases. At low pressures, olivine is the liquidus phase for each melt, and as FeO is not incompatible in olivine, olivine crystallization decreases liquid density, increasing buoyancy with crystallization. However, FeO is incompatible in pyroxene, and thus liquids crystallizing pyroxene become denser and less buoyant with crystallization, producing liquids with densities up to and above 3.0 g/cc. As the olivine-pyroxene saturation relationship is affected by pressure and chemistry, the identity of the liquidus phase and density evolution will vary between magmas. Without spreading centers, Mars has no location where the mantle approaches the surface, and it is likely that any magma which is denser than the crust will stall below or within that crust. The crystallization path of a liquid is a function of pressure, with pyroxene crystallizing first at P > 10 kbar (~80 km depth), close to the base of the Martian

  1. Volcanism in Eastern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Clay; Coombs, Cassandra R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1891, the Virunga Mountains of Eastern Zaire were first acknowledged as volcanoes, and since then, the Virunga Mountain chain has demonstrated its potentially violent volcanic nature. The Virunga Mountains lie across the Eastern African Rift in an E-W direction located north of Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyamuragira and Mt. Nyiragongo present the most hazard of the eight mountains making up Virunga volcanic field, with the most recent activity during the 1970-90's. In 1977, after almost eighty years of moderate activity and periods of quiescence, Mt. Nyamuragira became highly active with lava flows that extruded from fissures on flanks circumscribing the volcano. The flows destroyed vast areas of vegetation and Zairian National Park areas, but no casualties were reported. Mt. Nyiragongo exhibited the same type volcanic activity, in association with regional tectonics that effected Mt. Nyamuragira, with variations of lava lake levels, lava fountains, and lava flows that resided in Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyiragongo, recently named a Decade volcano, presents both a direct and an indirect hazard to the inhabitants and properties located near the volcano. The Virunga volcanoes pose four major threats: volcanic eruptions, lava flows, toxic gas emission (CH4 and CO2), and earthquakes. Thus, the volcanoes of the Eastern African volcanic field emanate harm to the surrounding area by the forecast of volcanic eruptions. During the JSC Summer Fellowship program, we will acquire and collate remote sensing, photographic (Space Shuttle images), topographic and field data. In addition, maps of the extent and morphology(ies) of the features will be constructed using digital image information. The database generated will serve to create a Geographic Information System for easy access of information of the Eastem African volcanic field. The analysis of volcanism in Eastern Africa will permit a comparison for those areas from which we have field data. Results from this summer's work will permit

  2. What Generated the Eruptive Tremor During the Bardarbunga Eruption, Iceland?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibl, Eva P. S.; Bean, Christopher J.; Vogfjörd, Kristin S.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Höskuldsson, Armann; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur

    2016-04-01

    The Bárðarbunga eruption in Iceland 2014/15 led to the formation of a 85 km2 big lavafield and the extrusion of ~1.5 km3 of magma. The eruption initially started for 4 hours on August 29th. It stopped but restarted on the same fissure on August 31st. We installed a seismic array on August 30th. Harmonic tremor was seen on August 31st consistent with the visual opening of the fissure and continued through February 2015. The harmonic tremor with most energy from 0.8-1.5 Hz is remarkably stable over 6 months but 3 characteristic features occur from time to time: (i) Stronger harmonic tremor bursts in the same frequency range, (ii) Stronger non-harmonic bursts with energy up to 5 Hz and (iii) Step like increases or decreases in the tremor amplitude. Seemingly uncorrelated the array results show (iv) three very stable tremor directions until mid October and (v) tremor sources moving by up to 9 km in 4 days. We compare these five seismic observations with the features of the growing lavafield and discuss the relative importance of possible tremor sources such as: a resonating conduit, boiling magma in the vent, a resonating lavafield, interactions at the edges of the lavafield and inflation of the lavafield.

  3. The May 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, M. T.; Höskuldsson, Á.; Larsen, G.; Thordarson, T.; Oladottir, B. A.; Oddsson, B.; Gudnason, J.; Högnadottir, T.; Stevenson, J. A.; Houghton, B. F.; McGarvie, D.; Sigurdardottir, G. M.

    2012-04-01

    Grímsvötn is the most active volcano in Iceland with >60 known eruptions in the last 800 years. Grímsvötn is located in the centre of the 8100 km2 Vatnajökull glacier and typically produces basalts in phreatomagmatic eruptions. Magma-water interaction occurs as the eruptions quickly melt their way through 50-200 m thick ice covering a subglacial caldera lake. Most of these eruptions have been relatively modest in size (0.01-0.1 km3 DRE) causing relatively minor fallout of tephra outside Vatnajökull. After a relative quiet second half of the 20th century, a period of increased volcanic activity in Grímsvötn started in the 1990s, with basaltic phreatomagmatic eruptions occurring within the caldera in 1998 and 2004. The 2011 eruption was therefore expected. It began at 19 UTC on 21 May. The plume quickly rose to 15-20 km, forming a 50-100 km wide umbrella cloud that was maintained until late on 22 May. Heavy fallout occurred in the districts 70-100 km south of the volcano, where periods of total darkness with drifting ash closed roads and caused distress to the local population. Wind directions and plume transport varied somewhat during the eruption. After 23 May, the eruption was relatively minor, with fallout mostly confined to the Vatnajökull glacier. The eruption ended on May 28. Most of the magma was erupted in the first two days. During this period strong northerly winds were dominant at low altitude, carrying the tephra towards south as a 2-4 km high cloud, while the top part of the plume first drifted eastwards and later northwards. Most of the fallout after the first few hours came from the low southwards drifting cloud while the high plume was white in colour and with apparently low concentration of ash leading to only minor fallout. This eruption falls into a class of events that seem to happen once every 100-200 years, with previous large historical eruptions including 1619 and 1873. Preliminary estimates indicate that the eruption produced 0

  4. A conceptual model of the Mount Spurr magmatic system from seismic and geochemical observations of the 1992 Crater Peak eruption sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.; Jolly, A.; Nye, C.; Harbin, M.

    2002-01-01

    A conceptual model of the geometry and dynamics of the Mount Spurr magmatic system is developed using seismic, geochemical, and visual observations of the 1992 Crater Peak eruption sequence. The basis for this model is a new classification of all located seismic events and results from prior studies of seismology, geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Mount Spurr area. Significant seismic features of the 1992 eruption sequence include (1) a distinct swarm of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes in August 1991 directly beneath the Crater Peak vent, (2) a caldera-wide increase in VT earthquakes, lasting 7 months, which preceded the 27 June eruption, (3) two shallow swarms of VT earthquakes that occured on 5 June and 27 June, the latter immediately preceding the 27 June eruption, (4) a mix of VT, long-period (LP), and hybrid events at depths of 20-40 km, which began coincident with the onset of seismic unrest and reached a peak after eruptive activity ended, (5) a strong swarm of VT earthquakes that began as the 16-17 September eruption was ending, (6) a prominent swarm of VT earthquakes on 9-10 November at depths of 1 to 4 km beneath Crater Peak, and (7) a smaller swarm of VT earthquakes in late December 1992, which were located between 7 and 10 km depth. These seismic observations, combined with geological, geochemical, and geophysical data and observations, suggest a deep magmatic source zone for Crater Peak andesites at depths of 20-40 km, a smaller mid-crustal storage zone at about 10 km depth, and a conduit that extends to the surface. We infer that the magmas erupted in 1992 were generated at depths of 20-40 km and rose to the mid-crustal storage zone that fed all three 1992 eruptions. The 1992 eruption sequence may have terminated when additional magma solidified at shallow depths.

  5. The Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: The First 20 Years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina C.; Swanson, Donald A.; Takahashi, Taeko Jane

    2003-01-01

    The Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption started on January 3, 1983. The ensuing 20-year period of nearly continuous eruption is the longest at Kilauea Volcano since the famous lava-lake activity of the 19th century. No rift-zone eruption in more than 600 years even comes close to matching the duration and volume of activity of these past two decades. Fortunately, such a landmark event came during a period of remarkable technological advancements in volcano monitoring. When the eruption began, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Geographic Information System (GIS) were but glimmers on the horizon, broadband seismology was in its infancy, and the correlation spectrometer (COSPEC), used to measure SO2 flux, was still very young. Now, all of these techniques are employed on a daily basis to track the ongoing eruption and construct models about its behavior. The 12 chapters in this volume, written by present or past Hawaiian Volcano Observatory staff members and close collaborators, celebrate the growth of understanding that has resulted from research during the past 20 years of Kilauea's eruption. The chapters range widely in emphasis, subject matter, and scope, but all present new concepts or important modifications of previous ideas - in some cases, ideas long held and cherished.

  6. Jupiter Eruptions Captured in Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for high resolution image of Nature Cover

    Detailed analysis of two continent-sized storms that erupted in Jupiter's atmosphere in March 2007 shows that Jupiter's internal heat plays a significant role in generating atmospheric disturbances. Understanding these outbreaks could be the key to unlock the mysteries buried in the deep Jovian atmosphere, say astronomers.

    This infrared image shows two bright plume eruptions obtained by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on April 5, 2007.

    Understanding these phenomena is important for Earth's meteorology where storms are present everywhere and jet streams dominate the atmospheric circulation. Jupiter is a natural laboratory where atmospheric scientists study the nature and interplay of the intense jets and severe atmospheric phenomena.

    According to the analysis, the bright plumes were storm systems triggered in Jupiter's deep water clouds that moved upward in the atmosphere vigorously and injected a fresh mixture of ammonia ice and water about 20 miles (30 kilometers) above the visible clouds. The storms moved in the peak of a jet stream in Jupiter's atmosphere at 375 miles per hour (600 kilometers per hour). Models of the disturbance indicate that the jet stream extends deep in the buried atmosphere of Jupiter, more than 60 miles (approximately100 kilometers) below the cloud tops where most sunlight is absorbed.

  7. Herculaneum: Clues to Vesuvius eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    More than 80 skeletons have been unearthed in the ancient Mediterranean town of Herculaneum, west of Italy's Mount Vesuvius. This anthropological find corroborates a reinterpretation by three University of Rhode Island scientists of the sequence of the August A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius. In addition, the discovery is the first proof that large numbers of people perished as they tried to flee from the eruption, estimated to have been about 10 times more powerful than the May 1980 Mount St. Helens blast.‘Who says dead men don't talk? Their bones have something to say about them and their everyday lives,’ says Sara C. Bisel, a physical anthropologist who analyzed the skeletons. Among the remains are a cluster of skeletons from six adults, four children, and two infants trying to shield themselves from the volcanic onslaught; the skeleton of a sailor, still clutching an oar, lying on his back beside an 8-m-long capsized boat; a woman whose now bony hand was still graced with gem-encrusted gold rings; and a soldier (see Figure 1). From these and other finds the anthropological team was able to discern that the ancient Romans, on average, were shorter than modern citizens and, judging from the condition of some of the teeth, probably had a low-sugar diet.

  8. Mechanism of Human Tooth Eruption: Review Article Including a New Theory for Future Studies on the Eruption Process

    PubMed Central

    Kjær, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Human eruption is a unique developmental process in the organism. The aetiology or the mechanism behind eruption has never been fully understood and the scientific literature in the field is extremely sparse. Human and animal tissues provide different possibilities for eruption analyses, briefly discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptively and later to end these eruptive movements is not known. Pathological eruption courses contribute to insight into the aetiology behind eruption. A new theory on the eruption mechanism is presented. Accordingly, the mechanism of eruption depends on the correlation between space in the eruption course, created by the crown follicle, eruption pressure triggered by innervation in the apical root membrane, and the ability of the periodontal ligament to adapt to eruptive movements. Animal studies and studies on normal and pathological eruption in humans can support and explain different aspects in the new theory. The eruption mechanism still needs elucidation and the paper recommends that future research on eruption keeps this new theory in mind. Understanding the aetiology of the eruption process is necessary for treating deviant eruption courses. PMID:24688798

  9. Tephrostratigraphy and eruptive history of post-caldera stage of Toya Volcano, Hokkaido, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabuchi, Yasuo; Okuno, Mitsuru; Torii, Masayuki; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2014-06-01

    A detailed tephrostratigraphy of Toya Volcano in Hokkaido, northern Japan has been constructed to evaluate the post-caldera eruptive history of the volcano. The tephrostratigraphic sequence preserved above the Toya ignimbrite reaches a total thickness of 8 m southeast of the caldera. After the caldera formation (115-112 ka), there was a long quiescent period of more than 60 ka years. The first post-caldera activity started with Nakajima Osarugawa pumice-fall deposit (Nj-Os) inside the caldera at 48 ka. Eruptive activity at Nakajima Volcano resumed at 30 ka with Nakajima Sekinai pumice-fall deposit (Nj-Sk), and was followed by continuous emission of fine ash including abundant accretionary lapilli. Soon after the Nakajima pyroclastic eruption Usu Volcano began its activity with discharges of basaltic ash and scoria (forming the Usu prehistoric tephra) and extrusion of homogeneous lavas namely Usu somma lava, resulting in the formation of the initial volcanic edifice. Subsequently, a large sector collapse occurred between 30 and 20 ka that emplaced the Zenkoji debris avalanche with little break after the formation of the initial Usu volcanic edifice. After the sector collapse, the volcano remained dormant for about 20-30 ka years. Eruptive activity at Usu Volcano resumed in 1663 AD with the most explosive plinian eruption in the post-caldera stage of Toya Volcano. Since then, seven eruptions have been recorded in 1769, 1822, 1853, 1910, 1943-1945, 1977-1978 and 2000 at multi-decadal interval. Total tephra volume during the post-caldera stage is estimated at about 0.9 km3 (dense rock equivalent: DRE), whereas total lava volume is calculated at about 2.3 km3. Therefore, the average magma discharge rate during the post-caldera stage of Toya Volcano is estimated at about 0.03 km3/ky, which is one or two order smaller than those of other Quaternary volcanoes in Japan.

  10. Low intensity hawaiian fountaining as exemplified by the March 2011, Kamoamoa eruption at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, T. R.; Houghton, B. F.; Poland, M. P.; Patrick, M. R.; Thelen, W. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Parcheta, C. E.; Thornber, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The latest 'classic' hawaiian high-fountaining activity at Kilauea Volcano occurred in 1983-1986 with construction of the Pu`u `O`o pyroclastic cone. Since then, eruptions at Kilauea have been dominated by nearly continuous effusive activity. Episodes of sustained low hawaiian fountaining have occurred but are rare and restricted to short-lived fissure eruptions along Kilauea's east rift zone. The most recent of these weakly explosive fissure eruptions--the Kamoamoa eruption--occurred 5-9 March 2011. The Kamoamoa eruption was probably the consequence of a decrease in the carrying capacity of the conduit feeding the episode 58 eruptive vent down-rift from Pu`u `O`o in Kilauea's east rift zone. As output from the vent waned, Kilauea's summit magma storage and east rift zone transport system began to pressurize, as manifested by an increase in seismicity along the upper east rift zone, inflation of the summit and Pu`u `O`o, expansion of the east rift zone, and rising lava levels at both the summit and Pu`u `O`o. A dike began propagating towards the surface from beneath Makaopuhi Crater, 6 km west of Pu`u `O`o, at 1342 Hawaiian Standard Time (UTC - 10 hours) on 5 March. A fissure eruption started about 3.5 hours later near Nāpau Crater, 2 km uprift of Pu`u `O`o. Activity initially jumped between numerous en echelon fissure segments before centering on discrete vents near both ends of the 2.4-km-long fissure system for the final two days of the eruption. About 2.6 mcm of lava was erupted over the course of four days with a peak eruption rate of 11 m3/s. The petrologic characteristics of the fissure-fed lava indicate mixing between hotter mantle-derived magma and cooler rift-stored magma, with a greater proportion of the cooler component than was present in east rift zone lava erupting before March 2011. The fissure eruption was accompanied by the highest SO2 emission rates since 1986. Coincidentally, the summit and Pu`u `O`o deflated as magma drained away, causing

  11. Chronology of Postglacial Eruptive Activity and Calculation of Eruption Probabilities for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano has had 4 eruptive episodes in its postglacial history (since 13,000 years ago) comprising 16 eruptions. Time intervals between events within the episodes are relatively short, whereas time intervals between the episodes are much longer. An updated radiocarbon chronology for these eruptions is presented that uses paleomagnetic data to constrain the choice of calibrated ages. This chronology is used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to model the data for time intervals between eruptions. The mixed exponential distribution is the best match to the data and provides estimates for the conditional probability of a future eruption given the time since the last eruption. The probability of an eruption at Medicine Lake volcano in the next year from today is 0.00028.

  12. Coronal Magnetic Structures for Homologous Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Liu, C.; Jing, J.; Chae, J.

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have been made on homologous eruptions for their importance in understanding the flare energy build-up and release processes. We study the homologous eruptions that occurred in three active regions, NOAA 11444, 11283, and 12192, with emphasis on the coronal quantities derived from the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation. The quantities include magnetic energy, electric current, and magnetic twist number, and decay index, computed from the high cadence photospheric vector magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). In addition, photospheric magnetic flux, flare ribbons and overlying field distribution are also examined to determine the changes associated with each eruption. As main results, we will present the difference between the homology of confined eruptions and that of eruptive ones, and variations of the coronal quantities with flare strength.

  13. Large scale pantelleritic ash flow eruptions during the Late Miocene in central Kenya and evidence for significant environmental impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, L.; Veldkamp, A.; Schoorl, J. M.; Wijbrans, J. R.; van Gorp, W.; Macdonald, R.

    2016-10-01

    In the area south-east of Mount Kenya, four previously unrecorded peralkaline rhyolitic (pantelleritic) ash flow tuffs have been located. These predominantly greyish welded and non-welded tuffs form up to 12 m thick units, which are sometimes characterized by a basal vitrophyre. The four flow units yielded 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 6.36 to 8.13 Ma, indicating a period of ~ 1.8 Ma of pantelleritic volcanic activity during the Late Miocene in central Kenya. Tentative compositional and age correlations with other known tuff deposits suggest that the pantelleritic tuffs originally covered 40,000 km2 in central Kenya, extending much further than earlier recorded Pliocene tuffs. This newly identified magmatic phase occurred between the phonolitic flood eruptions (16-8 Ma) and the Pliocene tuff eruptions (6-4 Ma). The occurrence of multiple ash flow tuff deposits up to 150 km away from the inferred eruptive center(s) in the central sector of the Kenya Rift, indicates multi-cyclic peralkaline supereruptions during the Late Miocene. By analogy with more recent pantelleritic eruptions, the tuffs are thought to have been sulfur-rich; during eruption, they formed stratospheric aerosols, with significant environmental impact. The timing of the eruptions coincides with the shift towards more savannah-dominated environments in East Africa.

  14. Forecasting eruptions using pre-eruptive seismic patterns at Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCausland, W. A.; White, R. A.; Hendrasto, M.; Gunawan, H.; Indrastuti, N.; Triastuti, H.; Suparman, Y.; Putra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Forecasting the size, timing and style of volcanic eruptions is of primary interest to observatories and civil authorities world-wide, yet most observatories only have access to long-term data at a very limited number of volcanoes under their jurisdiction. When extensive long-term data sets are available to responsible agencies, volcanic eruptive size, timing and style can usually be successfully forecast using current monitoring data and knowledge of precursory eruptive patterns, enabling the communication of timely forecasts to civil authorities. Experienced agencies, such as Indonesia's Center for Volcanology and Geologic Hazards Mitigation and the USAID-USGS Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, utilize extensive collective experiences with multiple monitoring streams over multiple eruption cycles and across volcano types to successfully forecast eruption size, style and onset, as well as changes in eruptive style and size within ongoing eruptions. The longest-term real-time monitoring parameter commonly available at volcanoes worldwide is seismic data. Seismic data is a direct measure of rate-dependent strain changes in the magmatic system from the deep magmatic input to shallow eruptive processes. Patterns of pre-eruptive earthquakes coupled with other available monitoring data and conceptual models of magma ascent enable short-term forecasting of eruption size, style, and onset. First order event locations, characterization of background seismicity, and changes in earthquake types and energy release are most important to successful eruption forecasting. This study demonstrates how this approach has been used to successfully forecast eruption onsets, changes in eruptive style, and to change alert levels and extend or contract evacuation zones during the ongoing eruption of Sinabung Volcano, Indonesia.

  15. Large, Moderate or Small? The Challenge of Measuring Mass Eruption Rates in Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, M. T.; Dürig, T.; Hognadottir, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Bjornsson, H.; Barsotti, S.; Petersen, G. N.; Thordarson, T.; Pedersen, G. B.; Riishuus, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The potential impact of a volcanic eruption is highly dependent on its eruption rate. In explosive eruptions ash may pose an aviation hazard that can extend several thousand kilometers away from the volcano. Models of ash dispersion depend on estimates of the volcanic source, but such estimates are prone to high error margins. Recent explosive eruptions, including the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland, have provided a wealth of data that can help in narrowing these error margins. Within the EU-funded FUTUREVOLC project, a multi-parameter system is currently under development, based on an array of ground and satellite-based sensors and models to estimate mass eruption rates in explosive eruptions in near-real time. Effusive eruptions are usually considered less of a hazard as lava flows travel slower than eruption clouds and affect smaller areas. However, major effusive eruptions can release large amounts of SO2 into the atmosphere, causing regional pollution. In very large effusive eruptions, hemispheric cooling and continent-scale pollution can occur, as happened in the Laki eruption in 1783 AD. The Bárdarbunga-Holuhraun eruption in 2014-15 was the largest effusive event in Iceland since Laki and at times caused high concentrations of SO2. As a result civil protection authorities had to issue warnings to the public. Harmful gas concentrations repeatedly persisted for many hours at a time in towns and villages at distances out to 100-150 km from the vents. As gas fluxes scale with lava fluxes, monitoring of eruption rates is therefore of major importance to constrain not only lava but also volcanic gas emissions. This requires repeated measurements of lava area and thickness. However, most mapping methods are problematic once lava flows become very large. Satellite data on thermal emissions from eruptions have been used with success to estimate eruption rate. SAR satellite data holds potential in delivering lava volume and eruption rate estimates

  16. Estimates of mass eruption rates in Icelandic eruptions 1913-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Dürig, Tobias; Larsen, Gudrún

    2016-04-01

    In the period from 1913 to 2015 about 35 eruptions occurred in Iceland, although some uncertainty exists about the number of the smallest events, particularly within the ice covered regions. For the smaller events in the earlier part of the period, only order of magnitude estimates of mass eruption rates (MER) are possible, based on the approximate amount of erupted products, duration of eruption, and information on eruption plume height in some cases. After 1947 estimates are more reliable. This is not least due to the detailed observations and interpretations of Sigurdur Thorarinsson and co-workers until the early 1980s. After 1980, various observations and instrumental data, e.g. on plume height, coupled with detailed mapping by several workers of tephra fallout and lava flow extent provide a good basis for MER estimates. The most frequent events are explosive eruptions producing tephra, often basaltic phreatomagmatic eruptions. A contributing factor to the large number of explosive eruptions is unusually frequent eruptions in Hekla since 1947. Eruptions under glaciers are also common, while a majority of these become explosive as they break through the ice. For the initially subglacial eruptions ice melting rates provide the best estimate of the MER in the first and usually most powerful phase. If the whole data set is considered, the magma volumes erupted in a single eruption span three orders of magnitude, ˜0.001 km3 to 1 km3. The range of intensity is similar, with the smallest Krafla or Askja events having maximum mass eruption rates (MER) of order 10-100 tonnes/second while the most powerful ones (Hekla 1947 and Katla 1918) had MER ˜50,000 tonnes/second (˜5 x 107 kg/s). All the events with the highest MER were explosive, including Katla 1918 where initial subglacial melting caused the largest volcanogenic flood observed since the 18th century. The period 1913-2015 had no events that belong to the class of the largest observed eruptions in Iceland. In

  17. The longevity of lava dome eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, Robert L.; Ogburn, Sarah E.; Calder, Eliza S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the duration of past, ongoing, and future volcanic eruptions is an important scientific goal and a key societal need. We present a new methodology for forecasting the duration of ongoing and future lava dome eruptions based on a database (DomeHaz) recently compiled by the authors. The database includes duration and composition for 177 such eruptions, with "eruption" defined as the period encompassing individual episodes of dome growth along with associated quiescent periods during which extrusion pauses but unrest continues. In a key finding, we show that probability distributions for dome eruption durations are both heavy tailed and composition dependent. We construct objective Bayesian statistical models featuring heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto distributions with composition-specific parameters to make forecasts about the durations of new and ongoing eruptions that depend on both eruption duration to date and composition. Our Bayesian predictive distributions reflect both uncertainty about model parameter values (epistemic uncertainty) and the natural variability of the geologic processes (aleatoric uncertainty). The results are illustrated by presenting likely trajectories for 14 dome-building eruptions ongoing in 2015. Full representation of the uncertainty is presented for two key eruptions, Soufriére Hills Volcano in Montserrat (10-139 years, median 35 years) and Sinabung, Indonesia (1-17 years, median 4 years). Uncertainties are high but, importantly, quantifiable. This work provides for the first time a quantitative and transferable method and rationale on which to base long-term planning decisions for lava dome-forming volcanoes, with wide potential use and transferability to forecasts of other types of eruptions and other adverse events across the geohazard spectrum.

  18. Eruptive style and location of volcanic centers in the Miocene Washington Cascade Range: reconstruction from the sedimentary record

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.A.; Campbell, N.P.; Deacon, M.W.; Shafiqullah, M.

    1988-04-01

    Primary and reworked pyroclastic material in the Ellensburg Formation of central Washington records middle and late Miocene volcanism in the Cascade Range despite the absence of correlative volcanics within the volcanic chain. Volcanics marking sources for Ellensburg detritus were eroded during the late Neogene uplift. Facies patterns and paleocurrent data suggest that the bulk of the volcaniclastics were derived from a source near Bumping Lake; a K-Ar date for an intrusion in this area supports this conclusion. Depositional patterns and characteristics of the detritus allow hypothetical reconstruction of the style of volcanism during this period. Eruptive episodes began with modest-sized Plinian eruptions followed by extended periods of dome growth. Aggradation in adjacent sedimentary basins occurred principally in response to introduction of large volumes of lithic pyroclastic material during eruptive episodes. 29 references.

  19. The Sulfur Dioxide Plume from the February 26, 2000 Eruption of Mt. Hekla, Iceland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The February 2000 fissure eruption of Mt. Hekla, Iceland was captured in sulfur dioxide data from the Earth Probe TOMS. A special algorithm is used to discriminate sulfur dioxide from ozone. The eruption began at 18:19 GMT on February 26, 2000 and was first viewed by TOMS at 09:55 GMT on February 27. The volcanic cloud at that time appeared as a very long and narrow arc extending west from the volcano in southern Iceland, then north across Greenland, and finally east towards Norway. The cloud altitude was reported from aircraft sightings and data to be above 10 km. The circulation of a ridge located north of Iceland produced the large arc shaped cloud. As the eruption is non-explosive the high altitude cloud contains little ash. Almost all the ash from the eruption fell out locally across Iceland. By February 29, the sulfur dioxide cloud had drifted eastward in a band along the Barents Sea coast of Norway and Russia. The analysis includes an assessment of the initial sulfur dioxide content and its rate of conversion to sulfate.

  20. How Our Decimal Money Began.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clason, Robert G.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses how the decimal monetary system was created, considering colonial currency, continental currency, money under the Articles of Confederation, and money under the Constitution. Also discusses how money is taught in arithmetic textbooks during these times. (JN)

  1. Dome forming eruptions: a global hazards database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, S. E.; Loughlin, S.; Calder, E. S.; Ortiz, N.

    2009-12-01

    The analysis of global datasets of historical eruptions is a powerful tool for decision-making as well as for scientific discovery. Lava dome forming eruptions are common throughout the world, can extend for significant periods of time and have many associated hazards, thus providing a rich source of data to mine. A database on dome forming eruptions is under development with the view to aiding comparative studies, providing scientists with valuable data for analysis, and enabling advances in modeling of associated hazards. For new eruptive episodes in particular, and in the absence of monitoring data or a knowledge of a volcano’s eruptive history, global analysis can provide a method of understanding what might be expected based on similar eruptions in the past. Important scientific information has already been gleaned from disparate collections of dome-forming eruption hazard information, such as variation in the mobility of different types of pyroclastic flows, magma ascent and extrusion dynamics, and mechanisms of lava dome collapse. Further, modeling (both empirically-based and geophysically-based) of volcanic phenomena requires extensive data for development, calibration and validation. This study investigates the relationship between large explosive eruptions (VEI ≥ 4) and lava dome-growth from 1000 CE to present by development of a world-wide database of all relevant information, including dome growth duration, pauses between episodes of dome growth, and extrusion rates. Data sources include the database of volcanic activity maintained by the Smithsonian Institute (Global Volcanism Program) and all relevant published review papers, research papers and reports. For example, nearly all dome-forming eruptions have been associated with some level of explosive activity. Most explosions are vulcanian with eruption plumes reaching less than 15 km, and with a Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) <3. However large Plinian explosions with a VEI ≥ 4 can also occur

  2. Explosive Super-eruptions: Problems and Prejudices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, S.

    2010-12-01

    A super-eruption is defined as one with a magma yield > 10^15 kg (magnitude (M) 8). The term has mainly been applied to large-scale, caldera and ignimbrite-forming explosive eruptions, but it can be applied to all eruptions that released > 10^15 kg of magma. For effusive volcanism, evidence suggests that individual eruptions of this size ( > ~ 370 km^3 of typical basalt or > 450 km^3 of rhyolite flood lava) arise only during periods of LIP formation. The super-eruption concept raises interesting questions about genesis and storage of magmas that feed these vast events. Deposits of major explosive eruptions are Plinian fallout, ignimbrite sheets, and co-ignimbrite ash fall. Based on earlier suggestions and evidence, widespread outflow ignimbrite (O), co-ignimbrite ash (A), and inter-caldera ignimbrite (I) are all major components of the total super-eruption deposit and may tend towards being subequal. In super-eruption deposits, the reported volume of vent-derived Plinian eruption column fallout is often a minor component of the total volume, yet in several cases (Oruanui, Taupo, 26 ka ago, M 8.1; Bishop Tuff, 760 ka, M 8.2; Bandelier (Otowi) Tuff, 1.6 Ma, M8) it is now recognized that vent-derived columns persisted for most of the eruption. Thus, distally, the ash-fall derived from co-ignimbrite ash clouds may be mixed with contemporaneous fallout from a vertical column. Some major ignimbrites have no reported associated Plinian deposit; the huge Young Toba Tuff (YTT, 74 ka, M 8.8) is a significant example. However, the very widespread Toba ash-fall deposit constitutes ~ 40 % of the total mass of magma erupted and is presumed to be co-ignimbrite. Timing of the onset of column collapse probably controls whether a recognizable Plinian deposit is laid down. All super-eruptions probably produce extensive fallout deposits, and this is generally of vent-derived and pyroclastic-flow-derived origin. Establishing the relationships between large-scale ignimbrites and their

  3. Bipolar volcanic events in ice cores and the Toba eruption at 74 ka BP (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Acidity spikes in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores are applied as tracers of past volcanic activity. Besides providing information on the timing and magnitude of past eruptions, the acidity spikes are also widely used for synchronization of ice cores. All of the deep Greenland ice cores are thus synchronized throughout the last glacial cycle based on volcanic markers. Volcanic matching of ice cores from the two Hemispheres is much more challenging but it is feasible in periods of favourable conditions. Over the last two millennia, where ice cores are precisely dated, some 50 bipolar volcanic events have thus been identified. In order for an eruption to express a bipolar fingerprint it generally needs to be a low latitude eruption with stratospheric injection. Sometimes tephra is associated with the ice-core acidity spikes, but most often there is no tephra present in the ice. As yet, an unknown eruption occurring in 1259 AD is the only event reported to have deposited tephra in both Greenland and Antarctica. During the last glacial period bipolar volcanic matching is very challenging and very little work has been done, but recent high-resolution ice core records have the potential to provide bipolar ice core matching for some periods. Recently, Greenland and Antarctic ice cores have been linked by acidity spikes in the time window of the most recent eruption (the YTT eruption) of the Indonesian Toba volcano that is situated close to equator in Sumatra. Ash from this Toba event is widespread over large areas in Asia and has been identified as far west as Africa, but no corresponding tephra has been found in polar ice cores despite several attempts. The age of the YTT eruption is well constrained by recent Ar-Ar dating to have occurred some 74 ka ago close to the Marine Isotope Stage 4/5 boundary and close to the onset of the cold Greenland Stadial 20 and the corresponding mild Antarctic Isotopic Maxima 19 and 20. Surprisingly, no single outstanding acidity spike

  4. Modeling the Climate Response of the Laki Eruption - Benjamin Franklin was Right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, L.; Robock, A.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Thordarson, T.

    2006-12-01

    Benjamin Franklin was one of the first to recognize the connections between volcanic eruptions and climate. Shortly after the 1783-1784 Laki eruption, he postulated that the dry fog over much of Europe was likely caused by a volcanic eruption in Iceland, that the winds would have transported the gas and aerosol over much of the Northern Hemisphere, and that the cold winter of 1783-84 was caused by this dry fog. We used the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE climate model to examine the chemical conversion and transport of SO2 gas from the Laki eruption (64.10°N, 17.15°W) and used the resulting aerosol concentrations to model the climate response. Using our calculated aerosol distribution, we conducted a 10-member ensemble simulation with ModelE coupled to a q-flux mixed-layer ocean. The mean of these runs reproduced the extensive radiative cooling (-1 to -3°C) that occurred during the summer of 1783 across much of Asia, Canada, and Alaska and produced a strong dynamical effect in summer as the Laki eruption forces a significant weakening of the African and India monsoon circulations. This is seen in cloud cover and precipitation anomalies and resulted in significant warming (1 to 2°C) from the Sahel of Africa to northern India. This is a very robust result and has been observed after the last 3 large high-latitude volcanic eruptions, Eldgjá (939), Katmai (1912), and Laki, all of which produced large reductions in the flow of the Nile River. In the winter of 1783-1784 our model reproduced the significant negative temperature anomalies over the Northeastern United States, and smaller cooling produced over Europe. That winter was one of the coldest on record over these areas and our model results confirm that Laki could have been partially responsible for these anomalies.

  5. Generalized eruptive histiocytosis mimicking leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sharath Kumar, B C; Nandini, A S; Niveditha, S R; Gopal, M G

    2011-01-01

    Generalized eruptive histiocytosis (GEH) is a rare cutaneous histiocytosis that mainly affects adults and presents with multiple symmetric papules on face, trunk, and proximal extremities. GEH is included in type IIa (histiocytes involving cells of dermal dendrocyte lineage) of histiocytic disorders. Clinical and pathological correlations are required for differentiating GEH from other histiocytic disorders and from lepromatous leprosy which clinically mimic GEH and is prevalent in India. We report a case of a middle-aged woman who presented with generalized asymptomatic papules and nodules and was treated for leprosy but was finally diagnosed to have GEH after clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical correlation. Furthermore, the newer lesions also showed features of progressive nodular histiocytosis.

  6. Long-period (12sec) Volcanic Tremor Observed at Usu 2000 Eruption: Seismological Detection of a Deep Magma Plumbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KAWAKATSU, H.; YAMAMOTO, M.

    2001-12-01

    Mt. Usu is a dacitic stratovolcano located in southwestern Hokkaido, Japan, and has erupted repeatedly (in 1910, 1943-45, and 1977-78). In the end of March 2000, after twenty some years of quiescence, Usu volcano began its activity with an intensive earthquake swarm. After several days of the earthquake swarm, on March 31, 2000, the eruption began at the northwest foot of the volcano. We have installed five broadband seismometers around the volcano, and detected long period (12 sec) tremors (hereafter called LPTs) which are continually emitted from the volcano. Although these LPTs are continually observed at an interval of a few minutes, there exist no corresponding surface activities such as eruptions. The source of these LPTs are located relatively deep at a depth of 5 km, and their amplitude variation well correlates with the uplift rate of the eruption area. We thus attribute these LPTs to the flow induced vibration of a magma chamber and its outlet located around the source region of the LPTs. The estimated moment tensor for LPTs shows a reversed polarity for the isotropic and CLVD components. This is consistent with a combination of a deflating spherical source and an inflating crack which opens northwestern direction toward the eruption site. The volumetric magma flow rate may be estimated from the observed RMS amplitude of LPT through a seismic moment rate, and turns out to be around 3*E5 m3 per day. Geodetic observations report the volume change of the order of 107 m3 within the first few days. It appears that the volume flow rate estimated from LPTs is about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the actual flow rate. This may be reasonable if we consider that through seismic waves we are observing a fluctuating part of the magma flow. This may be the first seismological detection of dynamics of a main magma plumbing system beneath volcanos directly related to eruption activities.

  7. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J; Kendrick, Jackie E; von Aulock, Felix W; Kennedy, Ben M; Andrews, Benjamin J; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-24

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the 'strength' of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  8. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J; Kendrick, Jackie E; von Aulock, Felix W; Kennedy, Ben M; Andrews, Benjamin J; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-24

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the 'strength' of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  9. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  10. The largest volcanic eruptions on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Scott E.; Peate, Ingrid Ukstins; Peate, David W.; Self, Stephen; Jerram, Dougal A.; Mawby, Michael R.; Marsh, J. S. (Goonie); Miller, Jodie A.

    2010-10-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs) are sites of the most frequently recurring, largest volume basaltic and silicic eruptions in Earth history. These large-volume (> 1000 km 3 dense rock equivalent) and large-magnitude (> M8) eruptions produce areally extensive (10 4-10 5 km 2) basaltic lava flow fields and silicic ignimbrites that are the main building blocks of LIPs. Available information on the largest eruptive units are primarily from the Columbia River and Deccan provinces for the dimensions of flood basalt eruptions, and the Paraná-Etendeka and Afro-Arabian provinces for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions. In addition, three large-volume (675-2000 km 3) silicic lava flows have also been mapped out in the Proterozoic Gawler Range province (Australia), an interpreted LIP remnant. Magma volumes of > 1000 km 3 have also been emplaced as high-level basaltic and rhyolitic sills in LIPs. The data sets indicate comparable eruption magnitudes between the basaltic and silicic eruptions, but due to considerable volumes residing as co-ignimbrite ash deposits, the current volume constraints for the silicic ignimbrite eruptions may be considerably underestimated. Magma composition thus appears to be no barrier to the volume of magma emitted during an individual eruption. Despite this general similarity in magnitude, flood basaltic and silicic eruptions are very different in terms of eruption style, duration, intensity, vent configuration, and emplacement style. Flood basaltic eruptions are dominantly effusive and Hawaiian-Strombolian in style, with magma discharge rates of ~ 10 6-10 8 kg s -1 and eruption durations estimated at years to tens of years that emplace dominantly compound pahoehoe lava flow fields. Effusive and fissural eruptions have also emplaced some large-volume silicic lavas, but discharge rates are unknown, and may be up to an order of magnitude greater than those of flood basalt lava eruptions for emplacement to be on realistic time scales (< 10 years). Most

  11. Andesitic Plinian eruptions at Mt. Ruapehu: quantifying the uppermost limits of eruptive parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Natalia; Cronin, Shane; Palmer, Alan; Procter, Jonathan; Smith, Ian

    2012-07-01

    New tephro-stratigraphic studies of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre (TgVC) on the North Island (New Zealand) allowed reconstruction of some of the largest, andesitic, explosive eruptions of Mt. Ruapehu. Large eruptions were common in the Late Pleistocene, before a transition to strombolian-vulcanian and phreatomagmatic eruptive styles that have predominated over the past 10,000 years. Considering this is the most active volcano in North Island of New Zealand and the uppermost hazard limits are unknown, we identified and mapped the pyroclastic deposits corresponding to the five largest eruptions since ~27 ka. The selected eruptive units are also characterised by distinctive lithofacies associations correlated to different behaviours of the eruptive column. In addition, we clarify the source of the ~10-9.7 ka Pahoka Tephra, identified by previous authors as the product of one of the largest eruptions of the TgVC. The most common explosive eruptions taking place between ~13.6 and ~10 ka cal years BP involved strongly oscillating, partially collapsing eruptive columns up to 37 km high, at mass discharge rates up to 6 × 108 kg/s and magnitudes of 4.9, ejecting minimum estimated volumes of 0.6 km3. Our results indicate that this volcano (as well as the neighbouring andesitic Mt. Tongariro) can generate Plinian eruptions similar in magnitude to the Chaitén 2008 and Askja 1875 events. Such eruptions would mainly produce pyroclastic fallout covering a minimum area of 1,700 km2 ESE of the volcano, where important touristic, agricultural and military activities are based. As for the 1995/1996 eruption, our field data indicate that complex wind patterns were critical in controlling the dispersion of the eruptive clouds, developing sheared, commonly bilobate plumes.

  12. Observed Aspects of Reconnection in Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast tether-cutting reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast breakout reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  13. Eruptive History of Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, G. J.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2004-12-01

    Tephra-stratigraphy, volcanic history, eruption types, eruptive dynamics and area distribution of tephra from the most important eruptions of Arenal volcano, are reviewed and updated. Deposits of explosive eruptions are named AR-1 to AR-22 (from older to younger). All previous and new Arenal and neighbouring Chato volcanoes' radiocarbon dates were calibrated: the last Chato eruption occurred 3720±150 B.P and the first known eruption of Arenal (AR-1), 7010+170-130 B.P. Isopachs and characteristics of the most relevant and recognized airfall deposits are presented. Area distributions of the key layers are oriented toward W, WSW and SW, except the lowest layer of AR-17, which is distributed northward. According to lithic isopleths, an eruption column height of 23 km (subplinian) was calculated for AR-20. Most fall layers in Arenal show associated pyroclastic flow deposits up to a distance of 6.5 km from the summit. They are restricted to river valley paths. Among Arenal eruptions, plinian-subplinian type events like AR-20, AR-15, AR-12 and AR-9, are the most violent and destructive, with tephra volumes between 0.2 and 1 km3. There are also violent strombolian eruptions which were sustained for a considerable time, resembling subplinian eruptions (the AR-19 case, total volume 0.45 km3), and pelean type eruptions, as AR-22, which erupted 0.026 km3 of tephra. A temporal correlation of explosive events after AR-8 shows that the four most important dacitic eruptions (AR-20, 15, 12 and 9), are separated by an average period of 800 years ("long term"). Three of them (AR-20, 15 and 9) have been preceded by two important explosive events with a more basic chemistry, which occurred around 300 years or less previously to the dacitic eruption ("short term" periods). Nevertheless, between cycles AR-13/14/15 and AR-18/19/20, there are two events (AR-16 and 17) that do not belong to any cycle. In fact, between the major eruptions AR-15 and 20, the highest eruptive frequency of all

  14. Solar Eruptions Initiated in Sigmoidal Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    active regions that have been shown to possess high probability for eruption. They present a direct evidence of the existence of flux ropes in the corona prior to the impulsive phase of eruptions. In order to gain insight into their eruptive behavior and how they get destabilized we need to know their 3D magnetic field structure. First, we review some recent observations and modeling of sigmoidal active regions as the primary hosts of solar eruptions, which can also be used as useful laboratories for studying these phenomena. Then, we concentrate on the analysis of observations and highly data-constrained non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) models over the lifetime of several sigmoidal active regions, where we have captured their magnetic field structure around the times of major flares. We present the topology analysis of a couple of sigmoidal regions pointing us to the probable sites of reconnection. A scenario for eruption is put forward by this analysis. We demonstrate the use of this topology analysis to reconcile the observed eruption features with the standard flare model. Finally, we show a glimpse of how such a NLFFF model of an erupting region can be used to initiate a CME in a global MHD code in an unprecedented realistic manner. Such simulations can show the effects of solar transients on the near-Earth environment and solar system space weather.

  15. Characteristics of EIT Dimmings in Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi; Sterling, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    Intensity "dimmings" in coronal images are a key feature of solar eruptions. Such dimmings are likely the source locations for much of the material expelled in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Characteristics such as the timing of the dimmings with respect to the onset of other eruption signatures, and the location of the dimmings in the context of the magnetic field environment of the erupting region, are indicative of the mechanism leading to the eruption. We examine dimmings of six eruptions in images from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on SOHO, along with supplementary soft X-ray (SXR) data from GOES and the SXR Telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. We examine the timing of the dimming onset and compare with the time of EUV and SXR brightening and determine the timescale for the recovery from dimming for each event. With line-of-sight photospheric magnetograms from the MDI instrument on SOHO, we determine the magnetic structure of the erupting regions and the locations of the dimmings in those regions. From our analysis we consider which mechanism likely triggered each eruption: internal tether cutting, external tether cutting ("breakout"), loss of equilibrium, or some other mechanism.

  16. Degassing Mechanisms and Timescales of Implied by (210Pb) Values for Andesites Erupted from Arenal Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Tepley, F. J.; Gill, J. B.; Lundstrom, C.

    2004-12-01

    The ongoing eruption of Arenal, which began in 1968, is an ideal laboratory for investigating magmatic processes that occur over short time periods during eruptions. To identify and place time constraints on these processes, lavas from throughout this eruption have been analyzed for (210Pb) (t1/2 = 22.6 y). Because Pb is both incompatible and only weakly volatile, variations in (210Pb)/(226Ra) largely monitor decade-scale fluxes of 222Rn through magmas. At present, only one lava has been analyzed for 226Ra, and the following discussion assumes that Ra varies in concert with other highly incompatible elements in Arenal lavas. By meeting time, additional whole rock 226Ra values will be available to further constrain this discussion. The eruption has been divided into two principal stages based on variations in bulk composition (Ryder, C., 2004, MS Thesis, UCSC). The first stage lasted from the beginning of the eruption until the early 1970s when Pb isotopes shifted. This shift marked the end of the eruption from one reservoir and the appearance of a new magma presumably from a deeper chamber. Lavas and tephras erupted in 1968 have small excesses in 210Pb over calculated 226Ra values, whereas those erupted in 1969 have 210Pb deficits. These data are consistent with decade-scale transfer of 222Rn from the less-differentiated lower portion of the original magma reservoir to the more differentiated and more phenocryst poor upper reservoir. This could occur either by diffusion of 222Rn through the melt within the chamber or by transfer in a separate gas phase in vapor saturated magma. In 1971, just before the shift in Pb isotopes, lavas erupted with an approximately 2-fold 210Pb excess over 226Ra, which suggests that the deeper magma that eventually erupted and shifted Pb-isotope values contributed volatiles to the lower portion of the original reservoir. If the excess in 1971 was due to 222Rn fluxing since 1968, then the average (222Rn)/( 226Ra) in the lava-gas mixture

  17. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the narrow margin between eruption and intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Alexander; Kilburn, Christopher; Wall, Richard; Charlton, Danielle

    2016-04-01

    Volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity is one of the primary geophysical signals for monitoring volcanic unrest. It measures the brittle response of the crust to changes in stress and provides a natural proxy for gauging the stability of a pressurizing body of magma. Here we apply a new model of crustal extension to observations from the 2015 unrest of Cotopaxi, in Ecuador. The model agrees well with field data and is consistent with accelerating unrest during the pressurization and rupture of a vertically-extended magma source within the volcanic edifice. At andesitic-dacitic stratovolcanoes in subduction zones, unrest after long repose is often characterised by increases in VT event rate that change from an exponential to hyperbolic trend with time. This sequence was observed when renewed unrest was detected in April 2015 at Cotopaxi, following at least 73 years of repose. After about 80 days of elevated seismicity at an approximately steady rate, the numbers of VT events increased exponentially with time for c. 80 days, before increasing for c. 15 days along a faster, hyperbolic trend. Both trends were characterised by the same value of 2 for the ratio of maximum applied stress SF to tensile strength of the crust σT, consistent with the pressurization of an approximately vertical, cylindrical magma body. The hyperbolic trend indicated a potential rupture on 25 September. Rupture appears to have occurred on 21-22 September, when the VT rate rapidly decreased. However, no major eruption accompanied the change, suggesting that a near-surface intrusion occurred instead. Although the quantitative VT trends were consistent with the rupture of a magmatic body, they could not on their own distinguish between an eruptive or intrusive outcome. An outstanding goal remains to identify additional precursory characteristics for quantifying the probability that magma will reach the surface after escaping from a ruptured parent body. Data for this analysis were kindly made available

  18. Regional paleogeographic evolution of west Africa: Implications for hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Hempton, M.R.; Rosen, M.A.; Coughlin, R.M.; Scardina, A.D.; Hagen, E.S.; Nordstrom, P.J. )

    1991-03-01

    New paleogeographic reconstructions of west African continental margins provide a regional framework to contrast differences in hydrocarbon habitat and tectonostratigraphic style. Five regional provinces are delineated: (1) Northwest Africa margin from mauritania to Sierra Leone, (2) Transform margin from Liberia to Benin, (3) Niger delta of Nigeria, Cameroon, and Equatorial Guinea, (4) South Atlantic Salt basin margin from Cameroon to Angola, and (5) Southwest Africa margin of Namibia and South Africa. Computer-constrained paleogeographic reconstructions based on exploration data depict the separation of west Africa from South and North America during the Late Triassic to the present along three rift systems. In northwest Africa rifting began in the Late Triassic associated with the opening of the Central Atlantic. In southwest Africa rifting began between the southern tips of Africa and South America in the Early Cretaceous (Valanginian) and propagated northward to the Benue Trough, a broad zone of left-lateral shear and extensional basins that began to open in the Aptian. Between these two rift systems, the Transform margin rift system initiated in the Early Cretaceous (Barremain) as a wrench-fault dominated eastward extension of the Proto-Caribbean ocean that propagated to the Benue Trough by the middle Albian. The most important variables affecting the tectonostratigraphic and hydrocarbon evolution of the west African margins include (1) the geometry, kinematics, and duration of rifting; (2) distribution of rift basins relative to paleoclimate zones (which affects the deposition of lacustrine source rocks and evaporites while influencing the type and quantity of sediment derived from land); (3) sea-level fluctuations; and (4) distribution of deltaic and turbiditic depocenters.

  19. Locating the depth of magma supply for volcanic eruptions, insights from Mt. Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Harri; Barker, Abigail K.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2016-01-01

    Mt. Cameroon is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa and poses a possible threat to about half a million people in the area, yet knowledge of the volcano’s underlying magma supply system is sparse. To characterize Mt. Cameroon’s magma plumbing system, we employed mineral-melt equilibrium thermobarometry on the products of the volcano’s two most recent eruptions of 1999 and 2000. Our results suggest pre-eruptive magma storage between 20 and 39 km beneath Mt. Cameroon, which corresponds to the Moho level and below. Additionally, the 1999 eruption products reveal several shallow magma pockets between 3 and 12 km depth, which are not detected in the 2000 lavas. This implies that small-volume magma batches actively migrate through the plumbing system during repose intervals. Evolving and migrating magma parcels potentially cause temporary unrest and short-lived explosive outbursts, and may be remobilized during major eruptions that are fed from sub-Moho magma reservoirs. PMID:27713494

  20. Locating the depth of magma supply for volcanic eruptions, insights from Mt. Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Harri; Barker, Abigail K.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2016-10-01

    Mt. Cameroon is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa and poses a possible threat to about half a million people in the area, yet knowledge of the volcano’s underlying magma supply system is sparse. To characterize Mt. Cameroon’s magma plumbing system, we employed mineral-melt equilibrium thermobarometry on the products of the volcano’s two most recent eruptions of 1999 and 2000. Our results suggest pre-eruptive magma storage between 20 and 39 km beneath Mt. Cameroon, which corresponds to the Moho level and below. Additionally, the 1999 eruption products reveal several shallow magma pockets between 3 and 12 km depth, which are not detected in the 2000 lavas. This implies that small-volume magma batches actively migrate through the plumbing system during repose intervals. Evolving and migrating magma parcels potentially cause temporary unrest and short-lived explosive outbursts, and may be remobilized during major eruptions that are fed from sub-Moho magma reservoirs.

  1. Satellite observations of the volcanic plume from the 23rd April 2015 eruption of Calbuco volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayer, Catherine; Carboni, Elisa; Ventress, Lucy; Povey, Adam; Grainger, Roy

    2016-04-01

    Calbuco volcano, Chile, erupted on 23rd April 2015, producing an eruption column reported to reach 17 km. The eruption was captured on the IASI NRT website (http://www.nrt-atmos.cems.rl.ac.uk/). The data were then reprocessed using the iterative optimal estimation retrieval developed by the EODG group at University of Oxford to determine the SO2 atmospheric loading and the altitude of the plume over time. The atmospheric loading was measured as 0.3 - 0.4 Tg of SO2 over the first 2 days. It is thought that the eruption was relatively ash poor, with the majority of the ash falling out within the first couple of days. The retrieved altitude of the plume is consistent with the range initially reported, with the core of the plume reaching 15 - 18 km. When the SO2 plume reached the west coast of South Africa, it was caught in a cyclonic system, causing it to remain in the same region for several days with a highly constrained core. A SO2 depletion rate and conversion time to H2SO4 are calculated from this data. The data from the IASI instruments are compared to CALIOP lidar overpasses as well as data from the MLS & OSIRIS instruments. The HYSPLIT trajectory model is used to investigate the evolution of the plume and to corroborate the altitudes retrieved by IASI.

  2. LATERAL OFFSET OF THE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM THE X-FLARE OF 2006 DECEMBER 13 AND ITS TWO PRECURSOR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Harra, Louise K. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2011-12-10

    Two GOES sub-C-class precursor eruptions occurred within {approx}10 hr prior to and from the same active region as the 2006 December 13 X4.3-class flare. Each eruption generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) with center laterally far offset ({approx}> 45 Degree-Sign ) from the co-produced bright flare. Explaining such CME-to-flare lateral offsets in terms of the standard model for solar eruptions has been controversial. Using Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data, and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data, we find or infer the following. (1) The first precursor was a 'magnetic-arch-blowout' event, where an initial standard-model eruption of the active region's core field blew out a lobe on one side of the active region's field. (2) The second precursor began similarly, but the core-field eruption stalled in the side-lobe field, with the side-lobe field erupting {approx}1 hr later to make the CME either by finally being blown out or by destabilizing and undergoing a standard-model eruption. (3) The third eruption, the X-flare event, blew out side lobes on both sides of the active region and clearly displayed characteristics of the standard model. (4) The two precursors were offset due in part to the CME originating from a side-lobe coronal arcade that was offset from the active region's core. The main eruption (and to some extent probably the precursor eruptions) was offset primarily because it pushed against the field of the large sunspot as it escaped outward. (5) All three CMEs were plausibly produced by a suitable version of the standard model.

  3. Vent conditions for expected eruptions at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papale, Paolo; Longo, Antonella

    2008-12-01

    Determining consistent sets of vent conditions for next expected eruptions at Vesuvius is crucial for the simulation of the sub-aerial processes originating the volcanic hazard and the eruption impact. Here we refer to the expected eruptive scales and conditions defined in the frame of the EC Exploris project, and simulate the dynamics of magma ascent along the volcanic conduit for sub-steady phases of next eruptions characterized by intensities of the Violent Strombolian (VS), Sub-Plinian 2 (SP2), and Sub-Plinian 1 (SP1) scale. Sets of conditions for the simulations are determined on the basis of the bulk of knowledge on the past history of Vesuvius [Cioni, R., Bertagnini, A., Santacroce, R., Andronico, D., Explosive activity and eruption scenarios at Somma-Vesuvius (Italy): towards a new classification scheme. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, this issue.]. Volatile contents (H 2O and CO 2) are parameterized in order to account for the uncertainty in their expected amounts for a next eruption. In all cases the flow in the conduit is found to be choked, with velocities at the conduit exit or vent corresponding to the sonic velocity in the two-phase non-equilibrium magmatic mixture. Conduit diameters and vent mixture densities are found to display minimum overlapping between the different eruptive scales, while exit gas and particle velocities, as well as vent pressures, largely overlap. Vent diameters vary from as low as about 5 m for VS eruptions, to 35-55 m for the most violent SP1 eruption scale. Vent pressures can be as low as less than 1 MPa for the lowest volatile content employed of 2 wt.% H 2O and no CO 2, to 7-8 MPa for highest volatile contents of 5 wt.% H 2O and 2 wt.% CO 2 and large eruptive scales. Gas and particle velocities at the vent range from 100-250 m/s, with a tendency to decrease, and to increase the mechanical decoupling between the phases, with increasing eruptive scale. Except for velocities, all relevant vent quantities are

  4. Timing signatures of large scale solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Hock-Mysliwiec, Rachel; Henry, Timothy; Kirk, Michael S.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the timing signatures of large solar eruptions resulting in flares, CMEs and Solar Energetic Particle events. We probe solar active regions from the chromosphere through the corona, using data from space and ground-based observations, including ISOON, SDO, GONG, and GOES. Our studies include a number of flares and CMEs of mostly the M- and X-strengths as categorized by GOES. We find that the chromospheric signatures of these large eruptions occur 5-30 minutes in advance of coronal high temperature signatures. These timing measurements are then used as inputs to models and reconstruct the eruptive nature of these systems, and explore their utility in forecasts.

  5. [Lichenoid drug eruption induced by olanzapine].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Torres, R; Almagro, M; del Pozo, J; Robles, O; Martínez-González, C; Mazaira, M; Fonseca, E

    2008-04-01

    Lichenoid drug eruptions can mimic idiopathic lichen planus and other dermatoses. The list of drugs that can cause them is long and growing steadily. Although cutaneous side effects of antipsychotics are rare, various cutaneous manifestations have been reported in association with olanzapine. We present the case of a patient who developed an atypical lichenoid eruption due to olanzapine. A review of the literature in Medline from 1951 to 2007 and in the Indice Médico Español (Spanish Medical Index) revealed no previous cases of lichenoid eruptions associated with the use of this drug. PMID:18358199

  6. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  7. Recurrent cutaneous jellyfish eruptions without envenomation.

    PubMed

    Månsson, T; Randle, H W; Mandojana, R M; Calton, G J; Burnett, J W

    1985-01-01

    Three patients exhibiting recurrent cutaneous eruptions induced by contact with jellyfish tentacles are presented. The recurrent eruptions appeared several days after the primary exposure without contact with any offending coelenterate. The principal species involved include Pelagia noctiluca, Physalia physalis and probably Lychnorhiza lucerna. These three cases, combined with an earlier similar report of recurrent lesions induced by Physalia physalis suggest that this phenomenon may be widespread. In two of the three cases, the secondary eruption was more severe than that occurring after the primary envenomation. PMID:2578711

  8. DAMAGE AND CORRESPOBDENCE OF LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS FOR Mt. SHINMOE 2011 ERUPTIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kohji; Nakano, Susumu; Kasubuchi, Yoshio

    On Jan. 27, 2011, Mt. Shinmoe in the Kirishima mountain range on the border between Kagoshima and Miyazaki Prefectures began erupting for the first time in 52 years. In this study, to clarify the damage and correspondence of local governments and business establishments for a series of volcanic hazards of Mt. Shinmoe in 2011, we conducted interview research and document investigation. For endless volcanic hazard, not only the serious and sustained effots of disaster-affected area, but also the broad-based supoorts from neighboring local governments and business establishments are required.

  9. Volumes and eruption rates for the 2008-2009 Chaitén rhyolite lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Griswold, J.; Muñoz, J.; Lara, L. E.; Valenzuela, C.; Burton, W. C.; Keeler, R.

    2010-12-01

    The 2008 eruption of Chaitén caldera, southern Chile, was one of the most explosive on Earth in the past two decades. The eruption began early on 2 May 2008 (UTC) and produced sub-plinian to plinian ash columns between 2 May and 9 May, before transitioning from explosive eruption of tephra to effusive eruption of rhyolite lava. A series of lava flow lobes accumulated within the caldera between late May and the end of the year, burying most of Chaitén’s prehistoric lava dome. A prominent lava spine was also extruded, starting in late 2008. The spine collapsed on 19 February 2009, producing a pyroclastic flow that extended out of the caldera and 7 km down the Río Chaitén. Dome growth continued through 2009, filling in much of the spine-collapse area and further expanding the composite dome through endogenous growth. Dome volumes are computed and eruption rates estimated using satellite data from 2008-10, photogrammetric analysis of oblique aerial photographs taken in January 2010, and digital elevation models derived from ASTER, SRTM, LIDAR and topographic maps. The 2008-10 dome has a total volume of approximately 0.8 km3. About 0.5 km3 erupted within the first four months, when extrusion rates were in the range 10-100 m3s-1. Extrusion rates decreased exponentially over the eruptive period. The 2008-10 dome is similar in volume and composition to the prehistoric lava dome, which has a volume of at least 0.5 km3. Together the two domes constitute about 20-40% of the 3.5-7 km3 collapse volume of the prehistoric caldera. The unusually rapid extrusion rates during the first four months are among the highest ever measured for silicic lava. Chaitén’s 2008-10 lava is obsidian and microcrystalline rhyolite with 75.35+/-0.02% SiO2. A large volume of low viscosity crystal-poor magma (about 0.1% phenocrysts) coupled with high extrusion pressures during the extended transition from explosive to effusive eruption style resulted in these exceptionally high extrusion rates.

  10. The ˜2 ka subplinian eruption of Montaña Blanca, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablay, G. J.; Ernst, G. G. J.; Marti, J.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    1995-11-01

    The latest cycle of volcanism on Tenerife has involved the construction of two stratovolcanoes, Teide and Pico Viejo (PV), and numerous flank vent systems on the floor of the Las Cañadas Caldera, which has been partially infilled by magmatic products of the basanite-phonolite series. The only known substantial post-caldera explosive eruption occurred ˜2 ka bp from satellite vents at Montaña Blanca (MB), to the east of Teide and at PV. The MB eruption began with extrusion of ≈0.022 km3 of phonolite lava (unit I) from a WNW-ESE fissure system. The eruption then entered an explosive subplinian phase. Over a 7 11 hour period, 0.25 km3 (DRE) of phonolitic pumice (unit II) was deposited from a 15 km high subplinian column, dispersed to the NE by 10 m/s winds. Pyroclastic activity also occurred from vents near PV to the west of Teide. Fire-fountaining towards the end of the explosive phase formed a proximal welded spatter facies. The eruption closed with extrusion of small volume domes and lavas (≈0.025 km3) at both vent systems. Geochemical, petrological data and Fe-Ti oxide geothermometry indicate the eruption of a chemically and thermally stratified magma system. The most mafic and hottest (≈875°C) unit I magma can yield the more evolved and cooler (755 825°C) phonolites of units II and III by between 7 and 11% fractional crystallization of an assemblage dominated by alkali feldspar. Analyses of glass inclusions from phenocrysts by ion microprobe show that the pumice was derived from the water-saturated roof zone of a chamber containing 3.0 4.5 wt.% H2O and abundant halogens (F≈0.35wt.%). Hotter, more mafic tephritic magma intermingled with the evolved phonolites in banded pumice, indicating the injection of mafic magma into the system during or just before eruption. Reconstruction ot the event indicates a small chamber chemically stratified by in situ (side-wall) crystallization at a depth of 3 4 km below PV. Although phonolite is the dominant product of

  11. Two types of volcanic tremor changed with eruption style during 1986 Izu-Oshima eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Aika; Takeo, Minoru; Kurita, Kei

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic tremor provides clues to magma migration pathways so that tremor source location is expected to be an efficient tool for tracking dynamic behavior of magma in evolution of eruptive activity. However, clear evidence, which connects between temporal variation in volcanic tremor and evolution of eruption style, is still lacking. We have analyzed volcanic tremors occurred during 1986 Izu-Oshima eruption using recently digitized data. The results present a clear link between eruption styles, waveform variations and source locations of the tremors. Moreover, precursory activity of the tremors that indicates injection of magma below fissures has been clarified 5 days prior to the fissure eruptions. This demonstrates predominance of tremor activity as an adaptive monitoring tool in volcanic eruption.

  12. Early prediction of eruption site using lightning location data: Estimates of accuracy during past eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Arason, Þórður; Bjornsson, Halldór

    2013-04-01

    Eruption of subglacial volcanoes may lead to catastrophic floods and therefore early determination of the exact eruption site may be critical to civil protection evacuation plans. Poor visibility due to weather or darkness often inhibit positive identification of exact eruption location for many hours. However, because of the proximity and abundance of water in powerful subglacial volcanic eruptions, they are probably always accompanied by early lightning activity in the volcanic column. Lightning location systems, designed for weather thunderstorm monitoring, based on remote detection of electromagnetic waves from lightning, can provide valuable real-time information on location of eruption site. Important aspect of such remote detection is its independence of weather, apart from thunderstorms close to the volcano. Individual lightning strikes can be 5-10 km in length and are sometimes tilted and to the side of the volcanic column. This adds to the lightning location uncertainty, which is often a few km. Furthermore, the volcanic column may be swayed by the local wind to one side. Therefore, location of a single lightning can be misleading but by calculating average location of many lightning strikes and applying wind correction a more accurate eruption site location can be obtained. In an effort to assess the expected accuracy, the average lightning locations during the past five volcanic eruptions in Iceland (1998-2011) were compared to the exact site of the eruption vent. Simultaneous weather thunderstorms might have complicated this analysis, but there were no signs of ordinary thunderstorms in Iceland during these eruptions. To identify a suitable wind correction, the vector wind at the 500 hPa pressure level (5-6 km altitude) was compared to mean lightning locations during the eruptions. The essential elements of a system, which predicts the eruption site during the first hour(s) of an eruption, will be described.

  13. Preliminary Seismic, Infrasound and Lightning Observations of the July 2008 Eruptions of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.; Arnoult, K. M.; Szuberla, C. A.; Stihler, S. D.

    2008-12-01

    Okmok volcano began to erupt July 12, 2008, following an 11 year hiatus. The previous eruption in 1997 was from Cone A whereas the new activity occurred on the north flank of Cone D, a structure that had not been active for 800 years. Seismic activity at Okmok is monitored by a network of eight short-period and four broadband seismometers. The eruption was preceded by a swarm of earthquakes lasting just 5 hours, with events large enough to be located only occurring in the last hour. The bulk of these events occurred under Cone D with a few near Cone A. The eruption began with the onset of continuous tremor at 19:43 UT, which increased abruptly at 19:48 UT and lasted about 12 hours, strongest at about 22:00 UT. The tremor was strong enough to appear on stations out to 260 km distance. The ash cloud quickly grew to an elevation of 16 km or more. Infrasonic waves from the eruption were recorded on the I53US infrasound array in Fairbanks as three groups of waves starting at 21:44 UT, 01:14 UT July 13, and 05:41 UT July 13 and lasting 29-95 minutes. The time of flight is estimated to be 94 minutes along a great circle path. The waves were strongest between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz and had amplitudes of 0.1-0.3 Pa at the array. Low-pass filtered broadband seismic data showed extremely long-period waves with a period of 540 sec starting at about 22:45 UT. However, these waves, which were also visible in GOES satellite images and are thought to be gravity waves, have not yet been found in the infrasound data. Vigorous lightning was observed in the eruption column by observers at Fort Glenn, 12 km from the vent, on July 12 and several occasions after that. Unfortunately no instrumental data were obtained for the lightning.

  14. IMPLOSION IN A CORONAL ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin; Alexander, David

    2009-05-01

    We present the observations of the contraction of the extreme-ultraviolet coronal loops overlying the flaring region during the preheating as well as the early impulsive phase of a GOES class C8.9 flare. During the relatively long, 6 minutes, preheating phase, hard X-ray (HXR) count rates at lower energies (below 25 keV) as well as soft X-ray fluxes increase gradually and the flare emission is dominated by a thermal looptop source with the temperature of 20-30 MK. After the onset of impulsive HXR bursts, the flare spectrum is composed of a thermal component of 17-20 MK, corresponding to the looptop emission, and a nonthermal component with the spectral index {gamma} = 3.5-4.5, corresponding to a pair of conjugate footpoints. The contraction of the overlying coronal loops is associated with the converging motion of the conjugate footpoints and the downward motion of the looptop source. The expansion of the coronal loops following the contraction is associated with the enhancement in H{alpha} emission in the flaring region, and the heating of an eruptive filament whose northern end is located close to the flaring region. The expansion eventually leads to the eruption of the whole magnetic structure and a fast coronal mass ejection. It is the first time that such a large scale contraction of the coronal loops overlying the flaring region has been documented, which is sustained for about 10 minutes at an average speed of {approx}5 km s{sup -1}. Assuming that explosive chromospheric evaporation plays a significant role in compensating for the reduction of the magnetic pressure in the flaring region, we suggest that a prolonged preheating phase dominated by coronal thermal emission is a necessary condition for the observation of coronal implosion. The dense plasma accumulated in the corona during the preheating phase may effectively suppress explosive chromospheric evaporation, which explains the continuation of the observed implosion up to {approx}7 minutes into the

  15. Active Volcanic Eruptions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Six views of the volcanic plume named Prometheus, as seen against Io's disk and near the bright limb (edge) of the satellite by the SSI camera on the Galileo spacecraft during its second (G2) orbit of Jupiter. North is to the top of each frame. To the south-southeast of Prometheus is another bright spot that appears to be an active plume erupting from a feature named Culann Patera. Prometheus was active 17 years ago during both Voyager flybys, but no activity was detected by Voyager at Culann. Both of these plumes were seen to glow in the dark in an eclipse image acquired by the imaging camera during Galileo's first (G1) orbit, and hot spots at these locations were detected by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.

    The plumes are thought to be driven by heating sulfur dioxide in Io's subsurface into an expanding fluid or 'geyser'. The long-lived nature of these eruptions requires that a substantial supply of sulfur dioxide must be available in Io's subsurface, similar to groundwater. Sulfur dioxide gas condenses into small particles of 'snow' in the expanding plume, and the small particles scatter light and appear bright at short wavelengths. The images shown here were acquired through the shortest-wavelength filter (violet) of the Galileo camera. Prometheus is about 300 km wide and 75 km high and Culann is about 150 km wide and less than 50 km high. The images were acquired on September 4, 1996 at a range of 2,000,000 km (20 km/pixel resolution). Prometheus is named after the Greek fire god and Culann is named after the Celtic smith god.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the

  16. 10,000 Years of explosive eruptions of Merapi Volcano, Central Java: archaeological and modern implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, C.G.; Bronto, S.; Alloway, B.; Banks, N.G.; Bahar, I.; Del Marmol, M.A.; Hadisantono, R.D.; Holcomb, R.T.; McGeehin, J.; Miksic, J.N.; Rubin, M.; Sayudi, S.D.; Sukhyar, R.; Andreastuti, S.; Tilling, R.I.; Torley, R.; Trimble, D.; Wirakusumah, A.D.

    2000-01-01

    Stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of pyroclastic deposits at Merapi Volcano, Central Java, reveals ~10,000 years of explosive eruptions. Highlights include: (1) Construction of an Old Merapi stratovolcano to the height of the present cone or slightly higher. Our oldest age for an explosive eruption is 9630±60 14C y B.P.; construction of Old Merapi certainly began earlier. (2) Collapse(s) of Old Merapi that left a somma rim high on its eastern slope and sent one or more debris avalanche(s) down its southern and western flanks. Impoundment of Kali Progo to form an early Lake Borobudur at ~3400 14C y B.P. hints at a possible early collapse of Merapi. The latest somma-forming collapse occurred ~1900 14C y B.P. The current cone, New Merapi, began to grow soon thereafter. (3) Several large and many small Buddhist and Hindu temples were constructed in Central Java between 732 and ~900 A.D. (roughly, 1400-1000 14C y B.P.). Explosive Merapi eruptions occurred before, during and after temple construction. Some temples were destroyed and (or) buried soon after their construction, and we suspect that this destruction contributed to an abrupt shift of power and organized society to East Java in 928 A.D. Other temples sites, though, were occupied by "caretakers" for several centuries longer. (4) A partial collapse of New Merapi occurred 14C y B.P. Eruptions ~700-800 14C y B.P. (12-14th century A.D.) deposited ash on the floors of (still-occupied?) Candi Sambisari and Candi Kedulan. We speculate but cannot prove that these eruptions were triggered by (the same?) partial collapse of New Merapi, and that the eruptions, in turn, ended "caretaker" occupation at Candi Sambisari and Candi Kedulan. A new or raised Lake Borobudur also existed during part or all of the 12-14th centuries, probably impounded by deposits from Merapi. (5) Relatively benign lava-dome extrusion and dome-collapse pyroclastic flows have dominated activity of the 20th century, but explosive eruptions much

  17. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors - such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses - relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11–15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011–2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  18. STEREO's View of Aug. 24, 2014 Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    A bright eruption of solar material surges into space as captured by NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory - Before satellite, which currently has a view of the far side of the sun. The in...

  19. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  20. Italian super-eruption larger than thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Recent research suggested that the super-eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera volcano in southern Italy about 40,000 years ago may have played a part in wiping out, or forcing the migration of, the Neanderthal and modern human populations in the eastern Mediterranean regions that were covered in ash. Now a new modeling study by Costa et al. suggests that this eruption may have been even larger than previously thought. This Campi Flegrei eruption produced a widespread ash layer known as Campanian Ignimbrite (CI). Using ash thickness measurements collected at 115 sites and a three-dimensional ash dispersal model, the researchers found that the CI super-eruption would have spread 250-300 cubic kilometers of ash across a 3.7-million-square kilometer region—2 to 3 times previous ash volume estimates.

  1. Lower third molar eruption following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Salehi, P; Danaie, S Momene

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of extraction and preservation of the 1st premolar on lower 3rd molar eruption. Orthodontic clinic records from 1993 to 1995 were evaluated before and after treatment and 8-9 years after treatment for 3 groups of patients: 32 with extraction of 1st premolars in both jaws, 32 with no extraction but orthodontic treatment and 48 controls with no extraction but orthodontic treatment in the upper jaws only. Successful eruption of 3rd molars was evaluated. There was a significant difference in the rates of successful eruptions in the extraction (42%), non-extraction (12%) and control (20%) groups. The findings indicate that 1st premolar extraction may increase the chance of 3rd molar eruption, leading to a lower incidence of health and economic complications.

  2. Ring-shaped Prominence Erupts from Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) on Jan. 31, 2013 was accompanied by a large prominence eruption best visible in light with a wavelength of 304 angstroms. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured ...

  3. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  4. Lower third molar eruption following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Salehi, P; Danaie, S Momene

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of extraction and preservation of the 1st premolar on lower 3rd molar eruption. Orthodontic clinic records from 1993 to 1995 were evaluated before and after treatment and 8-9 years after treatment for 3 groups of patients: 32 with extraction of 1st premolars in both jaws, 32 with no extraction but orthodontic treatment and 48 controls with no extraction but orthodontic treatment in the upper jaws only. Successful eruption of 3rd molars was evaluated. There was a significant difference in the rates of successful eruptions in the extraction (42%), non-extraction (12%) and control (20%) groups. The findings indicate that 1st premolar extraction may increase the chance of 3rd molar eruption, leading to a lower incidence of health and economic complications. PMID:19161121

  5. C3-class Solar Flare Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Just as sunspot 1105 was turning away from Earth on Sept. 8, the active region erupted, producing a C3-class solar flare (peak @ 2330 UT) and a fantastic prominence. This is a three color closeup o...

  6. Interacting filamentary eruptions in magnetised plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberg, S. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between multiple filamentary plasma eruptions is investigated by modelling the non-linear ideal MHD ballooning mode envelope equation with a mixed Eulerian and Lagrangian characterisation of the boundary conditions. The study of multiple plasma filaments is performed in a specific slab equilibrium susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. If the unstable system is initiated with three equal sized filaments, they erupt at the same rate, independently of each other, even in the non-linear regime. However, if one is initiated very slightly larger than the other two it causes a down-draft as it erupts upwards, which suppresses the smaller filaments. This suggests that those filaments which first enter the non-linear regime will dominate the plasma eruption dynamics.

  7. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-09-26

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide.

  8. Eruptive history of the Dieng mountains region, central Java, and potential hazards from future eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.D.; Sukhyar, R.; Santoso; Hamidi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The Dieng Mountains region consists of a complex of late Quaternary to recent volcanic stratocones, parasitic vents, and explosion craters. Six age groups of volcanic centers, eruptive products, and explosion craters are recognized in the region based on their morphology, degree of dissection, stratigraphic relationships, and degree of weathering. These features range in age from tens of thousands of years to events that have occurred this century. No magmatic eruptions have occurred in the Dieng Mountains region for at least several thousand years; volcanic activity during this time interval has consisted of phreatic eruptions and non-explosive hydrothermal activity. If future volcanic events are similar to those of the last few thousand years, they will consist of phreatic eruptions, associated small hot mudflows, emission of suffocating gases, and hydrothermal activity. Future phreatic eruptions may follow, or accompany, periods of increased earthquake activity; the epicenters for the seismicity may suggest where eruptive activity will occur. Under such circumstances, the populace within several kilometers of a potential eruption site should be warned of a possible eruption, given instructions about what to do in the event of an eruption, or temporarily evacuated to a safer location. 6 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Eruptive history of the Dieng Mountains region, central Java, and potential hazards from future eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C. Dan; Sushyar, R.; ,; Hamidi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The Dieng Mountains region consists of a complex of late Quaternary to recent volcanic stratocones, parasitic vents, and explosion craters. Six age groups of volcanic centers, eruptive products, and explosion craters are recognized in the region based on their morphology, degree of dissection, stratigraphic relationships, and degree of weathering. These features range in age from tens of thousands of years to events that have occurred this century. No magmatic eruptions have occurred in the Dieng Mountains region for at least several thousand years; volcanic activity during this time interval has consisted of phreatic eruptions and non-explosive hydrothermal activity. If future volcanic events are similar to those of the last few thousand years, they will consist of phreatic eruptions, associated small hot mudflows, emission of suffocating gases, and hydrothermal activity. Future phreatic eruptions may follow, or accompany, periods of increased earthquake activity; the epicenters for the seismicity may suggest where eruptive activity will occur. Under such circumstances, the populace within several kilometers of a potential eruption site should be warned of a possible eruption, given instructions about what to do in the event of an eruption, or temporarily evacuated to a safer location.

  10. Compound-specific carbon isotopes from Earth's largest flood basalt eruptions directly linked to the end-Triassic mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Jessica H; Olsen, Paul E; Eglinton, Timothy; Brookfield, Michael E; Sambrotto, Raymond N

    2010-04-13

    A leading hypothesis explaining Phanerozoic mass extinctions and associated carbon isotopic anomalies is the emission of greenhouse, other gases, and aerosols caused by eruptions of continental flood basalt provinces. However, the necessary serial relationship between these eruptions, isotopic excursions, and extinctions has never been tested in geological sections preserving all three records. The end-Triassic extinction (ETE) at 201.4 Ma is among the largest of these extinctions and is tied to a large negative carbon isotope excursion, reflecting perturbations of the carbon cycle including a transient increase in CO(2). The cause of the ETE has been inferred to be the eruption of the giant Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP). Here, we show that carbon isotopes of leaf wax derived lipids (n-alkanes), wood, and total organic carbon from two orbitally paced lacustrine sections interbedded with the CAMP in eastern North America show similar excursions to those seen in the mostly marine St. Audrie's Bay section in England. Based on these results, the ETE began synchronously in marine and terrestrial environments slightly before the oldest basalts in eastern North America but simultaneous with the eruption of the oldest flows in Morocco, a CO(2) super greenhouse, and marine biocalcification crisis. Because the temporal relationship between CAMP eruptions, mass extinction, and the carbon isotopic excursions are shown in the same place, this is the strongest case for a volcanic cause of a mass extinction to date.

  11. Two recent surtseyan eruptions in the Zubair archipelago (Red Sea) studied using high-resolution radar and optical satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenbin; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2014-05-01

    The birth and growth of new volcanic islands are rare and spectacular geological events that are far from being fully understood. The recent Surtseyan eruptions in the Zubair archipelago, southern Red Sea, from December 2011 to January 2012 as well as between September and November 2013, formed two new oceanic islands and thus provided an exceptional opportunity to study magma-ocean interaction, new-island formation and evolution, as well as coastal erosion. However, no in-situ ground-based geophysical or geodetic measurements were obtained during these eruptions, and we therefore use multiple optical satellite imagery from several different satellites (Ali, Landsat 7&8, Quickbird and WorldView-2) together with high-resolution TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X radar data to study the volcanic eruptions and how the islands evolved during and after the eruptive activity. The optical images show explosive activity during both eruptions, with a thick white plumes and black tephra rising from the eruptive vents. The images also reveal that the 2011-12 eruption began on ~19 December 2012, was fed from a short NW-SE fissure, and that it ended between 9 and 12 January 2012. The 2011-12 eruption formed a new island that consists of a single elongated cone, oriented approximately parallel to the axis of the Red Sea rift. The 2013 eruption started on 28 September 2013 and went by mostly unnoticed. It lasted both longer (about two months) and formed a larger island, than the 2011-12 eruption. Time series of optical images reveal that significant wind and coastal erosion, as well as possible landslide activity has resulted in changes of both the size and the shape of the two new islands. Regular high-resolution TerraSAR-X satellite acquisitions of the area did not start until on 20 January 2012. These data could provide information about post-eruption deformation associated with the new deposits, but the coherence is not very good on the island formed in the first eruption. However, we

  12. The 2008 Eruption of Chaitén Volcano, Chile and National Volcano-Monitoring Programs in the U.S. and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, J. W.; Lara, L. E.; Moreno, H.

    2008-12-01

    Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, began erupting on 2 May 2008. The eruption produced 3 Plinian eruption pulses between May 2 and 8. Between Plinian phases the volcano emitted a constant column of ash to approximately 10 km, gradually diminishing to approximately 3 km by the end of June. The eruption of Chaitén was remarkable on several counts--it was the first rhyolite eruption on the planet since Novarupta (Katmai) erupted in 1912, and Chaitén had apparently lain dormant for approximately 9300 years. Though Chaitén is located in a generally sparsely populated region, the eruption had widespread impacts. More than 5000 people had to be quickly evacuated from proximal areas and aviation in southern South America was disrupted for weeks. Within 10 days secondary lahars had overrun much of the town of Chaitén complicating the prospects of the townspeople to return to their homes. Prior to the eruption onset, the nearest real-time seismic station was 300 km distant, and earthquakes were not felt by local citizens until approximately 30 hours before the eruption onset. No other signs of unrest were noted. Owing to the lack of near-field monitoring, and the nighttime eruption onset, there was initial confusion about which volcano was erupting: Chaitén or nearby Michinmahuida. Lack of monitoring systems at Chaitén meant that warning time for the public at risk was extremely short, and owing to the nature of the eruption and the physical geography of the area, it was very difficult to install monitoring instruments to track its progress after the eruption started. The lack of geophysical monitoring also means that an important data set on precursory behavior for silicic systems was not collected. With more than 120 Pleistocene to Holocene-age volcanoes within its continental territory, Chile is one of the more volcanically active countries in the world. The eruption of Chaitén has catalyzed the creation of a new program within the Servicio Nacional de Geología y

  13. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.5E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. Even in this cloudy view, the full extent of the eruption is obvious. Thick layers of ash completely surrounds the crater and the effect of mudflows in this previously heavily forested and agricultural region can be traced as ribbons flowing downhill. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  14. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.0E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991 after over 600 years of inactivity. In this vertical view, the full extent of the eruption is obvious. Thick layers of ash completely surrounds the crater and the effect of mudflows in this previously heavily forested and agricultural region can be traced as ribbons flowing downhill. Clark AFB, once the crossroads of the SW Pacific can only partially be seen.

  15. Tephra from the 1979 soufriere explosive eruption.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, H

    1982-06-01

    The explosive phase of the 1979 Soufriere eruption produced 37.5 x 10(6) cubic meters (dense-rock equivalent) of tephra, consisting of about 40 percent juvenile basaltic andesite and 60 percent of a nonjuvenile component derived from the fragmentation of the 1971-1972 lava island during phreatomagmatic explosions. The unusually fine grain size, poor sorting, and bimodality of the land deposit are attributed to particle aggregation and the formation of accretionary lapilli in a wet eruption column.

  16. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On March 29, 2007, the Shiveluch Volcano on the Russian Federation's Kamchatka Peninsula erupted. According to the Alaska Volcano Observatory the volcano underwent an explosive eruption between 01:50 and 2:30 UTC, sending an ash cloud skyward roughly 9,750 meters (32,000 feet), based on visual estimates. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying onboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this picture at 02:00 UTC on March 29. The top image shows the volcano and its surroundings. The bottom image shows a close-up view of the volcano at 250 meters per pixel. Satellites often capture images of volcanic ash plumes, but usually as the plumes are blowing away. Plumes have been observed blowing away from Shiveluch before. This image, however, is different. At the time the Aqua satellite passed overhead, the eruption was recent enough (and the air was apparently still enough) that the ash cloud still hovered above the summit. In this image, the bulbous cloud casts its shadow northward over the icy landscape. Volcanic ash eruptions inject particles into Earth's atmosphere. Substantial eruptions of light-reflecting particles can reduce temperatures and even affect atmospheric circulation. Large eruptions impact climate patterns for years. A massive eruption of the Tambora Volcano in Indonesia in 1815, for instance, earned 1816 the nickname 'the year without a summer.' Shiveluch is a stratovolcano--a steep-sloped volcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. One of Kamchatka's largest volcanoes, it sports a summit reaching 3,283 meters (10,771 feet). Shiveluch is also one of the peninsula's most active volcanoes, with an estimated 60 substantial eruptions in the past 10,000 years.

  17. A Nanolite Record of Eruption Style Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujin, M.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-12-01

    Microlites in pyroclasts have been intensively studied to understand magma ascent processes. However, microlites do not record the explosive-effusive transitions in sub-Plinian eruptions when such transitions are governed by the shallow level degassing rather than by the magma ascent rate. To overcome this limitation, we studied the "nanolites" in the quenched products of the 2011 Shinmoedake, Kirishima Volcanic Group, Kyusyu Japan1. Nanolites are the nanometer-scale components of the groundmass minerals and exhibit a steeper slope of crystal size distribution than that of the microlites2. In the 2011 Shinmoedake eruption, the style of activity had undergone transformations from sub-Plinian eruption to Vulcanian explosion and intermittent effusion of lava3. We found that, although the products formed by different eruptive activities have similar microlite characteristics, such products can be distinguished clearly by their mineral assemblage of nanolites. The samples of pumices of sub-Plinian eruptions and Vulcanian explosions and the dense juvenile fragments of lava (in descending order of explosivity) contained, respectively, nanolites of low-Ca pyroxene, low-Ca pyroxene + plagioclase, and low-Ca pyroxene + plagioclase + Fe-Ti oxides. Nanolites are assumed to crystallize when undercooling of the magma due primarily to dehydration increases rapidly near the surface. The water contents of the interstitial glass indicate that the quenched depths did not differ greatly between eruption styles. Hence, the different nanolite assemblages of each eruption style are assumed to have resulted from differences in magma residence time near the surface. Thus, we propose that nanolites in pyroclasts have the potential to indicate the physicochemical conditions of magma at the transition points of eruption styles. References 1) Mujin and Nakamura, 2014, Geology, v.42, p.611-614 2) Sharp et al., 1996, Bull. Volcanol, v.57, p.631-640 3) Miyabuchi et al, 2013, J. Volcanol

  18. Are flood basalt eruptions monogenetic or polygenetic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental classification of volcanoes divides them into "monogenetic" and "polygenetic." We discuss whether flood basalt fields, the largest volcanic provinces, are monogenetic or polygenetic. A polygenetic volcano, whether a shield volcano or a stratovolcano, erupts from the same dominant conduit for millions of years (excepting volumetrically small flank eruptions). A flood basalt province, built from different eruptive fissures dispersed over wide areas, can be considered a polygenetic volcano without any dominant vent. However, in the same characteristic, a flood basalt province resembles a monogenetic volcanic field, with only the difference that individual eruptions in the latter are much smaller. This leads to the question how a flood basalt province can be two very different phenomena at the same time. Individual flood basalt eruptions have previously been considered monogenetic, contrasted by only their high magma output (and lava fluidity) with typical "small-volume monogenetic" volcanoes. Field data from Hawaiian shield volcanoes, Iceland, and the Deccan Traps show that whereas many feeder dykes were single magma injections, and the eruptions can be considered "large monogenetic" eruptions, multiple dykes are equally abundant. They indicate that the same dyke fissure repeatedly transported separate magma batches, feeding an eruption which was thus polygenetic by even the restricted definition (the same magma conduit). This recognition helps in understanding the volcanological, stratigraphic, and geochemical complexity of flood basalts. The need for clear concepts and terminology is, however, strong. We give reasons for replacing "monogenetic volcanic fields" with "diffuse volcanic fields" and for dropping the term "polygenetic" and describing such volcanoes simply and specifically as "shield volcanoes," "stratovolcanoes," and "flood basalt fields."

  19. Preventive health measures in volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, P J; Bernstein, R S; Buist, A S

    1986-01-01

    Medical treatment has only a small role in severe volcanic eruptions and so preventive measures are paramount if injuries and loss of life are to be reduced. The health team must be incorporated in emergency planning and response at the earliest stage. Guidance on the interpretation of geological information about a volcano and the appropriate health measures that should be adopted before and after an eruption are summarized for the benefit of health workers. PMID:3946731

  20. Volcanic eruptions; energy and size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de la Cruz-Reyna, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth is a dynamic planet. Many different processes are continuously developing, creating a delicate balance between the energy stored and generated in its interior and the heat lost into space. The heat in continuously transferred through complex self-regulating convection mechanisms on a planetary scale. The distribution of terrestrial heat flow reveals some of the fine structure of the energy transport mechanisms in the outer layers of the Earth. Of these mechanisms in the outer layers of the Earth. Of these mechanisms, volcanism is indeed the most remarkable, for it allows energy to be transported in rapid bursts to the surface. In order to maintain the subtle balance of the terrestrial heat machine, one may expect that some law or principle restricts the ways in which these volcanic bursts affect the overall energy transfer of the Earth. For instance, we know that the geothermal flux of the planet amounts to 1028 erg/year. On the other hand, a single large event like the Lava Creek Tuff eruption that formed Yellowstone caldera over half a million years ago may release the same amount of energy in a very small area, over a short period of time. 

  1. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  2. Fixed drug eruption in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nnoruka, Edith N; Ikeh, V O; Mbah, A U

    2006-09-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) causes cosmetic embarrassment in Nigerian patients, particularly when the characteristic hyperpigmented patches affect the face and lips. Drugs that have been implicated in the etiology of FDE, and the sites of lesions, may vary from country to country. Antimalarials, such as Fansidar, Fancimef, Maloxine, Amalar, and Metakelfin, were the most common offending agents, accounting for 38% of FDEs, followed by trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) (28%), dipyrones (10%), Butazolidin (6%), thiacetazone (6%), metronidazole (4%), paracetamol (3%), and naproxen (3%). Lesions induced by the combination of sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (in antimalarials) mainly involved the face and lips. In most cases, patients took these sulfa-containing antimalarials in combination with numerous other drugs, particularly analgesics. Unlike chloroquine-induced pruritus, which affects most Africans, the association between antimalarials and FDE has not been well documented in our region. Co-trimoxazole was associated more often than antimalarials with FDEs involving the mucocutaneous junctions of the genitalia and lips. Males with genital lesions on the glans penis represented 11 (48%) of those with co-trimoxazole hypersensitivity. The trunk and limbs were affected mainly by pyrazoles and Butazolidin, respectively; however, solitary lesions on the trunk were usually due to co-trimoxazole, whereas solitary lesions on the limbs were associated with Butazolidin.

  3. The ten-year eruption of Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Heliker, C.

    1992-01-01

    About 1 km3 of lava erupted during the first 0 years of the eruption. Lava flows have destroyed 181 houses and severed the coastal highway along the volcano's south flank, severely restricting transportation on this part of the island of Hawaii. the eruption consisted of many distinct episodes characterized by activity at different vents and by different eruptive styles. the following summarizes the first 10 years of the eruption, starting with the initial outbreak in 1983.

  4. Two-Stage Magma Mixing and Initial Phase of the 1667 Plinian Eruption of Tarumai Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, A.; Takeuchi, S.

    2009-12-01

    25, Mg/Mn > 10 (type-3) with no type-1 (classification based on Nakagawa et al. (2006)); magnetite inclusions in pyroxene phenocrysts in b8-bottom are, however, type-1. According to the observations, we propose two-stage magma mixing as follows. Prior to the 1667 eruption, there are high-T mafic magma with olivine, calcic plagioclase and type-3 magnetite, and low-T main magma with two pyroxenes, other types of plagioclase and type-1 magnetite (and few ilmenite). The first-stage mixing between the two magmas formed the precursory hybrid magma, but could not prompt the magma to erupt immediately. In the hybrid magma, type-1 and -3 magnetite rehomogenized into type-2 due to rapid cation diffusion, but magnetite inclusions in pyroxene remained type-1. Then, the second-stage mixing between the hybrid magma and the high-T magma occurred, and just after the mixing (with no rehomogenization of type-3 magnetite) the eruption began. Following the hybrid magma (b8-bottom), the main magma erupted. Considering the diffusion coefficients of Ti and Mg in magnetite, the period between the two mixings was several years, whereas the period between the second mixing and the eruption was less than weeks. The two-stage mixing of high-T magma enabled the high-viscosity phenocryst-rich magma to erupt.

  5. Satellite Observations of Volcanic Clouds from the Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, K. G.; Ekstrand, A. L.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano began erupting on 23 March 2009 (UTC) and consisted of 19 events over a 14 day period. The volcano is located on the Alaska Peninsula, 175 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The previous eruption was in 1989/1990 and seriously disrupted air traffic in the region, including the near catastrophic engine failure of a passenger airliner. Plumes and ash clouds from the recent eruption were observed on a variety of satellite data (AVHRR, MODIS and GOES). The eruption produced volcanic clouds up to 19 km which are some of the highest detected in recent times in the North Pacific region. The ash clouds primarily drifted north and east of the volcano, had a weak ash signal in the split window data and resulted in light ash falls in the Cook Inlet basin and northward into Alaska’s Interior. Volcanic cloud heights were measured using ground-based radar, and plume temperature and wind shear methods but each of the techniques resulted in significant variations in the estimates. Even though radar showed the greatest heights, satellite data and wind shears suggest that the largest concentrations of ash may be at lower altitudes in some cases. Sulfur dioxide clouds were also observed on satellite data (OMI, AIRS and Calipso) and they primarily drifted to the east and were detected at several locations across North America, thousands of kilometers from the volcano. Here, we show time series data collected by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, illustrating the different eruptive events and ash clouds that developed over the subsequent days.

  6. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These `recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions.

  7. Sympathetic solar eruptions in quadrupolar magnetic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Panasenco, O.

    2014-12-01

    Observations by SDO/AIA have renewed the interest in sympathetic solareruptions, i.e., of eruptions that occur simultaneously (or in shortsuccession) at different source regions in the corona. Recently, Toroket al. (2011) developed an idealized numerical model for the triggermechanisms of sympathetic eruptions in so-called pseudo-streamers, whichconsist of a tri-polar magnetic configuration with a parasitic polarityin their center. Here we extend the work by Torok et al. by investigating sympathetic eruptions in (the topologically somewhat more complex) quadrupolar configurations, using MHD simulations. We consider both symmetric and asymmetric initial configurations that contain two or three flux ropes within the quadrupole. We find, differentto Torok et al. (2011), that magnetic reconnection induced by a firsteruption cannot just trigger, but also prevent subsequent eruptions. In addition, a (relatively modest) asymmetry of the configuration may fully suppress the occurrence of successive full eruptions, i.e., of coronal mass ejections. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of sympathetic eruptions.

  8. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions.

    PubMed

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-07-28

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These 'recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions.

  9. Petrologic constraints on rift-zone processes - Results from episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, M.O.; Ho, R.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Wolfe, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Puu Oo eruption in the middle of Kilauea volcano's east rift zone provides an excellent opportunity to utilize petrologic constraints to interpret rift-zone processes. Emplacement of a dike began 24 hours before the start of the eruption on 3 January 1983. Seismic and geodetic evidence indicates that the dike collided with a magma body in the rift zone. Most of the lava produced during the initial episode of the Puu Oo eruption is of hybrid composition, with petrographic and geochemical evidence of mixing magmas of highly evllved and more mafic compositions. Some olivine and plagioclase grains in the hybrid lavas show reverse zoning. Whole-rock compositional variations are linear even for normally compatible elements like Ni and Cr. Leastsquares mixing calculations yield good residuals for major and trace element analyses for magma mixing. Crystal fractionation calculations yield unsatisfactory residuals. The highly evolved magma is similar in composition to the lava from the 1977 eruption and, at one point, vents for these two eruptions are only 200 m apart. Possibly both the 1977 lava and the highly evolved component of the episode 1 Puu Oo lava were derived from a common body of rift-zone-stored magma. The more mafic mixing component may be represented by the most mafic lava from the January 1983 eruption; it shows no evidence of magma mixing. The dike that was intruded just prior to the start of the Puu Oo eruption may have acted as a hydraulic plunger causing mixing of the two rift-zone-stored magmas. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Communicating Uncertainty to the Public During Volcanic Unrest and Eruption -A Case Study From the 2004-2005 Eruption of Mount St. Helens, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, C. A.; Pallister, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The earthquake swarm beneath Mount St. Helens that began on 23 September 2004 did not initially appear different from previous swarms (none of which culminated in an eruption) that had occurred beneath the volcano since the end of the 1980-1986 eruptions. Three days into the swarm, however, a burst of larger-magnitude earthquakes indicated that this swarm was indeed different and prompted the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) to issue a change in alert level, the first time such a change had been issued in the Cascades in over 18 years. From then on, the unrest accelerated quickly as did the need to communicate the developing conditions to the public and public officials, often in the spotlight of intense media attention. Within three weeks of the onset of unrest, magma reached the surface. Since mid-October 2004, lava has been extruding through a glacier within the crater of Mount St. Helens, forming a 60 Mm3 dome by August 2005. The rapid onset of the eruption required a rapid ramping up of communication within and among the scientific, emergency-response and land-management communities, as well as the reestablishment of protocols that had not been rigorously tested for 18 years. Early on, daily meetings of scientists from CVO and the University of Washington's Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network were established to discuss incoming monitoring data and to develop a consensus on the likely course of activity, hazard potential and the uncertainty inherent in these forecasts. Subgroups developed scenario maps to describe the range of activity likely under different eruptive behaviors and sizes, and assessed short- and long-term probabilities of eruption, explosivity and hazardous events by employing a probability-tree methodology. Resultant consensual information has been communicated to a variety of groups using established alert levels for ground-based and aviation communities, daily updates and media briefings, postings on the

  11. Environmental impact of the 1.8 ka Taupo eruption, New Zealand: Landscape responses to a large-scale explosive rhyolite eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manville, V.; Segschneider, B.; Newton, E.; White, J. D. L.; Houghton, B. F.; Wilson, C. J. N.

    2009-10-01

    Large-scale ignimbrite eruptions from rhyolitic caldera volcanoes can trigger geologically instantaneous changes in sedimentary systems over huge areas by either burying existing environments or overloading them with vast quantities of unconsolidated particulate material. The post-eruption readjustment of the landscape to such perturbations is one of the most dramatic processes in physical sedimentology, exemplified here by the 1.8 ka Taupo eruption in the central North Island of New Zealand. This eruption generated voluminous fall deposits, then climaxed with emplacement of a c. 30 km 3 non-welded ignimbrite over a near-circular area of c. 20 000 km 2. Approximately 90% of the area, but < 50% of the ignimbrite volume, is represented by a landscape-mantling unit that covered the pre-eruption topography to a depth varying from c. 10 m in proximal areas to less than 15-30 cm distally. The remainder of the ignimbrite deposit is represented by landscape-modifying material that ponded in valley bottoms and depressions to thicknesses of up to 70 m, with no systematic variation in thickness with distance from source. The headwaters of many of the North Island's largest rivers were impacted by both the primary pyroclastic fall and flow material. Large-scale post-eruption remobilisation of this material, coupled with the re-establishment of fluvial systems, occurred in a distinct sequence as recorded by the evolution of sedimentary facies in different sub-environments. Following an initial period dominated by mass flows, re-establishment of fluvial systems began with the headward erosion of box canyons through the ponded ignimbrite deposits, a process often associated with the break-out of temporary lakes. Aggradational streams developed in these channels rapidly evolved from shallow, ephemeral, sediment-laden outbursts associated with flash flood events to deeper, permanent braided rivers, before declining sediment yields led to retrenchment of single thread rivers and a

  12. Africa: Prosperous times

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Political instability and corruption is the rule, rather than the exception, in Africa`s main producing regions, but exploration and production prospects there are bright and attractive to foreign operators. The paper discusses exploration, drilling, resource development, and production in Nigeria, Libya, Algeria, Egypt, Angola, Congo, Gabon, and Tunisia. The other countries of Africa are briefly mentioned, i.e., Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, South Africa, Sudan, Namibia, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Zaire, Mozambique, Ghana, Niger, and Seychelles.

  13. Gas-driven eruptions at Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand: towards a coherent model of eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgour, G. N.; Mader, H. M.; Mangan, M.; Blundy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mt. Ruapehu is an andesitic cone volcano situated at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone. The summit plateau at Ruapehu consists of three craters (South, Central and North). Historical activity has consisted of frequent small phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions from South Crater. The active vents of South Crater are submerged beneath Crater Lake - a warm, acidic lake. The most recent eruption at Ruapehu occurred on 25th September, 2007 that generated a moderate steam column to about 4.5 km above Crater Lake, and a directed ballistic and surge deposit of coarse blocks and ash to the north of Crater Lake. It also initiated lahars in two catchments. The eruption occurred during the ski season and it resulted in the temporary closure of the three ski fields. Seismicity for the main eruption lasted for about 4 minutes and included an explosive phase which lasted for less than 1 minute and a post-explosion phase which probably indicated resonance in the conduit together with signals generated from lahars and vent stabilisation. Preceding seismicity occurred ~ 10 min before the eruption. The 2007 eruption appears strikingly similar to phreatic/phreatomagmatic eruptions of 1969 and 1975. In those eruptions, limited precursory seismicity was recorded, the bulk of the erupted deposits were accidental lithics, including lake sediments and older lavas, and only a small amount of juvenile material was erupted (~ 5%). It is likely that all three eruptions were driven by magmatic gases, either stored and pressurised beneath a hydrothermal seal, or rapidly exsolved during a gas release event. This poster outlines the plan that we will use to model this common type of eruption at Ruapehu. We will analyse the volatile content of phenocryst-hosted melt inclusions to determine the degassing depth of historic eruptions. This will allow us to identify where the magmas have been or are degassing beneath Crater Lake. Analogue modelling of gas and fluid flow through a visco

  14. Eruption forerunners from multiparameter monitoring and application for eruptions time predictability (Piton de la Fournaise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, A.; Grasso, J. R.; Clarke, D.; Ferrazzini, V.; BachèLery, P.; Staudacher, T.

    2012-11-01

    Volcanic eruptions impact on societal risk, and volcanic hazard assessment is a necessary ingredient for decision-makers. However, the prediction of volcanic eruptions remains challenging due to the complexity and the non-linearity of volcanic processes. Identified forerunners such as increasing seismicity or deformation of the volcanic edifice prior to eruption are not deterministic. In this study, we use statistical methods to identify and discriminate precursory patterns to eruptions, on three sets of observables of Piton de la Fournaise volcano. We analyzed the short-term (i.e. the inter-eruptive period) time series of the seismicity rate, the deformation and the seismic velocity changes (deduced from seismic noise cross-correlations) over the period 1999-2006, with two main goals. First, we characterize the average pre-eruptive time patterns before 22 eruptions using superposed epoch analysis for the three observables. Using daily rate values, we resolve (1) a velocity change within 100-50 days from the eruptions onsets, then a plateau value up to eruption onset; (2) a power law increase in seismicity rate from noise level 15-10 days before eruption time; (3) an increase of displacement rate on the eruption day. These results support a three step mechanism leading to magma transfers toward the surface. Second we use pattern recognition techniques and the formalization of error diagrams to quantify the predictive power of each forerunner either as used independently or as combined to each other. We show that when seismicity rate alone performs the best prediction in the failure to predict versus alarm duration space, the combination of the displacement and seismicity data reduces the false alarm rate. We further propose a tool which explores the prediction results in order to optimize prediction strategy for decision-makers, as a function of the risk value.

  15. Impulsive Seafloor Signals from the 2015 Eruption of Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Tan, Y. J.; Tolstoy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge that has erupted three times over the past two decades. The most recent eruption was recorded by a cabled seismic network in the southern half of the summit caldera that has been operated by the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) since November 2014. After five months of increasing seismicity, a 10-hour seismic crisis involving thousands of earthquakes began at 0500 GMT on April 24, 2015 accompanied by ~2 m of deflation in the central caldera (Nooner et al., this meeting). Local seismicity declined rapidly after the eruption, but thousands of impulsive waterborne events were observed across the network starting immediately after the seismic crisis. Over 1500 events per day were recorded on April 25 and 26, decreasing to less than 500 per day after May 1, and ceasing altogether around May 20. Each event comprises a train of three to five consistently spaced arrivals visible on all 3 seismometer channels with a broad frequency content of 10-100 Hz. The timing of arrivals across the network is consistent with water column multiples from a seafloor source to the north. A subset of events has been manually picked and located by modeling travel times of the first three arrivals assuming flat bathymetry at a range of depths between 1500-1800 m and a sound speed of 1.5 km/s. The preliminary locations are clustered around Axial Seamount's northern rift at a distance of 10-15 km from the north rim of the caldera. In July, an OOI cruise discovered fresh pillow lavas up to 100 m thick and 670 m wide, and extending for 7 km along the rift in the same region (Kelley et al., this meeting). The source of the impulsive events is uncertain and could involve gas explosions, bubble collapse, and thermal or mechanical cracking, but their colocation with the fresh lava flow suggests that ocean bottom seismic networks can not only track the faulting and fracturing associated with subsurface magma movements but also the

  16. Africa's Geomosaic under Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Blij, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Traces the transformation of Subsaharan Africa during the last 35 years. Contends that the domino effect hastened decolonization and increased polarization within South Africa. Argues that modernization is taking place only in South Africa's core and that the geopolitical framework appears stable but may collapse from within. (NL)

  17. New insights into the initiation and venting of the Bronze-Age eruption of Santorini (Greece), from component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druitt, T. H.

    2014-02-01

    The late-seventeenth century BC Minoan eruption of Santorini discharged 30-60 km3 of magma, and caldera collapse deepened and widened the existing 22 ka caldera. A study of juvenile, cognate, and accidental components in the eruption products provides new constraints on vent development during the five eruptive phases, and on the processes that initiated the eruption. The eruption began with subplinian (phase 0) and plinian (phase 1) phases from a vent on a NE-SW fault line that bisects the volcanic field. During phase 1, the magma fragmentation level dropped from the surface to the level of subvolcanic basement and magmatic intrusions. The fragmentation level shallowed again, and the vent migrated northwards (during phase 2) into the flooded 22 ka caldera. The eruption then became strongly phreatomagmatic and discharged low-temperature ignimbrite containing abundant fragments of post-22 ka, pre-Minoan intracaldera lavas (phase 3). Phase 4 discharged hot, fluidized pyroclastic flows from subaerial vents and constructed three main ignimbrite fans (northwestern, eastern, and southern) around the volcano. The first phase-4 flows were discharged from a vent, or vents, in the northern half of the volcanic field, and laid down lithic-block-rich ignimbrite and lag breccias across much of the NW fan. About a tenth of the lithic debris in these flows was subvolcanic basement. New subaerial vents then opened up, probably across much of the volcanic field, and finer-grained ignimbrite was discharged to form the E and S fans. If major caldera collapse took place during the eruption, it probably occurred during phase 4. Three juvenile components were discharged during the eruption—a volumetrically dominant rhyodacitic pumice and two andesitic components: microphenocryst-rich andesitic pumices and quenched andesitic enclaves. The microphenocryst-rich pumices form a textural, mineralogical, chemical, and thermal continuum with co-erupted hornblende diorite nodules, and together

  18. Incorporating the eruptive history in a stochastic model for volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We show how a stochastic version of a general load-and-discharge model for volcanic eruptions can be implemented. The model tracks the history of the volcano through a quantity proportional to stored magma volume. Thus large eruptions can influence the activity rate for a considerable time following, rather than only the next repose as in the time-predictable model. The model can be fitted to data using point-process methods. Applied to flank eruptions of Mount Etna, it exhibits possible long-term quasi-cyclic behavior, and to Mauna Loa, a long-term decrease in activity. An extension to multiple interacting sources is outlined, which may be different eruption styles or locations, or different volcanoes. This can be used to identify an 'average interaction' between the sources. We find significant evidence that summit eruptions of Mount Etna are dependent on preceding flank eruptions, with both flank and summit eruptions being triggered by the other type. Fitted to Mauna Loa and Kilauea, the model had a marginally significant relationship between eruptions of Mauna Loa and Kilauea, consistent with the invasion of the latter's plumbing system by magma from the former.

  19. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. Valentine

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', presents information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. Many aspects of this work are aimed at resolution of the Igneous Activity Key Technical Issue (KTI) as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1998, p. 3), Subissues 1 and 2, which address the probability and consequence of igneous activity at the proposed repository site, respectively. Within the framework of the Disruptive Events Process Model Report (PMR), this AMR provides information for the calculations in two other AMRs ; parameters described herein are directly used in calculations in these reports and will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). Compilation of this AMR was conducted as defined in the Development Plan, except as noted. The report begins with considerations of the geometry of volcanic feeder systems, which are of primary importance in predicting how much of a potential repository would be affected by an eruption. This discussion is followed by one of the physical and chemical properties of the magmas, which influences both eruptive styles and mechanisms for interaction with radioactive waste packages. Eruptive processes including the ascent velocity of magma at depth, the onset of bubble nucleation and growth in the rising magmas, magma fragmentation, and velocity of the resulting gas-particle mixture are then discussed. The duration of eruptions, their power output, and mass discharge rates are also described. The next section summarizes geologic constraints regarding the interaction between magma and waste packages. Finally, they discuss bulk grain size produced by relevant explosive eruptions and grain shapes.

  20. A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao; Liu Yu

    2010-03-10

    We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

  1. Jet noise recorded during discrete explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlato, P.; Sesterhenn, J.; Taddeucci, J.

    2013-12-01

    Most commonly, acoustic studies of explosive volcanic activity focus on the infrasonic range, as related to large volumetric changes mostly associated with the liberation of pressurized gas. However, there are multiple potential sources of sound that accompany explosive activity, expected to cover a broad range of frequencies. Among the audible range are several mechanisms, generating sound in high-velocity jets of gas or gas-particle mixture entering the atmosphere. This types of sound, well-documented and investigated in physics and engineering literature, has been so far mostly neglected in the study of explosive eruptions, due to the high energy content of the jet noise in the infrasonic regime, despite the potential it holds for parameterizing and understanding eruption processes. High-speed imaging of Strombolian and Vulcanian explosive eruptions at several volcanoes allowed the visualization of acoustic waves generated during the emission of the eruptive gas-pyroclast mixture. The waves, visible only when travelling within dilute gas/aerosol plumes, are thought to cause a temporary phase change in the travel medium. Image analysis allows direct measurement of the apparent (projected) trajectory, wavelength and travel velocity of the waves. Synchronized audio recording from the same eruptions include frequency contents in agreement with the observed waves. The general features of the observed waves are compatible with jet noise originated by the gas-pyroclast mixture entering the atmosphere, opening the way for future comparison with the results of numerical simulations of explosive eruptions, and possibly setting the basis for new acoustic monitoring tools for explosive eruptions.

  2. Magma chamber dynamics and Vesuvius eruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobran, F.

    2003-04-01

    Magma is continuously or periodically refilling an active volcano and its eruption depends on the mechanical, fluid, thermal, and chemical aspects of the magma storage region and its surroundings. A cyclically loaded and unloaded system can fail from a weakness in the system or its surroundings, and the fluctuating stresses can produce system failures at stress levels that are considerably below the yield strength of the material. Magma in a fractured rock system within a volcano is unstable and propagates toward the surface with the rate depending on the state of the system defined by the inertia, gravity, friction, and permeability parameters of magma and its source region. Cyclic loading and unloading of magma from a reservoir caused by small- or medium-scale eruptions of Vesuvius can produce catastrophic plinian eruptions because of the structural failure of the system and the quiescent periods between these eruptions increase with time until the next eruption cycle which will be plinian or subplinian and will occur with a very high probability this century. Such a system behavior is predicted by a Global Volcanic Simulator of Vesuvius developed for simulating different eruption scenarios for the purpose of urban planning the territory, reducing the number of people residing too close to the cone of the volcano, and providing safety to those beyond about 5 km radius of the crater. The magma chamber model of the simulator employs a thermomechanical model that includes magma inflow and outflow from the chamber, heat and mass transfer between the chamber and its surroundings, and thermoelastoplastic deformation of the shell surrounding the magma source region. These magma chamber, magma ascent, and pyroclastic dispersion models and Vesuvius eruption forecasting are described in Dobran, F., VOLCANIC PROCESSES, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2001, 590 pp.

  3. Eruption and degassing dynamics of the major August 2015 Piton de la Fournaise eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Muro, Andrea; Arellano, Santiago; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Bachelery, Patrick; Boudoire, Guillaume; Coppola, Diego; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Gurioli, Lucia; Harris, Andy; Liuzzo, Marco; Metrich, Nicole; Moune, Severine; Peltier, Aline; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Vlastelic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano is one of the most active basaltic volcanoes in the World with one eruption every nine months, on average. This frequent volcanic activity is broadly bimodal, with frequent small volume, short lived eruptions (< 30 Mm3, most being < 10 Mm3) and less frequent relatively large (50-210 Mm3) and long lasting (months) eruptions. After the major caldera forming event of 2007, the volcano produced several short lived small volume summit to proximal eruptions of relatively evolved cotectic magmas and relatively long repose periods (up to 3.5 years between 2010 and 2014). The August 2015 eruption was the first large (45±15 Mm3) and long lasting (2 months) eruption since 2007 and the only event to be fully monitored by the new gas geochemical network of Piton de la Fournaise volcanological observatory (DOAS, MultiGaS, diffuse CO2 soil emissions). Regular lava and tephra sampling was also performed for geochemical and petrological analysis. The eruption was preceded by a significant increase in CO2 soil emissions at distal soil stations (ca. 15 km from the summit), with CO2 enrichment also being recorded at summit low temperature fumaroles. Eruptive products were spectacularly zoned, with plagioclase and pyroxene being abundant in the early erupted products and olivine being the main phase in the late-erupted lavas. Total gas emissions at the eruptive vent underwent a decrease during the first half of the eruption and then an increase, mirroring the time evolution of magma discharge rate (from 5-10 m3/s in September to 15-30 m3/s in late-October) and the progressive change in magma composition. In spite of significant evolution in magma and gas output, CO2/SO2 ratios in high temperature gases remained quite low (< 0.3) and with little temporal change. Geochemical data indicated that this relatively long-lived eruption corresponded to the progressive drainage of most of the shallow part of PdF plumbing system, triggered by a new

  4. Decompression Induced Crystallization of Basaltic Andesite Magma: Constraints on the Eruption of Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szramek, L. A.; Gardner, J. E.; Larsen, J. F.

    2004-12-01

    Arenal Volcano is a small stratovolcano located 90 km NW of San Jose, Costa Rica. In 1968 current activity began with a Plinian phase, and has continued to erupt lava flows and pyroclastic flows intermittently since. Samples from the Plinian, pyroclastic flow, strombolian, and effusive phases have been studied texturally. Little variation in crystallinity occurs amongst the different phases. Number density of crystals, both 2D and 3D are 50-70 mm-2 and 30,000-50,000 mm-3 in the Plinian sample, compared to the lesser values in other eruptive types. Characteristic crystal size also increases as explosivity decreases. Two samples, both lava flows collected while warm, overlap with the Plinian sample. This suggests that the variations seen may be a result of cooling history. Plagioclase differs between the Plinian sample, in which they are only tabular in shape, and the other eruptive types, which contain both tabular and equant crystals. To link decompression paths of the Arenal magma to possible pre-eruptive conditions, we have carried out hydrothermal experiments. The experiments were preformed in TZM pressure vessels buffered at a fugacity of Ni-NiO and water saturation. Phase equilibria results in conjunction with mineral compositions and temperature estimates by previous workers from active lava flows and two-pyroxene geothermometry, constrain the likely pre-eruptive conditions for the Arenal magma to 950-1040° C with a water pressure of 50-80 MPa. Samples that started from conditions that bracket our estimated pre-eruptive conditions were decompressed in steps of 5-30 MPa and held for various times at each step until 20 MPa was reached, approximating average decompression rates of 0.25, 0.025, 0.0013 MPa/s. Comparison of textures found in the natural samples to the experimentally produced textures suggest that the Plinian eruption likely was fed by magma ascending at 0.05-1 m/s, whereas the less explosive phases were fed by magma ascending at 0.05 m/s or less.

  5. Recent Observations of the Early Stage of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    We examine the onset of two solar eruptions, using data from Hinode STEREO, TRACE, and SOHO, and other sources. One eruption occurred on 2007 March 2, and the other occurred on 2007 May 20. The first eruption involves a filament that erupts, and motions of the filament begin at least 20 min prior to onset of the main eruption; magnetic cancellation occurs beneath the filament among opposite polarity magnetic elements for at least six hours prior to the eruption.. In the second case, a surge-like filament is ejected from a location north of the main erupting magnetic neutral line; in this case magnetic cancellation occurs both along the main neutral line and also at the sight of the surge source north of the main neutral line. Thus in both cases, magnetic cancellation prior to eruption plays a crucial role in releasing the magnetic energy responsible for the respective eruptions.

  6. Two cases of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis induced by mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Oka, Keiko; Ohtaki, Noriko; Kasai, Shinji; Takayama, Kaoru; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2012-03-01

    Eruptive pseudoangiomatosis is a skin eruption characterized by millet-sized erythema with an anemic halo appearing on exposed body areas. Insect bites, particularly mosquito bites, have been reported as one of the causes of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis. We experienced two cases of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis and the eruption was seen on the face and upper extremities of two women aged 48 and 77 years old. The two cases consented to be experimentally bitten by Culex pipiens mosquitoes and Aedes albopictus to determine if eruptive pseudoangiomatosis could be experimentally elicited by these mosquitoes. Our results showed that several minutes after a C. pipiens mosquito bite, an erythematous spot appeared on the bite site, followed by the formation of an anemic halo surrounding the erythema in 30 min; a successful reproduction of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis. The erythema lasted for more than a week and was not accompanied by any pruritus. With A. albopictus, we were able to reproduce a milder eruptive pseudoangiomatosis eruption: in case 1, a smaller erythematous spot with an ill-defined halo which disappeared within 1 week; and in case 2, an immediate response consisting of a wheal and erythema but not eruptive pseudoangiomatosis. We demonstrated that eruptive pseudoangiomatosis was the response manifested in individuals who normally did not demonstrate any immediate or delayed reaction to insect bites; and the typical eruptive pseudoangiomatosis eruption was elicited by C. pipiens mosquito bites. However, the mechanism resulting in the manifestation of eruptive pseudoangiomatosis is still unknown.

  7. Vent Processes and Deposits of a Hiatus in a Violent Eruption: Quilotoa Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J. A.; Bustillos, J.; Ort, M. H.; Cashman, K. V.; Mothes, P. A.; di Muro, A.; Rosi, M.

    2009-12-01

    high proportion of stained fragments in U2b requires a different, possibly hydrothermal, source. We interpret the lava lapilli of U2c and U3 as being from a single explosion, perhaps the opening of a new vent, and thus they indicate that the eruption was continuous from U2b through U3. Our current hypothesis is that, as the U1 eruption ended, acidic gas streamed through the material clogging the vent. This elutriated vitric material that eventually formed a cap on the system. As the U3 magma began its ascent, gas flux increased, leading to explosions that gradually removed the vitric cap and depositing the vitric U2a. Then, more continuous gas streaming led to the development of an pulsatory eruption column that carried the hot stained crystals and lithic fragments into a convecting column and eventual deposition as fallout of U2b, which was then followed by the establishment of the U3 eruption column.

  8. Thermal signature, eruption style, and eruption evolution at Pele and Pillan on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Williams, D.A.; Phillips, C.B.; McEwen, A.S.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Smythe, W.D.; Kamp, L.W.; Soderblom, L.A.; Carlson, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft has been periodically monitoring volcanic activity on Io since June 1996, making it possible to chart the evolution of individual eruptions. We present results of coanalysis of Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and solid-state imaging (SSI) data of eruptions at Pele and Pillan, especially from a particularly illuminating data set consisting of mutually constraining, near-simultaneous NIMS and SSI observations obtained during orbit C9 in June 1997. The observed thermal signature from each hot spot, and the way in which the thermal signature changes with time, tightly constrains the possible styles of eruption. Pele and Pillan have very different eruption styles. From September 1996 through May 1999, Pele demonstrates an almost constant total thermal output, with thermal emission spectra indicative of a long-lived, active lava lake. The NIMS Pillan data exhibit the thermal signature of a "Pillanian" eruption style, a large, vigorous eruption with associated open channel, or sheet flows, producing an extensive flow field by orbit C10 in September 1997. The high mass eruption rate, high liquidus temperature (at least 1870 K) eruption at Pillan is the best candidate so far for an active ultramafic (magnesium-rich, "komatiitic") flow on Io, a style of eruption never before witnessed. The thermal output per unit area from Pillan is, however, consistent with the emplacement of large, open-channel flows. Magma temperature at Pele is ???1600 K. If the magma temperature is 1600 K, it suggests a komatiitic-basalt composition. The power output from Pele is indicative of a magma volumetric eruption rate of ???250 to 340 m3 s-1. Although the Pele lava lake is considerably larger than its terrestrial counterparts, the power and mass fluxes per unit area are similar to active terrestrial lava lakes. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Homologous prominence non-radial eruptions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchlev, P.; Koleva, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Dechev, M.

    2016-10-01

    The present study provides important details on homologous eruptions of a solar prominence that occurred in active region NOAA 10904 on 2006 August 22. We report on the pre-eruptive phase of the homologous feature as well as the kinematics and the morphology of a forth from a series of prominence eruptions that is critical in defining the nature of the previous consecutive eruptions. The evolution of the overlying coronal field during homologous eruptions is discussed and a new observational criterion for homologous eruptions is provided. We find a distinctive sequence of three activation periods each of them containing pre-eruptive precursors such as a brightening and enlarging of the prominence body followed by small surge-like ejections from its southern end observed in the radio 17 GHz. We analyse a fourth eruption that clearly indicates a full reformation of the prominence after the third eruption. The fourth eruption although occurring 11 h later has an identical morphology, the same angle of propagation with respect to the radial direction, as well as similar kinematic evolution as the previous three eruptions. We find an important feature of the homologous eruptive prominence sequence that is the maximum height increase of each consecutive eruption. The present analysis establishes that all four eruptions observed in Hα are of confined type with the third eruption undergoing a thermal disappearance during its eruptive phase. We suggest that the observation of the same direction of the magnetic flux rope (MFR) ejections can be consider as an additional observational criterion for MFR homology. This observational indication for homologous eruptions is important, especially in the case of events of typical or poorly distinguishable morphology of eruptive solar phenomena.

  10. An arcade-like eruptive prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu-Hua; Zhan, La-Sheng

    2004-12-01

    An eruptive prominence happened on the east-northern limb of the Sun on March 7, 1991. It appeared in a relatively quiet region where any activity phenomena such as flare, filament and sunspot etc. was not found. The maximum height reachable of the prominence was 6.97×104km and its maximum length reached as 11.6×104km. The eruptive prominence might belong to the one of the middle-smaller scale according to its size in morphology. The course of the eruption exhibited some properties: ascending rapidly and descending slowly just like the process of the flare eruption. After the eruption, the most material in the prominence basically moved along a parabola under the action of magnetic force lines forming the arcade-like shape and keeping it till to the disappearance of the prominence. Before and after descending, a little matter came from the top part was ejected and divorced from the main body of the prominence and diffused into the interplanetary space.

  11. Coronal Bright Points Associated with Minifilament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 109 cm-3. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  12. a Solar Eruption Driven by Sunspot Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Y.; Ruan, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present an observational study of a major solar eruption associated with fast sunspot rotation. The event includes a sigmoidal filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection, and a GOES X2.1 flare from NOAA AR11283. The filament and some overlying coronal arcades were partially rooted in a sunspot, which rotated at an average rate of ˜10 degrees per hour during a period of 6 hours prior to the eruption. Along with the sunspot rotation, significant amounts of magnetic energy ~10^31 erg and helicity 10^41 Mx^2 were transported into the corona. In the 6-hour period, we also found an overall decrease (increase) of the mean photospheric horizontal field strength (magnetic field inclination angle) using the HMI data measured in the region along the polarity inversion line underneath the filament, and a gradual levitation of current density concentrations in the corona according to the NLFFF (NonLinear Force Free Field) extrapolation. These results indicate that the magnetic structure carrying the filament undergoes an overall gradual ascending motion before its final eruption, consistent in general with the observed filament dynamical evolution during the sunspot rotation. The study provides direct evidences of sunspot rotation as a major process twisting, energizing, and destabilizing the coronal filament-flux rope system leading to the eruption.

  13. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  14. Russian eruption warning systems for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, C.; Girina, O.; Senyukov, S.; Rybin, A.; Osiensky, J.; Izbekov, P.; Ferguson, G.

    2009-01-01

    More than 65 potentially active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula and the Kurile Islands pose a substantial threat to aircraft on the Northern Pacific (NOPAC), Russian Trans-East (RTE), and Pacific Organized Track System (PACOTS) air routes. The Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitors and reports on volcanic hazards to aviation for Kamchatka and the north Kuriles. KVERT scientists utilize real-time seismic data, daily satellite views of the region, real-time video, and pilot and field reports of activity to track and alert the aviation industry of hazardous activity. Most Kurile Island volcanoes are monitored by the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT) based in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk. SVERT uses daily moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images to look for volcanic activity along this 1,250-km chain of islands. Neither operation is staffed 24 h per day. In addition, the vast majority of Russian volcanoes are not monitored seismically in real-time. Other challenges include multiple time-zones and language differences that hamper communication among volcanologists and meteorologists in the US, Japan, and Russia who share the responsibility to issue official warnings. Rapid, consistent verification of explosive eruptions and determination of cloud heights remain significant technical challenges. Despite these difficulties, in more than a decade of frequent eruptive activity in Kamchatka and the northern Kuriles, no damaging encounters with volcanic ash from Russian eruptions have been recorded. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  15. Galeras Volcano: International Workshop and Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, F. A.; Calvache, M. L.; Cortes, G. P.; Gomez, D. M.; Narvaez, L.; Ordonez, M.; Ortega, A.; Torres, R.; Silva, B.; Williams, S. N.; Sanders, C. O.; Stix, J.

    Galeras, a 4270-m high andesitic stratovolcano in southwestern Colombia near the Ecuadorian border (Figure 1), gradually reawoke in 1988 after more than 40 years of dormancy. In 1991, after a request from the Geological Survey of Colombia (INGEOMIAS) and the National Disaster Prevention Office (ONAD), Galeras was named a “Decade Volcano” by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI) as part of the United Nations' International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR) program. A workshop was held in 1993 to research, monitor, and mitigate the hazards of the volcano.Galeras lies at latitude 1°14‧N, longitude 77°22‧W (see Figure 2), and its active cone rises about 150 m above the floor of a small summit caldera that is open to the west [Calvache and Williams, 1992]. The active crater is located about 6 km west of Pasto, a city of about 300,000 inhabitants. At least six major Galeras eruptions have been identified during the past 4500 years. These eruptions were mainly vulcanian, with inferred low-altitude eruption columns (<10 km) that produced small-volume pyroclastic flow deposits containing a high proportion of nonjuvenile material and lava flow fragments [Calvache and Williams, 1992]. During the last 500 years, eruptions have been characterized by gas and ash emissions, small lava flows, and explosive eruptions producing pyroclastic flows that have traveled up to 15 km from the crater [Calvache, 1990; Cepeda, 1993].

  16. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, H L; Nagarathna, J; Kumar, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  17. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, HL; Nagarathna, J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  18. Temporal changes in stress preceding the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehto, H.L.; Roman, D.C.; Moran, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    The 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, was preceded by a swarm of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) that began on September 23, 2004. We calculated locations and fault-plane solutions (FPS) for shallow VTs recorded during a background period (January 1999 to July 2004) and during the early vent-clearing phase (September 23 to 29, 2004) of the 2004-2008 eruption. FPS show normal and strike-slip faulting during the background period and on September 23; strike-slip and reverse faulting on September 24; and a mixture of strike-slip, reverse, and normal faulting on September 25-29. The orientation of ??1 beneath MSH, as estimated from stress tensor inversions, was found to be sub-horizontal for all periods and oriented NE-SW during the background period, NW-SE on September 24, and NE-SW on September 25-29. We suggest that the ephemeral ~90?? change in ??1 orientation was due to intrusion and inflation of a NE-SW-oriented dike in the shallow crust prior to the eruption onset. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Regional Climate Modeling of Volcanic Eruptions and the Arctic Climate System: A Baffin Island Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losic, M.; Robock, A.

    2010-12-01

    It is well-understood that the effects of volcanic aerosol loading into the stratosphere are transient, with global cooling lasting only a few years after a single large eruption. Geological evidence collected from Northern Baffin Island, Canada, suggests ice cap growth began soon after a succession of several large eruptions in the 13th century, and they did not start to melt until roughly a century ago. We investigate which feedbacks allowed these ice caps to be maintained long after the transient forcing of the volcanic aerosols, by conducting sensitivity studies with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Polar WRF, a version of WRF developed specifically for the polar regions. Results from an ensemble of month-long regional simulations over Baffin Island suggest that better treatment of snow and ice in Polar WRF improves our regional climate simulations. Thus, sensitivity test results from decade-long runs with imposed changes to boundary condition temperatures and carbon dioxide concentrations using Polar WRF are presented. Preliminary findings suggest that not only large scale but localized climate feedbacks play an important role in the responses of the ice caps after temperature and carbon dioxide forcings are applied. The results from these and further sensitivity tests will provide insight into the influence of regional feedbacks on the persistence of these ice caps long after the 13th century eruptions.

  20. The explosive eruption of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies, 17 September, 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, R.; Cole, P.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Harford, C.; Lejeune, A. M.; McGuire, W. J.; Miller, A. D.; Murphy, M. D.; Norton, G.; Stevens, N. F.; Young, S. R.

    On 17 September 1996 the Soufriere Hills Volcano started a 9 hour period of dome collapse involving 11.7 × 106 m³ (DRE) of lava. After 2.5 hours of quiescence a sustained explosive eruption began. Estimated eruption parameters are: plume height at least 11.3 km and a maximum of 15 km; 180 m/s for launch velocities of ballistic clasts; peak explosion pressure of 27.5 MPa; magma water contents of 2.5-5% magma discharge rates from 2300 to 4300 m³/s ejecta volume of 3.2 (± 0.9) × 106 m³ (DRE). Ejecta consists of pumice (ρ =1160 kg/m³), higher density vesiculated ejecta (ρ =1300 to 2000 kg/m³), dense glassy clasts (ρ =2600 kg/m³), breccias cut by tuffisite veins and hydrothermally altered lithics. The ejecta are interpreted as a conduit assemblage with evacuation of the conduit down to depths of about 3 to 5 km. The eruption was triggered by unloading of a gas pressurised conduit due to dome collapse.

  1. Arizona-sized Io Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These images of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, show the results of a dramatic event that occurred on the fiery satellite during a five-month period. The changes, captured by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft, occurred between the time Galileo acquired the left frame, during its seventh orbit of Jupiter, and the right frame, during its tenth orbit. A new dark spot, 400 kilometers (249 miles) in diameter, which is roughly the size of Arizona, surrounds a volcanic center named Pillan Patera. Galileo imaged a 120 kilometer (75 mile) high plume erupting from this location during its ninth orbit. Pele, which produced the larger plume deposit southwest of Pillan, also appears different than it did during the seventh orbit, perhaps due to interaction between the two large plumes. Pillan's plume deposits appear dark at all wavelengths. This color differs from the very red color associated with Pele, but is similar to the deposits of Babbar Patera, the dark feature southwest of Pele. Some apparent differences between the images are not caused by changes on Io's surface, but rather are due to differences in illumination, emission and phase angles. This is particularly apparent at Babbar Patera.

    North is to the top of the images. The left frame was acquired on April 4th, 1997, while the right frame was taken on Sept. 19th, 1997. The images were obtained at ranges of 563,000 kilometers (350,000 miles) for the left image, and 505,600 kilometers (314,165 miles) for the right.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  2. Multi-disciplinary Monitoring of the 2014 Eruption of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Faria, B. V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Fogo volcano, located in the Cape Verde Archipelago (offshore Western Africa), is a complete stratovolcano system. It is the most recent expression of the Cape Verde hotspot, that has formed the archipelago. The summit reaches ~2830m above sea level, and raises 1100m above Chã das Caldeiras, an almost flat circular area. The last eruption of Fogo started on November 23, 2014 (~10:00UTC), after 19 years of inactivity. C4G, a distributed research infrastructure created in 2014 in the framework of the Portuguese Roadmap for Strategic Research Infrastructures, collaborated immediately with INMG, the Cape Verdean Meteorological and Geophysical Institut with the goal of complementing the permanent geophysical monitoring network in operation on Fogo island. The INMG permanent network is composed of seven seismographic stations and three tiltmeter stations, with real-time data transmitted. On the basis of increased pre-event activity (which started in October 2014), INMG issued a formal alert of an impending eruption to the Civil Protection Agency, about 24 hours before the onset of the eruption. Although the eruption caused no casualties or personal injuries due to the warnings issued, the lava expelled by the eruption (which last until the end of January) destroyed the two main villages in the caldera (~1000 inhabitants) and covered vast areas of agricultural land, causing very large economic losses and an uncertain future of the local populations. The C4G team installed a network of seven GNSS receivers and nine seismometers, distributed by the entire island. The data collection started on 28th November 2014, and continued until the end of January 2015. The mission also included a new detailed gravimetric survey of the island, the acquisition of geological samples, and the analysis of the air quality during the eruption. We present here a detailed description of the monitoring efforts carried out during the eruption as well as initial results of the analysis of the

  3. Mafic intrusions triggering eruptions in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2012-04-01

    The last two eruptions in Iceland, Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011, were both provoked by an intrusion of more mafic magma into pre-existing magmatic system. Injection into the latter volcano, which is located in the main rift-zone of the island, above the presumed centre of the mantle plume and is the most active volcano of Iceland, has been gradual since the last eruption in 2004. In contrast, at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, one of the least active volcano in Iceland and located at the southern part of a propagating rift-zone where extensional tectonics are poorly developed, mafic magma intrusion occurred over less than a year. Beneath Eyjafjallajökull, a silicic intrusion at approximately 6 km depth was recharged with mantle derived alkali basalt that was injected into residual rhyolite from the penultimate eruption in the years 1821-23. The resulting magma mingIing process was highly complex, but careful sampling of tephra during the entire eruption allows the dynamics of the mingling process to be unravelled. Short-lived disequilibria between the gaseous nuclide 210Po and the much less volatile nuclide 210Pb, suggest that basalt accumulated beneath the silicic intrusion over approximately 100 days, or from early January 2010 until the onset of the explosive summit eruption on 14 April. Due to the degassing, crystal fractionation modified the composition of the injected mafic magma producing evolved Fe-and Ti-rich basalt, similar in composition to that of the nearby Katla volcano. This evolved basalt was intruded into the liquid part of the silicic intrusion only a few hours before the onset of the explosive summit eruption. The short time between intrusion and eruption led to the production of very heterogeneous (of basaltic, intermediate and silicic composition) and fine-grained tephra during the first days of explosive eruption. The fine grained tephra resulted from combined effects of magma fragmentation due to degassing of stiff magma rich in

  4. Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina A.; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  5. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  6. Research oriented MSc course on solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami; Heber, Bernd; Agueda, Neus; Kilpua, Emilia; Isavnin, Alexey; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Ganse, Urs; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.

    2014-05-01

    Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, organized a five-credit-point Master-level course on "Solar Eruptions and Space Environment" in spring 2013. The course, attended by nine students, included twenty hours of introductory lectures on solar eruptive phenomena (focusing on energetic particle emissions) as well as experimental and theoretical methods to analyze them. In addition, the course contained ten hours of exercise sessions, where solutions on short calculation exercises were presented and discussed. The main learning method on the course was, however, a coordinated scientific analysis of five solar eruptions observed by the STEREO spacecraft in 2010-2011. The students were grouped in four teams to study the solar eruptive events from four different view points: (1) Analysis of morphology and kinematics of coronal mass ejections, (2) analysis of EUV imaging observations of coronal wave-like transients, (3) solar and interplanetary magnetic field conditions during the eruptions, and (4) emission and transport modelling of near-relativistic electron events associated with the eruptions. Each group of students was assigned a scientist to oversee their work. The students reported weekly on their progress and gave a final presentation (of 30 minutes) in a seminar session at the end of the seven-week course. Grading of the course was based on the home exercises and final presentations. Students were also asked to give anonymous feedback on the course. Learning results on the course were very encouraging, showing that research oriented courses with practical research exercises on specific topics give students deeper knowledge and more practical skills than traditional lectures and home exercises alone.

  7. ROTATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS DURING ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. E-mail: yanli@ssl.berkeley.edu E-mail: spiro.k.antiochos@nasa.gov

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the connection between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is one of the most important problems in solar-terrestrial physics. We calculate the rotation of erupting field structures predicted by numerical simulations of CME initiation via the magnetic breakout model. In this model, the initial potential magnetic field has a multipolar topology and the system is driven by imposing a shear flow at the photospheric boundary. Our results yield insight on how to connect solar observations of the orientation of the filament or polarity inversion line (PIL) in the CME source region, the orientation of the CME axis as inferred from coronagraph images, and the ICME flux rope orientation obtained from in situ measurements. We present the results of two numerical simulations that differ only in the direction of the applied shearing motions (i.e., the handedness of the sheared-arcade systems and their resulting CME fields). In both simulations, eruptive flare reconnection occurs underneath the rapidly expanding sheared fields transforming the ejecta fields into three-dimensional flux rope structures. As the erupting flux ropes propagate through the low corona (from 2 to 4 R{sub sun}) the right-handed breakout flux rope rotates clockwise and the left-handed breakout flux rope rotates counterclockwise, in agreement with recent observations of the rotation of erupting filaments. We find that by 3.5 R {sub sun} the average rotation angle between the flux rope axes and the active region PIL is approximately 50 deg. We discuss the implications of these results for predicting, from the observed chirality of the pre-eruption filament and/or other properties of the CME source region, the direction and amount of rotation that magnetic flux rope structures will experience during eruption. We also discuss the implications of our results for CME initiation models.

  8. The character of long-term eruptions: Inferences from episodes 50-53 of the Pu'u 'Ō'ō-Kūpaianaha eruption of Kīlauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, C.C.; Mangan, M.T.; Mattox, T.N.; Kauahikaua, J.P.; Helz, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    The Pu'u 'Ō'ō-Kūpaianaha eruption on the east rift zone of Kīlauea began in January 1983. The first 9 years of the eruption were divided between the Pu'u 'Ō'ō (1983–1986) and Kūpaianaha (1986–1992) vents, each characterized by regular, predictable patterns of activity that endured for years. In 1990 a series of pauses in the activity disturbed the equilibrium of the eruption, and in 1991, the output from Kūpaianaha steadily declined and a short-lived fissure eruption broke out between Kūpaianaha and Pu'u 'Ō'ō. In February 1992 the Kūpaianaha vent died, and, 10 days later, eruptive episode 50 began as a fissure opened on the uprift flank of the Pu'u 'Ō'ō cone. For the next year, the eruption was marked by instability as more vents opened on the flank of the cone and the activity was repeatedly interrupted by brief pauses in magma supply to the vents. Episodes 50–53 constructed a lava shield 60 m high and 1.3 km in diameter against the steep slope of the Pu'u 'Ō'ō cone. By 1993 the shield was pockmarked by collapse pits as vents and lava tubes downcut as much as 29 m through the thick deposit of scoria and spatter that veneered the cone. As the vents progressively lowered, the level of the Pu'u 'Ō'ō pond also dropped, demonstrating the hydraulic connection between the two. The downcutting helped to undermine the prominent Pu'u 'Ō'ō cone, which has diminished in size both by collapse, as a large pit crater formed over the conduit, and by burial of its flanks. Intervals of eruptive instability, such as that of 1991–1993, accelerate lateral expansion of the subaerial flow field both by producing widely spaced vents and by promoting surface flow activity as lava tubes collapse and become blocked during pauses.

  9. The Variable Climate Impact of Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, H.

    2011-12-01

    The main effect of big volcanic eruptions in the climate system is due to their efficient transport of condensable gases and their precursors into the stratosphere. There the formation of aerosols leads to effects on atmospheric radiation transfer inducing a reduction of incoming solar radiation by reflection (i.e. cooling of the Earth surface) and absorption of near infrared radiation (i.e. heating) in the aerosol laden layers. In the talk processes determining the climate effect of an eruption will be illustrated by examples, mainly from numerical modelling. The amount of gases released from a magma during an eruption and the efficiency of their transport into very high altitudes depends on the geological setting (magma type) and eruption style. While mid-sized eruption plumes of Plinian style quickly can develop buoyancy by entrainment of ambient air, very large eruptions with high magma flux rates often tend to collapsing plumes and co-ignimbrite style. These cover much bigger areas and are less efficient in entraining ambient air. Vertical transport in these plumes is chaotic and less efficient, leading to lower neutral buoyancy height and less gas and particles reaching high stratospheric altitudes. Explosive energy and amount of released condensable gases are not the only determinants for the climatic effect of an eruption. The effect on shortwave radiation is not linear with the amount of aerosols formed since according to the Lambert-Beer Law atmospheric optical depth reaches a saturation limit with increased absorber concentration. In addition, if more condensable gas is available for aerosol growth, particles become larger and this affects their optical properties to less reflection and more absorption. Larger particles settle out faster, thus reducing the life time of the aerosol disturbance. Especially for big tropical eruptions the strong heating of the stratosphere in low latitudes leads to changes in atmospheric wave propagation by strengthened

  10. Mt. Pinatubo Volcano - Post Eruption, Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mt. Pinatubo, on the island of Luzon (15.0N, 120.5E) erupted catastrophically in June 1991, probably the largest of the twentieth century. Great rivers of gray ash (mud flows) radiate in all directions from the newly formed caldera. Within the caldera, a small lake can be seen. Since the eruption, the local environment has been impacted by mud flows and on a global scale, some of the ash is expected to remain in the atmosphere for several more years.

  11. Tephra from the 1979 soufriere explosive eruption.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, H

    1982-06-01

    The explosive phase of the 1979 Soufriere eruption produced 37.5 x 10(6) cubic meters (dense-rock equivalent) of tephra, consisting of about 40 percent juvenile basaltic andesite and 60 percent of a nonjuvenile component derived from the fragmentation of the 1971-1972 lava island during phreatomagmatic explosions. The unusually fine grain size, poor sorting, and bimodality of the land deposit are attributed to particle aggregation and the formation of accretionary lapilli in a wet eruption column. PMID:17808489

  12. Magma movements and Iceland's next eruptions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmundsson, F.; Ofeigsson, B.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Hensch, M.; Gudmundsson, G.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Roberts, M. J.; Geirsson, H.; La Femina, P. C.; Hooper, A. J.; Sturkell, E. C.; Einarsson, P.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Brandsdottir, B.; Loughlin, S. C.; Team, F.

    2013-12-01

    Iceland, created by hotspot-ridge interaction, is characterized by higher magmatic input and more complicated plate boundary structure than other parts of the Mid-Atlantic rift system. It has 30+ volcanic systems, where 20 confirmed eruptions have occurred in the last 40 years, the most recent at Eyjafjallajökull in 2010 and Grimsvotn in 2011. Likely candidates for the next eruption include the four most active volcanoes in Iceland (Hekla, Katla, Grimsvotn, and Bardarbunga) and other areas of volcanic unrest (Askja region, the Krisuvik area). Present volcano monitoring and research, including the FUTUREVOLC project, aims at providing warnings of impending eruptions and their character. Earthquake monitoring and deformation studies have hereto provided the most relevant information. Hekla continuously accumulates magma at a rate of about 0.003-0.02 km3/yr, according to GPS and InSAR studies, in a magma chamber placed below 14 km depth. A sequence of M0.4-1 earthquakes early this year stands out from otherwise mostly aseismic character of Hekla during repose periods. The Hekla magma chamber does not fail at a constant amount of magma volume, rather a clear pattern is observed with eruption size scaling with the length of the preceding period of dormancy. The ice capped Katla volcano shows unusual annual deformation pattern, seismic activity, and hydrological variations depending on time of year, presumably related to ice load and water pressure variations. It may be in a critical stage and renewed inflow of magma may quickly move the volcano towards failure. Bardarbunga had major earthquake and magma transfer activity in 1996, and has been the site of deep low-frequency earthquakes. Grímsvötn volcano is the only volcano with a shallow magma chamber with ongoing confirmed recharging, and failure criteria closest to 'expected'. A large eruption occurred in 2011 compared to much smaller eruption in 2004. However, the amount of erupted magma did not scale with the

  13. Fixed drug eruption due to methaqualone.

    PubMed

    Slazinski, L; Knox, D W

    1984-08-01

    We report three cases of fixed drug eruption due to methaqualone. Eruptions from methaqualone have been rarely reported since the drug's introduction in 1963. Our discovery of these three cases during a two-year period suggests that dermatologic reactions from methaqualone may be much more common than has been appreciated. This may be related to the reluctance of the patient to admit to the use or abuse of methaqualone, and physicians' lack of recognition of the widespread abuse of this drug and its possible cutaneous complications.

  14. Giant eruptions of very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris

    2016-07-01

    Giant eruptions or supernova-impostor events are far more mysterious than true supernovae. An extreme example can release as much radiative energy as a SN, ejecting several Mʘ of material. These events involve continuous radiation-driven outflows rather than blast waves. They constitute one of the main unsolved problems in stellar astrophysics, but have received little theoretical attention. The most notorious giant-eruption survivor, ƞ Carinae, is amazingly close to us for such a rare event. It offers a wealth of observational clues, many of them quite unexpected in terms of simple theory.

  15. Kamchatka and North Kurile Volcano Explosive Eruptions in 2015 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Melnikov, Dmitry; Manevich, Alexander; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    There are 36 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and North Kurile, and several of them are continuously active. In 2015, four of the Kamchatkan volcanoes (Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) and two volcanoes of North Kurile (Alaid and Chikurachki) had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Bezymianny, Kizimen, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruptions of volcanoes are the most dangerous for aircraft because they can produce in a few hours or days to the atmosphere and the stratosphere till several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2015: on 07, 12, and 15 January, 01, 17, and 28 February, 04, 08, 16, 21-22, and 26 March, 07 and 12 April: ash plumes rose up to 7-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the different directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Ust'-Kamchatsk on 16 March, and Klyuchi on 30 October. Strong and moderate hot avalanches from the lava dome were observing more often in the second half of the year. Aviation color code of Sheveluch was Orange during the year. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Explosive-effusive eruption of Klyuchevskoy volcano lasted from 01 January till 24 March. Strombolian explosive volcanic activity began from 01 January, and on 08-09 January a lava flow was detected at the Apakhonchich chute on the southeastern flank of the volcano. Vulcanian activity of the volcano began from 10 January. Ashfalls

  16. Public and Media Communication of Volcanic Hazard Before and During the 2010 Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gylfason, A. G.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Reynisson, V.

    2010-12-01

    The 39 day long explosive eruption in Eyjafjallajökull was the largest natural hazard event in Iceland for decades. It began with a small flank eruption in March, but the main event was the explosive summit eruption. The flooding that resulted from melting of ice at the eruption site posed considerable danger for the local population, fallout of ash made conditions south of the volcano difficult for several weeks, threatening the future of farming in this rural area, and lead to unprecedented disruption to air traffic in Europe and the North Atlantic. About 800 people were evacuated in a hurry three times during these events because of imminent flood hazard, but fortunately no dwellings were damaged and people could usually return to their homes the same day. These events called for extensive media coverage, both locally and internationally. Some staff at research institutes had for several days to devote their time exclusively to giving interviews to the international media. Scientific communication with the local population was mainly conducted through four channels: (1) the web pages of institutions, (2) the national media; (3) indirectly at meetings on the status of the eruption with local and national officials, and (4) public meetings in the affected areas. In addition the scientific community issued daily status reports to the Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management, these reports served both national and local Civil Protection officials when preparing their statements on the eruption and answer basic questions from the media. During media communication, it is important to stick to facts, avoid speculation and use plain language without scientific jargon. However, the most critical part of the communication occurred in the years before the eruption through meetings with the local inhabitants. At these meetings the results of a detailed hazard assessment on eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull and the neighboring ice-filled Katla caldera where

  17. Advances in our Understanding of Lava-Dome Eruptions Arising From the Study of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.

    2006-12-01

    The eruption of Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, began in July 1995 and is ongoing 11 years later. Over 0.6 km3 andesite lava has been erupted at rates of up to around 10 m3/s; more generally at rates of 1-3 m3/s. The style of eruption has been dominantly effusive: a lava dome has grown and repeatedly collapsed, generating pyroclastic flows and surges. The eruption has been the focus of intense international scientific study; as a result, there have been major advances in understanding how such volcanoes work that can be applied to other volcanoes in similar tectonic settings. The traditional concept of magma chambers containing stored, molten magma is inadequate for Soufrière Hills; instead, both petrological evidence and ground deformation suggests that hot, mafic magma rises from depth and re-melts the silicic, highly crystalline rocks beneath the volcano shortly before eruption. Even during pauses in lava eruption, magma continues to be supplied at depth beneath the volcano. The hot, mafic magma supplies a vapor phase as it degasses, which ascends to the surface and is erupted with the andesite. The vapor is rich in SO2 and HCl gases, the proportions of which vary with the rate and style of eruption. Extensive study at Soufrière Hills and elsewhere has revealed that intense shallow degassing, cooling and crystallization of magma causes development of large rheological gradients and overpressures. After the observation of pulsatory magma effusion and transitions between effusive and explosive styles of eruption, models were developed to describe pressurization, flow rate and escape of gas in the upper few hundred meters of the conduit. A number of large lava dome collapses have offered an opportunity to observe the phenomena associated with the instability of lava domes, volcanic flows and the interaction between these flows and seawater. Large- volume pyroclastic flows have entered the sea and caused hydrovolcanic activity and energetic surges. The rate

  18. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Ramsey, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ??? 55??km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ??? 2000??km2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ??? 475 to 300??ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ??? 300??ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300??ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ??? 200 to ??? 180??ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ??? 100??ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100??ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200??years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ??? 600??km3, giving an overall effusion rate of ??? 1.2??km3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100??kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline

  19. Eruptive history and tectonic setting of Medicine Lake Volcano, a large rear-arc volcano in the southern Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.

    2008-10-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), located in the southern Cascades ˜ 55 km east-northeast of contemporaneous Mount Shasta, has been found by exploratory geothermal drilling to have a surprisingly silicic core mantled by mafic lavas. This unexpected result is very different from the long-held view derived from previous mapping of exposed geology that MLV is a dominantly basaltic shield volcano. Detailed mapping shows that < 6% of the ˜ 2000 km 2 of mapped MLV lavas on this southern Cascade Range shield-shaped edifice are rhyolitic and dacitic, but drill holes on the edifice penetrated more than 30% silicic lava. Argon dating yields ages in the range ˜ 475 to 300 ka for early rhyolites. Dates on the stratigraphically lowest mafic lavas at MLV fall into this time frame as well, indicating that volcanism at MLV began about half a million years ago. Mafic compositions apparently did not dominate until ˜ 300 ka. Rhyolite eruptions were scarce post-300 ka until late Holocene time. However, a dacite episode at ˜ 200 to ˜ 180 ka included the volcano's only ash-flow tuff, which was erupted from within the summit caldera. At ˜ 100 ka, compositionally distinctive high-Na andesite and minor dacite built most of the present caldera rim. Eruption of these lavas was followed soon after by several large basalt flows, such that the combined area covered by eruptions between 100 ka and postglacial time amounts to nearly two-thirds of the volcano's area. Postglacial eruptive activity was strongly episodic and also covered a disproportionate amount of area. The volcano has erupted 9 times in the past 5200 years, one of the highest rates of late Holocene eruptive activity in the Cascades. Estimated volume of MLV is ˜ 600 km 3, giving an overall effusion rate of ˜ 1.2 km 3 per thousand years, although the rate for the past 100 kyr may be only half that. During much of the volcano's history, both dry HAOT (high-alumina olivine tholeiite) and hydrous calcalkaline basalts erupted

  20. Eruption Source Parameters for Recent Icelandic Eruptions and Their Implications for Duration and Termination of Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordarson, T.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1947, Iceland has featured 26 volcanic eruptions (2.5 eruptions/year). These include events at the central volcanoes Hekla, Eyjafjallajökull, Grímsvötn and Askja and the fissure eruptions of Surtsey 1963-67 and Nornahraun 2014-15. Of these, 11 are effusive, 8 are mixed (explosive to effusive) and 6 are within-glacier events. Surtsey is the only emergent submarine event (1309 days; 1 km3). Duration of effusive eruptions spans 0.3 to 181 days, with volume, average and peak magma discharge ranging from 10-5-1.6 km3, 0.5-123 m3/s and 1-370 m3/s. Similarly, the mixed events have durations spanning 2.8 to 393 days with volume, average and peak magma discharge ranging from 0.03-0.87 km3, 14-617 m3/s and 50-35600 m3/s. Duration of within-glacier events spans 4.4 to 14 days with volume, average and peak magma discharge ranging from 0.05-0.27 km3, 9-440 m3/s and 400-14000 m3/s. The discharge profiles for these eruptions are highly variable. Mixed eruptions often feature intense discharge (1500 to 40000 m3/s) at the onset of eruption (lasting hours), but some start in a much more subdued manner (500-1000 m3/s). This initial phase is followed by low (3-20 m3/s) magma discharge lasting for weeks to months that normally terminates abruptly. The onset of effusive eruptions is typified by modest discharge (10's to 100's m3/s). They can be very abrupt (<1 day), or drawn out for weeks to months with discharge dropping steadily throughout. The within-glacier events are short-lived explosive events, although with highly varied intensity (see above), and appear to terminate rather abruptly. Plots of eruption duration against size or discharge exhibits no systematic correlation suggesting that none of the eruption source parameters exert principal control on eruption duration or termination. However, these parameters may play a role in conjunction with other factors such as the nature of the lithostratigraphic succession and the local stress field at the eruption site.

  1. The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program: Working with International Partners to Reduce the Risk from Volcanic Eruptions Worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Pallister, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) is a joint effort between USGS and the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). OFDA leads and coordinates disaster responses overseas for the U.S. government and is a unique stakeholder concerned with volcano disaster risk reduction as an international humanitarian assistance donor. One year after the tragic eruption of Nevado del Ruiz in 1985, OFDA began funding USGS to implement VDAP. VDAP's mission is to reduce the loss of life and property and limit the economic impact from foreign volcano crises, thereby preventing such crises from becoming disasters. VDAP fulfills this mission and complements OFDA's humanitarian assistance by providing crisis response, capacity-building, technical training, and hazard assessments to developing countries before, during, and after eruptions. During the past 30 years, VDAP has responded to more than 27 major volcanic crises, built capacity in 12+ countries, and helped counterparts save tens of thousands of lives and hundreds of millions of dollars in property. VDAP responses have evolved as host-country capabilities have grown, but the pace of work has not diminished; as a result of VDAP's work at 27 volcanoes in fiscal year 2014, more than 1.3 million people who could have been impacted by volcanic activity benefitted from VDAP assistance, 11 geological policies were modified, 188 scientists were trained, and several successful eruption forecasts were made. VDAP is developing new initiatives to help counterparts monitor volcanoes and communicate volcanic risk. These include developing the Eruption Forecasting Information System (EFIS) to learn from compiled crisis data from 30 years of VDAP responses, creating event trees to forecast eruptions at restless volcanoes, and exploring the use of unmanned aerial systems for monitoring. The use of these new methods, along with traditional VDAP assistance, has improved VDAP

  2. Monitoring lava-dome growth during the 2004-2008 Mount St. Helens, Washington, eruption using oblique terrestrial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.; Schilling, S.P.; Poland, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of lava dome growth during the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens using oblique terrestrial images from a network of remotely placed cameras. This underutilized monitoring tool augmented more traditional monitoring techniques, and was used to provide a robust assessment of the nature, pace, and state of the eruption and to quantify the kinematics of dome growth. Eruption monitoring using terrestrial photography began with a single camera deployed at the mouth of the volcano's crater during the first year of activity. Analysis of those images indicates that the average lineal extrusion rate decayed approximately logarithmically from about 8 m/d to about 2 m/d (± 2 m/d) from November 2004 through December 2005, and suggests that the extrusion rate fluctuated on time scales of days to weeks. From May 2006 through September 2007, imagery from multiple cameras deployed around the volcano allowed determination of 3-dimensional motion across the dome complex. Analysis of the multi-camera imagery shows spatially differential, but remarkably steady to gradually slowing, motion, from about 1–2 m/d from May through October 2006, to about 0.2–1.0 m/d from May through September 2007. In contrast to the fluctuations in lineal extrusion rate documented during the first year of eruption, dome motion from May 2006 through September 2007 was monotonic (± 0.10 m/d) to gradually slowing on time scales of weeks to months. The ability to measure spatial and temporal rates of motion of the effusing lava dome from oblique terrestrial photographs provided a significant, and sometimes the sole, means of identifying and quantifying dome growth during the eruption, and it demonstrates the utility of using frequent, long-term terrestrial photography to monitor and study volcanic eruptions.

  3. Solar Prominence Eruption Marks 1 Million on Helioviewer

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie of a prominence eruption on April 20, 2013, was the millionth movie made on Helioviewer.org. The wispy eruption seen here eventually blossomed into a much larger cloud of solar material,...

  4. On an Unified Scaling Law for Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo, F.; Nunnari, G.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanoes constitute dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom. Their eruptions are the result of complex processes that involve interacting chemical-physical systems. At the present, both analytical and numerical models are unable to include all the possible dynamics involved into eruptions. On the other hand, the knowledge of eruption duration can be a key factor for natural hazard estimation. In this work, analyzing a large database with most of all the known volcanic eruptions, we have determined that the duration of eruptions can be described by a unique universal distribution which fully governs eruption duration dynamics. In particular, after the well-known results proposed in literature concerning the seismicity (i.e. the Gutenberg-Richter law), we present an Earth-wise power-law distribution of durations of volcanic eruptions that holds from worldwide to local scales, for different volcanic environments and for all the considered eruption types.

  5. Vent Processes and Deposits of a Hiatus in a Violent Eruption: Quilotoa Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J. A.; Bustillos, J.; Ort, M. H.; Cashman, K. V.; Mothes, P. A.; di Muro, A.; Rosi, M.

    2010-12-01

    , with the simultaneous milling of the weakened material producing the orange dust. We interpret the dense vitric lapilli ≥ -2.0 φ of U2c as being from an explosion through a lava dome, and thus they indicate that the eruption was continuous from U2c through U3. Our current hypothesis is that, as the U1 eruption ended, magma stalled deep in the conduit and degassed hot acidic gas that streamed through the material clogging the vent. This elutriated vitric material that eventually formed a cap on the system. As the U3 magma began its ascent, gas flux increased, leading to explosions that gradually removed the vitric cap and deposited the vitric U2a. Then, more continuous gas streaming led to the development of a pulsatory eruption column that carried hot crystals and vitric grains from the vent clog into a convecting column and eventual deposition as U2b fallout, which was then followed by the establishment of the U3 eruption column.

  6. The eruption of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands, 15 May 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Norman G.; Koyanagi, Robert Y.; Sinton, John M.; Honma, Kenneth T.

    1984-10-01

    A major explosive eruption occurred 15 May 1981 at Mount Pagan Volcano, the larger of two historic eruptive centers on Pagan Island, Mariana Islands. The eruption was preceded by increased numbers of locally felt earthquakes beginning in late March or early April and by new ground cracks, new sublimates, and increased gas emissions. A swarm of felt earthquakes began at 0745h (local time = UCT+10 hours) 15 May, and at 0915 h, closely following a loud sonic boom, a strong plinian column issued from the volcano. The high-altitude ash cloud (at least 13.5 km) travelled south-southeast, but ash and scoria deposits were thickest (> 2 m) in the NW sector of the island because of the prevailing low-altitude southeasterly winds. The early activity of 15 May probably involved magmatic eruption along a fissure system oriented about N10°E. However, the eruption became hydromagmatic, possibly within minutes, and was largely restricted to three long-lived vents. The northernmost of these built a substantial new scoria-ash cinder cone. Flows and air-fall deposits, consisting almost entirely of juvenile material, exceeded 105 × 10 6 m 3 in volume (75 × 10 6 m 3 of magma) on land and at least 70-100 × 60 6 m 3 at sea. An unknown volume was carried away by stratospheric winds. Lithic blocks and juvenile bombs as large as 1 m in diameter were thrown more than 2 km from the summit, and evidence for base-surge was observed in restricted corridors as low as 200 m elevation on the north and south slopes of the volcano. Neither of these events resulted in serious injuries to the 54 residents of the island, nor did the eruption produce serious chemical hazards in their water supply. Weak eruptions occurred during the ensuing month, and some of these were monitored by ground observations, seismic monitoring, and deformation studies. Precursory seismicity and possibly deformation occurred with some of the observed eruptions. More vigorous eruptions were reported by visiting residents in

  7. The eruption of Mount Pagan volcano, Mariana Islands, 15 May 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, N.G.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Sinton, J.M.; Honma, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    A major explosive eruption occurred 15 May 1981 at Mount Pagan Volcano, the larger of two historic eruptive centers on Pagan Island, Mariana Islands. The eruption was preceded by increased numbers of locally felt earthquakes beginning in late March or early April and by new ground cracks, new sublimates, and increased gas emissions. A swarm of felt earthquakes began at 0745h (local time = UCT+10 hours) 15 May, and at 0915 h, closely following a loud sonic boom, a strong plinian column issued from the volcano. The high-altitude ash cloud (at least 13.5 km) travelled south-southeast, but ash and scoria deposits were thickest (> 2 m) in the NW sector of the island because of the prevailing low-altitude southeasterly winds. The early activity of 15 May probably involved magmatic eruption along a fissure system oriented about N10??E. However, the eruption became hydromagmatic, possibly within minutes, and was largely restricted to three long-lived vents. The northernmost of these built a substantial new scoria-ash cinder cone. Flows and air-fall deposits, consisting almost entirely of juvenile material, exceeded 105 ?? 106 m3 in volume (75 ?? 106 m3 of magma) on land and at least 70-100 ?? 606 m3 at sea. An unknown volume was carried away by stratospheric winds. Lithic blocks and juvenile bombs as large as 1 m in diameter were thrown more than 2 km from the summit, and evidence for base-surge was observed in restricted corridors as low as 200 m elevation on the north and south slopes of the volcano. Neither of these events resulted in serious injuries to the 54 residents of the island, nor did the eruption produce serious chemical hazards in their water supply. Weak eruptions occurred during the ensuing month, and some of these were monitored by ground observations, seismic monitoring, and deformation studies. Precursory seismicity and possibly deformation occurred with some of the observed eruptions. More vigorous eruptions were reported by visiting residents in late

  8. The 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska: Reconnaissance Observations and Preliminary Physical Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Schneider, D. J.; Prejean, S. G.

    2008-12-01

    The August 7, 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano was the first documented historical eruption of this small (3 x 3 km) island volcano with a 1 km2 lake filled crater in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Reports of previous Kasatochi eruptions are unconfirmed and lacking in detail and little is known about the eruptive history. Three explosively-generated ash plumes reaching altitudes of 15 to 20 km were observed in satellite data and were preceded by some of the most intense seismicity yet recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) seismic network. Eruptive products on Kasatochi Island observed on August 22 and 23 consist of pumice-bearing, lithic-rich pyroclastic-flow deposits overlain by a 1-2 m thick sequence of fine- grained pyroclastic-surge, and -fall deposits all exposed at the coastline. These deposits completely blanket Kasatochi Island to a depth of many meters. Pyroclastic flows entered the sea and extended the coastline 300-400 m beyond prominent wave cut cliffs and sea stacks. Tide gauge data from Adak Island, 80 km to the west, indicate a small tsunami with maximum water amplitude of 20 cm, was initiated during the eruption. Kasatochi volcano lacks a real-time seismic monitoring network. Seismic activity was detected by AVO instruments on Great Sitkin Island 40 km to the west, and thus the timing of eruptive events is approximate. The eruption began explosively at 2201 UTC on August 7, and was followed by at least two additional strong eruptive bursts at 0150 UTC and 0435 UTC, August 8. Satellite data show a significant ash cloud associated with the 0435 UTC event followed by at least 14 hours of continuous ash emission. The lack of a strong ash signature in satellite data suggest that the first two plumes were ash poor. Satellite data also show a large emission of SO2 that entered the stratosphere. Correlation of eruptive periods with deposits on the island is not yet possible, but it appears that pyroclastic flows were emplaced during

  9. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  10. Active Eruptions in the NE Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, J. A.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    NE Lau Response Team: K Rubin, E Baker, J Lupton, M Lilley, T Shank, S Merle, R Dziak, T Collasius (Jason 2 Expedition Leader), N Buck, T Baumberger, D Butterfield, D Clague, D Conlin, J Cowen, R Davis, L Evans, J Huber, M Keith, N Keller, P Michael, E Podowski, A-L Reysenbach, K Roe, H Thomas, S Walker. During a May 2009 cruise to W Mata volcano in the NE Lau Basin, we made the first observations of an active eruption on the deep-sea floor. The cruise was organized after volcanic activity was detected at two sites (W Mata volcano and NE Lau Spreading Center, NELSC) during a Nov. 2008 NOAA-PMEL expedition. At that time, both sites had elevated H2 concentrations and volcaniclastic shards in the hydrothermal plumes. Moored hydrophone data since Jan 2009 indicate that the activity at W Mata has been continuous between these expeditions. Results of our cruise and other work suggest that the NE Lau Basin hosts an unusually high level of magmatic activity, making it an ideal location to study the effects of magmatic processes on hydrothermal activity and associated ecosystems. W Mata was visited with 5 ROV Jason 2 dives and 2 dives with the MBARI autonomous mapping vehicle in May 2009. It was actively erupting at the 1200 m deep summit during each, so a hydrophone was deployed locally to collect acoustic data. Ship and shore-based analysis of HD video, molten lava, rocks, sediments, hot spring waters, and micro- and macro biological specimens collected by Jason 2 have provided a wealth of data. The eruption itself was characterized by extrusion of red, molten lava, extensive degassing, formation of large magma bubbles, explosive pyroclast ejection, and the active extrusion of pillow lavas. The erupting magmas are boninite, a relatively rare magma type found only at convergent margins. The hydrothermal fluids are generally acidic and all diffuse fluids collected were microbially active, even those at pH <3. W Mata was host to shrimp similar to those found at several other

  11. The Cataclysmic 1991 Eruption of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, Christopher G.; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    1997-01-01

    The second-largest volcanic eruption of this century, and by far the largest eruption to affect a densely populated area, occurred at Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines on June 15, 1991. The eruption produced high-speed avalanches of hot ash and gas, giant mudflows, and a cloud of volcanic ash hundreds of miles across. The impacts of the eruption continue to this day.

  12. Burst conditions of explosive volcanic eruptions recorded on microbarographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate pressure disturbances in the atmosphere that propagate away either as acoustic or as shock waves, depending on the explosivity of the eruption. Both types of waves are recorded on microbarographs as 1- to 0.1-hertz N-shaped signals followed by a longer period coda. These waveforms can be used to estimate burst pressures end gas concentrations in explosive volcanic eruptions and provide estimates of eruption magnitudes.

  13. A Volcano Rekindled: The Renewed Eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Mount St. Helens began a dome-building eruption in September 2004 after nearly two decades of quiescence. Dome growth was initially robust, became more sluggish with time, and ceased completely in late January 2008. The volcano has been quiet again since January 2008. Professional Paper 1750 describes the first 1 1/2 years of this eruptive activity, chiefly from September 2004 until December 2005. Its 37 chapters contain contributions of 87 authors from 23 institutions, including the U.S. Geological Survey, Forest Service, many universities, and local and State emergency management agencies. Chapter topics range widely - from seismology, geology, geodesy, gas geochemistry, and petrology to the human endeavor required for managing the public volcanic lands and distributing information during the hectic early days of a renewed eruption. In PDF format, the book may be downloaded in its entirety or by its topical sections, each section including a few prefatory paragraphs that describe the general findings, recurrent themes, and, in some cases, the unanswered questions that arise repeatedly. Those readers who prefer downloading the smaller files of only a chapter or two have this option available as well. Readers are directed to chapter 1 for a general overview of the eruption and the manner in which different chapters build our knowledge of events. More detailed summaries for specific topics can be found in chapter 2 (seismology), chapter 9 (geology), chapter 14 (deformation), chapter 26 (gas geochemistry), and chapter 30 (petrology). The printed version of the book may be purchased as a hardback weighty tome (856 printed pages) that includes a DVD replete with the complete online version, including all chapters and several additional appendixes not in the printed book.

  14. Eruption-related lahars and sedimentation response downstream of Mount Hood: Field guide to volcaniclastic deposits along the Sandy River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Tom C.; Scott, William E.; Vallance, James W.; Pringle, Patrick T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Late Holocene dome-building eruptions at Mount Hood during the Timberline and Old Maid eruptive periods resulted in numerous dome-collapse pyroclastic flows and lahars that moved large volumes of volcaniclastic sediment into temporary storage in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. During each eruptive period, accelerated sediment loading to the river through erosion and remobilization of volcanic fragmental debris resulted in very high sediment-transport rates in the Sandy River during rain- and snowmelt-induced floods. Large sediment loads in excess of the river's transport capacity led to channel aggradation, channel widening, and change to a braided channel form in the lowermost reach of the river, between 61 and 87 km downstream from the volcano. The post-eruption sediment load moved as a broad bed-material wave, which in the case of the Old Maid eruption took ~2 decades to crest 83 km downstream. Maximum post-eruption aggradation levels of at least 28 and 23 m were achieved in response to Timberline and Old Maid eruptions. In each case, downstream aggradation cycles were initiated by lahars, but the bulk of the aggradation was achieved by fluvial sediment transport and deposition. When the high rates of sediment supply began to diminish, the river degraded, incising the channel fills and forming progressively lower sets of degradational terraces. A variety of debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and fluvial (upper and lower flow regime) deposits record the downstream passage of the sediment waves that were initiated by these eruptions. The deposits also presage a hazard that may be faced by communities along the Sandy River when volcanic activity at Mount Hood resumes.

  15. Largest explosive eruption in historical times in the Andes at Huaynaputina volcano, a.d. 1600, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouret, Jean-Claude; Davila, Jasmine; Eissen, Jean-Philippe

    1999-05-01

    The largest explosive eruption (volcanic explosivity index of 6) in historical times in the Andes took place in a.d. 1600 at Huaynaputina volcano in southern Peru. According to chronicles, the eruption began on February 19 with a Plinian phase and lasted until March 6. Repeated tephra falls, pyroclastic flows, and surges devastated an area 70 × 40 km2 west of the vent and affected all of southern Peru, and earthquakes shook the city of Arequipa 75 km away. Eight deposits, totaling 10.2 13.1 km3 in bulk volume, are attributed to this eruption: (1) a widespread, ˜8.1 km3 pumice-fall deposit; (2) channeled ignimbrites (1.6 2 km3) with (3) ground-surge and ash-cloud-surge deposits; (4) widespread co-ignimbrite ash layers; (5) base-surge deposits; (6) unconfined ash-flow deposits; (7) crystal-rich deposits; and (8) late ash-fall and surge deposits. Disruption of a hydrothermal system and hydromagmatic interactions are thought to have fueled the large-volume explosive eruption. Although the event triggered no caldera collapse, ring fractures that cut the vent area point to the onset of a funnel-type caldera collapse.

  16. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SLOW-RISE, MULTISTEP X1.6 FLARE AND THE ASSOCIATED ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2015-10-20

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  17. Multiwavelength Observations of a Slow Raise, Multi-Step X1.6 Flare and the Associated Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.

    2015-12-01

    Using multi-wavelength observations we studied a slow rise, multi-step X1.6 flare that began on November 7, 2014 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region. This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, IRIS spacecraft along with the ground based data from the New Solar Telescope (NST) present evidence that i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ--sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; ii) this event represented an example of an in-situ formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; iii) the global PEA system spanned the entire AR and was due to global scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radii, indicating on the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  18. Multiwavelength Observations of a Slow-rise, Multistep X1.6 Flare and the Associated Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K.; Abramenko, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  19. Tephra architecture, pyroclast texture and magma rheology of mafic, ash-dominated eruptions: the Violent Strombolian phase of the Pleistocene Croscat (NE Spain) eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, C.; Di Traglia, F.; Vona, A.,; Taddeucci, J.

    2012-04-01

    A broad range of low- to mid-intensity explosive activity is dominated by the emission of ash-sized pyroclasts. Among this activity, Violent Strombolian phases characterize the climax of many mafic explosive eruptions. Such phases last months to years, and produce ash-charged plumes several kilometers in height, posing severe threats to inhabited areas. To tackle the dominant processes leading to ash formation during Violent Strombolian eruptions, we investigated the magma rheology and the field and textural features of products from the 11 ka Croscat basaltic complex scoria cone in the Quaternary Garrotxa Volcanic Field (GVF). Field, grain-size, chemical (XRF, FE-SEM and electron microprobe) and textural analyses of the Croscat pyroclastic succession outlined the following eruption evolution: activity at Croscat began with fissural, Hawaiian-type fountaining that rapidly shifted towards Strombolian style from a central vent. Later, a Violent Strombolian explosion included several stages, with different emitted volumes and deposit features indicative of differences within the same eruptive style: at first, quasi-sustained fire-fountaining with ash jet and plume produced a massive, reverse to normal graded, scoria deposit; later, a long lasting series of ash-explosions produced a laminated scoria deposit. The eruption ended with a lava flow breaching the western-side of the volcano. Scoria clasts from the Croscat succession ubiquitously show micrometer- to centimeter-sized, microlite-rich domains (MRD) intermingled with volumetrically dominant, microlite-poor domains (MPD). MRD magmas resided longer in a relatively cooler, degassed zone lining the conduit walls, while MPD ones travelled faster along the central, hotter streamline, the two interminging along the interface between the two velocity zones. The preservation of two distinct domains in the short time-scale of the eruption was favoured by their rheological contrast related to the different microlite

  20. The September 1988 intracaldera avalanche and eruption at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; De Roy, T.; Carrasco, A.

    1991-01-01

    During 14-16 September 1988, a large intracaldera avalanche and an eruption of basaltic tephra and lava at Fernandina volcano, Galapagos, produced the most profound changes within the caldera since its collapse in 1968. A swarm of eight earthquakes (mb 4.7-5.5) occurred in a 14 h period on 24 February 1988 at Fernandina, and two more earthquakes of this size followed on 15 April and 20 May, respectively. On 14 September 1988, another earthquake (mb 4.6) preceded a complex series of events. A debris avalanche was generated by the failure of a fault-bounded segment of the east caldera wall, approximately 2 km long and 300 m wide. The avalanche deposit is up to 250 m thick and has an approximate volume of 0.9 km3. The avalanche rapidly displaced a preexisting lake from the southeast end of the caldera floor to the northwest end, where the water washed up against the lower part of the caldera wall, then gradually seeped into the avalanche deposit and was completely gone by mid-January 1989. An eruption began in the caldera within about 1-2 h of the earthquake, producing a vigorous tephra plume for about 12 h, then lava flows during the next two days. The eruption ended late on 16 September. Most of the eruptive activity was from vents on the caldera floor near the base of the new avalanche scar. Unequivocal relative timing of events is difficult to determine, but seismic records suggest that the avalanche may have occurred 1.6 h after the earthquake, and field relations show that lava was clearly erupted after the avalanche was emplaced. The most likely sequence of events seems to be that the 1988 feeder dike intruded upward into the east caldera wall, dislocated the unstable wall block, and triggered the avalanche. The avalanche immediately exposed the newly emplaced dike and initiated the eruption. The exact cause of the earthquakes is unknown. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  1. X-ray and EUV Observations of CME Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations from SOHO/EIT and from TRACE in EUV, and from Yohkoh/SXT in soft X-rays of the pre-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  2. Triggering of Solar Magnetic Eruptions on Various Size Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2010-01-01

    Solar eruptions occur on many different scales. (Schrijver 2010: bipole eruptions more frequent as size decreases.) Trigger might be any of several different candidates, working independently or in tandem. How about larger scales than (solar) CMEs? (Stellar eruptions.) How about smaller scales than X-ray jets? (Spicules? Moore 1989)

  3. CME Eruption Onset Observations from EIT and SXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why CMEs erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations in EUV from SOHO/EIT and in soft X-rays from Yohkoh/SXT of the re-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  4. Holocene eruptions of mauna kea volcano, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Porter, S C

    1971-04-23

    Postglacial lava flows, interstratified with thick locally derived sheets of tephra, cover some 27.5 square kilometers on the south slope of Mauna Kea. Most of the volcanics were erupted about 4500 years ago and overlie a regionally extensive paleosol which developed largely during the last glaciation.

  5. Holocene eruptions of mauna kea volcano, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Porter, S C

    1971-04-23

    Postglacial lava flows, interstratified with thick locally derived sheets of tephra, cover some 27.5 square kilometers on the south slope of Mauna Kea. Most of the volcanics were erupted about 4500 years ago and overlie a regionally extensive paleosol which developed largely during the last glaciation. PMID:17756040

  6. Modeling Solar Eruptions: Where Do We Stand?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, Tibor

    2013-06-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections involve massive releases of energies into the heliosphere and are the main driver of space weather disturbances near Earth. It is now well accepted that these enigmatic events are manifestations of a sudden and violent disruption of the Sun's coronal magnetic field. However, although such eruptions have been studied for many years, the detailed physical mechanisms by which they are initiated and driven are not yet fully understood; primarily because of our present inability to accurately measure magnetic fields in the corona. Numerical models have become a powerful tool to help us overcome this limitation. Global simulations of solar eruptions are particularly challenging, because of the enormous disparity of the relevant scales. While the steady advance of computational power has enabled us to model eruptions with ever increasing detail and realism, many questions remain unanswered. In this talk, I review what we have learned from numerical modeling about the physical processes associated with solar eruptions and I will discuss the current limitations and future prospects of models.

  7. Modeling Solar Eruptions: Where Do We stand?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, Tibor

    2013-07-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections involve massive releases of energies into the heliosphere and are the main driver of space weather disturbances near Earth. It is now well accepted that these enigmatic events are manifestations of a sudden and violent disruption of the Sun's coronal magnetic field. However, although such eruptions have been studied for many years, the detailed physical mechanisms by which they are initiated and driven are not yet fully understood; primarily because of our present inability to accurately measure magnetic fields in the corona. Numerical models have become a powerful tool to help us overcome this limitation. Global simulations of solar eruptions are particularly challenging, because of the enormous disparity of the relevant scales. While the steady advance of computational power has enabled us to model eruptions with ever increasing detail and realism, many questions remain unanswered. In this talk, I review what we have learned from numerical modeling about the physical processes associated with solar eruptions and I will discuss the current limitations and future prospects of models.

  8. Fixed drug eruption related to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lai, Olivia; Hsu, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a type of cutaneous drug reaction that occurs at the same sites upon re-exposure to specific medications. Herein we discuss the case of a 23-year-old man with a FDE to fluconazole. PMID:27617471

  9. Eruptive history of Mount Katmai, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Edward; Fierstein, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Compositionally, products of Mount Katmai represent an ordinary medium-K arc array, both tholeiitic and calcalkaline, that extends from 51.6% to 72.3% SiO2. Values of 87Sr/86Sr range from 0.70335 to 0.70372, correlating loosely with fractionation indices. The 5–6 km3 of continuously zoned andesite-dacite magma (58%–68% SiO2) that erupted at Novarupta in 1912 was withdrawn from beneath Mount Katmai and bears close compositional affinity with products of that edifice, not with pre-1912 products of the adjacent Trident cluster. Evidence is presented that the 7–8 km3 of high-silica rhyolite (77% SiO2) released in 1912 is unlikely to have been stored under Novarupta or Trident. Pre-eruptive contiguity with the andesite-dacite reservoir is suggested by (1) eruption of ∼3 km3 of rhyolite magma first, followed by mutual mingling in fluctuating proportions; (2) thermal and redox continuity of the whole zoned sequence despite the wide compositional gap; (3) Nd, Sr, O isotopic, and rare earth element (REE) affinities of the whole array; (4) compositional continuity of the nearly aphyric rhyolite with the glass (melt) phase of the phenocryst-rich dacite; and (5) phase-equilibrium experiments that indicate similar shallow pre-eruptive storage depths (3–6 km) for rhyolite, dacite, and andesite.

  10. Differential diagnosis of severe cutaneous drug eruptions.

    PubMed

    Bachot, Nicolas; Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs are frequent, mostly secondary to antibacterials, however, serious adverse cutaneous reactions are infrequent. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are a spectrum of the same disease. They are the more severe drug eruptions, with a mortality around 30% for TEN. The confusion between erythema multiforme major and SJS means that erythema multiforme major is the main differential diagnosis. Skin disorders involving desquamation, in particular after pustulosis, are also common differential diagnoses. Mechanical or autoimmune blistering are also potential misdiagnoses of TEN/SJS. Hypersensitivity Syndrome (HSS) or Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) is a severe cutaneous drug reaction with often a long duration of eruption and serious other organ involvement. Exfoliative dermatitis, whether caused by psoriasis, dermatitis or lymphoma, can be thought of as a differential diagnosis of DRESS/HSS. Angio-immunoblastic lymphadenopathy, viral eruption and vasculitis are other differential diagnoses of DRESS/HSS. Prompt recognition of a severe drug reaction and withdrawal of the culprit drug is often the most important therapeutic action. Alternatively, a delay in starting a specific treatment for a disease misdiagnosed as a drug eruption could be deleterious.

  11. Geyser's Eruptive Activity in Broadband Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim

    2010-05-01

    A geyser is a spring characterized by intermittent discharge of water ejected turbulently and accompanied by a vapor phase (steam). The formation of geysers is due to particular hydrogeological conditions, which exist in only a few places on Earth, so they are a fairly rare phenomenon. The reasons of geyser periodicity and specifics of the activity for every particular geyser are not completely clear yet. So almost for all known geysers it is necessary to develop the personal model. In given study we first use seismic method for detection of possible hidden feature of geyser's eruptive activity in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. Broadband seismic records of geyser generated signals were obtained in hydrothermal field. The Valley of the Geysers belongs to Kronotskiy State Natural Biosphere Reserve and the UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site "Volcanoes of Kamchatka". Neither seismological nor geophysical investigations were carried out here earlier. In September, 2009 seismic observation was organized in geyser's field by 24-bit digital output broadband seismometers (GURALP CMG-6TD flat velocity response 0.033-50 Hz). Four geysers were surveyed: the fountain type Big and Giant geysers; the cone type Pearl geyser and the short-period Gap geyser. Seismometers were set as possible close to the geyser's surface vent (usually at the distance near 3-5 m). Main parameters of the eruptions for the investigated geysers: - The Giant geyser is the most powerful among the regular active geysers in Kamchatkan Valley of the Geysers. The height of the fountain reaches 30 meters, the mass of water erupted is about 40-60 tons. The main cycle of activity varies significantly: in 1945 the intervals between eruptions was near 3 hours, nowadays it is 5-6 hours. As a geyser of fountain type, the Giant geyser erupts from the 2*3 m2 pool of water. - The Big geyser was flooded by the lake after the natural catastrophe (giant mud-stone avalanche, formed by landslide, bed into Geiyzernaya

  12. Fixed Drug Eruption Due to Ornidazole

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ramji

    2014-01-01

    A 56-year-old male developed an ulcer on his glans penis and mucosae of upper and lower lips 3 days after taking ofloxacin, cephalexin, and ornidazole. Clinically, a provisional diagnosis of fixed drug eruption was made. The causative drug was confirmed by an oral provocation test which triggered a reactivation of all lesions only with ornidazole. PMID:25484435

  13. Gas Eruptions Taper Off in Northwestern Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Don

    1980-01-01

    Describes the eruption of inflammable natural gas from the ground surface in the Edith area near Camp Houston. Determining the source of the gas, the results established the Chester-Oswago interval as the most likely source. The surface venting has declined steadily; the likelihood of finding its cause is also described. (SK)

  14. Volcanic twilights from the fuego eruption.

    PubMed

    Volz, F E

    1975-07-01

    Striated twilight glows have been observed since 26 November 1974 in New England, indicating the spread of stratospheric dust earlier observed over Arizona. Similar photometric results were obtained from New Mexico and Florida, and twilights in Puerto Rico showed features not hitherto measured. Letters and verbal reports indicate the source to be eruptions of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala between 13 and 23 October 1974.

  15. Monster Prominence Erupts from the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    When a rather large M 3.6 class flare occurred near the edge of the Sun on Feb. 24, 2011, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted for 90 minutes. NASA’s So...

  16. The influence of magma supply rate on eruption style and textures of erupted ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M.; Cashman, K. V.

    2011-12-01

    Persistent low- to moderate-level eruptive activity of basaltic to andesitic volcanoes is difficult to monitor because small changes in magma supply rates can cause abrupt transitions in eruption style. Direct measurement of magma ascent rate is not possible; therefore, we must develop indirect measures of ascent rate. Here, we use a petrologic approach to this problem. We quantify textural variations in Vulcanian and Strombolian eruptive products (erupted between 1999-2006) from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We compare average crystallinities of pyroclasts from a succession of ash eruptions with magma supply rates determined using satellite observations of plume heights and seismic recordings of explosion frequency. We show that tephra crystallinity correlates inversely with magma supply rate, similar to correlations described from decompression experiments of intermediate composition magma. We further suggest that the range of textures present in any individual sample indicates recycling from one eruption to the next and/or simultaneous eruption of particles with different crystallization histories. The correlation between crystallinity and magma supply rate is most easily explained by efficient degassing at very low pressures and degassing-driven crystallization between eruptions. A similar correlation has been shown at Crater Peak, USA (Gardner et al. 1998); Merapi, Indonesia (Hammer et al. 2000); Unzen, Japan (Nakada and Motomura, 1999); and Sakurajima, Japan (Miwa et al., 2009). Futhermore, systematic changes in crystallinity have been shown to extend across a range of eruption styles (including Vulcanian and Strombolian), as at Etna, Italy (Taddeucci et al. 2002) and Croscat, Spain (Cimarelli et al., 2010). This variation with eruption style suggests that the observed transition from intermittent Vulcanian explosions to more continuous periods of Strombolian eruptions and lava fountains can be explained simply by changes in the average crystal content of the

  17. Pre-eruptive storage conditions of the Holocene dacite erupted from Kizimen Volcano, Kamchatka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browne, B.; Izbekov, P.; Eichelberger, J.; Churikova, T.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of the pre-eruptive conditions (T, P and fO2) of dacite magma erupted during the KZI cycle (12,000-8400 years ago) of Kizimen Volcano, Kamchatka, the earliest, most voluminous and most explosive eruption cycle in the Kizimen record. Hydrothermal, water-saturated experiments on KZI dacite pumice coupled with titanomagnetite-ilmenite geothermometry calculations require that the KZI dacite existed at a temperature of 823 ?? 20??C and pressures of 125-150 MPa immediately prior to eruption. This estimate corresponds to a lithologic contact between Miocene volcaniclastic rocks and Pliocene-Pleistocene volcanic rocks located at a depth of 5-6 km beneath the Kizimen edifice, which may have facilitated the accumulation of atypically large volumes of gas-rich dacite during the KZI cycle.

  18. The Mechanisms for the Onset and Explosive Eruption of Coronal Mass Ejections and Eruptive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, Carl Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the onset and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. To isolate the eruption physics, our study uses the breakout model, which is insensitive to the energy buildup process leading to the eruption. We performed 2.5D simulations with adaptive mesh refinement that achieved the highest overall spatial resolution to date in a CME/eruptive flare simulation. The ultra-high resolution allows us to separate clearly the timing of the various phases of the eruption. Using new computational tools, we have determined the number and evolution of all X- and O-type nulls in the system, thereby tracking both the progress and the products of reconnection throughout the computational domain. Our results show definitively that CME onset is due to the start of fast reconnection at the breakout current sheet. Once this reconnection begins, eruption is inevitable; if this is the only reconnection in the system, however, the eruption will be slow. The explosive CME acceleration is triggered by fast reconnection at the flare current sheet. Our results indicate that the explosive eruption is caused by a resistive instability, not an ideal process. Moreover, both breakout and flare reconnections begin first as a form of weak tearing characterized by a slowly evolving plasmoids, but eventually transition to a fast form with well-defined Alfvenic reconnection jets and rapid flux transfer. This transition to fast reconnection is required for both CME onset and explosive acceleration. We discuss the key implications of our results for CME/flare observations and for theories of magnetic reconnection.

  19. 2014 Mount Ontake eruption: characteristics of the phreatic eruption as inferred from aerial observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takayuki; Maeno, Fukashi; Nakada, Setsuya

    2016-05-01

    The sudden eruption of Mount Ontake on September 27, 2014, led to a tragedy that caused more than 60 fatalities including missing persons. In order to mitigate the potential risks posed by similar volcano-related disasters, it is vital to have a clear understanding of the activity status and progression of eruptions. Because the erupted material was largely disturbed while access was strictly prohibited for a month, we analyzed the aerial photographs taken on September 28. The results showed that there were three large vents in the bottom of the Jigokudani valley on September 28. The vent in the center was considered to have been the main vent involved in the eruption, and the vents on either side were considered to have been formed by non-explosive processes. The pyroclastic flows extended approximately 2.5 km along the valley at an average speed of 32 km/h. The absence of burned or fallen trees in this area indicated that the temperatures and destructive forces associated with the pyroclastic flow were both low. The distribution of ballistics was categorized into four zones based on the number of impact craters per unit area, and the furthest impact crater was located 950 m from the vents. Based on ballistic models, the maximum initial velocity of the ejecta was estimated to be 111 m/s. Just after the beginning of the eruption, very few ballistic ejecta had arrived at the summit, even though the eruption plume had risen above the summit, which suggested that a large amount of ballistic ejecta was expelled from the volcano several tens-of-seconds after the beginning of the eruption. This initial period was characterized by the escape of a vapor phase from the vents, which then caused the explosive eruption phase that generated large amounts of ballistic ejecta via sudden decompression of a hydrothermal reservoir.

  20. THE MECHANISMS FOR THE ONSET AND EXPLOSIVE ERUPTION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND ERUPTIVE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-11-20

    We have investigated the onset and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. To isolate the eruption physics, our study uses the breakout model, which is insensitive to the energy buildup process leading to the eruption. We performed 2.5D simulations with adaptive mesh refinement that achieved the highest overall spatial resolution to date in a CME/eruptive flare simulation. The ultra-high resolution allows us to separate clearly the timing of the various phases of the eruption. Using new computational tools, we have determined the number and evolution of all X- and O-type nulls in the system, thereby tracking both the progress and the products of reconnection throughout the computational domain. Our results show definitively that CME onset is due to the start of fast reconnection at the breakout current sheet. Once this reconnection begins, eruption is inevitable; if this is the only reconnection in the system, however, the eruption will be slow. The explosive CME acceleration is triggered by fast reconnection at the flare current sheet. Our results indicate that the explosive eruption is caused by a resistive instability, not an ideal process. Moreover, both breakout and flare reconnections begin first as a form of weak tearing characterized by slowly evolving plasmoids, but eventually transition to a fast form with well-defined Alfvenic reconnection jets and rapid flux transfer. This transition to fast reconnection is required for both CME onset and explosive acceleration. We discuss the key implications of our results for CME/flare observations and for theories of magnetic reconnection.

  1. Addressing the needs of the telecoms industry for optical fibre communication in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, Andrew W. R.; Conibear, Ann B.

    2005-10-01

    We report on a successful partnership between the Department of Physics at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) and Telkom, South Africa's national telecommunications company, to train physics students in the important fields related to optical fibre technology. The partnership, which began in 2001 and forms part of Telkom's Centre of Excellence program in South Africa, is currently being extended to other countries in Africa. The training being conducted in the Physics Department has as one of its main goals an increased understanding of polarisation mode dispersion (PMD), an effect that will ultimately limit the transmission speeds through optical fibre.

  2. Bringing the world to a standstill: an investigation into the effects of a Novarupta scale volcanic eruption on today's aviation industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welchman, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Novarupta erupted in Alaska on 6th June 1912 and was the biggest of the 21st century. It erupted for 60 hours and sent an ash cloud over 32,000m into the air. People were stranded for several days, houses destroyed, villages abandoned and food supplies disrupted for a long period after the eruption. Ash was recorded to have travelled over 9,500km away in Africa, demonstrating potentially global impacts. The eruption occurred when Alaska had very little aviation industry, today however the airspace above Alaska is one of the busiest in the world. The eruption in Iceland in 2010 which disrupted the European airspace for several weeks and closed it completely for five days, brought to light just how disruptive a volcanic eruption can be, even in countries where volcanic activity is not considered a hazard. It was an expensive event for the aviation industry and caused much disruption. Simulations of a Katmai scale eruption were run in the ‘present-day’, using the PUFF ash fall model. Simulations were run for one week from the start the eruption. A ‘worst-case’ scenario is presented based on data from 2005-2009. It is a hypothetical eruption started on 17th January 2005 and it shows that ash is likely to cause havoc in North America, Europe and parts of Asia. At least 43 airports on average would be severely affected each day of the simulation, leading to several of the major air routes being affected. Where financial data is available, an estimated cost of this event is presented. A 500 hr simulation is presented to demonstrate the possible global effects that could occur within three weeks of an eruption. It shows ash being transported across the equator at high altitudes to the southern hemisphere in Asia as well as the whole of the northern hemisphere being engulfed. The complex implications an eruption like this would have on national and international infrastructures is presented. The results could aid further scientific studies, governmental bodies and

  3. ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2010-08-10

    We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

  4. Products of a Subglacial Flood Basalt Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, C. F.; White, J. D. L.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Snæbýlisheiði unit, SE Iceland, is a ca. 26 km³ elongate, flat-topped ridge of volcaniclastic debris coupled with and intruded by coherent basalt stretching over 34 km from the eruption site perpendicular to the rift fissure source. It formed from a single subglacial flood basalt eruption during a recent glaciation, and its elongation reflects glacial control on dispersal via the hydraulic potential gradient at the glacier's base, which drove towards the glacier terminus the meltwater+debris formed during the eruption by quenching and fragmentation. High magma discharge and outgassing drove segregation of magma into down-flow propagating intrusions. Edifice growth was mediated by the extent of ice melting, extent and efficiency of meltwater+debris drainage, and hydraulic gradients locally favoring meltwater accumulation. Eruption style reflected magma flux, edifice stability, and accessibility of water to the vent area via flooding or infiltration. Deposits reflect these competing factors in their chaotic internal organization and stratigraphy, limited lithofacies continuity, and diverse particle populations from multiple source vents. Linear growth of the ridge down-gradient from the eruption site was driven primarily by propagation and continuous fragmentation of shoaling intrusions that formed an interconnected intrusive complex with extensive peperites. Advance was along gently meandering and locally bifurcating sub-ice conduits within hyaloclastite with sheet-lobe levees and lobate fingered intrusions. Irregular dikes, apophyses, horns, and tendrils extended from the main body and generated voluminous lapilli tuff and contorticlasts while providing additional heat to the system. Prolonged transport and deposition of debris produced complexly bedded volcaniclastic deposits derived from and intruded by the basalt sheet. The bedding and depositional features of volcaniclastic debris and relationship to their adjacent intrusions suggest transport and

  5. Kamchatka and North Kurile Volcano Explosive Eruptions in 2015 and Danger to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, Olga; Melnikov, Dmitry; Manevich, Alexander; Demyanchuk, Yury; Nuzhdaev, Anton; Petrova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    There are 36 active volcanoes in the Kamchatka and North Kurile, and several of them are continuously active. In 2015, four of the Kamchatkan volcanoes (Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) and two volcanoes of North Kurile (Alaid and Chikurachki) had strong and moderate explosive eruptions. Moderate gas-steam activity was observing of Bezymianny, Kizimen, Avachinsky, Koryaksky, Gorely, Mutnovsky and other volcanoes. Strong explosive eruptions of volcanoes are the most dangerous for aircraft because they can produce in a few hours or days to the atmosphere and the stratosphere till several cubic kilometers of volcanic ash and aerosols. Ash plumes and the clouds, depending on the power of the eruption, the strength and wind speed, can travel thousands of kilometers from the volcano for several days, remaining hazardous to aircraft, as the melting temperature of small particles of ash below the operating temperature of jet engines. The eruptive activity of Sheveluch volcano began since 1980 (growth of the lava dome) and is continuing at present. Strong explosive events of the volcano occurred in 2015: on 07, 12, and 15 January, 01, 17, and 28 February, 04, 08, 16, 21-22, and 26 March, 07 and 12 April: ash plumes rose up to 7-12 km a.s.l. and extended more 900 km to the different directions of the volcano. Ashfalls occurred at Ust'-Kamchatsk on 16 March, and Klyuchi on 30 October. Strong and moderate hot avalanches from the lava dome were observing more often in the second half of the year. Aviation color code of Sheveluch was Orange during the year. Activity of the volcano was dangerous to international and local aviation. Explosive-effusive eruption of Klyuchevskoy volcano lasted from 01 January till 24 March. Strombolian explosive volcanic activity began from 01 January, and on 08-09 January a lava flow was detected at the Apakhonchich chute on the southeastern flank of the volcano. Vulcanian activity of the volcano began from 10 January. Ashfalls

  6. Volcano geodesy: The search for magma reservoirs and the formation of eruptive vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Routine geodetic measurements are made at only a few dozen of the world's 600 or so active volcanoes, even though these measurements have proven to be a reliable precursor of eruptions. The pattern and rate of surface displacement reveal the depth and rate of pressure increase within shallow magma reservoirs. This process has been demonstrated clearly at Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Long Valley caldera, California; Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy; Rabaul caldera, Papua New Guinea; and Aira caldera and nearby Sakurajima, Japan. Slower and lesser amounts of surface displacement at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming, are attributed to changes in a hydrothermal system that overlies a crustal magma body. The vertical and horizontal dimensions of eruptive fissures, as well as the amount of widening, have been determined at Kilauea, Hawaii; Etna, Italy; Tolbachik, Kamchatka; Krafla, Iceland; and Asal-Ghoubbet, Djibouti, the last a segment of the East Africa Rift Zone. Continuously recording instruments, such as tiltmeters, extensometers, and dilatometers, have recorded horizontal and upward growth of eruptive fissures, which grew at rates of hundreds of meters per hour, at Kilauea; Izu-Oshima, Japan; Teishi Knoll seamount, Japan; and Piton de la Fournaise, Re??union Island. In addition, such instruments have recorded the hour or less of slight ground movement that preceded small explosive eruptions at Sakurajima and presumed sudden gas emissions at Galeras, Colombia. The use of satellite geodesy, in particular the Global Positioning System, offers the possibility of revealing changes in surface strain both local to a volcano and over a broad region that includes the volcano.

  7. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jonathan; Roberts, Gareth; White, Nicky

    2013-04-01

    The characteristic basins and swells of Africa's surface topography probably reflect patterns of convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. We have interrogated drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~560 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Africa. An inverse model is then used to minimise the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~22 to ~5. Our results suggest that Africa's topography began to grow most rapidly after ~30 Ma at peak uplift rates of 0.1-0.15 mm/yr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Angolan Dome). Uplift rate histories are shown to vary significantly from swell to swell. The calculated magnitudes, timing, and location of uplift agree well with local independent geological constraints, such as intense volcanism at Hoggar (42-39 Ma) and Afar (31-29 Ma), uplifted marine terraces, and warped peneplains. We have also calculated solid sediment flux histories for major African deltas which have persisted through time. This onshore record provides an important indirect constraint on the history of vertical motions at the surface, and agrees well with the offshore flux record, obtained from mapping isopachs of deltaic sediments. Our modelling and reconstructed sedimentary flux histories indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  8. The practice of pathology in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kaschula, Ronald Otto Christian

    2013-06-01

    In attempting to advance the health of women and children in Africa, practitioners should be cognizant of the history of health care delivery in the continent and the nature of the existing systems. Although autopsies began in Africa several millennia ago, traditional healers have held sway for many centuries and continue to do so for most of Africa's people. The role of laboratory medicine in advancing modern health care has been impeded by its ever-increasing high cost, lack of confidence in the system, lack of adequately trained personnel, and inadequate provision of facilities and training opportunities. This is partly caused by the continent having the highest proportion of young children in the world, an exceptionally heavy disease burden, and a low proportion of tax payers. For laboratory medicine to have its intended effect in making accurate diagnoses, national, minimal standards for certification and practice should be formulated. There should be periodic inspections, rewards for excellence, and opportunities for professional development. It is recommended that laboratory medicine be practiced in a 4-tier system, with the highest in teaching hospitals, and the lowest in primary health care clinics. For the practice of anatomic pathology to advance, an effective referral system and an equitable minimal and maximal workload for each pathologist are needed. The changing dynamics of urbanization, with massive unemployment rates, unhealthy life styles, and the continued role of traditional healers calls for gifted leaders to come to the fore and facilitate internal and external cooperation with diverse health care agencies. PMID:23721269

  9. Wood energy in eastern and southern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, P. ); Soussan, J. ); Munslow, B. ); Spence, D. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper has outlined a learning curve in dealing with the wood energy situation in eastern and southern Africa. The curve began in total ignorance when wood energy was not considered part of the energy problem. Dominance of wood fuel, throughout the region, became immediately apparent on calculation of national energy balances. The discovery of this other energy crisis'' was, again, to prove that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, since the emphasis on project intervention was at a national, not local, level. In evaluating the success and failure of energy intervention strategies it was increasingly apparent that the wood energy problem was but another symptom of the problems of subsistence production in Africa. Wood energy, in effect, was simply the rubbish that was left from a wider utilization of biomass, and trying to grow woodfuel per se, especially as a full-price monetary good, was impossible so long as the major relationships and the subsistence system remained outside the market. The failures, however, have allowed the identification of a range of methods for woody biomass intervention in eastern and southern Africa, from which wood energy could be an offtake.

  10. 2-D Numerical Simulation of Eruption Clouds : Effects of Turbulent Mixing between Eruption Cloud and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; KOYAGUCHI, T.; OGAWA, M.; Hachisu, I.

    2001-05-01

    Mixing of eruption cloud and air is one of the most important processes for eruption cloud dynamics. The critical condition of eruption types (eruption column or pyroclastic flow) depends on efficiency of mixing of eruption cloud and the ambient air. However, in most of the previous models (e.g., Sparks,1986; Woods, 1988), the rate of mixing between cloud and air is taken into account by introducing empirical parameters such as entrainment coefficient or turbulent diffusion coefficient. We developed a numerical model of 2-D (axisymmetrical) eruption columns in order to simulate the turbulent mixing between eruption column and air. We calculated the motion of an eruption column from a circular vent on the flat surface of the earth. Supposing that relative velocity of gas and ash particles is sufficiently small, we can treat eruption cloud as a single gas. Equation of state (EOS) for the mixture of the magmatic component (i.e. volcanic gas plus pyroclasts) and air can be expressed by EOS for an ideal gas, because volume fraction of the gas phase is very large. The density change as a function of mixing ratio between air and the magmatic component has a strong non-linear feature, because the density of the mixture drastically decreases as entrained air expands by heating. This non-linear feature can be reproduced by changing the gas constant and the ratio of specific heat in EOS for ideal gases; the molecular weight increases and the ratio of specific heat approaches 1 as the magmatic component increases. It is assumed that the dynamics of eruption column follows the Euler equation, so that no viscous effect except for the numerical viscosity is taken into account. Roe scheme (a general TVD scheme for compressible flow) is used in order to simulate the generation of shock waves inside and around the eruption column. The results show that many vortexes are generated around the boundary between eruption cloud and air, which results in violent mixing. When the size of

  11. Bang! Month-scale eruption triggering at Santorini volcano.

    PubMed

    Martin, Victoria M; Morgan, Daniel J; Jerram, Dougal A; Caddick, Mark J; Prior, David J; Davidson, Jon P

    2008-08-29

    The time lag between intrusion of fresh, hot magma and an ensuing eruption is of critical importance in both understanding the triggering and mitigating the consequences of volcanic eruptions. This work looks at material erupted during 1925-28 at the Nea Kameni volcanic center in Santorini, Greece, to determine this time scale. By exploiting Fe-Mg diffusion in olivine crystals, we constrained the intrusion-to-eruption time lag to between 3 and 10 weeks. These techniques have potential application at many volcanic centers; previously erupted material can be used to calibrate records of the short-time scale processes common to many volcanic centers.

  12. Thermodynamics of gas and steam-blast eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.

    1995-01-01

    Eruptions of gas or steam and non-juvenile debris are common in volcanic and hydrothermal areas. From reports of non-juvenile eruptions or eruptive sequences world-wide, at least three types (or end-members) can be identified: (1) those involving rock and liquid water initially at boiling-point temperatures ('boiling-point eruptions'); (2) those powered by gas (primarily water vapor) at initial temperatures approaching magmatic ('gas eruptions'); and (3) those caused by rapid mixing of hot rock and ground- or surface water ('mixing eruptions'). For these eruption types, the mechanical energy released, final temperatures, liquid water contents and maximum theoretical velocities are compared by assuming that the erupting mixtures of rock and fluid thermally equilibrate, then decompress isentropically from initial, near-surface pressure (???10 MPa) to atmospheric pressure. Maximum mechanical energy release is by far greatest for gas eruptions (??????1.3 MJ/kg of fluid-rock mixture)-about one-half that of an equivalent mass of gunpowder and one-fourth that of TNT. It is somewhat less for mixing eruptions (??????0.4 MJ/kg), and least for boiling-point eruptions (??????0.25 MJ/kg). The final water contents of crupted boiling-point mixtures are usually high, producing wet, sloppy deposits. Final erupted mixtures from gas eruptions are nearly always dry, whereas those from mixing eruptions vary from wet to dry. If all the enthalpy released in the eruptions were converted to kinetic energy, the final velocity (vmax) of these mixtures could range up to 670 m/s for boiling-point eruptions and 1820 m/s for gas eruptions (highest for high initial pressure and mass fractions of rock (mr) near zero). For mixing eruptions, vmax ranges up to 1150 m/s. All observed eruption velocities are less than 400 m/s, largely because (1) most solid material is expelled when mr is high, hence vmax is low; (2) observations are made of large blocks the velocities of which may be less than the

  13. Generation 2030/Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Danzhen; Hug, Lucia; Anthony, David

    2014-01-01

    Until relatively recently, much of Africa has been among the economically least developed and least densely populated places on earth, replete with villages and rural communities. Africa is changing rapidly, in its economy, trade and investment; in climate change; in conflict and stability; in urbanization, migration patterns, and most of all in…

  14. Teaching about Francophone Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merryfield, Mary; Timbo, Adama

    Lessons and resources for Social Studies and French courses are included in this document. The major goals of these materials are to help students (1) explore the history and geography of Francophone Africa, (2) examine French influences in contemporary Africa, (3) recognize and appreciate cultural differences and similarities in values and…

  15. Language in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesthrie, Rajend, Ed.

    This collection of 24 papers focuses on language and society in South Africa. Part 1, "The Main Language Groupings," includes (1) "South Africa: A Sociolinguistic Overview" (R. Mesthrie); (2) "The Khoesan Languages" (A. Traill); (3) "The Bantu Languages: Sociohistorical Perspectives" (Robert K. Herbert and Richard Bailey); (4) "Afrikaans:…

  16. Historical Capsule: South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Briefly traces the history of South Africa from British acquisition in 1815 through the creation of the Union of South Africa in 1910. Presents a chronicle of the year 1900 to show part of the European achievement in close-up. Lists accomplishments in literature, fine arts, science, technology, music, theater, and dance. (GEA)

  17. Multilingualism in Southern Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peirce, Bonny Norton; Ridge, Stanley G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews recent research in multilingualism in Southern Africa, focusing on the role of languages in education, sociolinguistics, and language policy. Much of the research is on South Africa. Topics discussed include language of instruction in schools, teacher education, higher education, adult literacy, language contact, gender and linguistic…

  18. Keanakākoʻi Tephra produced by 300 years of explosive eruptions following collapse of Kīlauea's caldera in about 1500 CE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.; Rose, Timothy R.; Fiske, Richard S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The Keanakākoʻi Tephra at Kīlauea Volcano has previously been interpreted by some as the product of a caldera-forming eruption in 1790 CE. Our study, however, finds stratigraphic and 14C evidence that the tephra instead results from numerous eruptions throughout a 300-year period between about 1500 and 1800. The stratigraphic evidence includes: (1) as many as six pure lithic ash beds interleaved in sand dunes made of earlier Keanakākoʻi vitric ash, (2) three lava flows from Kīlauea and Mauna Loa interbedded with the tephra, (3) buried syneruptive cultural structures, (4) numerous intraformational water-cut gullies, and (5) abundant organic layers rich in charcoal within the tephra section. Interpretation of 97 new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C ages and 4 previous conventional ages suggests that explosive eruptions began in 1470–1510 CE, and that explosive activity continued episodically until the early 1800s, probably with two periods of quiescence lasting several decades. Kīlauea's caldera, rather than forming in 1790, predates the first eruption of the Keanakākoʻi and collapsed in 1470–1510, immediately following, and perhaps causing, the end of the 60-year-long, 4–6 km3 ʻAilāʻau eruption from the east side of Kīlauea's summit area. The caldera was several hundred meters deep when the Keanakākoʻi began erupting, consistent with oral tradition, and probably had a volume of 4–6 km3. The caldera formed by collapse, but no eruption of lava coincided with its formation. A large volume of magma may have quickly drained from the summit reservoir and intruded into the east rift zone, perhaps in response to a major south-flank slip event, leading to summit collapse. Alternatively, magma may have slowly drained from the reservoir during the prolonged ʻAilāʻau eruption, causing episodic collapses before the final, largest downdrop took place. Two prolonged periods of episodic explosive eruptions are known at Kīlauea, the Keanak

  19. Keanakākoʻi Tephra produced by 300 years of explosive eruptions following collapse of Kīlauea's caldera in about 1500 CE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.; Rose, Timothy R.; Fiske, Richard S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The Keanakākoʻi Tephra at Kīlauea Volcano has previously been interpreted by some as the product of a caldera-forming eruption in 1790 CE. Our study, however, finds stratigraphic and 14C evidence that the tephra instead results from numerous eruptions throughout a 300-year period between about 1500 and 1800. The stratigraphic evidence includes: (1) as many as six pure lithic ash beds interleaved in sand dunes made of earlier Keanakākoʻi vitric ash, (2) three lava flows from Kīlauea and Mauna Loa interbedded with the tephra, (3) buried syneruptive cultural structures, (4) numerous intraformational water-cut gullies, and (5) abundant organic layers rich in charcoal within the tephra section. Interpretation of 97 new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C ages and 4 previous conventional ages suggests that explosive eruptions began in 1470–1510 CE, and that explosive activity continued episodically until the early 1800s, probably with two periods of quiescence lasting several decades. Kīlauea's caldera, rather than forming in 1790, predates the first eruption of the Keanakākoʻi and collapsed in 1470–1510, immediately following, and perhaps causing, the end of the 60-year-long, 4–6 km3 ʻAilāʻau eruption from the east side of Kīlauea's summit area. The caldera was several hundred meters deep when the Keanakākoʻi began erupting, consistent with oral tradition, and probably had a volume of 4–6 km3. The caldera formed by collapse, but no eruption of lava coincided with its formation. A large volume of magma may have quickly drained from the summit reservoir and intruded into the east rift zone, perhaps in response to a major south-flank slip event, leading to summit collapse. Alternatively, magma may have slowly drained from the reservoir during the prolonged ʻAilāʻau eruption, causing episodic collapses before the final, largest downdrop took place. Two prolonged periods of episodic explosive eruptions are known at Kīlauea, the Keanak

  20. Keanakāko´i Tephra produced by 300 years of explosive eruptions following collapse of Kīlauea's caldera in about 1500 CE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Rose, Timothy R.; Fiske, Richard S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2012-02-01

    The Keanakākói Tephra at Kīlauea Volcano has previously been interpreted by some as the product of a caldera-forming eruption in 1790 CE. Our study, however, finds stratigraphic and 14C evidence that the tephra instead results from numerous eruptions throughout a 300-year period between about 1500 and 1800. The stratigraphic evidence includes: (1) as many as six pure lithic ash beds interleaved in sand dunes made of earlier Keanakākói vitric ash, (2) three lava flows from Kīlauea and Mauna Loa interbedded with the tephra, (3) buried syneruptive cultural structures, (4) numerous intraformational water-cut gullies, and (5) abundant organic layers rich in charcoal within the tephra section. Interpretation of 97 new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C ages and 4 previous conventional ages suggests that explosive eruptions began in 1470-1510 CE, and that explosive activity continued episodically until the early 1800s, probably with two periods of quiescence lasting several decades. Kīlauea's caldera, rather than forming in 1790, predates the first eruption of the Keanakākói and collapsed in 1470-1510, immediately following, and perhaps causing, the end of the 60-year-long, 4-6 km3 ´Ailā´au eruption from the east side of Kīlauea's summit area. The caldera was several hundred meters deep when the Keanakākói began erupting, consistent with oral tradition, and probably had a volume of 4-6 km3. The caldera formed by collapse, but no eruption of lava coincided with its formation. A large volume of magma may have quickly drained from the summit reservoir and intruded into the east rift zone, perhaps in response to a major south-flank slip event, leading to summit collapse. Alternatively, magma may have slowly drained from the reservoir during the prolonged ´Ailā´au eruption, causing episodic collapses before the final, largest downdrop took place. Two prolonged periods of episodic explosive eruptions are known at Kīlauea, the Keanakākói and the Uw

  1. A Management Framework for Training Providers to Improve Workplace Skills Development in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschoff, Tom; Govender, Cookie

    2007-01-01

    Deputy President, Ms Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, says a skills revolution is necessary for South Africa's (SA) skills crisis. The SA skills revolution began with the skills legislation of 1998-1999 when the Departments of Labour and Education intended a seamless, integrated approach to rapid skills development. The National Skills Development…

  2. Guidance and Counselling in the Republic of South Africa: A Future Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marais, James L.

    This report reviews the development and history of school guidance, which began in 1936, among the various cultural groups in the Republic of South Africa. It explains how political and economic factors influenced the nature and character of school guidance and counseling and how political structures gradually led to the fact that white education…

  3. Mass Flux of Tephra Sampled Frequently During the Ongoing Halema`uma`u Eruption (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D.; Wooten, K.; Orr, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    The ongoing summit eruption of Kilauea provides an unparalleled opportunity to track, almost daily, the production of tephra. The eruption began on 19 March 2008, and tephra has been erupted every day since then to the end of August 2009. Most of the time, tephra is ejected quasi-continuously from the vent accompanied by a light gray to white gas plume, occasionally broken by a more vigorous pulse (“brown plume”) richer in ejecta. In early April 2008, an array of 10 plastic buckets was placed within 400 m of the new vent in Halema`uma`u down the prevailing NE wind direction. The configuration of the array, spanning an area of about 73,000 m2, has not changed since then. Buckets are emptied frequently, initially every day and, since summer 2008, on all weekdays. The contents are dried and weighed, and an “average network accumulation rate” is calculated in g/m2/hour. In addition, componentry analyses are made of the >0.5-mm size fraction from a bucket near the vent, in order to categorize the tephra into juvenile and lithic fractions. To estimate the total mass of tephra ejected from the vent for a given collection, we first drew isomass contours for several daily collections and plotted isomass versus square root of area to obtain the total mass of the deposit. From this, we developed an empirical multiplication factor that allows us to estimate, within ~25 percent, the total ejected mass per day in kilograms from the total collected mass in grams. The tephra is a mix of vitric and lithic pyroclasts, mostly ash in size. The vitric clasts, interpreted as juvenile, include Pele’s hair and tears, hollow spherules, dumbbells, pumice, and bits of coarsely vesicular glass. All these clasts were probably produced by weak spattering at the top of the lava column, which has rarely been seen. Especially since fall 2008, some vitric clasts are partly coated with secondary minerals or rock dust. We interpret such clasts as recycled, first erupted during spattering

  4. Precursory seismicity associated with the May 29, 2010 undersea eruption south of Sarigan Island, Northern Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, C. K.; Power, J. A.; Webley, P.

    2010-12-01

    On May 29, 2010 at approximately 1148 UTC, an undersea volcano south of Sarigan Island in the Northern Marianna Islands erupted sending an ash plume to 40,000 feet (12.2 km) ASL. Pre-eruptive seismicity associated with this event was recorded on three short-period seismic stations, SARN located on Sarigan Island, ANNE and ANA2, both located on the island of Anatahan. The presumed vent location is about 16 km south east of Sarigan Island and about 30 km north east of Anatahan. Small volcano tectonic earthquakes were recorded on SARN in early April at a rate of 0-1 per day. S-P phase arrivals for these earthquakes place the source of the VT’s between 12.3 km to 16.8 km from station SARN. VT activity continued to increase into May with a maximum of 20 earthquakes per day occurring on May 12. The largest VT’s associated with this eruption occurred on May 20, with most events on this day having coda lengths of 20 to 30 seconds. On May 27 tremor-like waveforms began to show up on Sarigan and Anatahan stations. These events had durations of 3 to 7 minutes with emergent arrivals and no clear S phase. The frequency content of these waveforms is variable with some events showing low frequency content (below 5 HZ) with higher frequency banding and others having a broadband signal. At about 2252 UTC on May 28, these events merged into a continuous signal lasting nearly 30 minutes. A roughly 4 hour period of relative quiescence followed punctuated by individual low frequency events. Another burst of continuous tremor then began at about 0305 UTC on May 29, which lasted about 4.5 hours. During the tail end of this activity a mixture of VT’s and low frequency events are seen. Another period of relative quiescence with the occurrence of very small VT’s then followed for about 4.5 hours. A ramp up of activity began about 11 minutes before the plume producing event occurred at approximately 1148 UTC on May 29. Based on eye witness observations of water discoloration and

  5. The 1104 AD Plinian eruption of Hekla volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janebo, M. H.; Houghton, B. F.; Thordarson, T.

    2013-12-01

    Plinian eruptions in Iceland have attracted renewed attention due to the global disruption of air traffic in 2010. Hekla is the most active volcano in Europe with this type of activity. It has had 18 historical subplinian-Plinian eruptions, and since 1970 the frequency of such eruptions has increased to one every decade. Hekla is currently inflated to the levels seen prior to the most recent eruptions in 1991 and 2000. A future eruption at the end of the current stage of unrest is likely to pose a hazard to air traffic between North America and Europe because all historical Hekla eruptions, independent of size, have had a violent initial subplinian-Plinian phase that produced a sustained ash plume. We present a detailed study of the largest historical eruption, the so-called H1 eruption in 1104 AD, during which 2.5 km3 tephra was deposited over half of Iceland and beyond. Grain size analysis, componentry, and density/vesicularity were used to characterize the deposit and quantify changes during the course of the eruption. H1 was a relatively steady, dry eruption with a more powerful opening phase followed by a lower intensity waning phase. The juvenile material consists of three types of pumice (white, grey and banded), implying that the H1 magma underwent a complex history of ascent in the conduit. These data will be essential inputs to Volcanic Ash Advisory forecast models for tephra dispersal during the next eruption of Hekla.

  6. Ash from the Toba supereruption in Lake Malawi shows no volcanic winter in East Africa at 75 ka.

    PubMed

    Lane, Christine S; Chorn, Ben T; Johnson, Thomas C

    2013-05-14

    The most explosive volcanic event of the Quaternary was the eruption of Mt. Toba, Sumatra, 75,000 y ago, which produced voluminous ash deposits found across much of the Indian Ocean, Indian Peninsula, and South China Sea. A major climatic downturn observed within the Greenland ice cores has been attributed to the cooling effects of the ash and aerosols ejected during the eruption of the Youngest Toba Tuff (YTT). These events coincided roughly with a hypothesized human genetic bottleneck, when the number of our species in Africa may have been reduced to near extinction. Some have speculated that the demise of early modern humans at that time was due in part to a dramatic climate shift triggered by the supereruption. Others have argued that environmental conditions would not have been so severe to have such an impact on our ancestors, and furthermore, that modern humans may have already expanded beyond Africa by this time. We report an observation of the YTT in Africa, recovered as a cryptotephra layer in Lake Malawi sediments, >7,000 km west of the source volcano. The YTT isochron provides an accurate and precise age estimate for the Lake Malawi paleoclimate record, which revises the chronology of past climatic events in East Africa. The YTT in Lake Malawi is not accompanied by a major change in sediment composition or evidence for substantial temperature change, implying that the eruption did not significantly impact the climate of East Africa and was not the cause of a human genetic bottleneck at that time.

  7. Selected time-lapse movies of the east rift zone eruption of KĪlauea Volcano, 2004–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has used mass-market digital time-lapse cameras and network-enabled Webcams for visual monitoring and research. The 26 time-lapse movies in this report were selected from the vast collection of images acquired by these camera systems during 2004–2008. Chosen for their content and broad aesthetic appeal, these image sequences document a variety of flow-field and vent processes from Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983 and is still (as of 2011) ongoing.

  8. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SIGMOID ERUPTION OF ACTIVE REGION 11283

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2013-07-10

    Current magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the initiation of solar eruptions are still commonly carried out with idealized magnetic field models, whereas the realistic coronal field prior to eruptions can possibly be reconstructed from the observable photospheric field. Using a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation prior to a sigmoid eruption in AR 11283 as the initial condition in an MHD model, we successfully simulate the realistic initiation process of the eruption event, as is confirmed by a remarkable resemblance to the SDO/AIA observations. Analysis of the pre-eruption field reveals that the envelope flux of the sigmoidal core contains a coronal null and furthermore the flux rope is prone to a torus instability. Observations suggest that reconnection at the null cuts overlying tethers and likely triggers the torus instability of the flux rope, which results in the eruption. This kind of simulation demonstrates the capability of modeling the realistic solar eruptions to provide the initiation process.

  9. Monitoring of the volcanic rock compositions during the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, Anna O.; Edwards, Benjamin R.; Melnikov, Dmitry; Yakushev, Anton; Griboedova, Irina

    2015-12-01

    Here we present the results from monitoring of the composition of rocks produced during the 2012-2013 fissure eruption at Tolbachik volcano (FTE). Major and trace element concentrations in 75 samples are reported. Products of this eruption are represented by high alumina basaltic trachyandesites with higher alkalis and titanium contents than in all previously studied rocks of the Tolbachik monogenetic volcanic field. Rocks erupted during the first three days (27-30 November) from the northern (also called Menyailov) group of vents are the most silica- and alkali-rich (SiO2 concentrations up to 55.35 wt.% and K2O up to 2.67 wt.%). From December onwards, when the eruptive activity switched from the Menyailov vents to the southern (Naboko) group of vents, silica content dropped by 2 wt.%, concentrations of MgO, FeO, TiO2 and Mg# increased, and K2O and Na2O concentrations and K2O/MgO ratio decreased. For the rest of the eruption the compositions of rocks remained constant and homogeneous; no systematic compositional differences between lava, bombs and scoria samples are evident. Trace element distributions in the rocks of the Menyailov and Naboko vent lavas are relatively uniform; Menyailov lavas have slightly higher Th, Nb, Hf, Y, and HREE concentrations than the Naboko vent lavas at more or less constant element ratios. We explain the initial change in geochemistry by tapping of a slightly cooler and fractionated (~ 3% Mt and 8% Cpx) upper part of the magma storage zone before the main storage area began to feed the eruption. Thermodynamic constraints show that apparent liquidus temperatures varied from 1142 °C to 1151 °C, and thermodynamic modeling shows that variations in compositions are consistent with a high degree of low pressure (100-300 MPa), nominally anhydrous fractionation of a parent melt compositionally similar to the 1975 Northern Breakthrough high-Mg basalt. Geochemistry, petrological observations and modeling are in agreement with the newly erupted

  10. The death of a Strombolian eruption: Evidence for dyke drainage from Red Crater, Tongariro volcano, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, F. B.; von Aulock, F. W.; Kennedy, B.; Branney, M.; Bardsley, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    How volcanic eruptions stop is poorly understood. We present data from a dyke in the wall of Red Crater, Tongariro volcano, NZ, that record the closing stages of an eruption. The 1.85ka eruption began with andesite effusion followed by Strombolian eruption of basaltic andesite. It terminated with withdrawal of basaltic andesite from a shallow level dyke accompanied by a last gasp of phreatic explosivity. The dyke is twice as wide within the upper poorly consolidated scoria as it is within underlying better consolidated brecciated lava. In lower parts near the boundary between the lava breccia and scoria the dyke is full, whereas at higher levels both dyke marginal zones are preserved with a spectacular evacuated interior. Detailed field mapping and textural analysis of crystallinities and vesicularities using >5mm vesicles, reveal three texturally distinct facies. (1) A glassy marginal facies with 12% vesicularity, margin-parallel flow banding and fabric defined by a preferred orientation of small phenocrysts (20-30% vol.). (2) A fully crystalline lower central zone with phenocrysts (50% vol.) randomly orientated and variably elongate vesicles (32% vol.). (3) An upper, almost completely crystalline central facies with subhorizontal flow banding arranged in en-echelon arrays, subhorizontally orientated phenocrysts (45-50% vol.) and patchy development of sub-spherical vesicles (vesicularity varies from 18-24% vol.). Coating the evacuated dyke interior is 1-2m finely laminated, fine-grained palagonitized ash. We interpret the three facies to correspond to three phases of magma movement. Facies 1 is related to rapid freezing against the dyke margins during vertical eruption. Facies 2 relates to a waning eruption during which the dyke widened. Facies 3 records the draining body of magma in retreat, during which the magma level stepped inward, preserving subhorizontal, 0.2-0.5m wide “bathtub rings” on the interior wall of the dyke marginal zone. The rings occur 2m

  11. The May 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands: Geochemical evolution of a silicic island-arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wade, J.A.; Plank, T.; Stern, R.J.; Tollstrup, D.L.; Gill, J.B.; O'Leary, J. C.; Eiler, J.M.; Moore, R.B.; Woodhead, J.D.; Trusdell, F.; Fischer, T.P.; Hilton, David R.

    2005-01-01

    The first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano began on May 10, 2003. Samples of tephra from early in the eruption were analyzed for major and trace elements, and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, and O isotopic compositions. The compositions of these tephras are compared with those of prehistoric samples of basalt and andesite, also newly reported here. The May 2003 eruptives are medium-K andesites with 59-63 wt.% SiO2, and are otherwise homogeneous (varying less than 3% 2?? about the mean for 45 elements). Small, but systematic, chemical differences exist between dark (scoria) and light (pumice) fragments, which indicate fewer mafic and oxide phenocrysts in, and less degassing for, the pumice than scoria. The May 2003 magmas are nearly identical to other prehistoric eruptives from Anatahan. Nonetheless, Anatahan has erupted a wide range of compositions in the past, from basalt to dacite (49-66 wt.% SiO2). The large proportion of lavas with silicic compositions at Anatahan (> 59 wt.% SiO2) is unique within the active Mariana Islands, which otherwise erupt a narrow range of basalts and basaltic andesites. The silicic compositions raise the question of whether they formed via crystal fractionation or crustal assimilation. The lack of 87Sr/86Sr variation with silica content, the MORB-like ??18O, and the incompatible behavior of Zr rule out assimilation of old crust, altered crust, or zircon-saturated crustal melts, respectively. Instead, the constancy of isotopic and trace element ratios, and the systematic variations in REE patterns are consistent with evolution by crystal fractionation of similar parental magmas. Thus, Anatahan is a type example of an island-arc volcano that erupts comagmatic basalts to dacites, with no evidence for crustal assimilation. The parental magmas to Anatahan lie at the low 143Nd/144Nd, Ba/La, and Sm/La end of the spectrum of magmas erupted in the Marianas arc, consistent with 1-3 wt.% addition of subducted sediment to the mantle source, or roughly one

  12. Eruptive history of the youngest Mexican Shield and Mexico's most voluminous Holocene eruption: Cerro El Metate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryaëlle Chevrel, Magdalena; Guilbaud, Marie-Noelle; Siebe, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Small to medium-sized shield volcanoes are an important component of many volcanic fields on Earth. The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, one of the most complex and active continental arcs worldwide, displays a large number of such medium-sized volcanoes. In particular the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF) situated in central Mexico, is the largest monogenetic volcanic field in the world and includes more than 1000 scoria cones and about four hundred medium-sized volcanoes, also known as Mexican shields. The Mexican shields nevertheless represent nearly 70% of the total volume erupted since 1 Ma and hence played a considerable role in the formation of the MGVF. However, the source, storage, and transport as well as the physical properties (density, viscosity, volatile content, etc.) of the magmas involved in these eruptions remain poorly constrained. Here, we focus on Cerro El Metate, the youngest monogenetic andesite shield volcano of the field. New C14 dates for the eruption yield a young age (~AD 1250), which briefly precedes the initial rise of the Tarascan Empire (AD 1350-1521) in this region. This volcano has a minimum volume of ~9.2 km3 DRE, and its viscous lava flows were emplaced during a single eruption over a period of ~35 years covering an area of 103 km2. By volume, this is certainly the largest eruption during the Holocene in Mexico, and it is the largest andesitic effusive eruption known worldwide for this period. Such a large volume of lava erupted in a relatively short time had a significant impact on the environment (modification of the hydrological network, forest fires, etc.), and hence, nearby human populations probably had to migrate. Its eruptive history was reconstructed through detailed mapping, and geochemical and rheological analyses of its thick hornblende-bearing andesitic flows. Early and late flows have distinct morphologies, chemical and mineralogical compositions, and isotopic signatures which show that these lavas were fed by

  13. Adjuvant therapy, not mammographic screening, accounts for most of the observed breast cancer specific mortality reductions in Australian women since the national screening program began in 1991.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert C; Bell, Robin J; Thiagarajah, Geetha; Stevenson, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    There has been a 28% reduction in age-standardised breast cancer mortality in Australia since 1991 when the free national mammographic program (BreastScreen) began. Therefore, a comparative study between BreastScreen participation and breast cancer age specific mortality trends in Australia was undertaken for two time periods between 1991 and 2007, where women aged 50-59 and 60-69 years, who were invited to screen, were compared to women aged 40-49 and 70-79 years who were not invited, but who did have access to the program. There were mortality reductions in all four age groups between 1991-1992 and 2007, resulting in 5,849 (95% CI 4,979 to 6,718) fewer women dying of breast cancer than would have otherwise been the case. Women aged 40-49 years, who had the lowest BreastScreen participation (approximately 20%), had the largest mortality reduction: 44% (95% CI 34.8-51.2). Women aged 60-69 years, who had the highest BreastScreen participation (approximately 60%), had the smallest mortality reduction: 19% (95% CI 10.5-26.9). As BreastScreen participation by invited women aged 50-69 years only reached a maximum of about 55-60% in 1998-1999, a decline in mortality in Australian women cannot be attributed to BreastScreen prior to this time. Thus, almost 60% of the Australian decline in breast cancer mortality since 1991 cannot be attributed to BreastScreen. Therefore, mammographic screening cannot account for most of the reductions in breast cancer mortality that have occurred in Australian women since 1991 and may have contributed to over-diagnosis. Most, if not all, of the reductions can be attributed to the adjuvant hormonal and chemotherapy, which Australian women have increasingly received since 1986.

  14. Triggering of solar magnetic eruptions on various size scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse

    A solar eruption that produces a coronal mass ejection (CME) together with a flare is driven by the eruption of a closed-loop magnetic arcade that has a sheared-field core. Before eruption, the sheared core envelops a polarity inversion line along which cool filament material may reside. The sheared-core arcade erupts when there is a breakdown in the balance between the confining downward-directed magnetic tension of the overall arcade field and the upward-directed force of the pent-up magnetic pressure of the sheared field in the core of the arcade. What triggers the breakdown in this balance in favor of the upward-directed force is still an unsettled question. We consider several eruption examples, using imaging data from the SoHO, TRACE and Hinode satellites, and other sources, along with information about the magnetic field of the erupting regions. In several cases, observations of large-scale eruptions, where the magnetic neutral line spans ˜ few ×10,000 km, are consistent with magnetic flux cancelation being the trigger to the eruption's onset, even though the amount of flux canceled is only ˜ few percent of the total magnetic flux of the erupting region. In several other cases, an initial compact (small size-scale) eruption occurs embedded inside of a larger closed magnetic loop system, so that the smaller eruption destabilizes and causes the eruption of the much larger system. In this way, small-scale eruptive events can result in eruption of much larger-scale systems. This work was funded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate thought the Living With a Star Targeted Research and Technology Program, the Supporting Research and Program, and the Hinode project.

  15. Ionospheric disturbances by volcanic eruptions by GNSS-TEC: Comparison between Vulcanian and Plinian eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Y.; Heki, K.; Takeo, A.; Cahyadi, M. N.; Aditiya, A.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic waves from volcanic eruptions are often observed as infrasound in near fields. Part of them propagate upward and disturb the ionosphere, and can be observed in Total Electron Content (TEC) data derived by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In the past, Heki (2006 GRL) detected ionospheric disturbances by the 2004 explosion of the Asama Volcano, central Japan, and Dautermann et al. (2009 JGR) studied the 2003 eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano in Montserrat, West Indies. Here we present new examples, and try to characterize such disturbances. We first show TEC disturbances by the 2014 February Plinian eruption (VEI 4) of the Kelud volcano, East Java, Indonesia (Figure), observed with a regional GNSS network.The 2014 Kelud eruption broke a lava dome made by 2007 eruption and created a new creator. Significant disturbances were detected with four GPS and two GLONASS satellites, and the wavelet analyses showed that harmonic oscillations started at ~16:25 UT and continued nearly one hour. The frequency of the oscillation was ~3.8 mHz, which coincides with the atmospheric fundamental mode. We also confirmed concentric wavefronts, moving outward by ~0.8m/sec (stronger signals on the northern side). These features are similar to the 2003 Soufriere Hills case, although the signals in the present Kelud case is much clearer. Next, we compare them with ionospheric disturbances by Vulcanian explosions that occurred recently in Japan, i.e. the 2004 Asama case and the 2009 Sakurajima, and the 2011 Shin-moedake eruptions. They are characterized with one-time N-shaped disturbances possibly excited by the compression of the air above the vents. On the other hand, data from nearby seismometers suggested that atmospheric oscillations of various frequencies were excited by this continuous Plinian eruption. Part of such oscillations would have grown large due to atmospheric resonance.

  16. Recent eruptive history of Mount Hood, Oregon, and potential hazards from future eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1980-01-01

    Each of three major eruptive periods at Mount Hood (12,000-15,000(?), 1,500-1,800, and 200-300 years ago) produced dacite domes, pyroclastic flows, and mudflows, but virtually no pumice. Most of the fine lithic ash that mantles the slopes of the volcano and the adjacent mountains fell from ash clouds that accompanied the pyroclastic flows. Widely scattered pumice lapilli that are present at the ground surface on the south, east, and north sides of Mount Hood may have been erupted during the mid-1800's, when the last known activity of the volcano occurred. The geologically recent history of Mount Hood suggests that the most likely eruptive event in the future will be the formation of another dome, probably within the present south-facing crater. The principal hazards that could accompany dome formation include pyroclastic flows and mudflows moving from the upper slopes of the volcano down the floors of valleys. Ash clouds which accompany pyroclastic flows may deposit as much as a meter of fine ash close to their source, and as much as 20 centimeters at a distance of 11 kilometers downwind from the pyroclastic flows. Other hazards that could result from such eruptions include laterally directed explosive blasts that could propel rock fragments outward from the sides of a dome at high speed, and toxic volcanic gases. The scarcity of pumiceous ash erupted during the last 15,000 years suggests that explosive pumice eruptions are not a major hazard at Mount Hood; thus, there seems to be little danger that such an eruption will significantly affect the Portland (Oregon) metropolitan area in the near future.

  17. A Comparison Study of an Active Region Eruptive Filament and a Neighboring Non-Eruptive Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Jiang, C.; Feng, X. S.; Hu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We perform a comparison study of an eruptive filament in the core region of AR 11283 and a nearby non-eruptive filament. The coronal magnetic field supporting these two filaments is extrapolated using our data-driven CESE-MHD-NLFFF code (Jiang et al. 2013, Jiang etal. 2014), which presents two magnetic flux ropes (FRs) in the same extrapolation box. The eruptive FR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) spatially co-aligned very well with a pre-eruption EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for the coronal sigmoids. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the FRs match observations of the filaments strikingly well, which supports strongly the FR-dip model for filaments. The FR that supports the AR eruptive filament is much smaller (with a length of 3 Mm) compared with the large-scale FR holding the quiescent filament (with a length of 30 Mm). But the AR eruptive FR contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher magnetic energy density than the quiescent FR, because it resides along the main polarity inversion line (PIL) around sunspots with strong magnetic shear. Both the FRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive FR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability (TI), at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the FR stably. To the contrary, the quiescent FR is firmly held down by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the TI threshold height. (This work is partially supported by NSF AGS-1153323 and 1062050)

  18. THE BEHAVIOR OF NOVAE LIGHT CURVES BEFORE ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Collazzi, Andrew C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Xiao Limin; Pagnotta, Ashley; Kroll, Peter; Loechel, Klaus; Henden, Arne A.

    2009-12-15

    In 1975, E. R. Robinson conducted the hallmark study of the behavior of classical nova light curves before eruption, and this work has now become part of the standard knowledge of novae. He made three points: 5 out of 11 novae showed pre-eruption rises in the years before eruption, one nova (V446 Her) showed drastic changes in the variability across eruptions, and all but one of the novae (excepting BT Mon) have the same quiescent magnitudes before and after the outburst. This work has not been tested since it came out. We have now tested these results by going back to the original archival photographic plates and measuring large numbers of pre-eruption magnitudes for many novae using comparison stars on a modern magnitude scale. We find in particular that four out of five claimed pre-eruption rises are due to simple mistakes in the old literature, that V446 Her has the same amplitude of variations across its 1960 eruption, and that BT Mon has essentially unchanged brightness across its 1939 eruption. Out of 22 nova eruptions, we find two confirmed cases of significant pre-eruption rises (for V533 Her and V1500 Cyg), while T CrB has a deep pre-eruption dip. These events are a challenge to theorists. We find no significant cases of changes in variability across 27 nova eruptions beyond what is expected due to the usual fluctuations seen in novae away from eruptions. For 30 classical novae plus 19 eruptions from 6 recurrent novae, we find that the average change in magnitude from before the eruption to long after the eruption is 0.0 mag. However, we do find five novae (V723 Cas, V1500 Cyg, V1974 Cyg, V4633 Sgr, and RW UMi) that have significantly large changes, in that the post-eruption quiescent brightness level is over ten times brighter than the pre-eruption level. These large post-eruption brightenings are another challenge to theorists.

  19. Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea, November 1991-February 1994; field data and flow maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, C. Christina; Mangan, Margaret T.; Mattox, Tari N.; Kauahikaua, James P.

    1998-01-01

    Pu`u `O`o - Kupaianaha eruption on the east rift zone of Kilauea, which began in January 1983, is the longest-lived rift zone eruption of the last two centuries. By 1994, a broad field of lava, nearly 1 km3 in volume and 12 km wide at the coast, had buried 87 km2 of the volcano?s south flank. The initial six months of fissure eruptions (episodes 1-3) were followed by three years of episodic lava fountaining from the Pu`u `O`o vent (episodes 4-47). In July 1986, after two days of fissure eruptions up- and downrift from Pu`u `O`o (episodes 48a and 48b), the eruption shifted to a new vent, K?paianaha, 3.5 km downrift. For the next five-and-a-half years (episode 48), K?paianaha was the site of nearly continuous low-level effusion. The 49th episode occurred in November 1991, when several fissures opened between Pu`u `O`o and K?paianaha (see Mangan and others, 1995, Bulletin of Volcanology, v. 57, p. 127-135). This three-week-long outburst was the result of the waning output of the Kupaianaha vent, which finally died in February 1992 (see Kauahikaua and others, 1996, Bulletin of Volcanology, v. 57, p. 641-648). The third epoch of the eruption began ten days later, when vents opened on the uprift slope of the Pu`u `O`o cone. Several flank vents erupted over the next two years (episodes 50-53). In the first year, from February 1992 through February 1993, the low-level effusion was interrupted by 21 brief pauses. These ended with the beginning of episode 53 in February 1993, and for the next year, lava effusion was continuous. Episode 53 was ongoing at the end of the interval covered by this report. During the years that K?paianaha was active, the Pu`u `O`o conduit gradually evolved into a crater 300 m in diameter as the conduit walls collapsed. Beginning in 1987, an active lava pond was intermittently visible in the bottom of the crater; from 1990 on, the pond was almost continuously present. The Pu`u `O`o pond drained at the beginning of episode 49 in November 1991, and

  20. Kilauea volcano eruption seen from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-51 crew had a clear view of the erupting Kilauea volcano during the early morning pass over the Hawaiian islands. Kilauea, on the southwest side of the island of Hawaii, has been erupting almost continuously since January, 1983. Kilauea's summit caldera, with the smaller Halemaumau crater nestled within, is highlighted in the early morning sun (just above the center of the picture). The lava flows which covered roads and subdivisions in 1983-90 can be seen as dark flows to the east (toward the upper right) of the steam plumes on this photo. The summit crater and lava flows of Mauna Loa volcano make up the left side of the photo. Features like the Volcano House and Kilauea Visitor Center on the edge of the caldera, the small subdivisions east of the summit, Ola's Rain Forest north of the summit, and agricultural land along the coast are easily identified.

  1. Fine particles in the Soufriere eruption plume

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, D.C.; Chuan, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The size distributions of fine particles measured at tropospheric altitudes in the periphery of the eruption plume formed during the 17 April 1979 eruption of Soufriere Volcano and in the low-level effluents on 15 May 1979 were found to be bimodal, having peak concentrations at geometric mean diameters of 1.1 and 0.23 micrometers. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis of the samplers revealed an abundance of aluminum and silicon and traces of sodium, magnesium, chlorine, potassium, calcium, and iron in the large-particle mode. The submicrometer-sized particles were covered with liquid containing sulfur, assumed to be in the form of liquid sulfuric acid.

  2. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature.

  3. Learning to recognize volcanic non-eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when, where, and how a volcano will erupt—in other words, eruption prediction. Generally, eruption predictions are based on insights from monitoring data combined with the history of the volcano. An outstanding example is the A.D. 1980–1986 lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington (United States). Recognition of a consistent pattern of precursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical monitoring enabled successful predictions of more than 12 dome-building episodes (Swanson et al., 1983). At volcanic systems that are more complex or poorly understood, probabilistic forecasts can be useful (e.g., Newhall and Hoblitt, 2002; Marzocchi and Woo, 2009). In such cases, the probabilities of different types of volcanic events are quantified, using historical accounts and geological studies of a volcano's past activity, supplemented by information from similar volcanoes elsewhere, combined with contemporary monitoring information.

  4. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E.; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7–C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  5. Formation and eruption of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1989-01-01

    A model for the magnetic field associated with solar prominences is considered. It is shown that flux cancellation at the neutral line of a sheared magnetic arcade leads to the formation of helical field lines which are capable, in principle, of supporting prominence plasma. A numerical method for the computation of force-free, canceling magnetic structures is presented. Starting from an initial potential field we prescribe the motions of magnetic footpoints at the photosphere, with reconnection occurring only at the neutral line. As more and more flux cancels, magnetic flux is transferred from the arcade field to the helical field. Results for a particular model of the photospheric motions are presented. The magnetic structure is found to be stable: the arcade field keeps the helical field tied down at the photosphere. The axis of the helical field moves to larger and larger height, suggestive of prominence eruption. These results suggest that prominence eruptions may be trigered by flux cancellation.

  6. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7-C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  7. Pseudoephedrine may cause "pigmenting" fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Esen; Elinç-Aslan, Meryem Sevinç

    2011-05-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive drug eruption characterized by recurrent well-defined lesions in the same location each time the responsible drug is taken. Two different clinical forms have been described: the common classic pigmenting form and the rare nonpigmenting form. Nonpigmenting FDE is mainly characterized by symmetrical large erythematous plaques and the dermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Pseudoephedrine is known as the major inducer of nonpigmenting FDE. Pigmenting FDE from pseudoephedrine has not been reported previously. Here, the first case of pseudoephedrine-induced pigmenting FDE is reported, showing the characteristic features of classic pigmenting FDE such as asymmetry, normal-sized lesions, and the epidermodermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Moreover, a positive occlusive patch-test reaction to pseudoephedrine could be demonstrated on postlesional FDE skin for the first time.

  8. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature. PMID:26989523

  9. Safe water for Africa (Africa-1000)

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.; Kashkari, C.

    1996-12-31

    Africa-1000 is a program to provide safe water to thousands of villages in Africa. It is a formidable effort and needs the support of the international scientific community. Science and technology is the only hope for a solution of the African crisis. There are vast areas in the Sub-Saharan Africa that have water under the ground but due to lack of electric power, the water cannot be pumped. Thus the land is dry and barren and people are starving. The African continent has abundant renewable energy in the form of solar and wind energy. The technologies are well developed and available in the developed countries. Therefore, the solution is as follows: dig and drill wells and boreholes to reach underground water; install standardized solar or wind driven pumps to bring water to the surface; train village technicians to operate, maintain and repair these energy systems; and replicate these installations in thousands of villages, thus establishing standard water and energy systems across Africa.

  10. Impact of volcanic plume emissions on rain water chemistry during the January 2010 Nyamuragira eruptive event: implications for essential potable water resources.

    PubMed

    Cuoco, Emilio; Tedesco, Dario; Poreda, Robert J; Williams, Jeremy C; De Francesco, Stefano; Balagizi, Charles; Darrah, Thomas H

    2013-01-15

    On January 2, 2010 the Nyamuragira volcano erupted lava fountains extending up to 300 m vertically along an ~1.5 km segment of its southern flank cascading ash and gas on nearby villages and cities along the western side of the rift valley. Because rain water is the only available potable water resource within this region, volcanic impacts on drinking water constitutes a major potential hazard to public health within the region. During the 2010 eruption, concerns were expressed by local inhabitants about water quality and feelings of physical discomfort (e.g. nausea, bloating, indigestion, etc.) after consuming rain water collected after the eruption began. We present the elemental and ionic chemistry of drinking water samples collected within the region on the third day of the eruption (January 5, 2010). We identify a significant impact on water quality associated with the eruption including lower pH (i.e. acidification) and increases in acidic halogens (e.g. F(-) and Cl(-)), major ions (e.g. SO(4)(2-), NH(4)(+), Na(+), Ca(2+)), potentially toxic metals (e.g. Al(3+), Mn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Hf(4+)), and particulate load. In many cases, the water's composition significantly exceeds World Health Organization (WHO) drinking water standards. The degree of pollution depends upon: (1) ash plume direction and (2) ash plume density. The potential negative health impacts are a function of the water's pH, which regulates the elements and their chemical form that are released into drinking water.

  11. Compound-specific carbon isotopes from Earth’s largest flood basalt eruptions directly linked to the end-Triassic mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Jessica H.; Olsen, Paul E.; Eglinton, Timothy; Brookfield, Michael E.; Sambrotto, Raymond N.

    2010-01-01

    A leading hypothesis explaining Phanerozoic mass extinctions and associated carbon isotopic anomalies is the emission of greenhouse, other gases, and aerosols caused by eruptions of continental flood basalt provinces. However, the necessary serial relationship between these eruptions, isotopic excursions, and extinctions has never been tested in geological sections preserving all three records. The end-Triassic extinction (ETE) at 201.4 Ma is among the largest of these extinctions and is tied to a large negative carbon isotope excursion, reflecting perturbations of the carbon cycle including a transient increase in CO2. The cause of the ETE has been inferred to be the eruption of the giant Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP). Here, we show that carbon isotopes of leaf wax derived lipids (n-alkanes), wood, and total organic carbon from two orbitally paced lacustrine sections interbedded with the CAMP in eastern North America show similar excursions to those seen in the mostly marine St. Audrie’s Bay section in England. Based on these results, the ETE began synchronously in marine and terrestrial environments slightly before the oldest basalts in eastern North America but simultaneous with the eruption of the oldest flows in Morocco, a CO2 super greenhouse, and marine biocalcification crisis. Because the temporal relationship between CAMP eruptions, mass extinction, and the carbon isotopic excursions are shown in the same place, this is the strongest case for a volcanic cause of a mass extinction to date. PMID:20308590

  12. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  13. Erupted silicic cumulates in large ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Deering, C. D.; Huber, C.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    If chemical diversity in igneous rocks is dominated by crystal-liquid separation in open-system magma reservoirs, a significant number of crystal accumulation zones must be preserved in the crust and upper mantle. Such cumulates are conspicuous in mafic lithologies (MOR, layered mafic intrusions, lower crustal arc sections), but have rarely been described and/or are controversial in the silicic upper crust. Although it is possible to recognize signs of crystal accumulations in plutonic exposures, the fact that these batholiths are typically: 1) at least several millions of years old, 2) multi-stage, 3) deformed and 4) biased towards the youngest intrusive episodes, some ambiguity remains in how to interpret geochemical and textural observations. We have chosen to explore large zoned ignimbrites, which represent an instantaneous evacuation of an upper crustal magma reservoir, to isolate potential crystal accumulation zones. Late-erupted, crystal-rich scoria with unusual chemistries (e.g., high Ba, Zr, Eu/Eu*) have been found in multiple examples of these zoned ignimbrites around the world, including the 900+ km3 Ammonia Tanks and Carpenter Ridge Tuffs, both erupted during the Tertiary magmatic flare-up in the Western USA. As already suggested for the 7700 BP Crater Lake ignimbrite, such crystal-rich scoria have mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that are most convincingly explained by accumulation of low temperature minerals as highly-evolved melt escapes upward and pools at the top of large crystalline mushes. To account for the eruption of such crystal-rich zones (technically uneruptible with >50vol% crystals), some melting of low-temperature mineral phases is required; evidence for resorption textures in sanidine and quartz is commonplace in these scoria. The presence of mafic enclaves and/or mingling textures in such scoria indicate that recharge from below ultimately drove melting of part of the mineral assemblage within the cumulate rootzone, while

  14. Risk Assessment During the 2002 Etnean Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongo, R.; Crisci, G. M.

    2003-04-01

    A two-dimensional cellular automata model for the simulation of lava flows, has been in the past validated on real cases of Etnean eruptions. Its latest release, SCIARA-hex1 was applied on the 1991--93 Etnean eruption in the validation phase. Lava flows can be viewed as a dynamic system based on local interactions with discrete time and space, where space is represented by hexagonal cells, whose specification (state) describes the characteristics (substates) of the corresponding piece of space. The substates are: altitude, lava thickness, temperature, lava flows. SCIARA-hex1 was applied during the Etnean crisis in the summer of 2001, when a new eruption threatened the town of Nicolosi. The real-case study was performed in collaboration with the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Vulcanology of Catania, Sicily. A new real-time application of SCIARA has been the risk assessment for the new event which occurred in the autumn of 2002. Two major eruptions have charactersied this event. The first, started on the NE flank of the volcano, with lava generated by a fracture between 2500 ma.s.l and 2350 ma.s.l., near the 1809 fracture and point towards the town of Linguaglossa. The second one has interested the SW flank, with an emission point near 2700 ma.s.l., between the SE main crater and La Montagnola and flowing over the 2001 lava field. The simulation results have been consistent with the real lava flow paths, despite poor morphology data due to the presence of solidified magma from the 2001 event. SCIARA has proved to be a reliable and flexible tool for forecasting lava flow paths and for assessing hazard for this event, besides the development of real-time scenarios.

  15. Fixed drug eruptions with intraoral presentation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Bihari, Manorama; Bhuvan, Jyoti; Saad, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Fixed-drug eruption (FDE) is an unusual and rare adverse drug reaction. This type of reaction is actually a delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction that occurs as lesions recurring at the same skin site due to repeated intake of an offending drug. Here is a case report of a 58-year-old male patient who developed intraoral FDEs after ingestion of the first dose of ornidazole. PMID:26097341

  16. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  17. Voluminous Icelandic Basaltic Eruptions Appear To Cause Abrupt Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning on June 21, 1783, Laki volcano in southern Iceland erupted 14.7 km3 basalt, ejecting 24 Mt SO_{2} into the stratosphere where it was blown eastward and northward and 98 Mt into the troposphere where the jet stream transported it southeastward to Europe. The "dry fog" observed in Europe with an estimated mean concentration of 60 ppbv SO2, raised daytime temperatures as much as 3.3^{o}C, causing the warmest July in England from 1659 when measurements began until 1983. SO2, tropospheric O_{3}, NO2, and fine ash absorb ultraviolet energy from the sun that causes the bonds between and within their atoms to oscillate at 47 times higher frequency than the bonds in CO_{2} absorbing infrared radiation. Temperature is proportional to the kinetic energy of these oscillations, i.e. the frequency squared. Thus these gases are raised to much higher temperatures than greenhouse gases. The Stefan-Boltzmann law says that radiation from these molecules is a constant times temperature raised to the fourth power. As a result, SO2 and ash radiate far more energy back to earth than CO_{2}, causing warming. Another way to look at the energy involved shows that 15 ppbv SO2 in the 0.3-0.42 μm wavelength band absorbs as much solar energy per unit volume as 388,000 ppbv CO_{2} absorbs infrared energy in the 12.7-17.5 μm band. Basaltic volcanoes such as Laki emit 10 to 100 times more SO2 than more evolved magmas and are less explosive, leaving most of the SO_{2} in the troposphere. All 14 Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) sudden warmings between 46 and 11 ka are contemporaneous with the highest levels of sulfate in the GISP2 drill hole near Summit Greenland. These DO events typically warmed the northern hemisphere out of the ice age within decades, but as volcanism waned, ocean temperatures cooled the world back into an ice age within centuries. The world finally exited the ice age when voluminous volcanism continued from 11.6 to 9.6 ka. Basaltic table mountains or tuyas in Iceland document

  18. Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. Krier

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report, ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'', is to present information about natural volcanic systems and the parameters that can be used to model their behavior. This information is used to develop parameter-value distributions appropriate for analysis of the consequences of volcanic eruptions through a repository at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report provides information to four other reports: ''Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion'', (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170001]); ''Atmospheric Dispersal and Deposition of Tephra from Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170026]); ''Dike/Drift Interactions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170028]); ''Development of Earthquake Ground Motion Input for Preclosure Seismic Design and Postclosure Performance Assessment of a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027], Section 6.5). This report is organized into seven major sections. This section addresses the purpose of this document. Section 2 addresses quality assurance, Section 3 the use of software, Section 4 identifies the requirements that constrain this work, and Section 5 lists assumptions and their rationale. Section 6 presents the details of the scientific analysis and Section 7 summarizes the conclusions reached.

  19. Experimental insights into transient volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Ramos-Hernandez, S.; de Arcia, P.

    2014-12-01

    The explosive expansion of mixtures of pressurized gases and pyroclasts within volcanic conduits and volcanic flows is a complex process that cannot be directly observed. Here, we present the results of shock-tube experiments with volcanic particles which exhibit remarkable similarities to the ejection dynamics of transient eruptions. Upon rapid decompression (from 2-11 MPa argon pressure to atmospheric pressure Pa = 0.1 MPa), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Our experimental results show that: 1) time-scales of the mechanical coupling between pyroclasts and the gas phase control the mixture dynamics and different regimes can be defined in terms of the Stokes number according to the particles grain-size; 2) As suggested by previous studies, we found that the pseudo-gas approximation is a reasonable approximation in transient eruptions only under certain conditions (constrained here experimentally); 3) the non-linear decay of the particles velocities with time is related with the conduit depth and the initial volume of the expanding material. Our results broaden the impact of previous experimental studies and provide fundamental information for numerical models of eruptive dynamics.

  20. Assessing the atmospheric and climatic effects of basaltic fissure eruptions. A case study Nornahraun, North Iceland, 2014-2015.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Catherine; Burton, Kevin; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Brown, Richard

    2015-04-01

    A volcanic eruption's ability to release sulphur gases into the atmosphere is one of the critical factors in assessing their climatic and environmental effects, because it is directly linked to the potential H2SO4 aerosol burden produced [1]. Basaltic fissure eruptions loft large amounts of sulphur into the atmosphere because of the efficient degassing of volatiles and halogens from the magma at the vent [2-4] coupled with the high sulphur yield of basaltic magma. The common nature of this style of eruption and its products, regardless of magnitude, means that our understanding of the exact processes which influence atmospheric chemistry and environmental impact is very important. The Nornahraun fissure eruption in North Iceland that began on the 31st August 2014, has quickly become one of the best documented eruptions of its kind, through systematic monitoring and sampling by the Institute of Earth Sciences eruption team and The Icelandic Meteorological Office. As a result it is an excellent modern analogue for historic or ancient basaltic fissure eruptions, for which the amount of degassing can only be estimated through petrological and geochemical methods. It also serves as a timely testing platform for novel geochemical proxies. This study uses the exceptional sensitivity of the 187Os-187Re radiogenic system to the presence of crustal material [5], and highly siderophile stable isotopes Cu, Zn and S to indicate the chemistry and degassing of the melt carrying S to the surface. The geochemical isotopic proxies will be tested using established petrological methods and gas emission data. This study concentrates on determining the following key parameters: (1) The source of volatiles in the magma indicated though the pressure dependence of S solubility. (2) The mechanism of aerosol and gas release into the atmosphere is dictated both by the chemistry of the melt that controls the S species (H2S, SO2 or FeS2) present [6], and by the mechanism of transfer. (3) The

  1. Poverty reduction in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Poverty in Africa has been rising for the last quarter-century, while it has been falling in the rest of the developing world. Africa's distinctive problem is that its economies have not been growing. This article attempts to synthesize a range of recent research to account for this failure of the growth process. I argue that the reasons lie not in African peculiarities but rather in geographic features that globally cause problems but that are disproportionately pronounced in Africa. These features interact to create three distinct challenges that are likely to require international interventions beyond the conventional reliance on aid. PMID:17942702

  2. Fluvial responses to volcanism: resedimentation of the 1800a Taupo ignimbrite eruption in the Rangitaiki River catchment, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manville, Vern; Newton, Erin H.; White, James D. L.

    2005-02-01

    The potential for the generation of dangerous and damaging lahars and floods in response to the eruption of voluminous pyroclastic debris has become increasingly appreciated in recent years. The style and tempo of this response varies both between eruptions and between individual catchments impacted by a single eruption, so that an understanding of the factors controlling this variation is necessary for precise hazard assessment. The 1800a Taupo eruption from the Taupo Volcanic Centre in the central North Island of New Zealand devastated an area of 20,000 km 2 during eruption of a climactic ignimbrite, impacting the headwaters of all major rivers draining radially from this region. The Rangitaiki River, the subject of this paper, differs from other catchments in that the Taupo ignimbrite buried an essentially flat land surface inherited from a suite of welded ignimbrite sheets erupted between 320-340 and 230 ka. The middle reaches of the catchment are characterised by narrow, steep gorges alternating with low-gradient basins developed in tectonic half-grabens. Initially, remobilisation of pyroclastic material in the headwaters was dominated by hyperconcentrated sheet flows resulting in shallow reworking. In higher gradient areas, reintegration of drainage networks was achieved by incision of deep channels and gullies, assisted by breakouts from ephemeral lakelets developed in ignimbrite-dammed depressions. Braided, and later meandering, streams superseded this pattern as rill and gully systems stabilised and sediment yields fell leading to a decline in drainage density. Gorge reaches acted as efficient conduits for remobilised material while the basins acted as local depocentres for the temporary storage of volcaniclastic sediments, mediating the transfer of pyroclastic debris to the Bay of Plenty coast >100 km to the north. Reworking and resedimentation of pyroclastic debris began immediately after the eruption, peaking early and then rapidly declining so that

  3. The hazards of eruptions through lakes and seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Witter, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Eruptions through crater lakes or shallow seawater, referred to here as subaqueous eruptions, present hazards from hydromagmatic explosions, such as base surges, lahars, and tsunamis, which may not exist at volcanoes on dry land. We have systematically compiled information from eruptions through surface water in order to understand the circumstances under which these hazards occur and what disastrous effects they have caused in the past. Subaqueous eruptions represent only 8% of all recorded eruptions but have produced about 20% of all fatalities associated with volcanic activity in historical time. Excluding eruptions that have resulted in about a hundred deaths or less, lahars have killed people in the largest number of historical subaqueous eruptions (8), followed by pyroclastic flows (excluding base surges; 5) tsunamis (4), and base surges (2). Subaqueous eruptions have produced lahars primarily on high (>1000 m), steep-sided volcanoes containing small (<1 km diameter) crater lakes. Tsunamis and other water waves have caused death or destroyed man-made structures only at submarine volcanoes and at Lake Taal in the Philippines. In spite of evidence that magma-water mixing makes eruptions more explosive, such explosions and their associated base surges have caused fewer deaths, and have been implicated in fewer eruptions involving large numbers of fatalities than lahars and tsunamis. The latter hazards are more deadly because they travel much farther from a volcano and inundate coastal areas and stream valleys that tend to be densely settled.

  4. Deformation associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mann, Dorte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Lu, Zhiming

    2002-01-01

    Okmok volcano, located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian chain, Alaska, is the most eruptive caldera system in North America in historic time. Its most recent eruption occurred in 1997. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry shows deflation of the caldera center of up to 140 cm during this time, preceded and followed by inflation of smaller magnitude. The main part of the observed deformation can be modeled using a pressure point source model. The inferred source is located between 2.5 and 5.0 km beneath the approximate center of the caldera and ???5 km from the eruptive vent. We interpret it as a central magma reservoir. The preeruptive period features inflation accompanied by shallow localized subsidence between the caldera center and the vent. We hypothesize that this is caused by hydrothermal activity or that magma moved away from the central chamber and toward the later vent. Since all historic eruptions at Okmok have originated from the same cone, this feature may be a precursor that indicates an upcoming eruption. The erupted magma volume is ???9 times the volume that can be accounted for by the observed preeruptive inflation. This indicates a much longer inflation interval than we were able to observe. The observation that reinflation started shortly after the eruption suggests that inflation spans the whole time interval between eruptions. Extrapolation of the average subsurface volume change rate is in good agreement with the long-term eruption frequency and eruption volumes of Okmok.

  5. Solar Multiple Eruptions from a Confined Magnetic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-09-01

    How eruption can recur from a confined magnetic structure is discussed based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the NOAA active region 11444, which produced three eruptions within 1.5 hr on 2012 March 27. The active region (AR) had the positive-polarity magnetic fields in the center surrounded by the negative-polarity fields around. Since such a distribution of magnetic polarity tends to form a dome-like magnetic fan structure confined over the AR, the multiple eruptions were puzzling. Our investigation reveals that this event exhibits several properties distinct from other eruptions associated with magnetic fan structures: (i) a long filament encircling the AR was present before the eruptions; (ii) expansion of the open-closed boundary (OCB) of the field lines after each eruption was suggestive of the growing fan-dome structure, and (iii) the ribbons inside the closed magnetic polarity inversion line evolved in response to the expanding OCB. It thus appears that in spite of multiple eruptions the fan-dome structure remained undamaged, and the closing back field lines after each eruption rather reinforced the fan-dome structure. We argue that the multiple eruptions could occur in this AR in spite of its confined magnetic structure because the filament encircling the AR was adequate for slipping through the magnetic separatrix to minimize the damage to its overlying fan-dome structure. The result of this study provides a new insight into the productivity of eruptions from a confined magnetic structure.

  6. Particle-water heat transfer during explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, D. C.; Gilbert, J. S.; Lane, S. J.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal interaction between volcanic particles and water during explosive eruptions has been quantified using a numerical heat transfer model for spherical particles. The model couples intraparticle conduction with heat transfer from the particle surface by boiling water in order to explore heat loss with time for a range of particle diameters. The results are combined with estimates of particle settling times to provide insight into heat removal during eruption from samples of volcanic particles produced by explosive eruption. Heat removal is restricted by resistance to heat transfer from the volcanic particles with intraparticle thermal conduction important for large particles and surface cooling by boiling dominating for small particles. In most cases, volcanic particles approach thermal equilibrium with the surrounding fluid during an explosive eruption. Application of the results to a sample from the Gjálp 1996, Iceland eruption indicates that, relative to 0○C, 70-80% of the heat is transferred from the particles to boiling water during the settling time before burial in the stratigraphic succession. The implication is that, for subglacial explosive eruptions, much of the heat content of the magma is coupled into melting ice extremely rapidly. If all particles of the Gjálp 1996 deposit were cooled to the local boiling point by the end of the eruption then approximately 78% of the initial heat content was removed from the erupting magma during the eruption. This is consistent with calorimetric calculations based on volumes of ice melted during and after the eruption.

  7. The Late Holocene Compositionally Zoned Glass Mountain Eruption at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    The spectacular Glass Mountain rhyolite-dacite flow erupted high on the east side of Medicine Lake volcano 950 yrs ago, producing one cubic kilometer of pumice and lava from more than a dozen vents along a 5-km- long fissure. Detailed mapping and chemical/petrographic analysis of 107 lava and tephra samples, 40 quenched andesitic blobs, 18 co-magmatic cumulates, and 6 granitoid fragments show that the eruption commenced with an explosive ejection of rhyolitic tephra, followed by effusion of the mixed-magma dacitic flow, and ended with extrusion of rhyolitic lava at all vents along the fissure. Lava and pumice samples range from 61.3 to 74.6 percent silica and form linear to curvilinear arrays on variation diagrams. Quenched andesitic blobs (some with amphibole, Grove et al. 1977) are mainly in the dacitic lava flow, whereas the cumulate and granitoid fragments are found almost entirely in the distal domes near the ends of the fissure. The amphibole indicates high water contents in the parental andesitic magma, water that likely contributed to melting of granitic crust that combined with a rhyolitic differentiate to produce rhyolite. Compositional variation in the dacite and rhyolite requires at least three components. The dacite is a mixture of evolved rhyodacite (produced by fractionation of the parental andesite), a granitic crustal melt, and andesite containing olivine and An-rich plag. The dacite is charged with andesitic blobs, some of which may have intruded just prior to eruption. We interpret that before the eruption began, a zoned magma body formed at shallow depth, with rhyolitic magma at its top and dacitic magma underneath. Removal of rhyolitic magma during the initial explosive event allowed hotter and more fluid dacitic magma to enter and dominate the conduit resulting in effusion of the initial dacite flow. At times, rhyolitic melt remaining in the shallow reservoir squeezed into the conduit and was erupted as pods of obsidian (Anderson 1933) that

  8. The Novarupta-Katmai eruption of 1912 - largest eruption of the twentieth century; centennial perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2012-01-01

    The explosive outburst at Novarupta (Alaska) in June 1912 was the 20th century's most voluminous volcanic eruption. Marking its centennial, we illustrate and document the complex eruptive sequence, which was long misattributed to nearby Mount Katmai, and how its deposits have provided key insights about volcanic and magmatic processes. It was one of the few historical eruptions to produce a collapsed caldera, voluminous high-silica rhyolite, wide compositional zonation (51-78 percent SiO2), banded pumice, welded tuff, and an aerosol/dust veil that depressed global temperature measurably. It emplaced a series of ash flows that filled what became the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, sustaining high-temperature metal-transporting fumaroles for a decade. Three explosive episodes spanned ~60 hours, depositing ~17 km3 of fallout and 11±2 km3 of ignimbrite, together representing ~13.5 km3 of zoned magma. No observers were nearby and no aircraft were in Alaska, and so the eruption narrative was assembled from scattered villages and ship reports. Because volcanology was in its infancy and the early investigations (1915-23) were conducted under arduous expeditionary conditions, many provocative misapprehensions attended reports based on those studies. Fieldwork at Katmai was not resumed until 1953, but, since then, global advances in physical volcanology and chemical petrology have gone hand in hand with studies of the 1912 deposits, clarifying the sequence of events and processes and turning the eruption into one of the best studied in the world. To provide perspective on this century-long evolution, we describe the geologic and geographic setting of the eruption - in a remote, sparsely inhabited wilderness; we review the cultural and scientific contexts at the time of the eruption and early expeditions; and we compile a chronology of the many Katmai investigations since 1912. Products of the eruption are described in detail, including eight layers of regionwide fallout

  9. Eruption Source Parameters for forecasting ash dispersion and deposition from vulcanian eruptions at Tungurahua volcano: Insights from field data from the July 2013 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, René; Bernard, Benjamin; Narváez, Diego; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Hasselle, Nathalie; Folch, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Tungurahua volcano, located in the central area of the Ecuadorian Sierra, is erupting intermittently since 1999 alternating between periods of quiescence and explosive activity. Volcanic ash has been the most frequent and widespread hazard provoking air contamination episodes and impacts on human health, animals and crops in the surrounding area. After two months of quiescence, Tungurahua erupted violently on 14th July 2013 generating short-lived eruptive columns rising up to 9 km above the vent characterized as a vulcanian eruption. The resulting fallout deposits were sampled daily during and after the eruptions to determine grain size distributions and perform morphological and componentry analyses. Dispersion and sedimentation of ash were simulated numerically coupling the meteorological Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) with the volcanic ash dispersion FALL3D models. The combination of field and numerical studies allowed constraining the Eruption Source Parameters (ESP) for this event, which could be used to forecast ash dispersion and deposition from future vulcanian eruptions at Tungurahua. This set of pre-defined ESP was further validated using two different eruptions, as blind test, occurring on 16th December 2012 and 1st February 2014.

  10. Eruptions at Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA, part 1: energetics and eruption dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Leif; Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Murphy, Fred; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Johnston, Malcolm J.S.; Manga, Michael; McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Geysers provide a natural laboratory to study multiphase eruptive processes. We present results from a four–day experiment at Lone Star Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, USA. We simultaneously measured water discharge, acoustic emissions, infraredintensity, and visible and infrared video to quantify the energetics and dynamics of eruptions, occurring approximately every three hours. We define four phases in the eruption cycle: 1) a 28 ± 3 minute phase with liquid and steam fountaining, with maximum jet velocities of 16–28 m s− 1, steam mass fraction of less than ∼ 0.01. Intermittently choked flow and flow oscillations with periods increasing from 20 to 40 s are coincident with a decrease in jet velocity and an increase of steam fraction; 2) a 26 ± 8 minute post–eruption relaxation phase with no discharge from the vent, infrared (IR) and acoustic power oscillations gliding between 30 and 40 s; 3) a 59 ± 13 minute recharge period during which the geyser is quiescent and progressively refills, and 4) a 69 ± 14 minute pre–play period characterized by a series of 5–10 minute–long pulses of steam, small volumes of liquid water discharge and 50–70 s flow oscillations. The erupted waters ascend froma 160 − 170° C reservoir and the volume discharged during the entire eruptive cycle is 20.8 ± 4.1 m3. Assuming isentropic expansion, we calculate a heat output from the geyser of 1.4–1.5 MW, which is < 0.1% of the total heat output from Yellowstone Caldera.

  11. Research Management in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benneh, George

    2002-01-01

    Examines research management, particularly within higher education institutions, in Africa including, research and current trends in knowledge production, institutional aspects, research funding, and good practice in research management. (EV)

  12. Women in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Manon

    1975-01-01

    The role and status of women in Africa has changed profoundly since the end of the colonial period. Many differences in women's status and role are based on geography, history, nationality, political and socioeconomic systems, culture, and religion. (JR)

  13. Geomorphic consequences of volcanic eruptions in Alaska: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-10-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption, the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed. A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment-water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite large

  14. Geomorphic Consequences of Volcanic Eruptions in Alaska: A Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Eruptions of Alaska volcanoes have significant and sometimes profound geomorphic consequences on surrounding landscapes and ecosystems. The effects of eruptions on the landscape can range from complete burial of surface vegetation and preexisting topography to subtle, short-term perturbations of geomorphic and ecological systems. In some cases, an eruption will allow for new landscapes to form in response to the accumulation and erosion of recently deposited volcaniclastic material. In other cases, the geomorphic response to a major eruptive event may set in motion a series of landscape changes that could take centuries to millennia to be realized. The effects of volcanic eruptions on the landscape and how these effects influence surface processes has not been a specific focus of most studies concerned with the physical volcanology of Alaska volcanoes. Thus, what is needed is a review of eruptive activity in Alaska in the context of how this activity influences the geomorphology of affected areas. To illustrate the relationship between geomorphology and volcanic activity in Alaska, several eruptions and their geomorphic impacts will be reviewed. These eruptions include the 1912 Novarupta–Katmai eruption, the 1989–1990 and 2009 eruptions of Redoubt volcano, the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, and the recent historical eruptions of Pavlof volcano. The geomorphic consequences of eruptive activity associated with these eruptions are described, and where possible, information about surface processes, rates of landscape change, and the temporal and spatial scale of impacts are discussed.A common feature of volcanoes in Alaska is their extensive cover of glacier ice, seasonal snow, or both. As a result, the generation of meltwater and a variety of sediment–water mass flows, including debris-flow lahars, hyperconcentrated-flow lahars, and sediment-laden water floods, are typical outcomes of most types of eruptive activity. Occasionally, such flows can be quite

  15. Thermodynamics of gas and steam-blast eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, Larry G.

    1995-04-01

    Eruptions of gas or steam and non-juvenile debris are common in volcanic and hydrothermal areas. From reports of non-juvenile eruptions or eruptive sequences world-wide, at least three types (or end-members) can be identified: (1) those involving rock and liquid water initially at boiling-point temperatures (‘boiling-point eruptions’); (2) those powered by gas (primarily water vapor) at initial temperatures approaching magmatic (‘gas eruptions’); and (3) those caused by rapid mixing of hot rock and ground- or surface water (‘mixing eruptions’). For these eruption types, the mechanical energy released, final temperatures, liquid water contents and maximum theoretical velocities are compared by assuming that the erupting mixtures of rock and fluid thermally equilibrate, then decompress isentropically from initial, near-surface pressure (≤10 MPa) to atmospheric pressure. Maximum mechanical energy release is by far greatest for gas eruptions (≤˜1.3 MJ/kg of fluid-rock mixture)-about one-half that of an equivalent mass of gunpowder and one-fourth that of TNT. It is somewhat less for mixing eruptions (≤˜0.4 MJ/kg), and least for boiling-point eruptions (≤˜0.25 MJ/kg). The final water contents of crupted boiling-point mixtures are usually high, producing wet, sloppy deposits. Final erupted mixtures from gas eruptions are nearly always dry, whereas those from mixing eruptions vary from wet to dry. If all the enthalpy released in the eruptions were converted to kinetic energy, the final velocity ( v max) of these mixtures could range up to 670 m/s for boiling-point eruptions and 1820 m/s for gas eruptions (highest for high initial pressure and mass fractions of rock ( m r) near zero). For mixing eruptions, v max ranges up to 1150 m/s. All observed eruption velocities are less than 400 m/s, largely because (1) most solid material is expelled when m r is high, hence v max is low; (2) observations are made of large blocks the velocities of which may be

  16. Predicting eruptions from precursory activity using remote sensing data hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P. W.

    2016-07-01

    Many volcanoes produce some level of precursory activity prior to an eruption. This activity may or may not be detected depending on the available monitoring technology. In certain cases, precursors such as thermal output can be interpreted to make forecasts about the time and magnitude of the impending eruption. Kamchatka (Russia) provides an ideal natural laboratory to study a wide variety of eruption styles and precursory activity prior to an eruption. At Bezymianny volcano for example, a clear increase in thermal activity commonly occurs before an eruption, which has allowed predictions to be made months ahead of time. Conversely, the eruption of Tolbachik volcano in 2012 produced no discernable thermal precursors before the large scale effusive eruption. However, most volcanoes fall between the extremes of consistently behaved and completely undetectable, which is the case with neighboring Kliuchevskoi volcano. This study tests the effectiveness of using thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing to track volcanic thermal precursors using data from both the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors. It focuses on three large eruptions that produced different levels and durations of effusive and explosive behavior at Kliuchevskoi. Before each of these eruptions, TIR spaceborne sensors detected thermal anomalies (i.e., pixels with brightness temperatures > 2 °C above the background temperature). High-temporal, low-spatial resolution (i.e., ~ hours and 1 km) AVHRR data are ideal for detecting large thermal events occurring over shorter time scales, such as the hot material ejected following strombolian eruptions. In contrast, high-spatial, low-temporal resolution (i.e., days to weeks and 90 m) ASTER data enables the detection of much lower thermal activity; however, activity with a shorter duration will commonly be missed. ASTER and AVHRR data are combined to track low

  17. Eruptive History and Chemical Evolution of the Precaldera and Postcaldera Basalt-Dacite Sequences, Long Valley, California: Implications for Magma Sources, Current Seismic Unrest, and Future Volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    The Long Valley Volcanic Field in east-central California straddles the East Sierran frontal fault zone, overlapping the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The volcanic field overlies a mature mid-Tertiary erosional surface that truncates a basement composed mainly of Mesozoic plutons and associated roof pendants of Mesozoic metavolcanic and Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Long Valley volcanism began about 4 Ma during Pliocene time and has continued intermittently through the Holocene. The volcanism is separable into two basalt-rhyolite episodes: (1) an earlier, precaldera episode related to Long Valley Caldera that climaxed with eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of the caldera; and (2) a later, postcaldera episode structurally related to the north-south-trending Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which extends from the vicinity of Mammoth Mountain northward through the west moat of the caldera to Mono Lake. Eruption of the basalt-dacite sequence of the precaldera basalt-rhyolite episode peaked volumetrically between 3.8 and 2.5 Ma; few basalts were erupted during the following 1.8 m.y. (2.5?0.7 Ma). Volcanism during this interval was dominated by eruption of the voluminous rhyolites of Glass Mountain (2.2?0.8 Ma) and formation of the Bishop Tuff magma chamber. Catastrophic rupture of the roof of this magma chamber caused eruption of the Bishop Tuff and collapse of Long Valley Caldera (760 ka), after which rhyolite eruptions resumed on the subsided caldera floor. The earliest postcaldera rhyolite flows (700?500 ka) contain quenched globular basalt enclaves (mafic magmatic inclusions), indicating that basaltic magma had reentered shallow parts of the magmatic system after a 1.8-m.y. hiatus. Later, at about 400 ka, copious basalts, as well as dacites, began erupting from vents mainly in the west moat of the caldera. These later eruptions initiated the postcaldera basalt-rhyolite episode related to the Mono-Inyo Craters fissure system, which

  18. DISCOVERY OF THE PREDICTED 2010 ERUPTION AND THE PRE-ERUPTION LIGHT CURVE FOR RECURRENT NOVA U SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Pagnotta, Ashley; Xiao Limin; Darnley, Matthew J.; Bode, Michael F.; Harris, Barbara G.; Dvorak, Shawn; Menke, John; Linnolt, Michael; Templeton, Matthew; Henden, Arne A.; Pojmanski, Grzegorz; Pilecki, Bogumil; Szczygiel, Dorota M.; Watanabe, Yasunori

    2010-10-15

    We report the discovery by B. G. Harris and S. Dvorak on JD 2455224.9385 (2010 January 28.4385 UT) of the predicted eruption of the recurrent nova U Scorpii (U Sco). We also report 815 magnitudes (and 16 useful limits) on the pre-eruption light curve in the UBVRI and Sloan r' and i' bands from 2000.4 up to 9 hr before the peak of the 2010 January eruption. We found no significant long-term variations, though we did find frequent fast variations (flickering) with amplitudes up to 0.4 mag. We show that U Sco did not have any pre-eruption rises or dips with an amplitude greater than 0.2 mag on timescales from one day to one year before the eruption. We find that the peak of this eruption occurred at JD 2455224.69 {+-} 0.07 and the start of the rise was at JD 2455224.32 {+-} 0.12. From our analysis of the average B-band flux between eruptions, we find that the total mass accreted between eruptions is consistent with being a constant, in agreement with a strong prediction of nova trigger theory. The date of the next eruption can be anticipated with an accuracy of {+-}5 months by following the average B-band magnitudes for the next {approx}10 years, although at this time we can only predict that the next eruption will be in the year 2020 {+-} 2.

  19. Dynamics and pre-eruptive conditions of catastrophic, ignimbrite-producing eruptions from the Yenkahe Caldera, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firth, Chris W.; Cronin, Shane J.; Turner, Simon P.; Handley, Heather K.; Gaildry, Clement; Smith, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A combined stratigraphic and geochemical examination of ~ 43 kyr of volcanic activity is presented for the Yenkahe Caldera, a mafic-intermediate volcanic system on the island of Tanna, in the Vanuatu Arc. Through this period two catastrophic ignimbrite-producing eruptions have occurred: the Siwi eruption and the older, Old Tanna Ignimbrite eruption. The latter was previously linked with a different edifice to the north-east, however re-examination has shown it was derived from the Yenkahe Caldera. Radiocarbon dating of this ignimbrite gives an age of ~ 43 kyr B.P. Both eruptions produced voluminous ignimbrite sheets, however differences in deposit sequences show that the eruptions followed distinct courses. Deposits from the more recent Siwi eruption display greater evidence for phreatomagmatic phases during eruption onset. Both ignimbrites are distributed asymmetrically about the caldera, indicating partial collapse in each case. The early stages of the Siwi eruption produced directed pyroclastic surges and spatter fountains. Between these two major eruptions, volcanic activity was maintained through the formation of small, discrete volcanic cones, such as Yasur, which is active today. Whole rock major and trace element data show that intra-caldera activity between cataclysmic eruptions produced magmas of uniform basaltic-trachy-andesitic composition (SiO2 ~ 56 wt.%). Minerals within these lavas appear to be in equilibrium with their host. The Siwi eruption produced the most evolved, trachy-andesitic magma (SiO2 > 58 wt.%), while the Old Tanna eruption is associated with less evolved, basaltic-andesite magma (SiO2 ~ 53 wt.%). Juvenile clasts from both ignimbrites display diverse mineral chemistry and mineral disequilibrium textures. From these variations in geochemistry and petrology we suggest that a crystal mush or resident magma remained following low-magnitude, intra-caldera activity. MELTS modelling suggest that this was stored at shallow depths, equivalent

  20. A comparison study of a solar active-region eruptive filament and a neighboring non-eruptive filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Feng, Xue-Shang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) cospatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match Hα observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much smaller (with a length of about 20 Mm), but it contains most of the magnetic free energy in the extrapolation box and holds a much higher free energy density than the non-eruptive one. Both the MFRs are weakly twisted and cannot trigger kink instability. The AR eruptive MFR is unstable because its axis reaches above a critical height for torus instability, at which the overlying closed arcades can no longer confine the MFR stably. On the contrary, the quiescent MFR is very firmly held by its overlying field, as its axis apex is far below the torus-instability threshold height. Overall, this comparison investigation supports that an MFR can exist prior to eruption and the ideal MHD instability can trigger an MFR eruption.

  1. Relationship between eruptive style and vesicularity of juvenile clasts during eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    It has been reported that juvenile pumice lapilli found in plinian eruptions have high vesicularity, while those found in phreatoplinian eruptions have low vesicularity. However, juvenile glass shards from phreatoplinian eruptions consist of large, expanded bubbles such as bubble wall-type glass. These glass shards seem to possess high vesicularity, unlike the pumice lapilli. This study examines the factors causing this difference, especially focusing on the temporal variations in the vesicularity of the juvenile pyroclasts from eruptive episode A of Towada Volcano, Northeast Japan. This examination was conducted through four analyses: density measurements of pumice lapilli, thin section texture classification of pumice lapilli, classification of glass shards, and surface texture classification of pumice lapilli. Further, pumice lapilli from plinian eruptions have a low density, and those from phreatoplinian eruptions are characterized by high density. The density of the pumice lapilli depends on the eruption style and is hence determined after the eruption. A progressive increase in the amount of large bubbles is observed in glass shards ejected during an eruptive magmatic to phreatomagmatic sequence. Because it does not hinge on the eruptive style, it is assumed that the vesicularity of the glass shards is kept from the conduit before contact with water, especially on fragmentation by magma vesiculation in the conduit. The surfaces of the pumice lapilli show a similar increase in vesicularity with time as glass shards. However, this increase is not successive throughout, but decreases temporarily at the phreatomagmatic stage of the eruption, as in the case of density. This indicates that the successive bubble growth continues within the pumice, and additional vesiculation is superposed when the magmatic eruption comes into contact with water. Because of this, different juvenile clasts exhibit different vesicularities upon cooling. Interestingly, magma

  2. Quantifying the condition of eruption column collapse during explosive volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyaguchi, Takehiro; Suzuki, Yujiro

    2016-04-01

    During an explosive eruption, a mixture of pyroclasts and volcanic gas forms a buoyant eruption column or a pyroclastic flow. Generation of a pyroclastic flow caused by eruption column collapse is one of the most hazardous phenomena during explosive volcanic eruptions. The quantification of column collapse condition (CCC) is, therefore, highly desired for volcanic hazard assessment. Previously the CCC was roughly predicted by a simple relationship between magma discharge rate and water content (e.g., Carazzo et al., 2008). When a crater is present above the conduit, because of decompression/compression process inside/above the crater, the CCC based on this relationship can be strongly modified (Woods and Bower, 1995; Koyaguchi et al., 2010); however, the effects of the crater on CCC has not been fully understood in a quantitative fashion. Here, we have derived a semi-analytical expression of CCC, in which the effects of the crater is taken into account. The CCC depends on magma properties, crater shape (radius, depth and opening angle) as well as the flow rate at the base of crater. Our semi-analytical CCC expresses all these dependencies by a single surface in a parameter space of the dimensionless magma discharge rate, the dimensionless magma flow rate (per unit area) and the ratio of the cross-sectional areas at the top and the base of crater. We have performed a systematic parameter study of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of eruption column dynamics to confirm the semi-analytical CCC. The results of the 3D simulations are consistent with the semi-analytical CCC, while they show some additional fluid dynamical features in the transitional state (e.g., partial column collapse). Because the CCC depends on such many parameters, the scenario towards the generation of pyroclastic flow during explosive eruptions is considered to be diverse. Nevertheless, our semi-analytical CCC together with the existing semi-analytical solution for the 1D conduit flow

  3. Emplacement of the final lava dome of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Anderson, Steven W.; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Wessels, Rick L.; Henton, Sarah M.

    2013-06-01

    After more than 8 months of precursory activity and over 20 explosions in 12 days, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska began to extrude the fourth and final lava dome of the 2009 eruption on April 4. By July 1 the dome had filled the pre-2009 summit crater and ceased to grow. By means of analysis and annotations of time-lapse webcam imagery, oblique-image photogrammetry techniques and capture and analysis of forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images, we tracked the volume, textural, effusive-style and temperature changes in near-real time over the entire growth period of the dome. The first month of growth (April 4-May 4) produced blocky intermediate- to high-silica andesite lava (59-62.3 wt.% SiO2) that initially formed a round dome, expanding by endogenous growth, breaking the surface crust in radial fractures and annealing them with warmer, fresh lava. On or around May 1, more finely fragmented and scoriaceous andesite lava (59.8-62.2 wt.% SiO2) began to appear at the top of the dome coincident with increased seismicity and gas emissions. The more scoriaceous lava spread radially over the dome surface, while the dome continued to expand from endogenous growth and blocky lava was exposed on the margins and south side of the dome. By mid-June the upper scoriaceous lava had covered 36% of the dome surface area. Vesicularity of the upper scoriaceous lava range from 55 to 66%, some of the highest vesiculari