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Sample records for africa dust storms

  1. Dust storm off Western Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The impacts of Saharan dust storms reach far beyond Africa. Wind-swept deserts spill airborne dust particles out over the Atlantic Ocean where they can enter trade winds bound for Central and North America and the Caribbean. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows a dust storm casting an opaque cloud of cloud across the Canary Islands and the Atlantic Ocean west of Africa on June 30, 2002. In general it takes between 5 and 7 days for such an event to cross the Atlantic. The dust has been shown to introduce foreign bacteria and fungi that have damaged reef ecosystems and have even been hypothesized as a cause of increasing occurrences of respiratory complaints in places like Florida, where the amount of Saharan dust reaching the state has been increasing over the past 25 years.

  2. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  3. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... April 11, 2004 (top panels) contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). ... Apr 11 and May 13, 2004 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Middle East thumbnail:  ...

  4. Dust storms: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Dust storms have a number of impacts upon the environment including radiative forcing, and biogeochemical cycling. They transport material over many thousands of kilometres. They also have a range of impacts on humans, not least on human health. In recent years the identification of source areas for dust storms has been an important area or research, with the Sahara (especially Bodélé) and western China being recognised as the strongest sources globally. Another major development has been the recognition of the degree to which dust storm activity has varied at a range of time scales, millennial, century, decadal, annual and seasonal.

  5. North Polar Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-334, 18 April 2003

    This composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle daily global images shows a north polar dust storm on March 7, 2003. Similar late summer storms occurred nearly every day from late February well into April 2003; these were also seen in late summer in 1999 and 2001. The white features at the top of the image are the water ice surfaces of the north polar residual cap. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  6. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  7. Dust storm, northern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This large dust storm along the left side of the photo, covers a large portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico (27.5N, 102.0E). The look angle of this oblique photo is from the south to the north. In the foreground is the Sierra Madre Oriental in the states Coahuila and Nuevo Leon with the Rio Grande River, Amistad Reservoir and Texas in the background.

  8. Diagnostic evaluation of the Community Earth System Model in simulating mineral dust emission with insight into large-scale dust storm mobilization in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, Sagar Prasad; Yang, Zong-Liang; Lawrence, David M.

    2016-06-01

    Large amounts of mineral dust are injected into the atmosphere during dust storms, which are common in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) where most of the global dust hotspots are located. In this work, we present simulations of dust emission using the Community Earth System Model Version 1.2.2 (CESM 1.2.2) and evaluate how well it captures the spatio-temporal characteristics of dust emission in the MENA region with a focus on large-scale dust storm mobilization. We explicitly focus our analysis on the model's two major input parameters that affect the vertical mass flux of dust-surface winds and the soil erodibility factor. We analyze dust emissions in simulations with both prognostic CESM winds and with CESM winds that are nudged towards ERA-Interim reanalysis values. Simulations with three existing erodibility maps and a new observation-based erodibility map are also conducted. We compare the simulated results with MODIS satellite data, MACC reanalysis data, AERONET station data, and CALIPSO 3-d aerosol profile data. The dust emission simulated by CESM, when driven by nudged reanalysis winds, compares reasonably well with observations on daily to monthly time scales despite CESM being a global General Circulation Model. However, considerable bias exists around known high dust source locations in northwest/northeast Africa and over the Arabian Peninsula where recurring large-scale dust storms are common. The new observation-based erodibility map, which can represent anthropogenic dust sources that are not directly represented by existing erodibility maps, shows improved performance in terms of the simulated dust optical depth (DOD) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) compared to existing erodibility maps although the performance of different erodibility maps varies by region.

  9. Dust Storm in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Along historic Route 66, just southeast of the little town of Amboy, California, lies a dried-up lake. Dry lakebeds are good sources of two things: salt and dust. In this image, the now-parched Bristol Lake offers up both. On April 12, 2007, dust storms menaced the area around Amboy. To the northwest, near Newberry Springs, California, dust hampered visibility and led to a multi-car collision on Interstate 40, killing two people and injuring several others. The same day, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of a dust storm in the dry remains of Bristol Lake. Many small dust clouds boil up from the ground surface, casting their shadows to the northwest. A bright white cloud floating over the dust also throws its shadow onto the ground below. East of the dust storm are salt works that stand out from the surrounding landscape thanks to their straight lines and sharp angles. Dark ground surfaces alternate with mined white salt in a network of stripes. When lakes evaporate, chemicals that had been dissolved in the water stay behind, making dry lake beds an ideal place to find heavy concentrations of minerals, including salt. Besides the salt works, something else appears in stark contrast to this arid place. Lush green fields of irrigated crops appear in the east. Besides their color, their orderly arrangement reveals their human-made origin.

  10. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  11. Synoptic analysis of dust storms in the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Mehdi; Kavianpour, Mohammad Reza; Shao, Yaping

    2013-05-01

    Dust storm in the Middle East and south-west Asia is a natural hazard and the Tigris-Euphrates alluvial plain has been recognized as the main dust source in this area. In this study, more than 60 dust storms that occurred during the period 2003-2011 are investigated on the basis of MODIS satellite images, and 12 of the dust storms are selected for synoptic analysis using the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Data. The potential dust sources in the Middle East and south-west Asian region (20°E to 80°E, 5°N to 50°N) are analyzed and used in the synoptic analysis. Dust storms in the region can be grouped into two main categories, i.e., the Shamal dust storms and the frontal dust storms. Synoptic systems, associated with the two categories, are distinguished and the frequency of the patterns is identified. For 68% of the Shamal dust storms, a high pressure system is situated between 0°E to 30°E and 27°N to 45°N, and a low pressure system between 50°E to 70°E and 23°N to 43°N. For 86% of the frontal dust storms, a high is located between 51°E to 67°E and 18°N to 33°N and a low between 28°E to 48°E and 32°N to 43°N. Three main patterns for Shamal dust storms are identified, which represent about 60% of the Shamal dust storms. This analysis confirms that the Shamal is related to the anticyclones located over northern Africa to Eastern Europe and the monsoon trough over Iraq, southern Iran, Pakistan and the Indian Subcontinent. The analysis also shows that the main dust sink for the frontal dust storms in Tigris and Euphrates alluvial plain extends from center of Iraq to west and center of Iran and, in most severe cases, to northern Iran and the southern coast of the Caspian Sea.

  12. long duration dust storm sequences on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Mars daily global maps have revealed new characteristics for long duration dust storm sequences. These dust storm sequences have long histories of more than a week, travel long distances out of their origination region, and influence large areas in different regions of the planet. During the Ls = 180 - 360 season, except for global dust storms which involve multiple remote dust lifting centers and generally expand explosively from the southern hemisphere northward, other long-lived dust storm sequences usually travel southward through the Acidalia-Chryse, Utopia-Isidis or Arcadia-Amazonis channels with subsequent dust lifting along the way. Sometimes, they penetrate remarkably deep to the southern high latitudes, producing fantastic display of dust band. During the rest of the year, long duration dust storm sequences usually originate from the Argyre/Solis, Hellas/Noachis, or Cimmeria/Sirenum area and travel northward toward the southern low latitudes. Each route exhibits its own peculiar characteristics. We will present our results about these long duration dust storm sequences summarized from the complete archive of MGS MOC daily global maps and two years of MRO MARCI daily global maps. The systematic daily nearly global coverage of these maps makes it feasible to reconstruct the history of long duration dust storm sequences with detail.

  13. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  14. Status and Future of Dust Storm Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been given to the large amounts of airborne dust derived from the deserts and desertified areas of the world and transported over scales ranging from local to global. This dust can have positive and negative impacts on human activities and the environment, including modifying cloud formation, fertilizing the ocean, degrading air quality, reducing visibility, transporting pathogens, and inducing respiratory problems. The atmospheric radiative forcing by the dust has implications for global climate change and presently is one of the largest unknowns in climate models. These uncertainties have lead to much of the funding for research into the sources, properties, and fate of atmospheric dust. As a result of advances in numerical weather prediction over the past decades and the recent climate research, we are now in a position to produce operational dust storm forecasts. International organizations and national agencies are developing programs for dust forecasting. The approaches and applications of dust detection and forecasting are as varied as the nations that are developing the models. The basic components of a dust forecasting system include atmospheric forcing, dust production, and dust microphysics. The forecasting applications include air and auto traffic safety, shipping, health, national security, climate and weather. This presentation will summarize the methods of dust storm forecasting and illustrate the various applications. The major remaining uncertainties (e.g. sources and initialization) will be discussed as well as approaches for solving those problems.

  15. Automated dust storm detection using satellite images. Development of a computer system for the detection of dust storms from MODIS satellite images and the creation of a new dust storm database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ossta, Esam Elmehde Amar

    Dust storms are one of the natural hazards, which have increased in frequency in the recent years over Sahara desert, Australia, the Arabian Desert, Turkmenistan and northern China, which have worsened during the last decade. Dust storms increase air pollution, impact on urban areas and farms as well as affecting ground and air traffic. They cause damage to human health, reduce the temperature, cause damage to communication facilities, reduce visibility which delays both road and air traffic and impact on both urban and rural areas. Thus, it is important to know the causation, movement and radiation effects of dust storms. The monitoring and forecasting of dust storms is increasing in order to help governments reduce the negative impact of these storms. Satellite remote sensing is the most common method but its use over sandy ground is still limited as the two share similar characteristics. However, satellite remote sensing using true-colour images or estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and algorithms such as the deep blue algorithm have limitations for identifying dust storms. Many researchers have studied the detection of dust storms during daytime in a number of different regions of the world including China, Australia, America, and North Africa using a variety of satellite data but fewer studies have focused on detecting dust storms at night. The key elements of this present study are to use data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers on the Terra and Aqua satellites to develop more effective automated method for detecting dust storms during both day and night and generate a MODIS dust storm database..

  16. Dust Storm Moving Near Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This series of images show the movement of several dust storms near NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These images were taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on the 137th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 13, 2008).

    These images were taken about 50 seconds apart, showing the formation and movement of dust storms for nearly an hour. Phoenix scientists are still figuring out the exact distances these dust storms occurred from the lander, but they estimate them to be about 1 to 2 kilometers (.6 or 1.2 miles) away.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    MedlinePlus

    ... US Border Regions US Southwest Locations Abandoned Mines Agricultural Runoff Airplanes and Air Travel Algae Blooms Animal ... Links from MedlinePlus (National Library of Medicine) Air Pollution Asthma Valley Fever More Links Dust Control On ...

  18. Dust storm simulation over Iran using HYSPLIT.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Khosro; Shafiepour-Motlagh, Majid; Aslemand, Alireza; Ghader, Sarmad

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matters have detrimental effects on human health, environment and economic. This pollutant may emit from anthropogenic or natural sources. On global scale, main proportion of natural particulate matter release to the atmosphere because of wind erosion from arid and semi-arid regions. Recently, the amount of dust coming from Arabian countries has dramatically increased, especially dust storms that are affecting western and even central parts of Iran. This phenomenon has caused a lot of environmental problems. Dust source identification and trajectory simulation using numerical techniques are the main aims of this study. HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model dust module and trajectory simulation are utilized in this research and two case studies are investigated (in May and June 2010). The base of the HYSPLIT dust module is the PM10 dust storm emission algorithm for desert land use. This methodology is applied to estimate hotspots and trajectories. Due to the results, dust storms started on May 17th and June 7th because of high wind shear (>8.5 m/s) from the western Syrian Desert. The source region limited to 32.50 °N to 33.80 °N and 38.00 °E to 38.80 °E coordinates. Dust plumes lifted and dispersed towards the east and southeast of the sources and reached Ahvaz on May 18th and June 8th. The average of PM10 concentration in these dates reached 625 and 494 μgm3 on Ahvaz monitoring stations, respectively. Moreover, the results gained from the model for dust motion simulation are similar to the MODIS satellite images. PMID:24397928

  19. Dust storm simulation over Iran using HYSPLIT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matters have detrimental effects on human health, environment and economic. This pollutant may emit from anthropogenic or natural sources. On global scale, main proportion of natural particulate matter release to the atmosphere because of wind erosion from arid and semi-arid regions. Recently, the amount of dust coming from Arabian countries has dramatically increased, especially dust storms that are affecting western and even central parts of Iran. This phenomenon has caused a lot of environmental problems. Dust source identification and trajectory simulation using numerical techniques are the main aims of this study. HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model dust module and trajectory simulation are utilized in this research and two case studies are investigated (in May and June 2010). The base of the HYSPLIT dust module is the PM10 dust storm emission algorithm for desert land use. This methodology is applied to estimate hotspots and trajectories. Due to the results, dust storms started on May 17th and June 7th because of high wind shear (>8.5 m/s) from the western Syrian Desert. The source region limited to 32.50 °N to 33.80 °N and 38.00 °E to 38.80 °E coordinates. Dust plumes lifted and dispersed towards the east and southeast of the sources and reached Ahvaz on May 18th and June 8th. The average of PM10 concentration in these dates reached 625 and 494 μgm3 on Ahvaz monitoring stations, respectively. Moreover, the results gained from the model for dust motion simulation are similar to the MODIS satellite images. PMID:24397928

  20. Dust storm simulation over Iran using HYSPLIT.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Khosro; Shafiepour-Motlagh, Majid; Aslemand, Alireza; Ghader, Sarmad

    2014-01-07

    Particulate matters have detrimental effects on human health, environment and economic. This pollutant may emit from anthropogenic or natural sources. On global scale, main proportion of natural particulate matter release to the atmosphere because of wind erosion from arid and semi-arid regions. Recently, the amount of dust coming from Arabian countries has dramatically increased, especially dust storms that are affecting western and even central parts of Iran. This phenomenon has caused a lot of environmental problems. Dust source identification and trajectory simulation using numerical techniques are the main aims of this study. HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model dust module and trajectory simulation are utilized in this research and two case studies are investigated (in May and June 2010). The base of the HYSPLIT dust module is the PM10 dust storm emission algorithm for desert land use. This methodology is applied to estimate hotspots and trajectories. Due to the results, dust storms started on May 17th and June 7th because of high wind shear (>8.5 m/s) from the western Syrian Desert. The source region limited to 32.50 °N to 33.80 °N and 38.00 °E to 38.80 °E coordinates. Dust plumes lifted and dispersed towards the east and southeast of the sources and reached Ahvaz on May 18th and June 8th. The average of PM10 concentration in these dates reached 625 and 494 μgm3 on Ahvaz monitoring stations, respectively. Moreover, the results gained from the model for dust motion simulation are similar to the MODIS satellite images.

  1. Mars Orbiter Camera climatology of textured dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Kulowski, Laura; Wang, Huiqun

    2015-09-01

    We report the climatology of "textured dust storms", those dust storms that have visible structure on their cloud tops that are indicative of active dust lifting, as observed in Mars Daily Global Maps produced from Mars Orbiter Camera wide-angle images. Textured dust storms predominantly occur in the equinox seasons while both solstice periods experience a planet-wide "pause" in textured dust storm activity. These pauses correspond to concurrent decreases in global atmospheric dust opacity. Textured dust storms most frequently occur in Acidalia Planitia, Chryse Planitia, Arcadia Planitia, and Hellas basin. To examine the nature of the link between textured dust storms and atmospheric dust opacity, we compare the textured dust storm climatology with a record of atmospheric dust opacity and find a peak global correlation coefficient of approximately 0.5 with a lag of 20-40° in solar longitude in the opacity compared to the solar climatology. This implies that textured dust storms observed at 1400 local time by MOC are responsible for a large fraction of atmospheric dust opacity and that other mechanisms (e.g., dust devil lifting or storm-scale lifting not observed in this study) may supply a comparable amount of dust.

  2. Earlier vegetation green-up has reduced spring dust storms.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bihang; Guo, Li; Li, Ning; Chen, Jin; Lin, Henry; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Shen, Miaogen; Rao, Yuhan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The observed decline of spring dust storms in Northeast Asia since the 1950s has been attributed to surface wind stilling. However, spring vegetation growth could also restrain dust storms through accumulating aboveground biomass and increasing surface roughness. To investigate the impacts of vegetation spring growth on dust storms, we examine the relationships between recorded spring dust storm outbreaks and satellite-derived vegetation green-up date in Inner Mongolia, Northern China from 1982 to 2008. We find a significant dampening effect of advanced vegetation growth on spring dust storms (r = 0.49, p = 0.01), with a one-day earlier green-up date corresponding to a decrease in annual spring dust storm outbreaks by 3%. Moreover, the higher correlation (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) between green-up date and dust storm outbreak ratio (the ratio of dust storm outbreaks to times of strong wind events) indicates that such effect is independent of changes in surface wind. Spatially, a negative correlation is detected between areas with advanced green-up dates and regional annual spring dust storms (r = -0.49, p = 0.01). This new insight is valuable for understanding dust storms dynamics under the changing climate. Our findings suggest that dust storms in Inner Mongolia will be further mitigated by the projected earlier vegetation green-up in the warming world.

  3. Earlier vegetation green-up has reduced spring dust storms.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bihang; Guo, Li; Li, Ning; Chen, Jin; Lin, Henry; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Shen, Miaogen; Rao, Yuhan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The observed decline of spring dust storms in Northeast Asia since the 1950s has been attributed to surface wind stilling. However, spring vegetation growth could also restrain dust storms through accumulating aboveground biomass and increasing surface roughness. To investigate the impacts of vegetation spring growth on dust storms, we examine the relationships between recorded spring dust storm outbreaks and satellite-derived vegetation green-up date in Inner Mongolia, Northern China from 1982 to 2008. We find a significant dampening effect of advanced vegetation growth on spring dust storms (r = 0.49, p = 0.01), with a one-day earlier green-up date corresponding to a decrease in annual spring dust storm outbreaks by 3%. Moreover, the higher correlation (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) between green-up date and dust storm outbreak ratio (the ratio of dust storm outbreaks to times of strong wind events) indicates that such effect is independent of changes in surface wind. Spatially, a negative correlation is detected between areas with advanced green-up dates and regional annual spring dust storms (r = -0.49, p = 0.01). This new insight is valuable for understanding dust storms dynamics under the changing climate. Our findings suggest that dust storms in Inner Mongolia will be further mitigated by the projected earlier vegetation green-up in the warming world. PMID:25343265

  4. The impact of dust storms on the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.; Kalenderski, S.; Osipov, S.; Bangalath, H.

    2015-01-01

    Located in the dust belt, the Arabian Peninsula is a major source of atmospheric dust. Frequent dust outbreaks and some 15 to 20 dust storms per year have profound effects on all aspects of human activity and natural processes in this region. To quantify the effect of severe dust events on radiation fluxes and regional climate characteristics, we simulated the storm that occurred from 18 to 20 March 2012 using a regional weather research forecast model fully coupled with the chemistry/aerosol module (WRF-Chem). This storm swept over a remarkably large area affecting the entire Middle East, northeastern Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. It was caused by a southward propagating cold front, and the associated winds activated the dust production in river valleys of the lower Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq; the coastal areas in Kuwait, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates; the Rub al Khali, An Nafud, and Ad Dahna deserts; and along the Red Sea coast on the west side of the Arabian Peninsula. Our simulation results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations. We estimate the total amount of dust generated by the storm to have reached 94 Mt. Approximately 78% of this dust was deposited within the calculation domain. The Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf received 5.3 Mt and the Red Sea 1.2 Mt of dust. Dust particles bring nutrients to marine ecosystems, which is especially important for the oligotrophic Northern Red Sea. However, their contribution to the nutrient balance in the Red Sea remains largely unknown. By scaling the effect of one storm to the number of dust storms observed annually over the Red Sea, we estimate the annual dust deposition to the Red Sea, associated with major dust storms, to be 6 Mt.

  5. Identification of dust storm source areas in West Asia using multiple environmental datasets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Amiraslani, Farshad; Liu, Jian; Zhou, Na

    2015-01-01

    Sand and Dust storms are common phenomena in arid and semi-arid areas. West Asia Region, especially Tigris-Euphrates alluvial plain, has been recognized as one of the most important dust source areas in the world. In this paper, a method is applied to extract SDS (Sand and Dust Storms) sources in West Asia region using thematic maps, climate and geography, HYSPLIT model and satellite images. Out of 50 dust storms happened during 2000-2013 and collected in form of MODIS images, 27 events were incorporated as demonstrations of the simulated trajectories by HYSPLIT model. Besides, a dataset of the newly released Landsat images was used as base-map for the interpretation of SDS source regions. As a result, six main clusters were recognized as dust source areas. Of which, 3 clusters situated in Tigris-Euphrates plain were identified as severe SDS sources (including 70% dust storms in this research). Another cluster in Sistan plain is also a potential source area. This approach also confirmed six main paths causing dust storms. These paths are driven by the climate system including Siberian and Polar anticyclones, monsoon from Indian Subcontinent and depression from north of Africa. The identification of SDS source areas and paths will improve our understandings on the mechanisms and impacts of dust storms on socio-economy and environment of the region. PMID:25260168

  6. Identification of dust storm source areas in West Asia using multiple environmental datasets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Amiraslani, Farshad; Liu, Jian; Zhou, Na

    2015-01-01

    Sand and Dust storms are common phenomena in arid and semi-arid areas. West Asia Region, especially Tigris-Euphrates alluvial plain, has been recognized as one of the most important dust source areas in the world. In this paper, a method is applied to extract SDS (Sand and Dust Storms) sources in West Asia region using thematic maps, climate and geography, HYSPLIT model and satellite images. Out of 50 dust storms happened during 2000-2013 and collected in form of MODIS images, 27 events were incorporated as demonstrations of the simulated trajectories by HYSPLIT model. Besides, a dataset of the newly released Landsat images was used as base-map for the interpretation of SDS source regions. As a result, six main clusters were recognized as dust source areas. Of which, 3 clusters situated in Tigris-Euphrates plain were identified as severe SDS sources (including 70% dust storms in this research). Another cluster in Sistan plain is also a potential source area. This approach also confirmed six main paths causing dust storms. These paths are driven by the climate system including Siberian and Polar anticyclones, monsoon from Indian Subcontinent and depression from north of Africa. The identification of SDS source areas and paths will improve our understandings on the mechanisms and impacts of dust storms on socio-economy and environment of the region.

  7. The Martian dust storm of Sol 1742

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    After nearly five earth years on Mars, the Mutch Memorial Station (Viking Lander 1) finally witnessed a local dust storm that eroded trenches, conical piles, and other disturbed surfaces in the sample field and near the Lander. The event, called the Dust Storm of Sol 1742, occurred late in the third winter of Lander observations between Sols 1728 and 1757. Analyses of tiny new wind tails and movement of materials indicate that the eroding winds were variable but northeasterly than those that had previously shaped the surface. Pebbly residues and movement of 4-5 mm clods suggest drag velocities or friction speeds of the winds were about 2.2-4.0 m/s. Wind speeds at the height of the meteorology boom (1.6 m) were probably about 40-50 m/s. Much of the observed erosion could have occurred in a few to several tens of seconds, but somewhat longer times are suggested by analogy with the erosion of terrestrial soils. Most of the erosion occurred where preexisting equilibrium conditions of surface configurations and surface material properties had been altered by the Lander during landing and during surface-sampler activities, but thin layers of bright fine-grained dust were also removed and redistributed. Surfaces where preexisting equilibrium conditions were unaltered appeared to be uneroded.

  8. The Martian dust storm of Sol 1742

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, H. J.

    1985-11-01

    After nearly five earth years on Mars, the Mutch Memorial Station (Viking Lander 1) finally witnessed a local dust storm that eroded trenches, conical piles, and other disturbed surfaces in the sample field and near the Lander. The event, called the Dust Storm of Sol 1742, occurred late in the third winter of Lander observations between Sols 1728 and 1757. Analyses of tiny new wind tails and movement of materials indicate that the eroding winds were variable but northeasterly than those that had previously shaped the surface. Pebbly residues and movement of 4-5 mm clods suggest drag velocities or friction speeds of the winds were about 2.2-4.0 m/s. Wind speeds at the height of the meteorology boom (1.6 m) were probably about 40-50 m/s. Much of the observed erosion could have occurred in a few to several tens of seconds, but somewhat longer times are suggested by analogy with the erosion of terrestrial soils. Most of the erosion occurred where preexisting equilibrium conditions of surface configurations and surface material properties had been altered by the Lander during landing and during surface-sampler activities, but thin layers of bright fine-grained dust were also removed and redistributed. Surfaces where preexisting equilibrium conditions were unaltered appeared to be uneroded.

  9. Modelling Convective Dust Storms in Large-Scale Weather and Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantillon, Florian; Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John H.; Panitz, Hans-Jürgen; Bischoff-Gauss, Ingeborg

    2016-04-01

    Recent field campaigns have shown that convective dust storms - also known as haboobs or cold pool outflows - contribute a significant fraction of dust uplift over the Sahara and Sahel in summer. However, in-situ observations are sparse and convective dust storms are frequently concealed by clouds in satellite imagery. Therefore numerical models are often the only available source of information over the area. Here a regional climate model with explicit representation of convection delivers the first full seasonal cycle of convective dust storms over North Africa. The model suggests that they contribute one fifth of the annual dust uplift over North Africa, one fourth between May and October, and one third over the western Sahel during this season. In contrast, most large-scale weather and climate models do not explicitly represent convection and thus lack such storms. A simple parameterization of convective dust storms has recently been developed, based on the downdraft mass flux of convection schemes. The parameterization is applied here to a set of regional climate runs with different horizontal resolutions and convection schemes, and assessed against the explicit run and against sparse station observations. The parameterization succeeds in capturing the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of convective dust storms. It can be tuned to different horizontal resolutions and convection schemes, although the details of the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle depend on the representation of the monsoon in the parent model. Different versions of the parameterization are further discussed with respect to differences in the frequency of extreme events. The results show that the parameterization is reliable and can therefore solve a long-standing problem in simulating dust storms in large-scale weather and climate models.

  10. Modelling Convective Dust Storms in Large-Scale Weather and Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantillon, F.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J. H.; Panitz, H. J.; Bischoff-Gauss, I.

    2015-12-01

    Recent field campaigns have shown that convective dust storms - also known as haboobs or cold pool outflows - contribute a significant fraction of dust uplift over the Sahara and Sahel in summer. However, in-situ observations are sparse and convective dust storms are frequently concealed by clouds in satellite imagery. Therefore numerical models are often the only available source of information over the area. Here a regional climate model with explicit representation of convection delivers the first full seasonal cycle of convective dust storms over North Africa. The model suggests that they contribute one fifth of the annual dust uplift over North Africa, one fourth between May and October, and one third over the western Sahel during this season. In contrast, most large-scale weather and climate models do not explicitly represent convection and thus lack such storms.A simple parameterization of convective dust storms has recently been developed, based on the downdraft mass flux of convection schemes. The parameterization is applied here to a set of regional climate runs with different horizontal resolutions and convection schemes, and assessed against the explicit run and against sparse station observations. The parameterization succeeds in capturing the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of convective dust storms. It can be tuned to different horizontal resolutions and convection schemes, although the details of the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle depend on the representation of the monsoon in the parent model. Different versions of the parameterization are further discussed with respect to differences in the frequency of extreme events. The results show that the parameterization is reliable and can therefore solve a long-standing problem in simulating dust storms in large-scale weather and climate models.

  11. Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms on Mars are predicted to be capable of producing electrostatic fields and discharges, even larger than those in dust storms on Earth. Such electrical activity poses serious risks to any Human exploration of the planet and the lack of sufficient data to characterize any such activity has been identified by NASA's MEPAG as a key human safety knowledge gap. There are three key elements in the characterization of Martian electrostatic discharges: dependence on Martian environmental conditions, frequency of occurrence, and the strength of the generated electric fields. We will describe a proposed program using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to carry out a long term monitoring campaign to search for and characterize the entire Mars hemisphere for powerful discharges during routine tracking of spacecraft at Mars on an entirely non-interfering basis. The resulting knowledge of Mars electrical activity would allow NASA to plan risk mitigation measures to ensure human safety during Mars exploration. In addition, these measurements will also allow us to place limits on presence of oxidants such as H2O2 that may be produced by such discharges, providing another measurement point for models describing Martian atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Because of the continuous Mars telecommunication needs of NASA's Mars-based assets, the DSN is the only instrument in the world that combines long term, high cadence, observing opportunities with large sensitive telescopes, making it a unique asset worldwide in searching for and characterizing electrostatic activity at Mars from the ground.

  12. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, A.; Faure, J.; Madeleine, J.; Maattanen, A. E.; Forget, F.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA onboard Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments onboard Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Detached layers are stable over several days owing to nighttime sedimentation being unable to counteract daytime convective transport, and to the resupply of convective energy at sunrise. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear season, which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maximum unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Our findings on dust-driven deep convection have strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.ensity-scaled dust optical depth at local times 1400 1600 and 1800 (lat 2.5°S, Ls 135°) hortwave heating rate at local time 1500 and latitude 2.5°S.

  13. Potential source regions of dust accumulated in northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowska, S.; Woronko, B.

    2012-04-01

    Sahara is the largest source of the dust in the world. The material sampled from dust storms in Tunisia (Nefta Oasis, El Kantoui Harbor), north Egypt (Alexandria) and Morocco (Mhamid Oasis) (March 2001, March and April 2009) was taken to identify the potential sources of dust accumulation and transport paths in North Africa. The samples were analyzed on grain size, micromorphology of silt grain surfaces in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), elemental composition of grains and their surface crusts, loss on ignition, mineralogical composition of samples and carbonate content. Additionally the meteorological situation was analyzed during the dust storm occurrences and preceding periods. The results of grain size analyses show that all studied sediments belong to the small dust type, and dust accumulated in Mhamid is the clay mineral agglomerated (CMA) dust. The source of the CMA are the old dry lake beds. Dust particles are mobilized as aggregates of clay minerals, what is controlled by structure (particle packing) of the original lake sediment, and accumulation is dry and wet as well. The results of the analysis of the quartz grain surface micromorphology, the elemental composition and loss on ignition indicate that dust accumulated in Morocco originated from a relatively homogenous sediment source and, on the other hand, dust found in Alexandria comes from a diversified source. Dust sampled in Tunisia is characterized by the highest content of carbonates and organic matter which suggests the intensive dispelling acting on the weathered material from carbonate rocks and local Mediterranean soil covers rich in CaCO3. The analyses of meteorological conditions during the dust storms and the analyses of the textural characteristics of deposits show that it is highly probable that analysed aeolian dust was transported both for shorter and longer distances. Hypothetic source areas of dust accumulated in Mhamid could be the old ergs, some located 300-500 km away like

  14. Maps of the MY 25 Planet-encircling Dust Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Cantor, B. A.; Wilson, R. J.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Barnes, J.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created 42 daily maps of the MY 25 planet-encircling dust storm (Ls=165-188) in order to better delimit the areal extent of storms observed by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). These maps allow us to better compare storm evolution with eddies observed in Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward traveling waves from 40 - 60° S with a period of about three sols. These maps use a new dust characterization scheme that categorizes dust storms and dust entrained in gravity waves by degree of (visual) structure. Preliminary analysis of these data indicate concurrent eastward migration of both storms and eddies. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas.

  15. The impact of dust storms on the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.; Kalenderski, S.; Osipov, S.; Bangalath, H.

    2014-07-01

    Located in the dust belt, the Arabian Peninsula is a major source of atmospheric dust. Frequent dust outbreaks and some 15 to 20 dust storms per year have profound effects on all aspects of human activity and natural processes in this region. To quantify the effect of severe dust events on radiation fluxes and regional climate characteristics, we simulated the storm that occurred on 18-20 March 2012 using a regional weather research forecast model fully coupled with the chemistry/aerosol module (WRF-Chem). This storm swept over a remarkably large area affecting the entire Middle East, North-Eastern Africa, Afghanistan and Pakistan. It was caused by a southward propagating cold front and associated winds activated the dust production in river valleys of the lower Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq, the coastal areas in Kuwait, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates, Rub al Khali, An Nafud and Ad Dahna deserts, and along the Red Sea coast on the west side of the Arabian Peninsula. Our simulation results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations. The total amount of dust generated by the storm reached 93.76 Mt. About 80% of this amount deposited within the calculation domain. The Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf received 5.3 Mt, and the Red Sea 1.2 Mt. Dust particles bring nutrients to marine ecosystems, which is especially important for the oligothrophic Northern Red Sea. However, their contribution to the nutrient balance in the Red Sea remains largely unknown. By scaling the effect of one storm to the number of dust storms observed annually over the Red Sea, we roughly estimate the annual dust deposition to the Red Sea to be 6 Mt.

  16. Interannual variability of planet-encircling dust storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Richard W.; Martin, Leonard J.

    1993-01-01

    A recent review of earth-based telescopic observations of Mars together with Viking orbiter and lander data are employed to estimate the frequency of occurrence of planet-encircling dust storms over the past century and to test whether the period spanned by the Mariner 9 and Viking missions to Mars is representative of the decades prior to 1950. Both spacecraft and earth-based observations suggest that planet-encircling dust storms on Mars occur during a 'dust storm season' in southern spring and summer. Viking data show that planet-encircling dust storms could have occurred in the past on Mars without being detected from earth during years in which Mars was far from earth during the dust storm season. Planet-encircling storms were absent during the dust storm seasons monitored during several favorable oppositions prior to 1956 and after 1986. The change of a planet-encircling dust storm occurring in any arbitrary Mars year is estimated to be approximately one in three, if this occurrence is random from year to year and yet restricted seasonally to southern spring and summer.

  17. Dust storms on Mars: Considerations and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Iverson, J. D.; Leach, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    Aeolian processes are important in modifying the surface of Mars at present, and appear to have been significant in the geological past. Aeolian activity includes local and global dust storms, the formation of erosional features such as yardangs and depositional features such as sand dunes, and the erosion of rock and soil. As a means of understanding aeolian processes on Mars, an investigation is in progress that includes laboratory simulations, field studies of earth analogs, and interpretation of spacecraft data. This report describes the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, an experimental facility established at NASA-Ames Research Center, and presents some results of the general investigation. Experiments dealing with wind speeds and other conditions required for the initiation of particle movement on Mars are described and considerations are given to the resulting effectiveness of aeolian erosion.

  18. Rocket dust storms and detached dust layers in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Faure, Julien; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2013-04-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling that includes the transport of radiatively active dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm," or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30-50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms produce detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since nighttime sedimentation is less efficient than daytime convective transport, and the detached dust layers can convect during the daytime, these layers can be stable for several days. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear seasons (late northern winter to late northern summer), which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maxima unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Dust-driven deep convection has strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.

  19. Where Do the Sand-Dust Storms Come From?: Conversations with Specialists from the Exploring Sand-Dust Storms Scientific Expedition Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shixin, Liu

    2004-01-01

    This article relates the different views from specialists of the scientific expedition team for the exploration of the origin of sand-dust storms. They observed and examined on-site the ecological environment of places of origin for sand-dust storms, and tried to find out causes of sand-dust storm and what harm it can cause in the hope of…

  20. Subtropical-polar jet interactions in Southern Plains dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Vellore, Ramesh K.; Lewis, John M.; Underwood, S. Jeffrey; Pauley, Patricia M.; Martin, Jonathan E.; Rabin, Robert M.; Krishnan, R.

    2013-12-01

    origin of two separate Southern High Plains dust storms, which occurred over a 2 day period in February 2007, is traced to an interaction between the subtropical jet (STJ) and the polar jet (PJ). A large-scale thermal wind imbalance resulting from the confluence of these two jets led to a series of mesoscale circulations that ultimately produced the dust storms. Understanding the connectivity between the dust storms with differing geometries is central to the present investigation. The study rests on the interpretation of analyses from upper air and surface observations complemented by imagery from satellites, the 32 km gridded data set from the North American Regional Reanalysis, and a fine-resolution (6 km grid) simulation from the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Principal assertions from the present study are (1) scale interaction is fundamental to the creation of an environment conducive to dust storm development, (2) low to middle tropospheric mass adjustment is the primary response to a large-scale imbalance, (3) the mesoscale mass adjustment is associated with circulations about a highly accelerative jet streak resulting from the merger of the PJ and STJ, (4) the structure of the jet streak resulting from this merger governs the evolution of the geometry of the dust plumes, with plumes that initially had a straight-line orientation developing a semicircular geometry, and (5) it is concluded that improvements in dust storm prediction will depend on an augmentation to the upper air network in concert with a flow-dependent data assimilation strategy.

  1. Martian dust storms witnessed by Viking Lander 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Guinness, R. E. A.

    1984-01-01

    Viking Lander 1 observations on Mars were punctuated by a strong local dust storm after two martian years of mild wind conditions. Tens of micrometers of dust settled to the surface during global dust storms of the first two falls and winters; some of this dust was locally removed during the second year. A late winter local dust storm of the first year caused little or no erosion of the surface materials despite wind speeds of 25 to 30 m/s. The strong local dust storm occurred during late winter of the third martian year. Winds of this storm altered and demolished small conical piles of surface materials constructed at the onset the first winter, removed 4 to 5 mm size fragments, displaced centimeter size fragments, destroyed clouds in areas disrupted by the sampler and footpad, eroded impact pits, and darkened the sky. Movement of erosional products and tiny wind tails indicate easterly to northeasterly winds. If the 4 to 5 mm size fragments were entrained and removd by the wind, threshold friction speeds near 3 to 5 m/s would have been required for the atmospheric temperatures and pressures that prevailed during the late winter of the third year.

  2. The relationship between gorgonian coral (Cnidaria: Gorgonacea) diseases and African dust storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weir-Brush, J. R.; Garrison, V.H.; Smith, G.W.; Shinn, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    The number of reports of coral diseases has increased throughout the world in the last 20 years. Aspergillosis, which primarily affects Gorgonia ventalina and G. flabellum, is one of the few diseases to be characterized. This disease is caused by Aspergillus sydowii, a terrestrial fungus with a worldwide distribution. Upon infection, colonies may lose tissue, and ultimately, mortality may occur if the infection is not sequestered. The spores of A. sydowii are <5 ??m, small enough to be easily picked up by winds and dispersed over great distances. Aspergillosis is prevalent in the Caribbean, and it appears that this primarily terrestrial fungus has adapted to a marine environment. It has been proposed that dust storms originating in Africa may be one way in which potential coral pathogens are distributed and deposited into the marine environments of the Caribbean. To test the hypothesis that African dust storms transport and deposit pathogens, we collected air samples from both dust storms and periods of nondust in St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Because we focused on fungal pathogens and used A. sydowii as a model, we isolated and cultured fungi on various types of media. Fungi including Aspergillus spp. were isolated from air samples taken from dust events and non-dust events. Twenty-three separate cultures and seven genera were isolated from dust event samples whereas eight cultures from five genera were isolated from non-dust air samples. Three isolates from the Virgin Islands dust event samples morphologically identified as Aspergillus spp. produced signs of aspergillosis in seafans, and the original pathogens were re-isolated from those diseased seafans fulfilling Koch's Postulates. This research supports the hypothesis that African dust storms transport across the Atlantic Ocean and deposit potential coral pathogens in the Caribbean.

  3. Long-term variability of dust-storms in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserová, Pavla; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Ólafur

    2013-04-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland are volcanic sandy deserts. Natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect not only regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze") but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean > 1000 km at times. The study places Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long term frequency of dust storm events in NE Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in NE Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the NE erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the NE deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust is not only a substantial source for regional air pollution, but may be considered to contribute to the Arctic haze phenomena and Arctic air pollution.

  4. WMO Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS): Research Implementation Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Barrie, Leonard

    2010-05-01

    Assessment System (SDS-WAS) in order to improve the capabilities of countries affected by dust to reduce risks associated with airborne sand and dust. This project is in response to the desire of more than 40 WMO member countries to improve capabilities for more reliable sand and dust storm forecasts. The project has strong crosscutting features: it relies on real-time delivery of products; it integrates research communities (modelling, observation groups, and effects) and communities of practice (e.g. medical, aeronautical, agricultural users). There are two already established SDS-WAS nodes (Asian and North-Africa-Europe-Middle East) that coordinate implementation of the project objectives at regional levels. This presentation will review current status and future steps in the project implementation.

  5. Dust storms and their impact on ocean and human health: dust in Earth's atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellog, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite imagery has greatly influenced our understanding of dust activity on a global scale. A number of different satellites such as NASA's Earth-Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Se-viewing Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquire daily global-scale data used to produce imagery for monitoring dust storm formation and movement. This global-scale imagery has documented the frequent transmission of dust storm-derived soils through Earth's atmosphere and the magnitude of many of these events. While various research projects have been undertaken to understand this normal planetary process, little has been done to address its impact on ocean and human health. This review will address the ability of dust storms to influence marine microbial population densities and transport of soil-associated toxins and pathogenic microorganisms to marine environments. The implications of dust on ocean and human health in this emerging scientific field will be discussed.

  6. Re-examination of the I-5 dust storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Vellore, Ramesh K.; Lewis, John M.; Underwood, S. Jeffrey; Pauley, Patricia M.; Martin, Jonathan E.; Krishnan, R.

    2013-01-01

    The infamous dust storm over the thanksgiving holiday of 1991 that led to loss of life from numerous automobile accidents on Interstate 5 (I-5) has been re-examined. Pauley et al. (1996) conducted an earlier investigation of this dust storm following the tenets of Danielsen's paradigm—a paradigm that links the tropopause fold phenomenon and a balanced thermally indirect circulation about the upper level jet stream. However, a cursory examination of mesoscale structures in the storm from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) indicated evidence of a low-level unbalanced thermally direct circulation that demanded further investigation using a high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation. Principal results from the present study follow: (1) Although the model simulation showed evidence of a weak indirect circulation in the upper troposphere in support of the Danielsen's paradigm, the dynamic control of the storm stemmed from the lower tropospheric mesoscale response to geostrophic imbalance. (2) A lower tropospheric direct circulation led to mass/temperature adjustments that were confirmed by upper air observations at locations in proximity to the accident site, and (3) boundary layer deepening and destabilization due to these mesoscale processes pinpointed the timing and location of the dust storm. Although the present study does not underestimate the value of analyses that focus on the larger/synoptic scales of motion, it does bring to light the value of investigation that makes use of the mesoscale resources in order to clarify synoptic-mesoscale interactions.

  7. Mars Atmospheric Chemistry in Electrified Dust Devils and Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, A.-S.; Renno, N. O.; Sentmann, D. D.; Marshall, J. G.; Cummer, S. A.; Rafkin, S.; Catling, D.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory studies, simulations and desert field tests all indicate that aeolian mixing dust can generate electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity". In convective structures like dust devils or storms, grain stratification (or charge separation) occurs giving rise to an overall electric dipole moment to the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous simulation studies [1] indicate that this storm electric field on Mars can approach atmospheric breakdown field strength of 20 kV/m. In terrestrial dust devils, coherent dipolar electric fields exceeding 20 kV/m have been measured directly via electric field instrumentation. Given the expected electrostatic fields in Martian dust devils and storms, electrons in the low pressure CO2 gas can be energized via the electric field to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, resulting in the formation of new chemical products CO and O- and OH and H- within the storm. Using a collisional plasma physics model we present a calculation of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach breakdown levels of 20-30 kV/m.

  8. Modeling haboob dust storms in large-scale weather and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantillon, Florian; Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John H.; Panitz, Hans-Jürgen; Bischoff-Gauss, Ingeborg

    2016-03-01

    Recent field campaigns have shown that haboob dust storms, formed by convective cold pool outflows, contribute a significant fraction of dust uplift over the Sahara and Sahel in summer. However, in situ observations are sparse and haboobs are frequently concealed by clouds in satellite imagery. Furthermore, most large-scale weather and climate models lack haboobs, because they do not explicitly represent convection. Here a 1 year long model run with explicit representation of convection delivers the first full seasonal cycle of haboobs over northern Africa. Using conservative estimates, the model suggests that haboobs contribute one fifth of the annual dust-generating winds over northern Africa, one fourth between May and October, and one third over the western Sahel during this season. A simple parameterization of haboobs has recently been developed for models with parameterized convection, based on the downdraft mass flux of convection schemes. It is applied here to two model runs with different horizontal resolutions and assessed against the explicit run. The parameterization succeeds in capturing the geographical distribution of haboobs and their seasonal cycle over the Sahara and Sahel. It can be tuned to the different horizontal resolutions, and different formulations are discussed with respect to the frequency of extreme events. The results show that the parameterization is reliable and may solve a major and long-standing issue in simulating dust storms in large-scale weather and climate models.

  9. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant. PMID:23712117

  10. Characterisation of atmospheric deposited particles during a dust storm in urban areas of Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Janaka; Ziyath, Abdul M; Bostrom, Thor E; Bekessy, Lambert K; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-09-01

    The characteristics of dust particles deposited during the 2009 dust storm in the Gold Coast and Brisbane regions of Australia are discussed in this paper. The study outcomes provide important knowledge in relation to the potential impacts of dust storm related pollution on ecosystem health in the context that the frequency of dust storms is predicted to increase due to anthropogenic desert surface modifications and climate change impacts. The investigated dust storm contributed a large fraction of fine particles to the environment with an increased amount of total suspended solids, compared to dry deposition under ambient conditions. Although the dust storm passed over forested areas, the organic carbon content in the dust was relatively low. The primary metals present in the dust storm deposition were aluminium, iron and manganese, which are common soil minerals in Australia. The dust storm deposition did not contain significant loads of nickel, cadmium, copper and lead, which are commonly present in the urban environment. Furthermore, the comparison between the ambient and dust storm chromium and zinc loads suggested that these metals were contributed to the dust storm by local anthropogenic sources. The potential ecosystem health impacts of the 2009 dust storm include, increased fine solids deposition on ground surfaces resulting in an enhanced capacity to adsorb toxic pollutants as well as increased aluminium, iron and manganese loads. In contrast, the ecosystem health impacts related to organic carbon and other metals from dust storm atmospheric deposition are not considered to be significant.

  11. Martian great dust storms - Interpretive axially symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E. K.

    1983-08-01

    The Martian great dust storms are presently considered in light of the Schneider (1977) simplified theory of steady, nearly inviscid, thermally forced and axially symmetric atmospheric motions. A highly idealized calculation of atmospheric response to heating that is concentrated in a small latitude band is conducted, leading to the identification of qualitatively different local and global response regimes. Idealized model results indicate that subtropical latitudes are favored for the initiation of a dust-raising global dust storm. The steady, axially symmetric Martian response to solar forcing and modification to this response through an additional, latitudinally localized heat source are also discussed, and it is suggested that transition behavior similar to that of the more idealized model is to be expected in this case as well.

  12. The Challenge of Modeling the Meteorology of Dust Emission: Lessons Learned from the Desert Storms Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J. H.; Cowie, S. M.; Fiedler, S.; Heinold, B.; Jemmett-Smith, B. C.; Pantillon, F.; Schepanski, K.; Roberts, A. J.; Pope, R.; Gilkeson, C. A.; Hubel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth system, but a reliable quantification of the global dust budget is still not possible due to a lack of observations and insufficient representation of relevant processes in climate and weather models. Five years ago, the Desert Storms project funded by the European Research Council set out to reduce these uncertainties. Its aims were to (1) improve the understanding of key meteorological mechanisms of peak wind generation in dust emission regions (particularly in northern Africa), (2) assess their relative importance, (3) evaluate their representation in models, (4) determine model sensitivities with respect to resolution and model physics, and (5) explore the usefulness of new approaches for model improvements. Here we give an overview of the most significant findings: (1) The morning breakdown of nocturnal low-level jets is an important emission mechanism, but details depend crucially on nighttime stability, which is often badly handled by models. (2) Convective cold pools are a key control on summertime dust emission over northern Africa, directly and through their influence on the heat low; they are severely misrepresented by models using parameterized convection. A new scheme based on downdraft mass flux has been developed that can mitigate this problem. (3) Mobile cyclones make a relatively unimportant contribution, except for northeastern Africa in spring. (4) A new global climatology of dust devils identifies local hotspots but suggests a minor contribution to the global dust budget in contrast to previous studies. A new dust-devil parameterization based on data from large-eddy simulations will be presented. (5) The lack of sufficient observations and misrepresentation of physical processes lead to a considerable uncertainty and biases in (re)analysis products. (6) Variations in vegetation-related surface roughness create small-scale wind variability and support long-term dust trends in semi-arid areas.

  13. The Challenge of Modelling the Meteorology of Dust Emission: Lessons Learned from the Desert Storms Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John H.; Cowie, Sophie; Fiedler, Stephanie; Heinold, Bernd; Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Pantillon, Florian; Schepanski, Kerstin; Roberts, Alexander; Pope, Richard; Gilkeson, Carl; Hubel, Eva

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust plays an important role in the Earth system, but a reliable quantification of the global dust budget is still not possible due to a lack of observations and insufficient representation of relevant processes in climate and weather models. Five years ago, the Desert Storms project funded by the European Research Council set out to reduce these uncertainties. Its aims were to (1) improve the understanding of key meteorological mechanisms of peak wind generation in dust emission regions (particularly in northern Africa), (2) assess their relative importance, (3) evaluate their representation in models, (4) determine model sensitivities with respect to resolution and model physics, and (5) explore the usefulness of new approaches for model improvements. Here we give an overview of the most significant findings: (1) The morning breakdown of nocturnal low-level jets is an important emission mechanism, but details depend crucially on nighttime stability, which is often badly handled by models. (2) Convective cold pools are a key control on summertime dust emission over northern Africa, directly and through their influence on the heat low; they are severely misrepresented by models using parameterized convection. A new scheme based on downdraft mass flux has been developed that can mitigate this problem. (3) Mobile cyclones make a relatively unimportant contribution, except for northeastern Africa in spring. (4) A new global climatology of dust devils identifies local hotspots but suggests a minor contribution to the global dust budget in contrast to previous studies. A new dust-devil parameterization based on data from large-eddy simulations will be presented. (5) The lack of sufficient observations and misrepresentation of physical processes lead to a considerable uncertainty and biases in (re)analysis products. (6) Variations in vegetation-related surface roughness create small-scale wind variability and support long-term dust trends in semi-arid areas.

  14. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: storm electric fields and electron dissociative attachment.

    PubMed

    Delory, Gregory T; Farrell, William M; Atreya, Sushil K; Renno, Nilton O; Wong, Ah-San; Cummer, Steven A; Sentman, Davis D; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and desert field tests indicate that aeolian dust transport can generate atmospheric electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity." In convective structures such as dust devils and dust storms, grain stratification leads to macroscopic charge separations and gives rise to an overall electric dipole moment in the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous numerical simulations indicate that these storm electric fields on Mars can approach the ambient breakdown field strength of approximately 25 kV/m. In terrestrial dust phenomena, potentials ranging from approximately 20 to 160 kV/m have been directly measured. The large electrostatic fields predicted in martian dust devils and storms can energize electrons in the low pressure martian atmosphere to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, which results in the formation of the new chemical products CO/O- and OH/H-, respectively. Using a collisional plasma physics model, we present calculations of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with the ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach the breakdown value of approximately 25 kV/m. The dissociation of H2O into OH/H- provides a key ingredient for the generation of oxidants; thus electrically charged dust may significantly impact the habitability of Mars. PMID:16805701

  15. Impact and monitoring of dust storms in Taklimakan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, G. G.; Li, X.; Zheng, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The Taklimakan is China's largest, driest, and warmest desert in total area of 338000km^2 with perimeter of 436 km, it is also known as one of the world's largest shifting-sand deserts. Fully 85 percent of the total area consists of mobile, crescent-shaped sand dunes and are virtually devoid of vegetation. The abundant sand provides material for frequent intense dust storms. The Taklimakan desert fills the expansive Tarim Basin between the Kunlun Mountains and the Tibet Plateau to the south and the Tian Shan Mountains to the north. The Tarim River flows across the basin from west-to-east. In these places, the oases created by fresh surface water support agriculture. Studies outside Xinjiang indicated that 80% dust source of storms was from farmland. Dust storms in the Tarim Basin occur for 20 to 59 days, mainly in spring every year. However, little effort was taken to investigate soil wind erosion and dust emission around the desert. Quantitative understanding of individual dust events in the arid Taklimakan desert, for example, the dust emission rates and the long-range transport, are still incomplete. Therefore, the dust events were observed through routine satellite sensors, lidar instruments, airborne samplers, and surface-based aerosol monitors. Soil wind erosion and suspended particulates emission of four major dust storms from the desert and the typical oasis farmlands at the north rim of the desert were measured using creep sampler, BSNE and TSP at eight heights in 2012. In addition, Aqua satellite AOD data, the NAAPS Global Aeosol model, the CALIPSO satellite products, EPA's AirNow AQI of PM2.5 and HYSPLIT Back Trajectory model were applied to analyze dust transport across the Pacific. Four significant dust storms were observed at the north rim of Taklimakan desert in the spring, 2012. During those events, predominant wind direction ranged from 296 to 334°, wind speed over 7 m/s at 2 m lasted for 471-1074 min, gust wind speed ranged from 11-18m/s. It was

  16. [Geochemical characteristics and sources of atmospheric particulates in Shanghai during dust storm event].

    PubMed

    Qian, Peng; Zheng, Xiang-min; Zhou, Li-min

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric particulates were sampled from three sampling sites of Putuo, Minhang and Qingpu Districts in Shanghai between Oct. , 2009 and Oct. , 2010. In addition, particulate samples were also collected from Nantong, Zhengzhou, Xi'an, and Beijing city where dust storm dust transported along during spring. Element compositions of atmospheric particulates were determined by XRF and ICP-MS. The concentrations of major and trace elements in atmospheric particulates from Putuo, Minhang and Qingpu Districts were similar, indicating their common source. The UCC standardization distribution map showed that the major element composition of dust storm samples was similar to that of loess in northwestern China, indicating that the dust storm dust was mainly derived from Western desert and partly from local area. The REE partition patterns of dust storm dusts among different cities along dust transport route were similar to each other, as well as to those of northern loess, which indicates that the dust storm samples may have the same material source as loess, which mainly comes from crust material. However, the REE partition patterns of non-dust storm particulates were different among the studied cities, and different from those of loess, which suggests that the non-dust storm samples may be mixed with non-crust source material, which is different from dust storm dust and loess. The major element composition and REE partition pattern are effective indicators for source tracing of dust storm dust. PMID:23914561

  17. [Geochemical characteristics and sources of atmospheric particulates in Shanghai during dust storm event].

    PubMed

    Qian, Peng; Zheng, Xiang-min; Zhou, Li-min

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric particulates were sampled from three sampling sites of Putuo, Minhang and Qingpu Districts in Shanghai between Oct. , 2009 and Oct. , 2010. In addition, particulate samples were also collected from Nantong, Zhengzhou, Xi'an, and Beijing city where dust storm dust transported along during spring. Element compositions of atmospheric particulates were determined by XRF and ICP-MS. The concentrations of major and trace elements in atmospheric particulates from Putuo, Minhang and Qingpu Districts were similar, indicating their common source. The UCC standardization distribution map showed that the major element composition of dust storm samples was similar to that of loess in northwestern China, indicating that the dust storm dust was mainly derived from Western desert and partly from local area. The REE partition patterns of dust storm dusts among different cities along dust transport route were similar to each other, as well as to those of northern loess, which indicates that the dust storm samples may have the same material source as loess, which mainly comes from crust material. However, the REE partition patterns of non-dust storm particulates were different among the studied cities, and different from those of loess, which suggests that the non-dust storm samples may be mixed with non-crust source material, which is different from dust storm dust and loess. The major element composition and REE partition pattern are effective indicators for source tracing of dust storm dust.

  18. Leonid Dust Spheres Captured During the 2002 Storm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Chizmadia, Lysa; Macy, B.; Fischer, T. P.; Zolensky, M. E.; Warren, J. L.; Jenniskens, P.

    2003-01-01

    An effort was made to collect dust from a known source, comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, in the form of Leonid meteor debris in the hours after the 2002 storm. No interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have yet been recovered from a known source. We do not expect Leonid debris at 72 km/s to survive atmospheric entry as aggregates and our effort was predicated on the notion that mm-sized and larger meteoroids after extreme mass could survive as up to approximately 100 micron-sized silicate spheres. Two anticipated Leonid storms, rather than its annual shower activity, were the target of the last Leonid Multi-Aircraft Campaign during the Nov. 19, 2002 storm. Flying westwards from Spain to the US the mission covered both the 1767 and 1866 dust trails whereby early in the flight the aircraft flew several hours across the region exposed to the first storm peak that did not include the continental US of the second peak with 5,400 meteors.

  19. Impacts of dust storms on PCDD/Fs and regulated harmful matter in a basin area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tzi-yi; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Chen, Yan-Min; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2010-08-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the relationship between the high levels of dust particles and the concentrations of atmospheric PCDD/F during dust storm episodes. However, they did not investigate the impact of dust storm on basin areas. This present study shows the dust storm effect on regulated harmful matter and polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxin/dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) concentrations in basin areas. The results indicate that the average PM 10 (aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm), SO 2 (sulfur dioxide), NO 2 (nitrogen oxides), CO (carbon monoxide) and O 3 (ozone) levels during the dust storm were 5.14, 2.30, 1.44, 1.40 and 1.41 times higher than those before the dust storm, respectively. Mean PCDD/F concentrations during the dust storm (0.958 pg Nm -3; 0.0484 pg I-TEQ Nm -3) were significantly higher than those before the dust storm (0.240 pg Nm -3; 0.00705 pg I-TEQ Nm -3). The PCDDs concentration during the dust storm was 1.84 times larger than that before the dust storm, and the PCDFs concentration was 10.2 times larger. Therefore, the dominant contribution of PCDD/Fs concentration during dust storm in the basin areas of northern Taiwan is PCDFs. OCDD concentration measured before dust storm was the highest among the seventeen investigated PCDD/F congeners, accounting for about 64.6% of the total concentration. However, OCDD concentration measured during the dust storm was comparable with the OCDF among the seventeen investigated PCDD/F congeners, accounting for about 24.5% (OCDD) and 22.9% (OCDF) of the total concentration. The above results indicate that the impact of a dust storm on regulated harmful matter and PCDD/F concentrations in the basin area is significant. An investigation of the health risk from dust storms in basin areas is needed.

  20. Global dust Detection Index (GDDI); a new remotely sensed methodology for dust storms detection.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Mehdi; Darvishi Boloorani, Ali; Alavipanah, Seyed Kazem; Mohamadi, Hossein; Najafi, Mohamad Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Dust storm occurs frequently in arid and semi-arid areas of the world. This natural phenomenon, which is the result of stormy winds, raises a lot of dust from desert surfaces and decreases visibility to less than 1 km. In recent years the temporal frequency of occurrences and their spatial extents has been dramatically increased. West of Iran, especially in spring and summer, suffers from significant increases of these events which cause several social and economic problems. Detecting and recognizing the extent of dust storms is very important issue in designing warning systems, management and decreasing the risk of this phenomenon. As the process of monitoring and prediction are related to detection of this phenomenon and it's separation from other atmospheric phenomena such as cloud, so the main aim of this research is establishing an automated process for detection of dust masses. In this study 20 events of dust happened in western part of Iran during 2000-2011 have been recognized and studied. To the aim of detecting dust events we used satellite images of MODIS sensor. Finally a model based on reflectance and thermal infrared bands has been developed. The efficiency of this method has been checked using dust events. Results show that the model has a good performance in all cases. It also has the ability and robustness to be used in any dust storm forecasting and warning system. PMID:24406015

  1. Dust Storm, Andean Altiplano, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Most of the land surface and the clouds in the foreground of this westerly looking view are over the South American Andean Altiplano at the frontier between Chile and Argentina (26.5S, 66.5W). Chile is to the west near the top of the photo just beyond the dry salt lake (Salar de Arizaro) at the upper right. Very strong winds are picking up dust and blowing it to the SE across mountain mountain ranges into the Chaco Austral region of Argentina.

  2. An electrified dust storm over the Negev desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Y.; Price, C. G.; Yaniv, R.; Katz, S.

    2015-12-01

    We report on atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory in Mitzpe-Ramon, Israel (30035'N, 34045'E) during a massive dust storm that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on 10-11 February 2015. The event transported Saharan dust from Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula in advance of the warm front of a Cyprus low pressure system. Satellite images show the dust plume covering the Negev desert and Southern Israel and moving north. The concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 450 μg m-3 and AOT from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker was 1.5 on the 10th. The gradual intensification of the event reached peak values on February 11th of over 1200 μg m-3 and AOT of 1.8. This was the most severe dust event in a decade. Continuous measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and vertical current density (Jz) were conducted with 1 minute temporal resolution. Meteorological data was also recorded at the site. As the dust was advected over the observation site, we noted very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters. Since the onset of the dust storm, the Ez values changed between +1000 and +8000 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -10 pA m2 and +20 pA m2, both on time-scales of a few minutes. These values are a significant departures from the mean fair-weather values measured at the site, which are -~200 V m-1 and ~2 pA m2. The disturbed episodes lasted for several hours on the 10th and 11th and coincided with local meteorological conditions related to the wind direction, which carried large amounts of dust particles. We interpret the rapid changes as caused by the transport of electrically charged dust. Calculation of the total electrical charge during the dust storm will be presented.

  3. Dust Storms and Mortality in the United States, 1995-2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extreme weather events, such as dust storms, are predicted to become more frequent as the global climate warms through the 21st century. The impact of dust storms on human health has been studied extensively in the context of Asian, Saharan, Arabian, and Australian storms, but t...

  4. Onset of frequent dust storms in northern China at ~AD 1100.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxin; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Mu; Liu, Weiguo; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dian; Liu, Zhonghui

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms in northern China strongly affect the living and health of people there and the dusts could travel a full circle of the globe in a short time. Historically, more frequent dust storms occurred during cool periods, particularly the Little Ice Age (LIA), generally attributed to the strengthened Siberian High. However, limited by chronological uncertainties in proxy records, this mechanism may not fully reveal the causes of dust storm frequency changes. Here we present a late Holocene dust record from the Qaidam Basin, where hydrological changes were previously reconstructed, and examine dust records from northern China, including the ones from historical documents. The records, being broadly consistent, indicate the onset of frequent dust storms at ~AD 1100. Further, peaked dust storm events occurred at episodes of high total solar irradiance or warm-dry conditions in source regions, superimposed on the high background of frequent dust storms within the cool LIA period. We thus suggest that besides strong wind activities, the centennial-scale dust storm events over the last 1000 years appear to be linked to the increased availability of dust source. With the anticipated global warming and deteriorating vegetation coverage, frequent occurrence of dust storms in northern China would be expected to persist. PMID:26607033

  5. Onset of frequent dust storms in northern China at ~AD 1100.

    PubMed

    He, Yuxin; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Mu; Liu, Weiguo; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dian; Liu, Zhonghui

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms in northern China strongly affect the living and health of people there and the dusts could travel a full circle of the globe in a short time. Historically, more frequent dust storms occurred during cool periods, particularly the Little Ice Age (LIA), generally attributed to the strengthened Siberian High. However, limited by chronological uncertainties in proxy records, this mechanism may not fully reveal the causes of dust storm frequency changes. Here we present a late Holocene dust record from the Qaidam Basin, where hydrological changes were previously reconstructed, and examine dust records from northern China, including the ones from historical documents. The records, being broadly consistent, indicate the onset of frequent dust storms at ~AD 1100. Further, peaked dust storm events occurred at episodes of high total solar irradiance or warm-dry conditions in source regions, superimposed on the high background of frequent dust storms within the cool LIA period. We thus suggest that besides strong wind activities, the centennial-scale dust storm events over the last 1000 years appear to be linked to the increased availability of dust source. With the anticipated global warming and deteriorating vegetation coverage, frequent occurrence of dust storms in northern China would be expected to persist.

  6. Onset of frequent dust storms in northern China at ~AD 1100

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuxin; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Mu; Liu, Weiguo; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dian; Liu, Zhonghui

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms in northern China strongly affect the living and health of people there and the dusts could travel a full circle of the globe in a short time. Historically, more frequent dust storms occurred during cool periods, particularly the Little Ice Age (LIA), generally attributed to the strengthened Siberian High. However, limited by chronological uncertainties in proxy records, this mechanism may not fully reveal the causes of dust storm frequency changes. Here we present a late Holocene dust record from the Qaidam Basin, where hydrological changes were previously reconstructed, and examine dust records from northern China, including the ones from historical documents. The records, being broadly consistent, indicate the onset of frequent dust storms at ~AD 1100. Further, peaked dust storm events occurred at episodes of high total solar irradiance or warm-dry conditions in source regions, superimposed on the high background of frequent dust storms within the cool LIA period. We thus suggest that besides strong wind activities, the centennial-scale dust storm events over the last 1000 years appear to be linked to the increased availability of dust source. With the anticipated global warming and deteriorating vegetation coverage, frequent occurrence of dust storms in northern China would be expected to persist. PMID:26607033

  7. Onset of frequent dust storms in northern China at ~AD 1100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuxin; Zhao, Cheng; Song, Mu; Liu, Weiguo; Chen, Fahu; Zhang, Dian; Liu, Zhonghui

    2015-11-01

    Dust storms in northern China strongly affect the living and health of people there and the dusts could travel a full circle of the globe in a short time. Historically, more frequent dust storms occurred during cool periods, particularly the Little Ice Age (LIA), generally attributed to the strengthened Siberian High. However, limited by chronological uncertainties in proxy records, this mechanism may not fully reveal the causes of dust storm frequency changes. Here we present a late Holocene dust record from the Qaidam Basin, where hydrological changes were previously reconstructed, and examine dust records from northern China, including the ones from historical documents. The records, being broadly consistent, indicate the onset of frequent dust storms at ~AD 1100. Further, peaked dust storm events occurred at episodes of high total solar irradiance or warm-dry conditions in source regions, superimposed on the high background of frequent dust storms within the cool LIA period. We thus suggest that besides strong wind activities, the centennial-scale dust storm events over the last 1000 years appear to be linked to the increased availability of dust source. With the anticipated global warming and deteriorating vegetation coverage, frequent occurrence of dust storms in northern China would be expected to persist.

  8. Radiative feedback of dust aerosols on the East Asian dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoye; Gong, Sunling; Chen, Yong; Shi, Guangyu; Li, Wei

    2010-12-01

    A new radiative parameterization scheme of dust aerosol has been developed within a mesoscale dust storm (DS) forecasting model to study the direct radiation of dust aerosol by incorporating both online forecasted dust concentrations and the updated dust reflective index. The radiation-induced temperature variations are fed back online to the model dynamics, resulting in two-way interactions between meteorology and dust aerosols. For a typical DS of 16-18 April 2006 in East Asia, the study shows that the strong extinction by dust leads to significant changes in the radiation flux from surface to the top of atmosphere, which tends to decrease the air temperature in the lower dust aerosol layers but to increase the air temperature in the upper dust aerosol layers. Consequently, variations of 3-D temperature fields reduce the cold air in the upper atmosphere, increase the sea level air pressure, decrease surface wind velocity, and eventually weaken the Mongolian cyclones owing to the blocking effects. These changes, in return, have impacts on the emission, transport, and deposition processes of DS. The interactively simulated total dust emission from the ground is reduced by over 50%, and the 72-hour averaged optical depth of dust aerosols declines by about 33% compared to the one-way model without dust direct radiative feedback, which indicates strong negative feedback effects. The findings of this study also suggest that online calculation of dust direct radiative effects in a mesoscale dust prediction model may lead to an improvement in the prediction of meteorological elements such as temperature, wind, and pressure during the dust events owing to its improved calculation accuracy of regional radiation budgets.

  9. Dust storm events over Delhi: verification of dust AOD forecasts with satellite and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Aditi; Iyengar, Gopal R.; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Thar desert located in northwest part of India is considered as one of the major dust source. Dust storms originate in Thar desert during pre-monsoon season, affects large part of Indo-Gangetic plains. High dust loading causes the deterioration of the ambient air quality and degradation in visibility. Present study focuses on the identification of dust events and verification of the forecast of dust events over Delhi and western part of IG Plains, during the pre-monsoon season of 2015. Three dust events have been identified over Delhi during the study period. For all the selected days, Terra-MODIS AOD at 550 nm are found close to 1.0, while AURA-OMI AI shows high values. Dust AOD forecasts from NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) for the three selected dust events are verified against satellite (MODIS) and ground based observations (AERONET). Comparison of observed AODs at 550 nm from MODIS with NCUM predicted AODs reveals that NCUM is able to predict the spatial and temporal distribution of dust AOD, in these cases. Good correlation (~0.67) is obtained between the NCUM predicted dust AODs and location specific observations available from AERONET. Model under-predicted the AODs as compared to the AERONET observations. This may be mainly because the model account for only dust and no anthropogenic activities are considered. The results of the present study emphasize the requirement of more realistic representation of local dust emission in the model both of natural and anthropogenic origin, to improve the forecast of dust from NCUM during the dust events.

  10. Climate Change Implications and Use of Early Warning Systems for Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriman, L.

    2014-12-01

    Increased changes in land cover and global climate have led to increased frequency and/or intensity of dust storms in some regions of the world. Early detection and warning of dust storms, in conjunction with effective and widespread information broadcasts, will be essential to the prevention and mitigation of future risks and impacts to people and the environment. Since frequency and intensity of dust storms can vary from region to region, there is a demonstrated need for more research to be conducted over longer periods of time to analyze trends of dust storm events [1]. Dust storms impact their origin area, but also land, water and people a great distance away from where dust finally settles [2, 3]. These transboundary movements and accompanying impacts further warrant the need for global collaboration to help predict the onset, duration and path of a dust storm. Early warning systems can help communicate when a dust storm is occurring, the projected intensity of the dust storm and its anticipated physical impact over a particular geographic area. Development of regional dust storm models, such as CUACE/Dust for East Asia, and monitoring networks, like the Sand and Dust Storm Warning Network operated by the World Meteorological Organization, and the use of remote sensing and satellite imagery derived products [4], including MODIS, are currently being incorporated into early warning and monitoring initiatives. However, to increase future certainty of impacts of dust storms on vulnerable populations and ecosystems, more research is needed to analyze the influences of human activities, seasonal variations and long-term climatic patterns on dust storm generation, movement and impact. Sources: [1] Goudie, A.S. (2009), Dust storms: recent developments, J Environ. Manage., 90. [2] Lee, H., and Liu, C. (2004), Coping with dust storm events: information, impacts, and policymaking in Taiwan, TAO, 15(5). [3] Marx, S.K., McGowan, H.A., and Balz, K.S. (2009), Long-range dust

  11. Interannual similarity in the Martian atmosphere during the dust storm season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.; Kleinböhl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Smith, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    We find that during the dusty season on Mars (southern spring and summer) of years without a global dust storm there are three large regional-scale dust storms. The storms are labeled A, B, and C in seasonal order. This classification is based on examining the zonal mean 50 Pa (˜25 km) daytime temperature retrievals from TES/MGS and MCS/MRO over 6 Mars Years. Regional-scale storms are defined as events where the temperature exceeds 200 K. Examining the MCS dust field at 50 Pa indicates that warming in the Southern Hemisphere is dominated by direct heating, while northern high latitude warming is a dynamical response. A storms are springtime planet encircling Southern Hemisphere events. B storms are southern polar events that begin near perihelion and last through the solstice. C storms are southern summertime events starting well after the end of the B storm. C storms show the most interannual variability.

  12. Springtime Dust Storm Swirls at Martian North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Two Hubble Space Telescope images of Mars, taken about a month apart on September 18 and October 15, 1996, reveal a state-sized dust storm churning near the edge of the Martian north polar cap. The polar storm is probably a consequence of large temperature differences between the polar ice and the dark regions to the south, which are heated by the springtime sun. The increased sunlight also causes the dry ice in the polar cap to sublime and shrink.

    Mars is famous for large, planet-wide dust storms. Smaller storms resembling the one seen here were observed in other regions by Viking orbiters in the late 1970s. However, this is the first time that such an event has been caught near the receding north polar cap. The Hubble images provide valuable new insights into the behavior of localized dust storms on Mars, which are typically below the resolution of ground-based telescopes. This kind of advanced planetary 'weather report' will be invaluable for aiding preparation for the landing of NASA's Pathfinder spacecraft in July 1997 and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor orbiter in September 1997.

    Top (September 18, 1996) - The salmon colored notch in the white north polar cap is a 600-mile (1,000 kilometer) long storm -- nearly the width of Texas. The bright dust can also be seen over the dark surface surrounding the cap, where it is caught up in the Martian jet stream and blown easterly. The white clouds at lower latitudes are mostly associated with major Martian volcanos such as Olympus Mons. This image was taken when Mars was more than 186 million miles (300 million kilometers) from Earth, and the planet was smaller in angular size than Jupiter's Great Red Spot!

    Bottom (October 15, 1996) - Though the storm has dissipated by October, a distinctive dust-colored comma-shaped feature can be seen curving across the ice cap. The shape is similar to cold fronts on Earth, which are associated with low pressure systems. Nothing quite like this feature has been seen

  13. Asian Dust Storm Outbreaks: A Satellite-Surface Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2006-01-01

    Airborne dusts from northern China contribute a significant part of the air quality problem and, to some extent, regional climatic impact in Asia during springtime. Asian dust typically originates in desert areas far from polluted urban regions. During the transport, dust layers can interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols from heavily polluted urban areas. Added to the complex effects of clouds and natural marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from the source. Thus, understanding the unique temporal and spatial variations of Asian dust is of special importance in regional-to-global climate issues (e.g., radiative forcing, hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in the mid-Pacific Ocean, etc.), as well as societal concerns (e.g., adverse health effects to humans). The Asian dust and air pollution aerosols can be detected by its colored appearance on current Earth observing satellites (e.g., MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS, etc.) and its evolution monitored by satellites and surface network (e.g. AERONET, SKY NET, MPLNET, etc.). Recently, many field campaigns (e.g., ACE-Asia-2001, TRACEP-2001, ADE-2002 & -2003, APEX-2001 & -2003, etc.) were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. I will present an overview of the outbreak of Asian dust storms from space and surface observations and to address the climatic effects and societal impacts.

  14. The role of unbalanced mesoscale circulations in dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Vellore, Ramesh K.; Lewis, John M.; Young, Matthew

    2011-12-01

    In this study, two dust storms in northwestern Nevada (February 2002 and April 2004) are investigated through the use of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations. The focus of the study is twofold: (1) Examination of dynamic processes on the meso-β scale for both cases, and (2) analysis of extreme upper-air cooling prior to storm formation and the development of a nearly discontinuous gust front in the 2002 case that could not be validated in an earlier synoptic-scale study. Results of the simulations suggest that the driving mechanism for dust storm dynamics derives from the breakdown and subsequent balance between the advection of geostrophic wind and total wind in the exit region of the polar jet. In this process, the deviation from quasi-geostrophic (Q-G) balance creates a plume of ascent along and to the right of the jet's exit region. The cold pool generation in the mid-lower troposphere in consequence of this adjustment sets up the kinetic energy in the planetary boundary layer and creates a forward leaning (slope from north to south) cold front under the jet exit region. Surface heating is coupled with this frontal structure, and rapid surface pressure falls (rises) occur initially (later) in response to diabatic (adiabatic) processes. The adjustments occur at fast time scales, scales that are radically different from those in studies that followed the Q-G tenets of the Danielsen paradigm. The results of this study indicate that meso-β scale features associated with subgeostrophy in the exit region of the curved jet aloft and associated thermal wind imbalance (700-500 hPa) lead to significant velocity divergence aloft. Mass/momentum adjustments and the associated cooling strengthen the baroclinic zone aloft. The restoration to thermal wind balance accompanying this cooling resulted in a narrow zone of surface pressure rise and strong low-level isallobaric winds. The turbulent momentum for dust ablation comes from this sequence of processes.

  15. An electrified dust storm over the Negev desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav; Katz, Shai; Yaniv, Roy; Ziv, Baruch; Price, Colin

    2016-11-01

    We report on atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory in Mitzpe-Ramon, Israel (30°35‧N, 34°45‧E) during a large dust storm that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on 10-11 February 2015. The dust was transported from the Sahara, Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula ahead of an approaching Cyprus low. Satellite images show the dust plume covering the Negev desert and Southern Israel and moving north. The concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 450 μg m- 3 and the AOT from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker was 1.5 on February 10th. The gradual intensification of the event reached peak concentrations on February 11th of over 1200 μg m- 3 and an AOT of 1.8. Continuous measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and vertical current density (Jz) were conducted at the Wise Observatory with 1 minute temporal resolution. Meteorological data was also recorded at the site. As the dust was advected over the observatory, very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters were registered. From the onset of the dust storm, the Ez values changed between + 1000 and + 8000 V m- 1 while the current density fluctuated between - 10 pA m2 and + 20 pA m2, both on time-scales of a few minutes. These values are significant departures from the average fair-weather values measured at the site, which are ~- 200 V m- 1 and ~ 2 pA m2. The disturbed episodes lasted for several hours on February 10th and the 11th and coincided with local meteorological conditions related to the wind speed and direction, which carried large amounts of dust particles over our observation station. We interpret the rapid changes as caused by the transport of electrically charged dust, carrying an excess of negative charge at lower altitudes.

  16. Retrieval of dust storm aerosols using an integrated Neural Network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fei; Wong, Man Sing; Lee, Kwon Ho; Campbell, James R.; Shea, Yu-kai

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modeling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. This study develops an integrated model for dust storm detection and retrieval based on the combination of geostationary satellite images and forward trajectory model. The proposed model consists of three components: (i) a Neural Network (NN) model for near real-time detection of dust storms; (ii) a NN model for dust Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval; and (iii) the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to analyze the transports of dust storms. These three components are combined using an event-driven active geo-processing workflow technique. The NN models were trained for the dust detection and validated using sunphotometer measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The HYSPLIT model was applied in the regions with high probabilities of dust locations, and simulated the transport pathways of dust storms. This newly automated hybrid method can be used to give advance near real-time warning of dust storms, for both environmental authorities and public. The proposed methodology can be applied on early warning of adverse air quality conditions, and prediction of low visibility associated with dust storm events for port and airport authorities.

  17. Detecting Dust Storms and Water Ice Clouds Onboard THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, K. L.; Bandfield, J. L.; Castano, R.; Chien, S.; Smith, M. D.; Stough, T. M.

    2006-05-01

    We are developing and testing the first data analysis algorithms to be used onboard a spacecraft in Mars orbit. In particular, these algorithms will be uploaded to the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, where they will analyze data collected by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) instrument. In order of increasing sophistication, they can detect thermal anomalies (which could be indicators of geothermal activity), track the movements of the seasonal polar caps, detect dust storms, and detect water ice clouds in the atmosphere. The benefit of estimating atmospheric constituents in an onboard setting is that we can then detect features or events of interest and use them to prioritize data for transmission back to Earth. Rather than collecting only a pre-specified list of target images, THEMIS can use a more continuous operating mode and only return images that successfully capture events of interest, such as the onset of a dust storm or particularly dense water ice clouds. We will present recent results obtained by our dust and water ice cloud detection algorithms when applied to raw data that was collected by THEMIS. To estimate the dust and water ice content of the atmosphere, we trained a support vector machine (SVM) to perform regression based on previous analyses of a combination of fully calibrated TES and THEMIS data by Smith et al. (JGR 108, 2003). We find that both algorithms are, on average, able to estimate optical depth to within the same level of the uncertainty associated with the values computed by Smith et al. We conclude that these algorithms are performing at a level suitable for use onboard THEMIS. We will also report on the status of onboard infusion of these methods.

  18. Aerosol optical properties affected by a strong dust storm over central and northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jinyuan; Du, Wupeng; Wang, Yuesi; Gao, Qingxian; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Mingxing

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol observational data at 8 ground-based observation sites in the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET) were analyzed to characterize the optical properties of aerosol particles during the strong dust storm of 16-21 April 2005. The observational aerosol optical depth (AOD) increased significantly during this dust storm at sites in Beijing city (86%), Beijing forest (84%), Xianghe (13%), Shapotou (27%), Shenyang (47%), Shanghai (23%), and Jiaozhou Bay (24%). The API (air pollution index) in Beijing and Tianjin also had a similar rise during the dust storm, while the Angström exponent ( α) declined evidently at sites in Beijing city (21%), Beijing forest (39%), Xianghe (19%), Ordos (77%), Shapotou (50%), Shanghai (12%), and Jiaozhou Bay (21%), respectively. Furthermore, The observational AOD and α demonstrated contrary trends during all storm stages (pre-dust storm, dust storm, and post-dust storm), with the AOD indicating an obvious “Valley-Peak-Valley” pattern of variation, while α demonstrated a “Peak-Valley-Peak” pattern. In addition, the dust module in a regional climate model (RegCM3) simulated the dust storm occurrence and track accurately and RegCM3 was able to basically simulate the trends in AOD. The simulation results for the North China stations were the best, and the simulation for dust-source stations was on the high side, while the simulation was on the low side for coastal sites.

  19. Distributed Visualization of Dust Storm in Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, C.; Wu, H.; Huang, Q.; Wong, D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent advancements of scientific modeling allow high resolution simulation of natural phenomena, such as metrological parameters. And the simulation results are offered online in increasing data volume. In the Internet arena, a distributed visualization approach for representing the resulting data is critical for data sharing and understanding. Our objective is to utilize spatial computing to develop a distributed visualization system, which provides three visualization modes for Earth Scientists to analyze spatial data. The system involves the data server, the application server, Internet and the visualization client. At the server side, the data are preprocessed to generate visualization results, such as images, models and geometries. When large volume data are involved, parallel computing is invoked to accelerate the processing. At the client side, NASA World Wind and enhanced development are deployed to display the results from the server. Using our dust storm simulation data as an example, this system can visualize the metrological parameters associated with dust storm events produced by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Current visualization modes include 2D images, 3D volume rendering, and time enabled animation. With the distributed visualization approach, the research featured with multi-dimensional view of Earth phenomena interactively. Acknowledgements: Research reported is sponsored by a NASA project (NNX07AD99G).

  20. Simulation of the Radiative Impact of High Dust Loading during a Dust Storm in March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthan Purakkal, J.; Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated a severe dust storm that developed over vast areas of the Middle East on 18-19 March 2012 and affected Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Egypt, Jordan, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, Kuwait, Iraq, Iran, Israel, and Pakistan. The visible aerosol optical depth recorded by the AERONET station on the KAUST campus (22.30o N 39.10o E) during the storm reached 4.5, exceeding the average level by an order of magnitude. To quantify the effects of the dust on atmospheric radiation and dynamics, we analyzed available ground-based and satellite observations and conducted numerical simulations using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem). The model was able to reproduce the spatial and temporal patterns of the aerosol optical depths (AOD) observed by airborne and ground-based instruments. The major dust sources included river valleys of lower Tigris and Euphrates in Iraq, desert areas in Kuwait, Iran, United Arab Emirates, central Arabia including Rub' al Khali, An Nafud, and Ad Dahna, as well as the Red Sea coast of the Arabian Peninsula. The total amount of dust generated across the entire domain during the period of the simulation reached 93.76 Mt; 73.04 Mt of dust was deposited within the domain; 6.56 Mt of dust sunk in the adjacent sea waters, including 1.20 Mt that sedimented into the Red Sea. The model predicted a well-mixed boundary layer expanding up to 3.5 km in the afternoon. Some dust plumes were seen above the Planetary Boundary layer. In our simulations, mineral dust heated the lower atmosphere with a maximum heating rate of 9 K/day. The dust storm reduced the downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface to a maximum daily average value of -134 Wm-2 and the daily averaged long-wave forcing at the surface increased to 43 Wm-2. The combined short-wave cooling and long-wave warming effects of dust aerosols caused significant reduction in the surface air temperature -6.7 K at 1200 UTC on 19 March 2013.

  1. Vulnerability Assessment of Dust Storms in the United States under a Changing Climate Scenario

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe weather events, such as flooding, drought, forest fires, and dust storms can have a serious impact on human health. Dust storm events are not well predicted in the United States, however they are expected to become more frequent as global climate warms through the 21st cen...

  2. Dust Storms in the United States are Associated with Increased Cardiovascular Mortality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Extreme weather events such as dust storms are predicted to become more frequent as the global climate warms through the 21st century. Studies of Asian, Saharan, Arabian, and Australian dust storms have found associations with cardiovascular and total non-accidental...

  3. Aerosol Properties Changes of Northeast Asia due to a Severe Dust Storm in April 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li; Wang, Shupeng; Yu, Tao; Gu, Xingfa; Zhang, Xingying; Wang, Weihe; Ren, Suling

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing the aerosol properties changes due to the dust storm named as "China's Great Wall of Dust" oriented from Taklimakan desert in April, 2014. Dust identification IDDI (Infrared Difference Dust Index) images from FY-2E and true color composite images from FY-3C MERSI (Medium Resolution Spectral Imager) show the breakout and transport of the dust storm.From 4-day forward air mass trajectories, the dusty air masses were mostly transported within the lower boundary layer(<3km) over the Northwest China on April 23rd and April 24th, however they were progressively increasing in altitude to above 5km above the surface when they reached the central part of north China region (32°N-42°N; 105°E-123°E). 3-hourly data records at surface stations suggest that anticyclonic circulation occupying southern Xinjiang basin and cyclonic circulation maintaining in Mongolia formed the typical Synoptic condition which leaded to the strong dust storm. Aerosol Index (AI) results of TOU (Total Ozone Unit) aboard FY-3B are first developed and used in studying the affected areas due to the dust storm. The retrieved aerosol indexes show sensitivity to the dust particles. The dust affected areas agree with the synoptic meteorological condition analysis, which prove the synoptic meteorological condition is the main reason for the break out and transport of the dust storm. Anomalies of the average MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) distributions over Northeast Asia during the dust storm to the average of that in April between 2010-2014 show high aerosol loading due to the dust storm. Compared with the 5-year average AOD in April, aerosol loading during this dust storm was much higher, with AOD values at 550nm up to 2.9 observed over the northwest China.The dust storm also brought different change in the aerosol microphysical properties between Beijing and Dalanzadgad. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals

  4. Feedbacks of dust and boundary layer meteorology during a dust storm in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rémy, S.; Benedetti, A.; Bozzo, A.; Haiden, T.; Jones, L.; Razinger, M.; Flemming, J.; Engelen, R. J.; Peuch, V. H.; Thepaut, J. N.

    2015-11-01

    Aerosols affect the atmosphere through direct interaction with short-wave and long-wave radiation and the microphysical properties of clouds. In this paper we report in detail on several mechanisms by which the short-term impact of dust on surface radiative fluxes can affect the dust loading of the atmosphere via modification of boundary-layer meteorology. This in turn affects the aerosol radiative forcing itself. Examples of these feedbacks between dust and boundary layer meteorology were observed during a series of dust storms in the Sahara and the eastern Mediterranean in April 2012. These case studies have been analysed using the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) system. The radiative fluxes in the short-wave and long-wave spectra were both significantly affected by the prognostic aerosol-radiation interaction, which in turn impacted the meteorological simulation. Reduced incoming solar radiation below the aerosol layers led to a decrease in maximum surface temperatures and to a more stable thermal stratification of the lower atmosphere. This in turn forced weaker surface wind speeds and eventually smaller dust emissions. Moreover, we also observed a secondary impact of the aerosol radiative forcing, whereby horizontal gradients of surface temperature were increased at the edge of the dust plume, which led to local increases of surface wind speeds due to the thermal wind effect. The differentiated impact of the aerosol layer on surface pressure also contributed to the increase in surface wind speed and dust production in the same area. Enhanced long-wave radiative fluxes by the dust mass were associated with opposite processes. Less stable thermal stratification at night, brought mainly by higher minimum temperatures at the surface, caused stronger surface winds. At the edge of the dust storm, weaker horizontal temperature and pressure gradients forced lower winds and reduced dust production. Regarding dust

  5. PREFACE: WMO/GEO Expert Meeting On An International Sand And Dust Storm Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    support of Spain to host a regional centre for the European/African/Middle East node of SDS-WAS and to play a lead role in implementation. In August 2007, the Korean Meteorological Administration hosted the 2nd International Workshop on Sand and Dust Storms highlighting Korean SDS-WAS activities as well as those of Asian regional partners. From 7-9 November 2007, Spain hosted the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on SDS-WAS at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center. This consultation meeting brought 100 international experts together from research, observation, forecasting and user countries especially in Africa and the Middle East to discuss the way forward in SDS-WAS implementation. The general objective of the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on an International Sand and Dust Storm Warning System was to discuss and recommend actions needed to develop a global routine SDS-WAS based on integrating numerical SDS prediction and observing systems, and on establishing effective cooperation between data producers and user communities in order to provide SDS-WAS products capable of contributing to the reduction of risks from SDS. The specific objectives were: to identify, present and suggest future real-time observations for forecast verification and dust surveillance: satellite, ground-based remote sensing (passive and active) and in-situ monitoring to present ongoing forecasting activities to discuss and identify user needs: health, air quality, air transport operations, ocean, and others to identify and discuss dust research issues relevant for operational forecast applications to present the concept of SDS-WAS and Regional Centers The meeting was organised around invited presentations and discussions on observations, modelling and users of the SDS-WAS. C Pérez and J M Baldasano Editors INTERNATIONAL STEERING COMMITTEE José María Baldasano (Chairman) - Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Spain Emilio Cuevas - Instituto Nacional de Meteorología, Spain Leonard A Barrie - World Meteorological

  6. Atmospheric Electricity Effects of Eastern Mediterranean Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Shai; Yair, Yoav; Yaniv, Roy; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    We present atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory (WO) in Mizpe-Ramon (30035'N, 34045'E) and Mt. Hermon (30024'N, 35051'E), Israel, during two massive and unique dust storms that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on February 10-11 and September 08-12, 2015. The first event transported Saharan dust from Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula in advance of a warm front of a Cyprus low pressure system. In the second event, dust particles were transported from the Syrian desert, which dominates the north-east border with Iraq, through flow associated with a shallow Persian trough system. In both events the concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 2200 μg m-3. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) obtained from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker reached values up to 4.0. The gradual intensification of the first event reached peak values on the February 11th > 1200 μg m-3 and an AOT ~ 1.8, while the second dust storm commenced on September 8th with a sharp increase reaching peak values of 2225 μg m-3 and AOT of 4.0. Measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and of the vertical current density (Jz) were conducted continuously with a 1 minute temporal resolution. During the February event, very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters were measured at the WO. The Ez values changed between +1000 and +8000 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -10 and +20 pA m-2 (this is an order of magnitude larger compared to the fair weather current density of ~2 pA m-2. In contrast, during the September event, Ez values registered at WO were between -430 and +10 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -6 and +3 pA m2. For the September event the Hermon site showed Ez and Jz values fluctuating between -460 and +570 V m-1 and -14.5 and +18 pA m-2 respectively. The electric field and current variability, amplitude and the

  7. Climatological analysis of dust storms in the area surrounding the Tengger Desert during 1960-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Qingyu; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Shilei; Pan, Baotian; Liu, Chenglin; Zhang, Di; Wu, Tao

    2014-09-01

    Based on dust storm records and meteorological data from six stations in the area surrounding the Tengger Desert over the period 1960-2007, the diurnal, monthly and interannual variation of dust storms and severe dust storms, as well as their relation to wind speed, precipitation and temperature, are analyzed and discussed. Statistical analyses demonstrate that such storms occur more frequently from 9:00 to 21:00 local standard time and much more frequently between March and May, especially April. Dust storm frequency (DSF) and severe dust storm frequency (SDSF) show a significant linear decreasing trend from 1960 to 2007. For monthly variability, winds (especially strong ones with speeds 10-20 m/s) are the main factor controlling both dust storm types. Precipitation and temperature have an indirect effect on DSF and SDSF by controlling vegetation growth. For interannual variability, strong wind is still the main control, with precipitation a relatively important cofactor. Temperature has an irregular but somewhat negative relationship with dust storms. Precipitation and especially temperature have likely been important in the increase of DSF since 2000.

  8. Climatological analysis of dust storms in the area surrounding the Tengger Desert during 1960-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Qingyu; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Shilei; Pan, Baotian; Liu, Chenglin; Zhang, Di; Wu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Based on dust storm records and meteorological data from six stations in the area surrounding the Tengger Desert over the period 1960-2007, the diurnal, monthly and interannual variation of dust storms and severe dust storms, as well as their relation to wind speed, precipitation and temperature, are analyzed and discussed. Statistical analyses demonstrate that such storms occur more frequently from 9:00 to 21:00 local standard time and much more frequently between March and May, especially April. Dust storm frequency (DSF) and severe dust storm frequency (SDSF) show a significant linear decreasing trend from 1960 to 2007. For monthly variability, winds (especially strong ones with speeds 10-20 m/s) are the main factor controlling both dust storm types. Precipitation and temperature have an indirect effect on DSF and SDSF by controlling vegetation growth. For interannual variability, strong wind is still the main control, with precipitation a relatively important cofactor. Temperature has an irregular but somewhat negative relationship with dust storms. Precipitation and especially temperature have likely been important in the increase of DSF since 2000.

  9. The effects of the 2009 dust storm on emergency admissions to a hospital in Brisbane, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Adrian G.; Fraser, John F.; Munck, Lynette

    2012-07-01

    In September 2009 an enormous dust storm swept across eastern Australia. Dust is potentially hazardous to health as it interferes with breathing, and previous dust storms have been linked to increased risks of asthma and even death. We examined whether the 2009 Australian dust storm changed the volume or characteristics of emergency admissions to hospital. We used an observational study design, using time series analyses to examine changes in the number of admissions, and case-only analyses to examine changes in the characteristics of admissions. The admission data were from the Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, between 1 January 2009 and 31 October 2009. There was a 39% increase in emergency admissions associated with the storm (95% confidence interval: 5, 81%), which lasted for just 1 day. The health effects of the storm could not be detected using particulate matter levels. We found no significant change in the characteristics of admissions during the storm; specifically, there was no increase in respiratory admissions. The dust storm had a short-lived impact on emergency hospital admissions. This may be because the public took effective avoidance measures, or because the dust was simply not toxic, being composed mainly of soil. Emergency departments should be prepared for a short-term increase in admissions during dust storms.

  10. The effects of the 2009 dust storm on emergency admissions to a hospital in Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Adrian G; Fraser, John F; Munck, Lynette

    2012-07-01

    In September 2009 an enormous dust storm swept across eastern Australia. Dust is potentially hazardous to health as it interferes with breathing, and previous dust storms have been linked to increased risks of asthma and even death. We examined whether the 2009 Australian dust storm changed the volume or characteristics of emergency admissions to hospital. We used an observational study design, using time series analyses to examine changes in the number of admissions, and case-only analyses to examine changes in the characteristics of admissions. The admission data were from the Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, between 1 January 2009 and 31 October 2009. There was a 39% increase in emergency admissions associated with the storm (95% confidence interval: 5, 81%), which lasted for just 1 day. The health effects of the storm could not be detected using particulate matter levels. We found no significant change in the characteristics of admissions during the storm; specifically, there was no increase in respiratory admissions. The dust storm had a short-lived impact on emergency hospital admissions. This may be because the public took effective avoidance measures, or because the dust was simply not toxic, being composed mainly of soil. Emergency departments should be prepared for a short-term increase in admissions during dust storms.

  11. ESA's experts are ready for a storm of comet dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    storm is likely to receive one hit penetrating aluminium to a depth of 0.4 millimetre. A larger spacecraft has a greater chance of being hit by a more penetrating dust grain. Operators are therefore advised to turn their spacecraft to present as small a target as possible, and to try to ensure that sensitive parts do not face the meteor stream. "Bullet-like damage caused by large particles is only part of the story," says Walter Flury of ESOC's mission analysis section. "Fine grains are far more numerous and can sand-blast optical systems, thermal blankets and solar cells. And in a cloud of charged particles created by the impacts, lightning-like discharges can cause faults in the electronic systems of the spacecraft. The very high speed of the Leonids aggravates that risk, so it may be advisable to switch off sensitive equipment. Damage due to electrical discharges may be the most serious hazard from the Leonids." Predictions are very uncertain and effects are very chancy, so one recommendation is simply to reinforce the spacecraft operation teams on 17 November, to cope with any emergency that arises. The direction of arrival of the Leonids is favourable for satellites in one respect. The dust grains will come from a direction almost at right angles to the direction of the Sun. Flat solar panels in their normal orientation, facing the Sun, present only a narrow edge as a target for the Leonids. Controllers of ESA's Earth observation satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 will switch off the instruments during the hazardous period to reduce the risk of electrically-induced damage. ESA's solar spacecraft SOHO, stationed 1.5 million kilometres out in space, is likely to experience an even stronger storm of Leonids than satellites in the Earth's vicinity. Measures to reduce the hazard may include rotating the spacecraft to screen vital equipment, and switching off scientific instruments. The view from the ground When the Leonids are at their peak, Leo will just be rising on Europe

  12. Effect of dust storms on the D region of the Martian ionosphere: Atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, S. A.; Sheel, V.; Smith, M. D.; Maguire, W. C.; Molina-Cuberos, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    We have used dust opacity values observed by the Thermal Emission Imaging System onboard Mars Odyssey to estimate the effect of dust aerosols in the D region of the Martian ionosphere. An ion-dust aerosol model has been developed to calculate ion concentrations and conductivity at midlatitudes during a dust storm in the Southern Hemisphere. We report that the concentration of the water cluster ions H+(H2O)n, NO2-(H2O)n, and CO3-(H2O)n are reduced by 2 orders of magnitude in the presence of dust aerosols. This indicates that during a dust storm, when the optical depth changes considerably, a large hole in the ion concentrations may appear until this anomalous condition returns to the normal condition after a period of about a few days. During such dust storms, the total ion conductivity is reduced by an order of magnitude.

  13. Tropical storm redistribution of Saharan dust to the upper troposphere and ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbener, Stephen R.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Heever, Susan C.; Twohy, Cynthia H.

    2016-10-01

    As a tropical cyclone traverses the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), the storm will spatially redistribute the dust from the SAL. Dust deposited on the surface may affect ocean fertilization, and dust transported to the upper levels of the troposphere may impact radiative forcing. This study explores the relative amounts of dust that are vertically redistributed when a tropical cyclone crosses the SAL. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was configured to simulate the passage of Tropical Storm Debby (2006) through the SAL. A dust mass budget approach has been applied, enabled by a novel dust mass tracking capability of the model, to determine the amounts of dust deposited on the ocean surface and transferred aloft. The mass of dust removed to the ocean surface was predicted to be nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than the amount of dust transported to the upper troposphere.

  14. Solar System dynamics and global-scale dust storms on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.

    2015-05-01

    Global-scale dust storms occur during the southern summer season on Mars in some Mars years but not in others. We present an updated catalog of Mars years including such storms (n = 9) and Mars years without global-scale storms (n = 11) through the year 2013. A remarkable relationship links the occurrence and non-occurrence of global-scale dust storms on Mars with changes in the orbital angular momentum of Mars with respect to the Solar System barycenter (LMars). All of the global-scale dust storms became planet-encircling in both latitude and longitude during periods when LMars was increasing or near maxima. Statistical significance at the 1% level is obtained for the clustering tendency of LMars phases for the 5 mid-season storms with Ls ranging from 208° to 262° (1956, 1971, 1982, 1994, and 2007). The 11 Mars years without global-scale dust storms exhibit mainly decreasing and minimum values of LMars during the first half of the dust storm season; this tendency is statistically significant at the 5% level. A systematic progression is present in the phasing of the solar irradiance and LMars waveforms for the global-scale storm years. LMars phases for the early season global-scale storms of 1977 and 2001 are advanced in phase with respect to those of the mid-season storms, while the phase for the late season storm of 1973 is delayed with respect to those of the mid-season storms cluster. Factors internal to the Mars climate system, such as a spatial redistribution of surface dust from year to year, must be invoked to account for the non-occurrence of global-scale dust storms in five years (1986, 2003, 2005, 2009, and 2013) when the LMars phase was otherwise favorable. Our results suggest that the occurrence of increasing or peak values of LMars immediately prior to and during the Mars dust storm season may be a necessary-but-not-sufficient condition for the initiation of global-scale dust storms on Mars.

  15. Dust storm monitoring: effects on the environment, human health, and potential security conflicts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davara, Fernando; de la Cruz, Antonio

    2004-10-01

    Monitoring dust storms with recently available medium and moderate resolution satellites (Meris, Modis and SeaWiFS) is providing new global information regarding the sources, transportation tracks and affected areas. Saharan dust plumes reach the SE region of the United States and the Caribbean region in summer and the Amazon basin in winter. Generally these Saharan plumes branch off in dust tracks along the North Atlantic reaching Western Europe as far north as the Scandinavian countries. Furthermore, dust storms originating in the Eastern Sahara and Northern African deserts form dust plumes propagated by the Sirocco winds that, after crossing the Mediterranean Sea, affect Southern and Central Europe particularly during spring and summer. Dust storms originating in the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts blow in an easterly direction propagating dust plumes affecting Korea, Japan and reach the United States after crossing the Pacific Ocean. The large amount of cyclic deposition generated by dust storms produces an environmental impact that causes the decay of coral reefs in the Caribbean, the origin and distribution of red tides and the disappearance of sea grasses. The relationship of dust plumes with the increasing number of asthma and allergy cases in the Caribbean correlates well with the appearance of similar cases in Europe and elsewhere during the mid 1980s. The recurrence presence of insecticides in regions where these products were banned long ago, or where they were never used, may be partly due to Saharan dust plumes. The loss of agricultural soil, literally blown away by dust storms in the source areas, creates hardship, hunger and forced-migration. Dust storms should be considered as an important security issue.

  16. Observations of the initiation and evolution of the 2001 Mars global dust storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strausberg, Melissa J.; Wang, Huiqun; Richardson, Mark I.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Toigo, Anthony D.

    2005-02-01

    A global dust storm occurred on Mars between June and October 2001. The storm began near Hellas just before southern spring equinox (~Ls = 177°). Local storms, likely forced by a combination of slope-flow and ice cap thermal contrasts, were observed to propagate along the northwestern rim of Hellas, apparently triggering the global storm. Cap-edge storm activity for much of late southern winter was similar in 2001 to one Mars year earlier; however, a very large storm propagated into the basin just after Ls = 177°. Subsequently, the total area of storm activity in 2001 was roughly double that of the previous year. For about 10 days, dust lifting was limited to the Hellas region. As additional storms propagated into Hellas, activity built and extended northward into Syrtis and eastward into Hesperia. It is not clear whether transport or spreading of lifting were of greatest importance for expansion. At Ls = 185° the storm began to spread rapidly to the east, along a line from the southern pole to the northern tropics. Essentially no storm propagation to the west occurred, yielding strong zonal asymmetry of expansion. As the dust storm reached the western edge of Tharsis, secondary dust lifting centers developed in Daedalia and Solis (southeastern Tharsis). Subsequently, the storm rapidly encompassed the planet (by Ls = 193°). Once fully global, the Syria/Solis/Daedalia lifting center appeared to dominate (on the basis of cloud top morphology), with Hellas quiescent. By Ls = 212°, lifting could no longer be discerned. Thereafter, dust haze appeared uniform and diffuse, and decay appeared to have set in.

  17. Potential Climate Effects of Dust Aerosols' over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, Z.; Wang, G.; Pal, J. S.; Yu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate in West Africa is under the influence of the West African monsoon circulation and mineral dust emitted from the Sahara desert (which is the world's largest source of mineral dust emission). Dust aerosols alter the atmospheric radiative fluxes and act as cloud condensation nuclei in the process of emission, transportation and deposition. However, our understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence the present-day and future climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4-CLM4.5 is used to investigate the potential climatic effects of dust aerosols both in present (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100) periods over WA. First, the model performance and dust climatic effects are evaluated. The contribution of dust climatic effects under RCP8.5 scenario and their confounding effects with land use change are assessed. Our results indicate that the model can reproduce with reasonable accuracy the spatial and temporal distribution of climatology, aerosol optical depth and surface concentration over WA. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative in the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in JJA and MAM compared to those in SON and DJF. Over most of West Africa, cooling is the dominant effect on temperature. Their impact on precipitation features a dipole pattern, with decrease in the north and increase in the south of West Africa. Despite the dust-induced decrease of precipitation amount, dusts cause extreme precipitation to increase. To evaluate the uncertainties surrounding our modeling results, sensitivity experiments driven by ICBC from MIROC-ESM and CESM and their dynamic downscaling results are used for comparisons. Results from these sensitivity experiments indicate that the impact of dust aerosols on present and future climate is robust.

  18. An automated and integrated framework for dust storm detection based on ogc web processing services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, F.; Shea, G. Y. K.; Wong, M. S.; Campbell, J.

    2014-11-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modelling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. The complexity of building scientific dust storm models is coupled with the scientific computation advancement, ongoing computing platform development, and the development of heterogeneous Earth Observation (EO) networks. It is a challenging task to develop an integrated and automated scheme for dust storm detection that combines Geo-Processing frameworks, scientific models and EO data together to enable the dust storm detection and tracking processes in a dynamic and timely manner. This study develops an automated and integrated framework for dust storm detection and tracking based on the Web Processing Services (WPS) initiated by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The presented WPS framework consists of EO data retrieval components, dust storm detecting and tracking component, and service chain orchestration engine. The EO data processing component is implemented based on OPeNDAP standard. The dust storm detecting and tracking component combines three earth scientific models, which are SBDART model (for computing aerosol optical depth (AOT) of dust particles), WRF model (for simulating meteorological parameters) and HYSPLIT model (for simulating the dust storm transport processes). The service chain orchestration engine is implemented based on Business Process Execution Language for Web Service (BPEL4WS) using open-source software. The output results, including horizontal and vertical AOT distribution of dust particles as well as their transport paths, were represented using KML/XML and displayed in Google Earth. A serious dust storm, which occurred over East Asia from 26 to 28 Apr 2012, is used to test the applicability of the proposed WPS framework. Our aim here is to solve a specific instance of a complex EO data

  19. Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On March 2, 2003, near-surface winds carried a large amount of Saharan dust aloft and transported the material westward over the Atlantic Ocean. These observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aboard NASA's Terra satellite depict an area near the Cape Verde Islands (situated about 700 kilometers off of Africa's western coast) and provide images of the dust plume along with measurements of its height and motion. Tracking the three-dimensional extent and motion of air masses containing dust or other types of aerosols provides data that can be used to verify and improve computer simulations of particulate transport over large distances, with application to enhancing our understanding of the effects of such particles on meteorology, ocean biological productivity, and human health.

    MISR images the Earth by measuring the spatial patterns of reflected sunlight. In the upper panel of the still image pair, the observations are displayed as a natural-color snapshot from MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. High-altitude cirrus clouds cast shadows on the underlying ocean and dust layer, which are visible in shades of blue and tan, respectively. In the lower panel, heights derived from automated stereoscopic processing of MISR's multi-angle imagery show the cirrus clouds (yellow areas) to be situated about 12 kilometers above sea level. The distinctive spatial patterns of these clouds provide the necessary contrast to enable automated feature matching between images acquired at different view angles. For most of the dust layer, which is spatially much more homogeneous, the stereoscopic approach was unable to retrieve elevation data. However, the edges of shadows cast by the cirrus clouds onto the dust (indicated by blue and cyan pixels) provide sufficient spatial contrast for a retrieval of the dust layer's height, and indicate that the top of layer is only about 2.5 kilometers above sea level.

    Motion of the dust and clouds is directly

  20. Snow-Dust Storm: Unique case study from Iceland, March 6-7, 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Hladil, Jindrich; Skala, Roman; Navratil, Tomas; Chadimova, Leona; Meinander, Outi

    2015-03-01

    Iceland is an active dust source in the high-latitude cold region. About 50% of the annual dust events in the southern part of Iceland take place at sub-zero temperatures or in winter, when dust may be mixed with snow. We investigated one winter dust event that occurred in March 2013. It resulted in a several mm thick dark layer of dust deposited on snow. Dust was transported over 250 km causing impurities on snow in the capital of Iceland, Reykjavik. Max one-minute PM10 concentration measured in Kirkjubæjarklaustur (20-50 km from the dust source) exceeded 6500 μg m-3 while the mean (median) PM10 concentration during 24-h storm was 1281 (1170) μg m-3. Dust concentrations during the dust deposition in Reykjavik were only about 100 μg m-3, suggesting a rapid removal of the dust particles by snow during the transport. Dust sample taken from the snow top layer in Reykjavik after the storm showed that about 75% of the dust deposit was a volcanic glass with SiO2 ∼45%, FeO ∼14.5%, and TiO2 ∼3.5. A significant proportion of organic matter and diatoms was also found. This case study shows that severe dust storms are related also to meteorological conditions, such as winter snow storms, and moist conditions. Small volcanic dust particles deposited on snow tend to form larger particles ("clumping mechanism") resulting in stronger light absorbance. This is one of the first reports on the "clumping mechanism" observed in natural conditions. The deposition of Icelandic dust on snow, glaciers and sea ice may accelerate the thaw, with the potential to increase the anthropogenic Arctic warming.

  1. Effect of Asian dust storms on daily mortality in seven metropolitan cities of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Lim, Youn-Hee; Yi, Seungmuk

    2013-11-01

    The adverse effects of dust storms on health have been a major issue in several countries. A substantial number of studies have found significant associations between dust storms and morbidity such as emergency visits and hospitalizations. However, the results of the studies on the association between dust storms and mortality are inconsistent. In Korea, no study has found statistically significant effect of Asian dust storms on daily mortality. Thus, this study aims to explore the effect of Asian dust storms on daily mortality in Korea during 2001-2009. All analyses were confined to non-accidental mortality. We used generalized additive model with Quasi-Poisson regressions. We considered the lag effect of dust storms up to 7 days and performed subgroup analyses by disease, sex and age. Current day's temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, day of the week, season and time trends were controlled for in a basic model. SO2, NO2 and PM10 levels were also added in the further analyses. Meta-analysis was applied for seven metropolitan cities in Korea to estimate the pooled effects of Asian dust storms. We reported results as excessive mortality by percentage due to Asian dust storms. We found significant positive associations between Asian dust storms and mortality at lag 0 (cardiovascular: 2.91%; 95% CI: 0.13, 5.77, male: 2.74%; 95% CI: 0.74, 4.77 and <65 years: 2.52%; 95% CI: 0.06, 5.04), at lag 2 (male 2.4%; 95% CI: 0.43, 4.4 and <65 years: 2.49%; 95% CI: 0.07, 4.97), at lag 3 (total non-accidental: 1.57%; 95% CI: 0.11, 3.06, male: 2.24%; 95% CI: 0.28, 4.25 and <65 years: 2.43%; 95% CI: 0.01, 4.91) and at lag 5 (cardiovascular: 3.7%; 95% CI: 0.93, 6.54 and male: 2.04%, 95 CI: 0.08, 4.04) in the model which adjusted for NO2 additionally. Other models showed similar significant results except the PM10-adjusted model. This is the first study to show the significant relationship between Asian dust storms and mortality in Korea and to present a pooled effect

  2. The Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology (DART) System was Developed to Recover Plant, Human, and Animal Pathogens in Asian and African Dust Storms over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Tench, B.; Nehr, A.; Emmons, T.; Valbuena, F.; Palaia, J.; Sugars, C.

    2014-12-01

    Dust emanates year-round from Africa and Asia and impacts air quality in North America. Asian dust plumes deliver up to 64 million tonnes of dust over the NW of the USA, and African dust storms deliver over 50 million tonnes of dust over Florida each year. Several recent studies have demonstrated that human and plant pathogens from Asian [1] African [2] aerosols can be transported to N. America in naturally occurring dust storms. What is unknown is whether these 'presumptive pathogens' impact human, plant, or animal health in the USA. In order to initiate a long-term monitoring program of pathogens in Asian and African dust plumes, we have developed a dust collection system called DART (Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology) (figure). The DART dust sampler can be mounted on a F104 Starfighter jet (figure) and a T6 Texan propeller driven airplane (not shown), and was test flown over FL in Dec. 2013 on the F104 and on the T6 in the summer of 2014. The DART system utilizes a high-volume pump to pass air through 6 separate filtration units where both aerosols and microbial cells are captured. The filtration systems exhibit flow rates from 25-142 L/min depending on the pore size and brand of filters used. Flow rates are directly correlated to increased air speed, and are inversely correlated to increased altitude. Filtration units can be turned on and off individually as required for specific science flight objectives. The DART dust sampler has performed nominally up to 7600 m, 0.92 Mach, and 3.5 +G's. During initial test flights in Dec. 2013, 5 of 8 genera of fungi recovered from the lower atmosphere over FL contained plant pathogens including species in the genera: Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Curvularia, and Fusarium. Numbers of recovered fungi, but not bacteria, increased significantly when 5 or 10 µm filters were used in the DART system compared to filter pore sizes ≤ 1.2 µm. Future sampling programs for both Asian and African dust events will be

  3. Dust storms and cyclone tracks over the arid regions in east Asia in spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemi, Tetsuya; Seino, Naoko

    2005-09-01

    It has been argued that frequent dust storm developments in east Asia in spring are closely related to midlatitude synoptic-scale cyclone activity. This study investigates the relationship of springtime dust storms and other dust-related phenomena in east Asia to the tracks and locations of synoptic-scale cyclones by conducting statistical analyses of surface weather data, cyclone track data, and satellite data. Through these analyses, we discuss the role of cyclone activity on dust weather phenomena in east Asia. In the Gobi Desert and northeast China regions, strong cyclonic winds associated with strong cyclones are responsible for the dust weather developments, and the dust weather preferably occurs in the southwestern sector of the cyclone, where frontal activity and cold air action are significant. Despite the extremely dry climate, the formation of frontal cloud systems is evident particularly over the Gobi Desert, which will contribute to the higher frequency of severer dust weather. On the other hand, in the Taklamakan Desert severe dust weather (i.e., dust storm) is not so much affected by synoptic-scale cyclones, but weaker dust phenomena such as dust haze occur around the centers of cyclones that do not propagate farther eastward out of the Taklamakan region.

  4. Direct climate effect of black carbon in China and its impact on dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yu; Liou, K. N.; Chen, Wen; Liao, Hong

    2010-04-01

    Dust storms originating in the Gobi desert and the surrounding areas critically impact weather, climate, and public health in China and neighboring Pacific Rim countries. In the decades between 1954 and 2007, reports of annual dust storm occurrences and the corresponding amount of total precipitation at 753 Chinese meteorological sites show a reduction in the occurrence and intensity of dust storms and clearly demonstrate an inverse relationship between the two. The correlation between dust storm occurrence and temperature in northwestern China also displays a negative trend but is less significant. Using a global climate model, we demonstrate that increased loading of light-absorbing aerosols in China, particularly black carbon (BC), is the primary reason for precipitation and temperature increases over northwestern China, and the consequence of reductions in dust storm frequency and intensity. The model-simulated precipitation and temperature changes over northwestern China compare reasonably well with observed trends when a certain portion of BC has been added to the model, which significantly affects regional climate patterns through the heating of the air column. In addition to a reduction in dust storm intensity/frequency in response to an increase in BC, the model has also reproduced the substantial variability in precipitation which has been observed in other regions of China.

  5. An observational Study of the "Interstate 5" Dust Storm Case.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauley, Patricia M.; Baker, Nancy L.; Barker, Edward H.

    1996-04-01

    On 29 November 1991 a series of collisions involving 164 vehicles occurred on Interstate 5 in the San Joaquin Valley in California in a dust storm that reduced the visibility to near zero. The accompanying high surface winds are hypothesized to result from intense upper-tropospheric downward motion that led to the formation of a strong upper front and tropopause fold and that transported high momentum air downward to midlevels where boundary layer processes could then mix it to the surface. The objectives of the research presented in this paper are to document the event, to provide support for the hypothesis that both upper-level and boundary layer processes were important, and to determine the structure of the mesoscale circulations in this case for future use in evaluating the navy's mesoscale data assimilation system.The strong upper-level descent present in this case is consistent with what one would expect for jet streak and frontal circulations in combination with quasigeostrophic processes. During the period examined, upper-level data and analyses portray a strong upper-tropospheric jet streak with maximum winds initially in excess of 85 m s1 (170 kt) that weakened as it propagated southward around the base of a long-wave trough. The jet streak was accompanied by a strong upper front and tropopause fold, both of which imply intense downward motion. The vertical motion field near the time of the accidents had two maxima-one that was associated with a combination of quasigeostrophic forcing and terrain-induced descent in the let of the Sierra and one that was associated with the descending branch of the secondary circulation in the jet streak exit region and the cold advection by both the geostrophic wind and the ageostrophic wind in the upper front. The 700-hPa wind speed maximum over and west of the San Joaquin Valley overlapped with the latter maximum, supporting the hypothesized role of downward momentum transport.Given the significant 700-hPa wind speeds

  6. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  7. Analysis of TES FFSM Eddies and MOC Dust Storms, MY 24 - 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Wilson, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.; Barnes, J.; Cantor, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. We present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. Integration of FFSM and MOC MY 24 and 25 data shows interesting temporal and spatial associations between the evolution of eddies and storms, including: 1) comparable periodicities of travelling waves and pulses of storm activity; 2) concurrent eastward propagation of both eddies and storms; and 3) structured spatial relationship where high-latitude storms tend to occur on the eastern side of the eddy, while lower (and some middle) latitude storms occur on the western. These results suggest a causal relationship between baroclinic eddies and local storm initiation. New MY 26 results will be presented.

  8. Analysis of TES FFSM Eddies and MOC Dust Storms, MY 24 - 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F.; Wilson, R.; Barnes, J.; Hollingsworth, J.; Kahre, M. A.; Cantor, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. We present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward-traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. Integration of FFSM and MOC MY 24 and 25 data shows interesting temporal and spatial associations between the evolution of eddies and storms, including: 1) comparable periodicities of travelling waves and pulses of storm activity; 2) concurrent eastward propagation of both eddies and storms; and 3) structured spatial relationship where high-latitude storms tend to occur on the eastern side of the eddy, while lower (and some middle) latitude storms occur on the western. These results suggest a causal relationship between baroclinic eddies and local storm initiation. New MY 26 results will be presented.lt;img border=0 src="images/P22A-03_B.jpg">

  9. Impacts of sand and dust storms on agriculture and potential agricultural applications of a SDSWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanski, R.; Sivakumar, M. V. K.

    2009-03-01

    This paper will give an overview of the various impacts of sand and dust storms on agriculture and then address the potential applications of a Sand and Dust Storm Warning System (SDSWS) for agricultural users. Sand and dust storms have many negative impacts on the agricultural sector including: reducing crop yields by burial of seedlings under sand deposits, the loss of plant tissue and reduced photosynthetic activity as a result of sandblasting, delaying plant development, increasing end-of-season drought risk, causing injury and reduced productivity of livestock, increasing soil erosion and accelerating the process of land degradation and desertification, filling up irrigation canals with sediments, covering transportation routes, affecting water quality of rivers and streams, and affecting air quality. One positive impact is the fertilization of soil minerals to terrestrial ecosystems. There are several potential agricultural applications of a SDSWS. The first is to alert agricultural communities farmers to take preventive action in the near-term such as harvesting maturing crops (vegetables, grain), sheltering livestock, and strengthening infrastructure (houses, roads, grain storage) for the storm. Also, the products of a SDSWS could be used in for monitoring potential locust movement and post-storm crop damage assessments. An archive of SDSWS products (movement, amount of sand and dust) could be used in researching plant and animal pathogen movement and the relationship of sand and dust storms to disease outbreaks and in developing improved soil erosion and land degradation models.

  10. Dust storm frequency and its relation to climate changes in Northern China during the past 1000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bao; Bräuning, Achim; Zhang, Ziyin; Dong, Zhibao; Esper, Jan

    Dust storm events and their relation to climate changes in Northern China during the past 1000 years were analyzed by using different paleoclimate archives such as ice cores, tree rings, and historical documents. The results show that in the semiarid region, the temperature and precipitation series were significantly negatively correlated to the dust storm frequency on a decadal timescale. Compared with temperature changes, however, there was a closer correlation between precipitation changes and dust storm events on a centennial timescale. At this timescale, precipitation accounts for 40% of the variance of dust fall variations during the last 1700 years, inferring precipitation control on the formation of dust storms. In the western arid region, both temperature and precipitation changes are important forcing factors for the occurrence of dust storms in the region on a centennial timescale. In the eastern arid region, the relationship between dust storm events and climate changes are similar like in the semiarid region. As a result, the effects of climate change on dust storm events were manifested on decadal and centennial timescales during the last millennium. However, there is a phase shift in the relation between climate change and the dust storm frequency. A 1400 years reconstruction of the strength of the Siberian High reveals that long-term variations of spring Siberian High intensity might provide a background for the dynamic conditions for the frequency of historical dust storm events in Northern China.

  11. The influence of source landforms, antecedent precipitation, and winds on dust events in North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantine, John-Andrew Chapin

    This dissertation identifies conditions associated with dust storms in North Africa. The introductory chapter frames a conceptual model of how atmospheric dustiness is governed by static landforms, dynamic characteristics of the surface (represented by cumulative antecedent precipitation or CAP), and surface wind fields. Visibility at 225 meteorological stations across Africa, north of 10° north latitude, is used as a proxy for atmospheric dust. A map of landforms is created from a multiple endmember mixture analysis of MODIS satellite imagery to represent landforms. The ten landforms identified are alluvial surfaces, dunes, dry lakebeds, water, basaltic surfaces, mountains, regs, bedrock surfaces, sandsheets, and vegetated surfaces. Climatological and event-based statistics are used to determine relationships between parameters related to visibility, landforms, CAP, and wind speed. CAP represents dynamic changes in the erodibility of the surface including the sheltering effect of vegetation and delivery of erodible sediments. Surface wind velocities represent the winds that mobilize fine sediments to become dust. Alluvial surfaces, dunes, dry lakebeds, regs, bedrock, and sandsheets are more often associated with low visibility (<5 km) events than high. Negative correlations between median wind speed and the monthly frequency of visibility less than five kilometers (DEF-5) identify 33 stations where factors other than dust strongly influence the visibility record and these stations are removed. Results regarding the relationship between CAP and dustiness find that at Sahelian and southern Saharan locations, vulnerability to dust emissions is related to drought reducing vegetation cover. At central, northern, and eastern Saharan locations, vulnerability to dust emissions is related to wet conditions, probably as a result of fresh sediment being deposited at erodible locations in the landscape. Wind speed results find that for any dust source, there is an

  12. Dust-storm dynamics over Sistan region, Iran: Seasonality, transport characteristics and affected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashki, A.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Francois, P.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Legrand, M.

    2015-03-01

    The present work examines the seasonality, dust-plume altitudinal variation and affected areas for dust storms originated from the Sistan region, southeastern Iran during the summer (June-September) months of the period 2001-2012 synthesizing local meteorological records, satellite observations (TOMS, OMI, METEOSAT, MODIS) and HYSPLIT forward trajectories. Dust-storm days (356 in total) are associated with visibility below 1 km at Zabol, Iran meteorological station with higher frequency and intensity in June and July. Monthly-mean composite maps of TOMS and OMI AI show high (>3-3.5) values over Sistan and nearby downwind areas. HYSPLIT forward-trajectory analysis at 500 m for air masses originated from Sistan on the dust-storm days shows that they usually follow an anti-clockwise transport direction at elevations usually below 2 km, initially moving southwards and then shifting to east-northeast when they are approaching the Arabian Sea coast. This is the result of the influence of the local topography and formation of thermal low-pressure systems over the arid lands. It is found that in few cases the dust storms from Sistan affect central/south Arabian Sea and India, while they control the aerosol loading over northernmost Arabian Sea. The Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI) images, which represent brightness temperature reduction due to dust presence over land, are used at specific periods of persistent dust storms over Sistan, confirming the main pathways of the dust plumes and illustrating the importance of the region as one of the most active dust sources in southwest Asia.

  13. Climate change implications and use of early warning systems for global dust storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harriman, Lindsey M.

    2014-01-01

    With increased changes in land cover and global climate, early detection and warning of dust storms in conjunction with effective and widespread information broadcasts will be essential to the prevention and mitigation of future risks and impacts. Human activities, seasonal variations and long-term climatic patterns influence dust storms. More research is needed to analyse these factors of dust mobilisation to create more certainty for the fate of vulnerable populations and ecosystems in the future. Early warning and communication systems, when in place and effectively implemented, can offer some relief to these vulnerable areas. As an issue that affects many regions of the world, there is a profound need to understand the potential changes and ultimately create better early warning systems for dust storms.

  14. A Stormy Forecast for the Upcoming Dust Storm Season on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, J. H.; Mischna, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The dust storm season on Mars is centered on the time of Mars' perihelion, which occurs late in the southern spring. The dust storm season of the current Mars year (MY 33) will begin on 1 June 2016 (Ls=160°) and will end on 28 March 2017 (Ls=340°). Mars will reach perihelion in late October 2016, about a month after the planned landing of the Mars InSight Lander. Spectacular global-scale dust storms (GDS) occur during the dust storm season in some Mars years but not in others. In a prior study (Shirley, 2015; Icarus 251, 128-144), systematic relationships were found linking the occurrence of historic global-scale dust storms on Mars with the variability of the orbital angular momentum of the planet with respect to the solar system barycenter. Conditions favorable to the occurrence of a future GDS in the current Mars year were noted in that study. A physical model that may account for the observed relationships has subsequently emerged. In this model, a weak coupling of the orbital and rotational motions of extended bodies is effected through a modulation of circulatory flows of atmospheres. The formal derivation yields a coupling term, which in turn prescribes an acceleration field that may constructively or destructively interfere with large-scale atmospheric motions driven by other means. This coupling term has been incorporated within the MarsWRF Global Circulation Model, and the GCM thus modified has undergone extensive validation and testing. The GCM "retrodicts" accelerations and circulation patterns favorable for the occurrence of southern summer solstice season global-scale dust storms in all of the prior years (n=7) in which such storms are known to have occurred (Mischna and Shirley, this meeting). The forcing function for the upcoming dust storm season exhibits amplitude and phasing that largely replicates the dynamical conditions prevailing prior to and during the MY 9 GDS of 1971. We conclude that a global-scale dust storm is likely to occur during

  15. Characterization of Asian dust storm and non-Asian dust storm PM 2.5 aerosol in southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Chen, Chien-Lung

    High winds that blow sand from the desert regions of central Asia to points east are commonly known as Asian dust storms (ADS). In this paper we study the impact of an ADS on the PM 2.5 aerosol extant in Tainan, a city in southern Taiwan. PM 2.5 aerosol was collected at an urban and a coastal site in Tainan before the ADS (4-12 January 2001), during the ADS (13-16 January 2001), and the following summer (3-12 June 2001). Total PM 2.5 mass was highest at both sites during the ADS despite already moderately high levels of PM 2.5 beforehand, demonstrating that the ADS brought with it a significant amount of PM 2.5 mass. The mass percentage of Ca 2+ in PM 2.5 increased noticeably during the ADS and there was a higher non-sea-salt SO 42-/elemental carbon ratio. This latter change was due to a heightened level of non-sea-salt SO 42-, which has a serious impact on air quality in southern Taiwan, and was likely sourced from sulfur integrated into the ADS aerosol as it passed major cities and industrial districts in China. The percentage water content in PM 2.5 was at its lowest during the ADS. This was despite high levels of hygroscopic sulfate in the ADS aerosol and indicates that sulfate in the ADS may combine with Ca 2+ to form CaSO 4, a major component of ADS dust and one that does not have strong hygroscopic characteristics. Water content was at its highest in summer when winds arrive in Taiwan with elevated sea salt concentrations, having spent several days traversing the South China Sea. Non-ADS urban site aerosols were weakly acidic while coastal site aerosols were weakly alkaline. Urban site acidity was always higher than equivalent to coastal site acidity, due to locally produced acidic aerosols. Acidity peaked during the ADS, however, as a result of additional acidic aerosols transported by the ADS from urban and industrial regions in China.

  16. Increase in dust storm related PM10 concentrations: A time series analysis of 2001-2015.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Helena; Katra, Itzhak; Friger, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decades, changes in dust storms characteristics have been observed in different parts of the world. The changing frequency of dust storms in the southeastern Mediterranean has led to growing concern regarding atmospheric PM10 levels. A classic time series additive model was used in order to describe and evaluate the changes in PM10 concentrations during dust storm days in different cities in Israel, which is located at the margins of the global dust belt. The analysis revealed variations in the number of dust events and PM10 concentrations during 2001-2015. A significant increase in PM10 concentrations was identified since 2009 in the arid city of Beer Sheva, southern Israel. Average PM10 concentrations during dust days before 2009 were 406, 312, and 364 μg m(-3) (median 337, 269,302) for Beer Sheva, Rehovot (central Israel) and Modi'in (eastern Israel), respectively. After 2009 the average concentrations in these cities during dust storms were 536, 466, and 428 μg m(-3) (median 382, 335, 338), respectively. Regression analysis revealed associations between PM10 variations and seasonality, wind speed, as well as relative humidity. The trends and periodicity are stronger in the southern part of Israel, where higher PM10 concentrations are found. Since 2009 dust events became more extreme with much higher daily and hourly levels. The findings demonstrate that in the arid area variations of dust storms can be quantified easier through PM10 levels over a relatively short time scale of several years. PMID:26874873

  17. From Source to City: Particulate Matter Concentration and Size Distribution Data from an Icelandic Dust Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsteinsson, T.; Mockford, T.; Bullard, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms are the source of particulate matter in 20%-25% of the cases in which the PM10health limit is exceeded in Reykjavik; which occurred approximately 20 times a year in 2005-2010. Some of the most active source areas for dust storms in Iceland, contributing to the particulate matter load in Reykjavik, are on the south coast of Iceland, with more than 20 dust storm days per year (in 2002-2011). Measurements of particle matter concentration and size distribution were recorded at Markarfljot in May and June 2015. Markarfljot is a glacial river that is fed by Eyjafjallajokull and Myrdalsjokull, and the downstream sandur areas have been shown to be significant dust sources. Particulate matter concentration during dust storms was recorded on the sandur area using a TSI DustTrak DRX Aerosol Monitor 8533 and particle size data was recorded using a TSI Optical Particle Sizer 3330 (OPS). Wind speed was measured using cup anemometers at five heights. Particle size measured at the source area shows an extremely fine dust creation, PM1 concentration reaching over 5000 μg/m3 and accounting for most of the mass. This is potentially due to sand particles chipping during saltation instead of breaking uniformly. Dust events occurring during easterly winds were captured by two permanent PM10 aerosol monitoring stations in Reykjavik (140 km west of Markarfljot) suggesting the regional nature of these events. OPS measurements from Reykjavik also provide an interesting comparison of particle size distribution from source to city. Dust storms contribute to the particular matter pollution in Reykjavik and their small particle size, at least from this source area, might be a serious health concern.

  18. Accelerating Dust Storm Simulation by Balancing Task Allocation in Parallel Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Z.; Yang, C.; XIA, J.; Huang, Q.; YU, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storm has serious negative impacts on environment, human health, and assets. The continuing global climate change has increased the frequency and intensity of dust storm in the past decades. To better understand and predict the distribution, intensity and structure of dust storm, a series of dust storm models have been developed, such as Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM), the NMM meteorological module (NMM-dust) and Chinese Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment for Dust (CUACE/Dust). The developments and applications of these models have contributed significantly to both scientific research and our daily life. However, dust storm simulation is a data and computing intensive process. Normally, a simulation for a single dust storm event may take several days or hours to run. It seriously impacts the timeliness of prediction and potential applications. To speed up the process, high performance computing is widely adopted. By partitioning a large study area into small subdomains according to their geographic location and executing them on different computing nodes in a parallel fashion, the computing performance can be significantly improved. Since spatiotemporal correlations exist in the geophysical process of dust storm simulation, each subdomain allocated to a node need to communicate with other geographically adjacent subdomains to exchange data. Inappropriate allocations may introduce imbalance task loads and unnecessary communications among computing nodes. Therefore, task allocation method is the key factor, which may impact the feasibility of the paralleling. The allocation algorithm needs to carefully leverage the computing cost and communication cost for each computing node to minimize total execution time and reduce overall communication cost for the entire system. This presentation introduces two algorithms for such allocation and compares them with evenly distributed allocation method. Specifically, 1) In order to get optimized solutions, a

  19. Dust-induced radiative feedbacks in north China: A dust storm episode modeling study using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixia; Huang, Xin; Ding, Aijun; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-01

    Radiative forcing of dust aerosol and the radiative feedbacks on the planetary boundary layer (PBL) in North China during a typical Asian dust storm in the early April of 2011 was investigated by an online coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model WRF-Chem. Dust-induced daily mean radiative forcing (RF) at the ground surface and in the atmosphere were estimated to be -21.1 W m-2 and 12.7 W m-2, respectively, over Gobi desert, and -13.1 W m-2 and 4.8 W m-2, respectively, in downwind region over the North China Plain (NCP). Comparatively, radiative perturbation on short-wave radiation was approximately twice that on long-wave radiation in magnitude. In the daytime, when solar radiation dominated, the surface cooling and atmospheric heating due to dust increased PBL stability, leading to reductions of PBL height (PBLH) about 90 m and decreases in wind speed up to 0.4 m s-1. On the contrary, the radiative forcing in terrestrial radiation caused an opposite response at night, especially in the downwind region. Although dust emission was repressed by weakened wind speed during daytime, the elevated PBLH along with larger deflation at night lifted more dust particles to higher altitude (by up to 75 m in average), which prolonged dust residence time in the atmosphere and further intensified dust loading in downwind areas. Taking dust radiative feedbacks into consideration notably narrowed gaps between model-predicted air temperature vertical profiles with corresponding observations, suggesting a significant importance of dust-radiation interaction in PBL meteorology during dust storms.

  20. Dust storm detection using random forests and physical-based approaches over the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souri, Amir Hossein; Vajedian, Sanaz

    2015-07-01

    Dust storms are important phenomena over large regions of the arid and semi-arid areas of the Middle East. Due to the influences of dust aerosols on climate and human daily activities, dust detection plays a crucial role in environmental and climatic studies. Detection of dust storms is critical to accurately understand dust, their properties and distribution. Currently, remotely sensed data such as MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) with appropriate temporal and spectral resolutions have been widely used for this purpose. This paper investigates the capability of two physical-based methods, and random forests (RF) classifier, for the first time, to detect dust storms using MODIS imagery. Since the physical-based approaches are empirical, they suffer from certain drawbacks such as high variability of thresholds depending on the underlying surface. Therefore, classification-based approaches could be deployed as an alternative. In this paper, the most relevant bands are chosen based on the physical effects of the major classes, particularly dust, cloud and snow, on both emissive infrared and reflective bands. In order to verify the capability of the methods, OMAERUV AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) product from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) sensor is exploited. In addition, some small regions are selected manually to be considered as ground truth for measuring the probability of false detection (POFD) and probability of missing detection (POMD). The dust class generated by RF is consistent qualitatively with the location and extent of dust observed in OMERAUV and MODIS true colour images. Quantitatively, the dust classes generated for eight dust outbreaks in the Middle East are found to be accurate from 7% and 6% of POFD and POMD respectively. Moreover, results demonstrate the sound capability of RF in classifying dust plumes over both water and land simultaneously. The performance of the physical-based approaches is found weaker than RF

  1. [Ultraviolet Mie lidar observations of aerosol extinction in a dust storm case over Macao].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiao-jun; Cheng, A Y S; Zhu, Jian-hua; Fong, S K; Chang, S W; Tam, K S; Viseu, A

    2012-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosol over Macao was monitored by using a 355 nm Mie scattering lidar during the dust event on March 22nd, 2010. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients were obtained and correlated with local PM10 concentration. The near-surface aerosol extinction coefficients have good agreement with PM10 concentration values. The aerosol extinction vertical profiles showed that there were distinct layers of dust aerosol concentration. The source and tracks of dust aerosol were analyzed by back-trajectory simulation. Observations showed that this lidar could run well even in dust storm episode, and it would help to further the study on aerosol properties over Macao. PMID:22582620

  2. Episode simulation of Asian dust storms with an air quality modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Yanju

    2011-05-01

    A dust deflation module was developed and coupled with the air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ to simultaneously treat all the major tropospheric aerosols (i.e., organic and black carbons, sulfate, nitrate, ammonia, soil dust, and sea salt). Then the coupled system was applied to East Asia to simulate Asian dust aerosol generation, transport and dry/wet removal processes during 14-25 March 2002 when two strong dust storms occurred consecutively. To evaluate model performance and to analyze the observed features of dust aerosols over the East Asian region, model results were compared to concentrations of suspended particulate matter of 10 µm or less (PM10; 1-h intervals) at four remote Japanese stations and daily air pollution index (API) values for PM10 at four large Chinese cities. The modeled values were generally in good agreement with observed data, and the model reasonably reproduced two dust storm outbreaks and generally predicted the dust onset and cessation times at each observation site. In addition, hourly averaged values of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) were calculated and compared with observations at four Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations to assess the model's capability of estimating dust aerosol column burden. Analysis shows that modeled and observed AOT values were generally comparable and that the contribution of dust aerosols to AOT was significant only with regard to their source regions and their transport paths.

  3. Effects of Asian dust storm events on daily clinical visits for conjunctivitis in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2006-09-01

    In spring, windblown dust storms originating in the deserts of Mongolia and China make their way to Taipei city. These occurrences are known as Asian dust storm (ADS) events. The objective of this study was to assess the possible associations of ADS with daily clinic visits for conjunctivitis in residents in Taipei, Taiwan, during the period from 1997-2001. Forty-nine dust storm episodes were classified and classified as index days. Daily clinical visits for conjunctivitis on the index days were compared with clinical visits on the comparison (non-storm) days. Two comparison days for each index day, 7 d before the index days and 7 d after the index days, were selected. The effects of dust storms on clinic visits for conjunctivitis were prominent 4 d after the event. However, the association was not statistically significant. There may not have been enough power to detect associations resulting from the inadequate sample size of conjunctivitis visits on ADS events days. However, it seems worthwhile to pay more attention to the ADS events and health in the future.

  4. Unraveling Local Dust Storm Structure on Mars: The Case of Northern Amazonis During Mars Year 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    On an average Martian afternoon, two or three local dust storms are taking place somewhere on the planet. By definition, these storms range in area from a few square kilometers to hundreds of thousands, rarely surviving from sol to the next. After more than 40 years of observation, a great deal is known about where and when they occur, but very little is known about the structure and dynamics of individual storms. This contrast in our knowledge about local dust storms results from how they are observed. Daily global mapping of Mars in the visible has enabled an accurate census of storms as well as observation of their morphological diversity. However, even under ideal conditions, an individual storm is only observed by sounder-type instrumentation once or twice (if it is a large enough), providing an incomplete picture of structure of an individual storm. Early studies of cyclogenesis on Earth had a similar problem. Cyclones were many, but observations of individual cyclones, especially over the ocean, were sparse. The structure and dynamics of cyclones was unraveled by noting similarities in properties between certain classes of cyclones and using observational data to generate composite cyclones that could be analyzed and modeled. Variability within the composite also could be studied. Here I establish the existence of a well-defined class of Martian local dust storms defined by: (1) occurrence along the axis of the dark albedo feature in northern Amazonis Planitia (36 N, 155 W); (2) not being associated with lifting or cloudiness due to a baroclinic wave/frontal boundary at higher latitude; (3) being textured, that is, having dust clouds with sharp, well-defined features that are thought to indicate their clouds are supplied by the active lifting of dust; (4) having dust clouds organized in well-defined streets indicative of convective rolls. In Mars Year 24, such storms developed on thirteen occasions in northern fall and autumn. Using data from the Mars

  5. Dust Storm Signatures in Global Ionosphere Map of GPS Total Electron Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fang-Tse; Shih, Ai-Ling; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Kuo, Cheng-Ling; Lin, Tang-Huang; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2016-04-01

    In this paper both MODIS data and GIM (global ionosphere map) TEC (total electron content) as well as numerical simulations are used to study ionospheric dust storm effects in May 2008. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the LTT (latitude-time-TEC) along the Sahara longitude simultaneously reach their maximum values on 28 May 2008. The LLT (latitude-longitude-TEC) map specifically and significantly increases over the Sahara region on 28 May 2008. The simulation suggests that the dust storm may change the atmospheric conductivity, which in turn modifies the GIM TEC over the Sahara area.

  6. Spatiotemporal Modelling of Dust Storm Sources Emission in West Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodabandehloo, E.; Alimohamdadi, A.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.; Darvishi Boloorani, A.; Alesheikh, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    Dust aerosol is the largest contributor to aerosol mass concentrations in the troposphere and has considerable effects on the air quality of spatial and temporal scales. Arid and semi-arid areas of the West Asia are one of the most important regional dust sources in the world. These phenomena directly or indirectly affecting almost all aspects life in almost 15 countries in the region. So an accurate estimate of dust emissions is very crucial for making a common understanding and knowledge of the problem. Because of the spatial and temporal limits of the ground-based observations, remote sensing methods have been found to be more efficient and useful for studying the West Asia dust source. The vegetation cover limits dust emission by decelerating the surface wind velocities and therefore reducing the momentum transport. While all models explicitly take into account the change of wind speed and soil moisture in calculating dust emissions, they commonly employ a "climatological" land cover data for identifying dust source locations and neglect the time variation of surface bareness. In order to compile the aforementioned model, land surface features such as soil moisture, texture, type, and vegetation and also wind speed as atmospheric parameter are used. Having used NDVI data show significant change in dust emission, The modeled dust emission with static source function in June 2008 is 17.02 % higher than static source function and similar result for Mach 2007 show the static source function is 8.91 % higher than static source function. we witness a significant improvement in accuracy of dust forecasts during the months of most soil vegetation changes (spring and winter) compared to outputs resulted from static model, in which NDVI data are neglected.

  7. Robotic observations of dust storm enhancement of carbon biomass in the North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bishop, James K B; Davis, Russ E; Sherman, Jeffrey T

    2002-10-25

    Two autonomous robotic profiling floats deployed in the subarctic North Pacific on 10 April 2001 provided direct records of carbon biomass variability from surface to 1000 meters below surface at daily and diurnal time scales. Eight months of real-time data documented the marine biological response to natural events, including hydrographic changes, multiple storms, and the April 2001 dust event. High-frequency observations of upper ocean particulate organic carbon variability show a near doubling of biomass in the mixed layer over a 2-week period after the passage of a cloud of Gobi desert dust. The temporal evolution of particulate organic carbon enhancement and an increase in chlorophyll use efficiency after the dust storm suggest a biotic response to a natural iron fertilization by the dust.

  8. An Extensive Study on Dynamical aspects of Dust Storm over the United Arab Emirates during 18-20 March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basha, Ghouse; Phanikumar, Devulapalli V.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-04-01

    On 18 March 2012, a super dust storm event occurred over Middle East (ME) and lasted for several hours. Following to this, another dust storm occurred on early morning of 20 March 2012 with almost higher intensity. Both these storms reduced the horizontal visibility to few hundreds of meters and represented as one of the most intense and long duration dust storms over United Arab Emirates (UAE) in recent times. These storms also reduced the air quality in most parts of the ME implying the shutdown of Airports, schools and hundreds of people were hospitalized with respirational problems. In the context of the above, we have made a detailed study on the dynamical processes leading to triggering of dust storm over UAE and neighboring regions. We have also analyzed its impact on surface, and vertical profiles of background parameters and aerosols during the dust storm period by using ground-based, space borne, dust forecasting model, and reanalysis data sets. The synoptic and dynamic conditions responsible for the occurrence of the dust storm are discussed extensively by using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA interim reanalysis data sets. The Impact of dust storm on surface and upper air radiosonde measurements and aerosol optical properties are also investigated before, during and after the dust storm event. During the dust storm, surface temperature decreased by 15oC when compared to before and after the event. PM10 values significantly increased maximum of about 1600µg/m3. Spatial variation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aerosol index (AI) exhibited very high values during the event and source region can be identified of dust transport to our region with this figure. The total attenuated backscatter at 550nm from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite shows the vertical extent of dust up to 8km. The dynamics of this event is

  9. Orbit-Spin Coupling Accelerations and the 2007 Global-Scale Dust Storm on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; Mischna, Michael A.

    2016-10-01

    Global-scale dust storms (GDS) occasionally occur during the southern summer season on Mars. The most recent such storm occurred in 2007 (Mars year 28). We employ a modified version of the MarsWRF global circulation model to simulate atmospheric conditions on Mars leading up to this event. Accelerations due to orbit-spin coupling (arxiv.org/abs/1605.02707) have been incorporated within the dynamical core of the MarsWRF GCM (arxiv.org/abs/1602.09137). We have previously documented an "intensification" of the large scale circulation (as represented in the GCM) due to these accelerations during the dust storm season of MY 28. In this presentation we look more closely at the differences between GCM outcomes for runs performed both with and without the "coupling term accelerations" for this important year. The current version of the GCM has a number of shortcomings; most significantly, we do not yet include radiatively active dust within our simulations. The GCM thus cannot replicate the rapid warming and inflation of the atmosphere that occurs soon after significant dust lifting has commenced; and we do not address specific mechanisms of dust lifting. Nonetheless our model outcomes provide some insight into phenomena such as the variability of global wind systems during intervals leading up to the inception of the global storm. The phasing and amplitude of the orbit-spin coupling accelerations (arxiv.org/abs/1605.01452) for the current Mars year (MY 33) are in some ways similar to those calculated for MY 28. Thus we will also examine and describe MarsWRF model outcomes for the current dust storm season.

  10. Effects of dust storm events on weekly clinic visits related to pulmonary tuberculosis disease in Minqin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Ruoyu; Ming, Jing; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Haixia; Zhen, Yunhe; Cheng, Guodong

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a major public health problem in China. Minqin, a Northwest county of China, has a very high number of annual PTB clinic visits and it is also known for its severe dust storms. The epidemic usually begins in February and ends in July, while the dust storms mainly occur throughout spring and early summer, thereby suggesting that there might be a close link between the causative agent of PTB and dust storms. We investigated the general impact of dust storms on PTB over time by analyzing the variation in weekly clinic visits in Minqin during 2005-2012. We used the Mann-Whitney-Pettitt test and a regression model to determine the seasonal periodicity of PTB and dust storms in a time series, as well as assessing the relationships between meteorological variables and weekly PTB clinic visits. After comparing the number of weekly PTB cases in Gansu province with dust storm events, we detected a clear link between the population dynamics of PTB and climate events, i.e., the onset of epidemics and dust storms (defined by an atmospheric index) occurred in almost the same mean week. Thus, particulate matter might be the cause of PTB outbreaks on dust storm days. It is highly likely that the significant decline in annual clinic visits was closely associated with improvements in the local environment, which prevented desertification and decreased the frequency of dust storm events. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first population-based study to provide clear evidence that a PTB epidemic was affected by dust storms in China, which may give insights into the association between this environmental problem and the evolution of epidemic disease.

  11. Dust Storm Reduction due to Precipitation and Temperature Enhancement in Northwestern China: A Direct Climatic Impact of Absorbing Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K.; Chen, W.; Liao, H.

    2009-12-01

    Dust storms originating in the Gobi desert and northwestern China critically impact weather, climate, and public health in China and neighboring Pacific Rim countries. The frequent occurrence of dust storms has been attributed to both deforestation and the changing environment. Dust storm formation is determined by a number of factors, including dryness, wind field, soil type, and precipitation, with precipitation being the most essential factor. Dust storms normally originate in northwestern China where annual precipitation is less than 400 mm, particularly in extremely dry areas (less than 200 mm), including the Taklamakan Desert, Tarim basin area, and Gobi Desert, where the most severe dust storms have been reported. In the decades between 1954 and 2007, reports of annual dust storm occurrences at 753 Chinese meteorological sites and the corresponding amount of total precipitation show a reduction in the occurrence and intensity of dust storms and clearly demonstrate an inverse relationship between the two. The correlation between dust storm occurrence and temperature in northwestern China also displays a negative trend but is less significant. Using a global climate model, we demonstrate that increased loading of light-absorbing aerosols in China, such as black carbon (BC), is the primary reason for precipitation and temperature increases over northwestern China, and the consequence of reductions in dust storm frequency and intensity. The model-simulated precipitation and temperature changes over northwestern China compare reasonably well with observed trends when a certain portion of absorbing aerosols has been added to the model, which significantly affects regional climate patterns through the heating of the air column. Anomalies of the observed annual total dust storm cases during the period from 1954 to 2007 (solid) and the corresponding anomalies of the observed annual mean (a) total precipitation (mm) and (b) surface temperature (C°) (dashed), along

  12. Thermal Tides During the 2001 Martian Global-Scale Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Wilson, R. John; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Bandfield, Donald J.; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 (Mars Year 25) global dust storm radically altered the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere. Using observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and Mars WRF general circulation model simulations, we examine the changes to thermal tides and planetary waves caused by the storm. We find that the extratropical diurnal migrating tide is dramatically enhanced during the storm, particularly in the southern hemisphere, reaching amplitudes of more than 20 K. The tropical diurnal migrating tide is weakened to almost undetectable levels. The diurnal Kelvin waves are also significantly weakened, particularly during the period of global expansion at Ls=200deg-210deg. In contrast, the westward propagating diurnal wavenumber 2 tide strengthens to 4-8 K at altitudes above 30km. The wavenumber 1 stationary wave reaches amplitudes of 10-12 K at 50deg-70degN, far larger than is typically seen during this time of year. The phase of this stationary wave and the enhancement of the diurnal wavenumber 2 tide appear to be responses to the high-altitude westward propagating equatorial wavenumber 1 structure in dust mixing ratio observed during the storm in previous works. This work provides a global picture of dust storm wave dynamics that reveals the coupling between the tropics and high-latitude wave responses. We conclude that the zonal distribution of thermotidal forcing from atmospheric aerosol concentration is as important to understanding the atmospheric wave response as the total global mean aerosol optical depth.

  13. Effects of Asian dust storm events on daily admissions for asthma in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Chang, Chih-Ching; Ho, Shu-Chen

    2005-12-15

    In spring, windblown dust storms originating in the deserts of Mongolia and China make their way to Taipei city. These occurrences are known as Asian dust storm (ADS) events. The objective of this study was to assess the possible associations of ADS on the hospital asthma admissions of residents in Taipei, Taiwan, during the period 1996-2001. We identified 54 dust storm episodes, which were classified as index days. Daily asthma admissions on the index days were compared with admissions on the comparison days. We selected two comparison days for each index day, 7 days before the index days and 7 days after the index days. The effects of dust storms on asthma admissions were prominent 2 days after the event (8%). However, the association was not statistically significant. There may not have been enough power to detect associations resulting from the inadequate sample size of asthma admissions on ADS events days. However, it seems worthwhile to pay more attention to the ADS events and health in the future.

  14. Correlation of Asian dust storm events with daily clinic visits for allergic rhinitis in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Ching; Lee, I-Ming; Tsai, Shang-Shyue; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2006-02-01

    In spring, windblown dust storms originating in the deserts of Mongolia and China head toward Taipei city. These occurrences are known as Asian dust storm (ADS) events. The objective of this study was to assess the possible associations of ADS on the daily clinical visits for allergic rhinitis of residents in Taipei, Taiwan, during the period 1997-2001. Forty-nine dust storms were identified and classified as index days. Daily clinical visits for allergic rhinitis on the index days were compared with clinical visits on the comparison (non-ADS) days. Two non-ADS days for each index day, 7 d before the index day and 7 d after the index day, were selected. The effects of dust storms on clinic visits for allergic rhinitis were prominent 2 d after the event (19%). However, the association was not statistically significant. There may not have been enough power to detect associations resulting from the inadequate sample size of allergic rhinitis visits on ADS days. Further study is needed to clarify this association.

  15. Dust storm contributions to airborne particulate matter in Reykjavík, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Gísladóttir, Guđrún; Bullard, Joanna; McTainsh, Grant

    2011-10-01

    Episodes of high levels of particulate matter (PM) in Reykjavík occur several times a year. The main sources of daily variation in PM are traffic or highly localized (e.g. construction) sources, however several episodes have been identified where these are not the cause. Examining PM10 (diameter < 10 μm) levels around the time when dust storms are seen on satellite images, and verifying that the weather conditions are favorable for the duration of the high levels of PM (>50-100 μg m-3; 30-min average), demonstrates that dust storms are the source of these increased levels of PM10. Since satellite coverage is sparse, visual confirmation of many such peaks in PM10 cannot be achieved. The level of pollution measured in Reykjavík during dust storms indicates that at least 200 kg s-1 of PM10 sized material is being eroded and transported away from sand plains ˜110 km away - this equates to an emission rate of 35 g m2 h-1. The source regions for dust storms in Iceland are the sandur areas on the southern coast of Iceland, and regions close to the glaciers. With climate warming, and fast retreating glaciers, the potential source regions in Iceland are rapidly increasing.

  16. Summer insolation is the primary driver for orbital-scale dust storm variability in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serno, Sascha; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Kienast, Stephanie S.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2016-04-01

    Eolian dust plays an important role in the global climate system through its influence on radiation, albedo and precipitation properties, and through delivering micronutrients like iron to the oceans. Glacial periods of Earth's climate are recognized to be dustier than interglacials, but the conditions leading to greater dust mobilization are poorly defined. We present a high-resolution dust flux record based on 230Th-normalised 4He flux from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 882 in the Subarctic North Pacific covering the last 170,000 years. Today, dust storms in the vast dry regions of East Asia are almost exclusively springtime phenomena, due to a specific set of climate conditions driven by the seasonal evolution of the meridional temperature gradient between high and low latitudes. The dust flux record points to high dust storm activity in East Asia during cold periods, with highest dust flux during Marine Isotope Stages 4 and 5d. We interpret periods of higher dust supply as the result of an expansion of the dust season into the summer, primarily controlled by reduced summer insolation at high latitudes and resulting lower air temperatures in Siberia over orbital timescales. Changes in the extent of the large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets in North America and Fennoscandinavia, and atmospheric teleconnections, act as a secondary control. On millennial timescales, the occurrence of Heinrich Stadials 1 and 11 signals during the last two terminations in Subarctic North Pacific dust records indicates that dust flux variability over millennial timescales was influenced by climate changes in the North Atlantic.

  17. Regional dust storm modeling for health services: The case of valley fever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Galgiani, John N.; Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Vujadinovic, Mirjam; Vukovic, Ana; Dacic, Milan; DiBiase, Scott; Prasad, Anup; El-Askary, Hesham

    2014-09-01

    On 5 July 2011, a massive dust storm struck Phoenix, Arizona (USA), raising concerns for increased cases of valley fever (coccidioidomycosis, or, cocci). A quasi-operational experimental airborne dust forecast system predicted the event and provides model output for continuing analysis in collaboration with public health and air quality communities. An objective of this collaboration was to see if a signal in cases of valley fever in the region could be detected and traced to the storm - an American haboob. To better understand the atmospheric life cycle of cocci spores, the DREAM dust model (also herein, NMME-DREAM) was modified to simulate spore emission, transport and deposition. Inexact knowledge of where cocci-causing fungus grows, the low resolution of cocci surveillance and an overall active period for significant dust events complicate analysis of the effect of the 5 July 2011 storm. In the larger context of monthly to annual disease surveillance, valley fever statistics, when compared against PM10 observation networks and modeled airborne dust concentrations, may reveal a likely cause and effect. Details provided by models and satellites fill time and space voids in conventional approaches to air quality and disease surveillance, leading to land-atmosphere modeling and remote sensing that clearly mark a path to advance valley fever epidemiology, surveillance and risk avoidance.

  18. Observation of a Dust Storm during 2015 Spring over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y.; Li, D.; Li, Z.; Chen, X.; Xu, H.; Liu, Z.; Qie, L.; Zhang, Y.; Li, K.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dust events bring significant impacts on the regional environment, human health and even climate. There are four major dust explosion areas in the world, such as North America, Australia, Central Asia and Middle East. Located in the Central Asia, North China has a severe desertification because of deforestation and excessive population growth. Beijing is at the fork of three dust transmission paths in Chin, which makes it a dust-prone region for a long history especially in spring. Thanks to the improvement of the ecological environment in Mongolia, the number of dust weather in recent years reduced significantly than before. However, as the spring coming earlier for the relatively high temperature, a severe dust weather process happened suddenly on March 28, 2015 following with the long-term hazy weather, which up to the highest intensity in the nearly two years. A set of ground-based observations for this serious dust event were adopted in this paper. The ground-based remote sensing station is equipped with an automatic CIMEL lidar and an AERONET sun-photometer. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size distribution were measured by sun-photometer. AOD of dust reached 2.0 at 532nm, which was much larger than clear days. And there was an obvious trend that coarse mode increases more significantly and quickly than fine mode when a dust storm occurs. At the same time, data provided by the air quality monitoring and analysis platform of China shown that the PM10 concentration was larger than 1000μg/m3 and PM10 made important contribution to the high AQI. Lidar observation clearly shown the dust spread very tall (higher than 1km) when the dust storm occurrence. After the dust dissipating, the planetary boundary layer roughly from 0 to 3km, aerosol has a very widely vertical distribution. The AOD based on sun-photometer were taken as a constraint, 65 sr were retrieved and analyzed. And the extinction coefficients indicated that the dust had been dissipation near

  19. Developing Subdomain Allocation Algorithms Based on Spatial and Communicational Constraints to Accelerate Dust Storm Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Zhipeng; Yu, Manzhu; Yang, Chaowei; Jiang, Yunfeng; Chen, Songqing; Xia, Jizhe; Huang, Qunying; Liu, Kai; Li, Zhenlong; Hassan, Mohammed Anowarul; Jin, Baoxuan

    2016-01-01

    Dust storm has serious disastrous impacts on environment, human health, and assets. The developments and applications of dust storm models have contributed significantly to better understand and predict the distribution, intensity and structure of dust storms. However, dust storm simulation is a data and computing intensive process. To improve the computing performance, high performance computing has been widely adopted by dividing the entire study area into multiple subdomains and allocating each subdomain on different computing nodes in a parallel fashion. Inappropriate allocation may introduce imbalanced task loads and unnecessary communications among computing nodes. Therefore, allocation is a key factor that may impact the efficiency of parallel process. An allocation algorithm is expected to consider the computing cost and communication cost for each computing node to minimize total execution time and reduce overall communication cost for the entire simulation. This research introduces three algorithms to optimize the allocation by considering the spatial and communicational constraints: 1) an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) based algorithm from combinational optimization perspective; 2) a K-Means and Kernighan-Lin combined heuristic algorithm (K&K) integrating geometric and coordinate-free methods by merging local and global partitioning; 3) an automatic seeded region growing based geometric and local partitioning algorithm (ASRG). The performance and effectiveness of the three algorithms are compared based on different factors. Further, we adopt the K&K algorithm as the demonstrated algorithm for the experiment of dust model simulation with the non-hydrostatic mesoscale model (NMM-dust) and compared the performance with the MPI default sequential allocation. The results demonstrate that K&K method significantly improves the simulation performance with better subdomain allocation. This method can also be adopted for other relevant atmospheric and numerical

  20. Developing Subdomain Allocation Algorithms Based on Spatial and Communicational Constraints to Accelerate Dust Storm Simulation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhipeng; Yu, Manzhu; Yang, Chaowei; Jiang, Yunfeng; Chen, Songqing; Xia, Jizhe; Huang, Qunying; Liu, Kai; Li, Zhenlong; Hassan, Mohammed Anowarul; Jin, Baoxuan

    2016-01-01

    Dust storm has serious disastrous impacts on environment, human health, and assets. The developments and applications of dust storm models have contributed significantly to better understand and predict the distribution, intensity and structure of dust storms. However, dust storm simulation is a data and computing intensive process. To improve the computing performance, high performance computing has been widely adopted by dividing the entire study area into multiple subdomains and allocating each subdomain on different computing nodes in a parallel fashion. Inappropriate allocation may introduce imbalanced task loads and unnecessary communications among computing nodes. Therefore, allocation is a key factor that may impact the efficiency of parallel process. An allocation algorithm is expected to consider the computing cost and communication cost for each computing node to minimize total execution time and reduce overall communication cost for the entire simulation. This research introduces three algorithms to optimize the allocation by considering the spatial and communicational constraints: 1) an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) based algorithm from combinational optimization perspective; 2) a K-Means and Kernighan-Lin combined heuristic algorithm (K&K) integrating geometric and coordinate-free methods by merging local and global partitioning; 3) an automatic seeded region growing based geometric and local partitioning algorithm (ASRG). The performance and effectiveness of the three algorithms are compared based on different factors. Further, we adopt the K&K algorithm as the demonstrated algorithm for the experiment of dust model simulation with the non-hydrostatic mesoscale model (NMM-dust) and compared the performance with the MPI default sequential allocation. The results demonstrate that K&K method significantly improves the simulation performance with better subdomain allocation. This method can also be adopted for other relevant atmospheric and numerical

  1. Developing Subdomain Allocation Algorithms Based on Spatial and Communicational Constraints to Accelerate Dust Storm Simulation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhipeng; Yu, Manzhu; Yang, Chaowei; Jiang, Yunfeng; Chen, Songqing; Xia, Jizhe; Huang, Qunying; Liu, Kai; Li, Zhenlong; Hassan, Mohammed Anowarul; Jin, Baoxuan

    2016-01-01

    Dust storm has serious disastrous impacts on environment, human health, and assets. The developments and applications of dust storm models have contributed significantly to better understand and predict the distribution, intensity and structure of dust storms. However, dust storm simulation is a data and computing intensive process. To improve the computing performance, high performance computing has been widely adopted by dividing the entire study area into multiple subdomains and allocating each subdomain on different computing nodes in a parallel fashion. Inappropriate allocation may introduce imbalanced task loads and unnecessary communications among computing nodes. Therefore, allocation is a key factor that may impact the efficiency of parallel process. An allocation algorithm is expected to consider the computing cost and communication cost for each computing node to minimize total execution time and reduce overall communication cost for the entire simulation. This research introduces three algorithms to optimize the allocation by considering the spatial and communicational constraints: 1) an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) based algorithm from combinational optimization perspective; 2) a K-Means and Kernighan-Lin combined heuristic algorithm (K&K) integrating geometric and coordinate-free methods by merging local and global partitioning; 3) an automatic seeded region growing based geometric and local partitioning algorithm (ASRG). The performance and effectiveness of the three algorithms are compared based on different factors. Further, we adopt the K&K algorithm as the demonstrated algorithm for the experiment of dust model simulation with the non-hydrostatic mesoscale model (NMM-dust) and compared the performance with the MPI default sequential allocation. The results demonstrate that K&K method significantly improves the simulation performance with better subdomain allocation. This method can also be adopted for other relevant atmospheric and numerical

  2. The origin, evolution, and trajectory of large dust storms on Mars during Mars years 24-30 (1999-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqun; Richardson, Mark I.

    2015-05-01

    Mars Daily Global Maps (MDGM) derived from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) are used to study the distribution and evolution of large dust storms over the period from Mars years 24-30 (1999-2001). Large storms are defined here as discrete dust events visible in image sequences extending over at least 5 sols (Mars days) and where the dust covers areas beyond the origination region. A total of 65 large dust storms meeting these criteria are identified during the observational period and all are observed during the Ls = 135-30° seasonal window. Dust storms originating in the northern and southern hemispheres appear to form two distinct families. All but two of the storms originating in the northern hemisphere are observed in two seasonal windows at Ls = 180-240° and Ls = 305-350°; while all but two of those originating in the southern hemisphere are observed during Ls = 135-245°. None of the large dust storms originating in the northern hemisphere are observed to develop to global scale, but some of them develop into large regional storms with peak area >1 × 107 km2 and duration on the order of several weeks. In comparison, large dust storms originating in the southern hemisphere are typically much smaller, except notably in the two cases that expanded to global scale (the 2001 and 2007 global storms). Distinct locations of preferred storm origination emerge from the dust storm image sequences, including Acidalia, Utopia, Arcadia and Hellas. A route (trajectory) 'graph' for the observed sequences is provided. The routes are highly asymmetric between the two hemispheres. In the south, for non-global dust storms, the main routes are primarily oriented eastwest, whereas in the north, the routes are primarily north-south and zonally-concentrated into meridional channels. In a few impressive cases, storms originating in the northern hemisphere are observed to "flush" through

  3. Effects of dust aerosols on tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G. G.; Knote, C.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm on tropospheric chemistry through a case study in northern India. Dust can alter photolysis rates by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and provide surface area for heterogeneous reactions. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to simulate the dust storm that occurred during 17-22 April 2010 and investigate the contribution of different processes on mixing ratios of several key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde. We revised the Fast Troposphere Ultraviolet Visible (F-TUV) photolysis scheme to include effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates in a manner consistent with the calculations of aerosol optical properties for feedback to the meteorology radiation schemes. In addition, we added twelve heterogeneous reactions on the dust surface, for which six reactions have relative humidity dependent reactive uptake coefficients (γ). The inclusion of these processes in WRF-Chem is found to reduce difference between observed and modeled ozone from 16 ± 9 to 2 ± 8 ppbv and that in NOy from 2129 ± 1425 to 372 ± 1225 pptv compared to measurements at the high altitude site Nainital in the central Himalayas, and reduce biases by up to 30% in tropospheric column NO2 compared to OMI retrievals. The simulated dust storm acted as a sink for all the trace gases examined here and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-100% and more than 80% of this reduction was due to heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of γ is also found to have substantial impact on the distribution of trace gases, with changes of up to 20-25% in ozone and HO2, 50% in H2O2 and 100% in HNO3. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging can reduce the uptake of trace gases (especially of H2O2 and acetic acid) by up to 50% in

  4. What is the impact of Harmattan surges on desert dust emission in North Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Stephanie; Kaplan, Michael L.; Knippertz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Desert dust aerosols have important implications in the Earth system, but their emission amount has a large model uncertainty. Improving the most important meteorological processes for dust-emitting winds helps to reduce this uncertainty. However, the dominant meteorological mechanisms for the large dust emission during spring remain unclear. This time of year is characterized by mobile, long-lived cyclones and Harmattan surges which are capable to uplift dust aerosol for long-range atmospheric transport. Emission near to the centre of mobile, long-lived cyclones are associated with a small mass of dust emission over the northern Sahara in spring, despite their most frequent occurrence in this season. Harmattan surges are proposed to be more efficient in emitting dust aerosol in spring. These events manifest themselves as a postfrontal strengthening of near-surface winds with a continental impact on dust emission. The present study shows the first long-term climatology of dust emission associated with Harmattan surges over North Africa. Using a newly-developed automated identification, Harmattan surges are statistically analysed in 32 years of ERA-Interim re-analysis from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The results show 34 events per year in the annual mean. Spring is herein the most active season with the largest mean number and duration of Harmattan surges, in contrast to summer with virtually no activity. The offline dust emission model by Tegen et al (2002) is used to calculate emissions with ERA-Interim data. Combining these results with the Harmattan surges allows a first quantitative estimate of the associated emission mass. The results highlight that a fraction of 32 % of the total emission is associated with these events, annually and spatially averaged across North Africa. This amount exceeds the annual mean contribution of nocturnal low-level jets to dust emission, which is known as one of the most important drivers for North

  5. Characterization of aerosolized bacteria and fungi from desert dust events in Mali, West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, C.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Garrison, V.H.; Peak, K.K.; Royall, N.; Smith, R.R.; Shinn, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Millions of metric tons of African desert dust blow across the Atlantic Ocean each year, blanketing the Caribbean and southeastern United States. Previous work in the Caribbean has shown that atmospheric samples collected during dust events contain living microbes, including plant and opportunistic human pathogens. To better understand the potential downwind public health and ecosystem effects of the dust microbes, it is important to characterize the source population. We describe 19 genera of bacteria and 3 genera of fungi isolated from air samples collected in Mali, a known source region for dust storms, and over which large dust storms travel.

  6. Impacts of crystal metal on secondary aliphatic amine aerosol formation during dust storm episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyang; Bei, Yiling

    2016-03-01

    Trimethylamine (TMA) enters the atmosphere from a variety of sources and is a ubiquitous atmospheric organic base. The atmospheric reaction mechanism of TMA with key atmospheric oxidants is important to predict its distribution and environmental behavior in the particle phase. While previous studies have extensively focused on the production of particle amine salts (i.e. trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)) using chamber experiments, the atmospheric behavior of TMAO in the environment is still poorly understood. Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected at two sampling sites in Beijing from March 10 to May 10, 2012. We analyzed the samples for water-soluble ions, crystal metals, TMA, and TMAO. Water-soluble ions (e.g. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+), TMA, and TMAO were measured using ion chromatography, while crystal metal (e.g. Al, Fe, Mn) in PM2.5 was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two dust storms (DS) occurred during the sampling period on March 28 and April 28. Mineral dust impacted PM2.5 mass and composition greatly during dust storm days, as it contributed approximately 1.2-4.0 times greater on dust storm days versus non-dust storm days. We found TMAO concentrations were highly associated with aluminum in PM2.5. Further, we applied the density functional theory (DFT) method to confirm that aluminum plays a catalytic effect in the reaction of TMA with ozone (O3). Our work improves understanding of the effect of crystal metals on secondary aliphatic amine aerosol formation in the atmosphere.

  7. Effects of dust aerosols on tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G. G.; Knote, C.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2014-07-01

    This study examines the effect of a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm on tropospheric chemistry through a case study in northern India. Dust can alter photolysis rates by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and provide surface area for heterogeneous reactions. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to simulate the dust storm that occurred during 17-22 April 2010 and investigate the contribution of different processes on mixing ratios of several key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde. We revised the Fast Troposphere Ultraviolet Visible (F-TUV) photolysis scheme to include effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates in a manner consistent with the calculations of aerosol optical properties for feedback to the meteorology radiation schemes. In addition, we added 12 heterogeneous reactions on the dust surface, for which 6 reactions have relative-humidity-dependent reactive uptake coefficients (γ). The inclusion of these processes in WRF-Chem is found to reduce the difference between observed and modeled O3 from 16 ± 9 to 2 ± 8 ppbv and that in NOy from 2129 ± 1425 to 372 ± 1225 pptv compared to measurements at the high-altitude site Nainital in the central Himalayas, and reduce biases by up to 30% in tropospheric column NO2 compared to OMI retrievals. The simulated dust storm acted as a sink for all the trace gases examined here and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-100%, and more than 80% of this reduction was due to heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of γ is also found to have substantial impact on the distribution of trace gases, with changes of up to 20-25% in O3 and HO2, 50% in H2O2 and 100% in HNO3. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging could change H2O2 and CH3COOH levels by up to 50% but has a relatively small impact on other gases.

  8. Use of dust storm observations on satellite images to identify areas vulnerable to severe wind erosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breed, C.S.; McCauley, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Blowing dust is symptomatic of severe wind erosion and deterioration of soils in areas undergoing dessication and/or devegetation. Dust plumes on satellite images can commonly be traced to sources in marginally arable semiarid areas where protective lag gravels or vegetation have been removed and soils are dry, as demonstrated for the Portales Valley, New Mexico. Images from Landsat and manned orbiters such as Skylab and the Space Shuttle are useful for illustrating the regional relations of airborne dust plumes to source areas. Geostationary satellites such as GOES are useful in tracking the time-histories of episodic dust storms. These events sometimes go unrecognized by weather observers and are the precursors of long-term land degradation trends. In areas where soil maps and meteorological data are inadequate, satellite images provide a means for identifying problem areas where measures are needed to control or mitigate wind erosion. ?? 1986 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  9. Long-Term Observations of Dust Storms in Sandy Desert Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hye-Won; Kim, Jung-Rack; Choi, Yun-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust occupies the largest portion of atmospheric aerosol. Considering the numerous risks that dust poses for socioeconomic and anthropogenic activities, it is crucial to understand sandy desert environments, which frequently generate dust storms and act as a primary source of atmospheric aerosol. To identify mineral aerosol mechanisms, it is essential to monitor desert environmental factors involving dust storm generation in the long term. In this study, we focused on two major environmental factors: local surface roughness and soil moisture. Since installments of ground observation networks in sandy deserts are unfeasible, remote sensing techniques for mining desert environmental factors were employed. The test area was established within the Badain Jaran and Kubuqi Deserts in Inner Mongolia, China, where significant seasonal aeolian processes emit mineral dust that influences all of East Asia. To trace local surface roughness, we employed a multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) image sequence to extract multi-angle viewing (MAV) topographic parameters such as normalized difference angular index, which represents characteristics of the target desert topography. The backscattering coefficient from various space-borne SAR and stereotopography were compared with MAV observations to determine calibrated local surface roughness. Soil moisture extraction techniques from InSAR-phase coherence stacks were developed and compiled with advanced scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture data. Combined with metrological information such as the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA interim, correlations between intensity of sand dune activity as a proxy of aeolian processes in desert environments, surface wind conditions, and surface soil moisture were traced. Overall, we have confirmed that tracking sandy desert aeolian environments for long-term observations is feasible with space-borne, multi-sensor observations when combined with

  10. A Robust Satellite Technique (RST) for detection and monitoring of dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizzola, C.; Sannazzaro, F.; Di Girolamo, P.; Marchese, F.; Mazzeo, G.; Summa, D.; Paciello, R.; Pergola, N.; Tramutoli, V.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, concurrently with climate change and poorly managed human activity, there has been a significant increase in the number of dust storms, which commonly arise, by the action of wind, in the arid and semi-arid regions of the planet, particularly at subtropical latitudes. They represent a devastating meteorological phenomenon because dust clouds contain large amounts of particles, particularly silicates, which can have a direct impact on the increase in health problems such as respiratory diseases, as well the inconvenience and disruption to transport routes and communication. For such reasons, there is much interest from government agencies and the scientific community to examine and analyze the problem (nature, extent and causes) in order to implement mitigation strategies, prevention, prediction and control of the same. To this aim, several satellite techniques have been, up to now, proposed in order to detect and monitor dust storms. Satellite-based methods usually consider the reverse absorption behaviour shown by silicate particles, in comparison with ice crystals and water droplets, at 11 and 12µm (split windows) wavelengths. However, performances of split window methods depend on observational conditions (day/night, land/sea, etc.) as well as on specific aerosol properties (mainly size distribution and complex refractive index). Moreover, several satellite techniques are based on fixed thresholds and they often have difficulties in identifying sandstorms over daytime images as well as problems in discriminating meteorological from dust clouds. To overcome such limitations, a Robust Satellite data analysis Technique (RST), named RSTDUST (Robust Satellite Technique for DUST detection) has been proposed and applied both to polar and geostationary satellite data for detecting and monitoring recent dust storms in several World places (central Europe, Greece, Saudi Arabia, Australia, etc). Main results obtained by using RSTDUST, in comparison with

  11. Multidisciplinary studies of the dust storm that affected Sydney in September 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deckker, P.

    2012-04-01

    A major dust storm transgressed over southeastern Australia in September 2009 and continued as far as northern Queensland [to the north], New Zealand and New Caledonia [to the east] . We analysed samples of the dust for organic compounds, its microbiological composition, pollen, trace and rare earth elements as well as Sr and Nd isotopes. Grain size analysis was also performed on some of the samples. We also obtained information on the meteorological conditions that led to the large dust plume and its pathway. Our geochemical fingerprinting allowed us to determine the origin of the dust, and this was confirmed by meteorological observations and satellite imagery. As the pathway of the dust plume went over the city of Canberra, located to the southwest of Sydney, we were able to collect samples of dust that fell with rain, and the surprise was that the geochemical composition of the dust varied with time [and dust fall], identifying that as the dust plume transgressed over the landscape, it picked up additional material that was compositionally different from its point of origin. We also compared our data with those obtained from another major dust event that affected Canberra in October 2002, and a number of important differences are noted, particularly with respect of the microbiological composition of the dust, and its chemical composition. Collaborators on this project are: Chris Munday and Gwen Allison [microbiology]: Research School of Biology, ANU; Jochen Brocks and Janet Hope [organic chemistry] and Marc Norman [inorganic geochemistry]: Research School of Earth Sciences, ANU; Tadhg O'Loingsigh and Nigel Tapper [meteorology, satellite imagery] and Sander van der Kaars [palynology]: Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University; and J.-B. Stuut [grain size analysis], NIOZ.

  12. Australian dust storm associated with extensive Aspergillus sydowii fungal "bloom" in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Coman, Frank; Davies, Claire; Hayashi, Aiko; McLeod, David; Slotwinski, Anita; Whittock, Lucy; Richardson, Anthony J

    2014-06-01

    A massive central Australian dust storm in September 2009 was associated with abundant fungal spores (150,000/m(3)) and hyphae in coastal waters between Brisbane (27°S) and Sydney (34°S). These spores were successfully germinated from formalin-preserved samples, and using molecular sequencing of three different genes (the large subunit rRNA gene [LSU], internal transcribed spacer [ITS[, and beta-tubulin gene), they were conclusively identified as Aspergillus sydowii, an organism circumstantially associated with gorgonian coral fan disease in the Caribbean. Surprisingly, no human health or marine ecosystem impacts were associated with this Australian dust storm event. Australian fungal cultures were nontoxic to fish gills and caused a minor reduction in the motility of Alexandrium or Chattonella algal cultures but had their greatest impacts on Symbiodinium dinoflagellate coral symbiont motility, with hyphae being more detrimental than spores. While we have not yet seen any soft coral disease outbreaks on the Australian Great Barrier Reef similar to those observed in the Caribbean and while this particular fungal population was non- or weakly pathogenic, our observations raise the possibility of future marine ecosystem pathogen impacts from similar dust storms harboring more pathogenic strains. PMID:24657868

  13. Australian Dust Storm Associated with Extensive Aspergillus sydowii Fungal “Bloom” in Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Frank; Davies, Claire; Hayashi, Aiko; McLeod, David; Slotwinski, Anita; Whittock, Lucy; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    A massive central Australian dust storm in September 2009 was associated with abundant fungal spores (150,000/m3) and hyphae in coastal waters between Brisbane (27°S) and Sydney (34°S). These spores were successfully germinated from formalin-preserved samples, and using molecular sequencing of three different genes (the large subunit rRNA gene [LSU], internal transcribed spacer [ITS[, and beta-tubulin gene), they were conclusively identified as Aspergillus sydowii, an organism circumstantially associated with gorgonian coral fan disease in the Caribbean. Surprisingly, no human health or marine ecosystem impacts were associated with this Australian dust storm event. Australian fungal cultures were nontoxic to fish gills and caused a minor reduction in the motility of Alexandrium or Chattonella algal cultures but had their greatest impacts on Symbiodinium dinoflagellate coral symbiont motility, with hyphae being more detrimental than spores. While we have not yet seen any soft coral disease outbreaks on the Australian Great Barrier Reef similar to those observed in the Caribbean and while this particular fungal population was non- or weakly pathogenic, our observations raise the possibility of future marine ecosystem pathogen impacts from similar dust storms harboring more pathogenic strains. PMID:24657868

  14. Assessment of Dust Emissions Model and PM10 in the United Arab Emirates during Dust Storms using the CMAQ-WRF Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooqui, M.; West, J. J.; Shankar, U.; Sexton, K.; Adelman, Z.; Omary, M.; Xin, A.; Arunachalam, S.; Davis, N.; Vizuete, W.

    2013-12-01

    An air quality model was applied to predict ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM) below 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10) from dust storms in the summer of 2007 in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where dust emissions are the dominant source of PM10. The aim was to investigate the performance of an advanced dust emissions parameterization (DUST_EI) from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model in predicting ambient concentrations of dust, compared to that of SimpleDust, a simplified dust emissions parameterization used to generate dust emissions for the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). The DUST_EI model aggregates dust emissions calculated in each of 10 size bins, yielding a variable ratio of fine to coarse PM emissions, compared to the fixed ratio used in SimpleDust. It also uses a temporally and spatially varying threshold friction velocity, a key parameter for initiating dust events, in contrast to the constant value used in SimpleDust Dust emissions from the two dust models were combined with emissions from other sources and input into CMAQ version 4.7 in air quality simulations for May to August, 2007. Relative to the SimpleDust model, seasonal total (fine + coarse) dust emissions estimated by the DUST_EI model increased by a factor of 2.4, and by a factor of 5 when summed over the fine size bins only. The SimpleDust model shows a consistent low bias of up to -87% compared to PM10 surface observations. On the other hand, biases at four surface PM10 monitors ranged from -10% to +36% with DUST_EI, which was also able to reproduce the timing and location of dust storms, but tended to under-predict PM10 during dust storm days. The parameterized DUST_EI model should be revised using observations of both PM10 and PM2.5 collected over a longer duration and more locations to improve the representation of dust emissions in this region.

  15. PREFACE: WMO/GEO Expert Meeting On An International Sand And Dust Storm Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science presents a selection of papers that were given at the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on an International Sand and Dust Storm Warning System hosted by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación in Barcelona (Spain) on 7-9 November 2007 (http://www.bsc.es/wmo). A sand and dust storm (SDS) is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions and arises when a gust front passes or when the wind force exceeds the threshold value where loose sand and dust are removed from the dry surface. After aeolian uptake, SDS reduce visibility to a few meters in and near source regions, and dust plumes are transported over distances as long as thousands of kilometres. Aeolian dust is unique among aerosol phenomena: (1) with the possible exception of sea-salt aerosol, it is globally the most abundant of all aerosol species, (2) it appears as the dominating component of atmospheric aerosol over large areas of the Earth, (3) it represents a serious hazard for life, health, property, environment and economy (occasionally reaching the grade of disaster or catastrophic event) and (4) its influence, impacts, complex interactions and feedbacks within the Earth System span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. From a political and societal point of view, the concern for SDS and the need for international cooperation were reflected after a survey conducted in 2005 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in which more than forty WMO Member countries expressed their interest for creating or improving capacities for SDS warning advisory and assessment. In this context, recent major advances in research - including, for example, the development and implementation of advanced observing systems, the theoretical understanding of the mechanisms responsible for sand and dust storm generation and the development of global and regional dust models - represent the basis for

  16. Modeling infrared thermal emissions on Mars during dust storm of MY28: PFS/MEX observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Syed A.; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Giuranna, Marco; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jethwa, Masoom P.

    2016-07-01

    We have analysed thermal emission spectra obtained from Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard Mars Express (MEX) for Martian Year (MY) 28 in presence and absence of dust storm at low latitude. A radiative transfer model for dusty atmosphere of Mars is developed to estimate the thermal emission spectra at latitude range 0-10oS, 10-20oS and 20-30oS. These calculations are made at Ls=240o, 280o, 300o, and 320o between wave numbers 250-1400 cm-1. We have also retrieved brightness temperatures from thermal emission spectra by inverting the Planck function. The model reproduces the observed features at wave numbers 600-750 cm-1 and 900-1200 cm-1 due to absorptions by CO2 and dust respectively. In presence of dust storm thermal emission spectra and brightness temperature are reduced by a factor of ~ 2 between wave numbers 900-1200 cm-1. The altitude profiles of dust concentration are also estimated for different aerosol particles of sizes 0.2 to 3 micron. The best fit to the PFS measurements is obtained in presence of aerosol particle of size 0.2 micron.

  17. Effects of South Asian dust storm on air quality over the capital city of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarragunta, Y.; Srivastava, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, an intense unseasonal dust storm has been analyzed during third week of March 2012 from multi satellite datasets and from surface measurements over National Capital Region (NCR), Delhi. The intrusion of dust over study region has increased the MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth at 550 nm more than 1.0 whereas significant decrease in Angstrom Exponent (α) has been observed . Very high UV aerosol Index (> 2) over study location indicates the presence of UV absorbing aerosols . Fire activities are found to be negligible over the source region confirming the effect of dust storm. Strong southwesterly winds prevailed over northern Arabian Sea which trans ported the dust plume across the oceanic region towards Indian capital region. In-situ measurements of PM 2.5 and PM10, obtained from CPCB observational site over the IGI airport, NCR Delhi, showed abrupt increase on 20, 21 March. Eight hourly average concentration of the particulate matters less than 10 μm (PM10) is found to be ~990 μg/m3 and particulate matters less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is found to be ~900 μg/m3 over IGI Airport, NCR Delhi. These values are remarkably higher as compared to the daily National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) i.e. 100 μg/m3 and 60 μg/m3 for PM10 and PM2.5 respectively. In addition, Vertical distribution of dust has been examined using CALIPSO observation. The layer of dust is found to be trapped within lower 3 km in altitude. The Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) modeling has been carried out to identify the specific source locations.

  18. Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance

    SciTech Connect

    Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

    2006-12-01

    Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

  19. Meteorological, atmospheric and climatic perturbations during major dust storms over Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvan; Kumar, Sanjay; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Singh, Ramesh P.; Singh, Rajeev K.; Mishra, Amit K.; Srivastava, Manoj K.; Singh, Abhay K.

    2015-06-01

    During the pre-monsoon season (April-June), the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) suffers from frequent and intense dust storms originated from the arid and desert regions of southwest Asia (Iran, Afghanistan), Arabia and Thar desert blanketing IGB and Himalayan foothills. The present study examines the columnar and vertical aerosol characteristics and estimates the shortwave (0.25-4.0 μm) aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and atmospheric heating rates over Kanpur, central IGB, during three intense dust-storm events in the pre-monsoon season of 2010. MODIS images, meteorological and AERONET observations clearly show that all the dust storms either originated from the Thar desert or transported over, under favorable meteorological conditions (low pressure and strong surface winds) affecting nearly the whole IGB and modifying the aerosol loading and characteristics (Ångström exponent, single scattering albedo, size distribution and refractive index). CALIPSO observations reveal the presence of high-altitude (up to 3-5 km) dust plumes that strongly modify the vertical aerosol profile and are transported over Himalayan foothills with serious climate implications (atmospheric warming, enhanced melting of glaciers). Shortwave ARF calculations over Kanpur using SBDART model show large negative forcing values at the surface (-93.27, -101.60 and -66.71 W m-2) during the intense dusty days, associated with planetary (top of atmosphere) cooling (-18.16, -40.95, -29.58 W m-2) and significant atmospheric heating (75.11, 60.65, 37.13 W m-2), which is translated to average heating rates of 1.57, 1.41 and 0.78 K day-1, respectively in the lower atmosphere (below ∼3.5 km). The ARF estimates are in satisfactory agreement with the AERONET ARF retrievals over Kanpur.

  20. Long-term Satellite Observations of Asian Dust Storm: Source, Pathway, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina

    2008-01-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of springtime cold front systems. Outbreaks of Asian dust storms occur often in the arid and semi-arid areas of northwestern China -about 1.6x10(exp 6) square kilometers including the Gobi and Taklimakan deserts- with continuous expanding of spatial coverage. These airborne dust particles, originating in desert areas far from polluted regions, interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols emitted from Chinese megacities during their transport over the mainland. Adding the intricate effects of clouds and marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from their sources. Furthermore, these aerosols, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol properties (e.g., optical thickness, single scattering albedo) over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. This new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. Reasonable agreements have been achieved

  1. Surface Wind Stresses and Triggering of Global Dust Storms on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischna, Michael A.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-10-01

    Global dust storms on Mars occur during summer in the southern hemisphere, but their occurrence in some years and not in others has stubbornly eluded explanation. Shirley (2016, in review, and at arxiv.org/abs/1605.02707) and Mischna and Shirley (2016, in revision, and at arxiv.org/abs/1602.09137) have demonstrated the role of a so-called "coupling term acceleration" (CTA) in modifying the Mars global circulation through potential exchange of Mars' orbital and rotational momenta. The CTA has been incorporated into the MarsWRF general circulation model (GCM), which reveals distinct changes to the circulation due to the CTA, leading to conditions favorable to GDS formation in all years in which perihelion season GDS were observed, and conditions unfavorable in nearly all other years. These circulation changes reveal themselves, in part, through changes in surface wind stress, which is a strong function of near-surface wind speed. We present additional analysis of these results for the past years with perihelion season GDS (7 in total) showing commonalities in the evolution of surface stresses in the season leading up to GDS initiation. Specifically, the enhancement of surface stress during this pre-storm season, arising from the orbit-spin coupling in years with perihelion season storms, presents some common patterns. Among these are the rate and duration of increase of wind stress, and the minimum level of enhancement from the CTA that is apparently required in these years prior to initiation of a GDS. Previously we assessed changes in surface stress using a simple, dust-free model atmosphere. Here, further, we perform parallel simulations for MY 24-27 using realistic dust profiles from TES limb observations. The inclusion of dust in the GCM modifies atmospheric opacity and will alter global atmospheric temperatures leading to a markedly different atmospheric state. We find that the inclusion of dust in the atmosphere reduces the magnitude of surface stresses as

  2. On the relations between land-surface Water Use Efficiency and Asian dust storms in the Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Asian dust storm is one of major environmental issures in the Northeast Asia. The dust storm occurrence is typically influenced by both atmospheric (i.e. pressure, wind speed, precipitation, etc.) and land-surface conditions (i.e. vegetation cover and vitality, soil dryness, etc). Severe water stess in arid and semi-arid regions can resulted in reduction of vegetation cover fraction ultimately. Plant physiological change might however precede the vegetation structural change by regulating leaf stomatal resistance. In this study, we tested whether plant physiological index can be used for early indicator of plant recession causing dust storm increase. For the purpose, satellite-based eco-physiological variables such as gross primary production (GPP), evapotranspiration (ET), and water use efficiency (WUE) were prepared and then, compared their spatial and temporal variability with Synop dust storm data for the Northeast Asia. In results, the asian dust storms occurrence decreased in early 2000s but again increased, especially, in eastern mongolia during late 2000s. Our tentative result indicates that this region was appeared consistently low water use efficiency result during the period of late 2000s. In this study, the relations between WUE and dust sorm were interpreted and discussed as a tool for early indicator of land degradation of arid and semi-arid grasslands.

  3. Effect of Asian dust storms on mortality in three Asian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyewon; Honda, Yasushi; Lim, Youn-Hee; Guo, Yue Leon; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kim, Ho

    2014-06-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) have affected several Asian countries and have been a major concern due to adverse effects on public health. The occurrence of ADS differs in each country based on geographical features and distance from the storms' origin. Many studies have reported significant associations between ADS and morbidity. However, regarding the association between ADS and mortality, only a few studies have found statistically significant ADS effects in Korea, Taiwan and Japan. Accordingly, this study aimed to examine the effects of ADS on daily mortality in three Asian cities (Seoul, South Korea; Taipei, Taiwan; and Kitakyushu, Japan) and to explore the differences in the extent of effects in each city. We performed time-series analyses using a generalized additive model (GAM) with Quasi-Poisson regressions. Deaths due to accidents or external causes were excluded. We used a dummy variable as an indicator of ADS and considered lag effects of ADS. Stratified analyses by disease and age and sensitivity analyses controlling for NO2, SO2, and PM10 were also conducted respectively. Additionally, influenza epidemics were adjusted for considering seasonal patterns, and a meta-analysis was performed. We reported results as excess mortality by percentage due to Asian dust storms. We found significant excess mortality in Seoul and Kitakyushu as follows. In Seoul, ADS showed adverse effects on mortality under 65 years old (lag 2: 4.44%, lag 3: 5%, lag 4: 4.39%). In Kitakyushu, ADS had adverse effects on respiratory mortality (lag 2: 18.82%). Contradictory to results in Seoul and Kitakyushu, ADS seemed to have a protective effect in Taipei: total non-accidental mortality (lag 0: -2.77%, lag 1: -3.24%), mortality over 65 years old (lag 0: -3.35%, lag 1: -3.29%) and respiratory mortality (lag 0: -10.62%, lag 1: -9.67%). Sensitivity analyses showed similar findings as the main results. Our findings suggest that ADS may affect mortality in several Asian cities, and that a dust

  4. Surface Properties Associated With Dust Storm Plume's Point-Source Locations In The Border Region Of The US And Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiweiss, M. P.; DuBois, D. W.; Flores, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storms in the border region of the Southwest US and Northern Mexico are a serious problem for air quality (PM10 exceedances), health (Valley Fever is pandemic in the region) and transportation (road closures and deadly traffic accidents). In order to better understand the phenomena, we are attempting to identify critical characteristics of dust storm sources so that, possibly, one can perform more accurate predictions of events and, thus, mitigate some of the deleterious effects. Besides the emission mechanisms for dust storm production that are tied to atmospheric dynamics, one must know those locations whose source characteristics can be tied to dust production and, therefore, identify locations where a dust storm is eminent under favorable atmospheric dynamics. During the past 13 years, we have observed, on satellite imagery, more than 500 dust events in the region and are in the process of identifying the source regions for the dust plumes that make up an event. Where satellite imagery exists with high spatial resolution (less than or equal to 250m), dust 'plumes' appear to be made up of individual and merged plumes that are emitted from a 'point source' (smaller than the resolution of the imagery). In particular, we have observed events from the ASTER sensor whose spatial resolution is 15m as well as Landsat whose spatial resolution is 30m. Tying these source locations to surface properties such as NDVI, albedo, and soil properties (percent sand, silt, clay, and gravel; soil moisture; etc.) will identify regions with enhanced capability to produce a dust storm. This, along with atmospheric dynamics, will allow the forecast of dust events. The analysis of 10 events from the period 2004-2013, for which we have identified 1124 individual plumes, will be presented.

  5. Preliminary Testing of a Pressurized Space Suit and Candidate Fabrics Under Simulated Mars Dust Storm and Dust Devil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; deLeon, Pablo G.; Lee, Pascal; McCue, Terry R.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Thrasher, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In August 2009 YAP Films (Toronto) received permission from all entities involved to create a documentary film illustrating what it might be like to be on the surface of Mars in a space suit during a dust storm or in a dust devil. The science consultants on this project utilized this opportunity to collect data which could be helpful to assess the durability of current space suit construction to the Martian environment. The NDX-1 prototype planetary space suit developed at the University of North Dakota was used in this study. The suit features a hard upper torso garment, and a soft lower torso and boots assembly. On top of that, a nylon-cotton outer layer is used to protect the suit from dust. Unmanned tests were carried out in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) at the NASA Ames Research Center, with the suit pressurized to 10 kPa gauge. These tests blasted the space suit upper torso and helmet, and a collection of nine candidate outer layer fabrics, with wind-borne simulant for five different 10 min tests under both terrestrial and Martian surface pressures. The infiltration of the dust through the outer fabric of the space suit was photographically documented. The nine fabric samples were analyzed under light and electron microscopes for abrasion damage. Manned tests were carried out at Showbiz Studios (Van Nuys, California) with the pressure maintained at 20 2 kPa gauge. A large fan-created vortex lifted Martian dust simulant (Fullers Earth or JSC Mars-1) off of the floor, and one of the authors (Lee) wearing the NDX-1 space suit walked through it to judge both subjectively and objectively how the suit performed under these conditions. Both the procedures to scale the tests to Martian conditions and the results of the infiltration and abrasion studies will be discussed.

  6. Preliminary Testing of a Pressurized Space Suit and Candidate Fabrics Under Simulated Mars Dust Storm and Dust Devil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; deLeon, Pablo G.; Lee, Pascal; McCue, Terry R.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Thrasher, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In August 2009 YAP Films (Toronto) received permission from all entities involved to create a documentary film illustrating what it might be like to be on the surface of Mars in a space suit during a dust storm or in a dust devil. The science consultants on this project utilized this opportunity to collect data which could be helpful to assess the durability of current space suit construction to the Martian environment. The NDX?1 prototype planetary space suit developed at the University of North Dakota was used in this study. The suit features a hard upper torso garment, and a soft lower torso and boots assembly. On top of that, a nylon-cotton outer layer is used to protect the suit from dust. Unmanned tests were carried out in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) at the NASA Ames Research Center, with the suit pressurized to 10 kPa gauge. These tests blasted the space suit upper torso and helmet, and a collection of nine candidate outer layer fabrics, with wind-borne simulant for five different 10 minute tests under both terrestrial and Martian surface pressures. The infiltration of the dust through the outer fabric of the space suit was photographically documented. The nine fabric samples were analyzed under light and electron microscopes for abrasion damage. Manned tests were carried out at Showbiz Studios (Van Nuys, CA) with the pressure maintained at 20?2 kPa gauge. A large fan-created vortex lifted Martian dust simulant (Fullers Earth or JSC Mars?1) off of the floor, and one of the authors (Lee) wearing the NDX?1 space suit walked through it to judge both subjectively and objectively how the suit performed under these conditions. Both the procedures to scale the tests to Martian conditions and the results of the infiltration and abrasion studies will be discussed.

  7. WMO SDS-WAS NAMEE Regional Center: Towards continuous evaluation of dust models in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; García-Castillo, Gerardo; Cuevas, Emilio; Terradellas, Enric

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important activities of the Regional Center for Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe of the World Meteorological Organization's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (WMO SDS-WAS, http://sds-was.aemet.es) is the dust model intercomparison and forecast evaluation, which is deemed an indispensable service to the users and an invaluable tool to assess model skills. Currently, the Regional Center collects daily dust forecasts from models run by nine partners (BSC, ECMWF, NASA, NCEP, SEEVCCC, EMA, CNR-ISAC, NOA and UK Met Office). A multi-model ensemble has also been set up in an effort to provide added-value products to the users. The first problem to address the dust model evaluation is the scarcity of suitable routine observations near the Sahara, the world's largest source of mineral dust. The present contribution presents preliminary results of dust model evaluation using new observational datasets. The current routine evaluation of dust predictions is focused on total-column dust optical depth (DOD) and uses remote-sensing retrievals from sun-photometric (AERONET) and satellite (MODIS) measurements. However, most users of dust forecasts are interested in the concentration near the surface (in the air we breathe) rather than in the total column content. Therefore, evaluation of the predicted surface concentration is also necessary. In this context, the initiative of the African Monsoon Interdisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) International Program to establish permanent measuring stations in the Sahel is extremely important. Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) monitors continuously record PM10 in M'Bour (Senegal); Cinzana (Mali) and Banizoumbou (Niger). This surface model evaluation is complemented with the PM10 observation from the Air Quality Control and Monitoring Network (AQCMN) of the Canary Islands (Spain). The region, located in the sub-tropical Eastern Atlantic (roughly 100 km west of the Moroccan coast), is

  8. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: implications for life and habitability.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Sushil K; Wong, Ah-San; Renno, Nilton O; Farrell, William M; Delory, Gregory T; Sentman, Davis D; Cummer, Steven A; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a new mechanism for producing oxidants, especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), on Mars. Large-scale electrostatic fields generated by charged sand and dust in the martian dust devils and storms, as well as during normal saltation, can induce chemical changes near and above the surface of Mars. The most dramatic effect is found in the production of H2O2 whose atmospheric abundance in the "vapor" phase can exceed 200 times that produced by photochemistry alone. With large electric fields, H2O2 abundance gets large enough for condensation to occur, followed by precipitation out of the atmosphere. Large quantities of H2O2 would then be adsorbed into the regolith, either as solid H2O2 "dust" or as re-evaporated vapor if the solid does not survive as it diffuses from its production region close to the surface. We suggest that this H2O2, or another superoxide processed from it in the surface, may be responsible for scavenging organic material from Mars. The presence of H2O2 in the surface could also accelerate the loss of methane from the atmosphere, thus requiring a larger source for maintaining a steady-state abundance of methane on Mars. The surface oxidants, together with storm electric fields and the harmful ultraviolet radiation that readily passes through the thin martian atmosphere, are likely to render the surface of Mars inhospitable to life as we know it.

  9. The global dispersion of pathogenic microorganisms by dust storms and its relevance to agriculture: Chapter 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Teigell-Perez, Nuria; Valladares, Basilio; Griffin, Dale W.

    2014-01-01

    Dust storms move an estimated 500–5000 Tg of soil through Earth’s atmosphere every year. Dust-storm transport of topsoils may have positive effects such as fertilization of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and the evolution of soils in proximal and distal environments. Negative effects may include the stripping of nutrient-rich topsoils from source regions, sandblasting of plant life in downwind environments, the fertilization of harmful algal blooms, and the transport of toxins (e.g., metals, pesticides, herbicides, etc.) and pathogenic microorganisms. With respect to the long-range dispersion of microorganisms and more specifically pathogens, research is just beginning to demonstrate the quantity and diversity of organisms that can survive this type of transport. Most studies to date have utilized different assays to identify microorganisms and microbial communities using predominately culture-based, and more recently nonculture-based, methodologies. There is a clear need for international-scale research efforts that apply standardized methods to advance this field of science. Here we present a review of dust-borne microorganisms with a focus on their relevance to agronomy.

  10. Effects of Martian Dust Storms on Ionization Profiles and Surface Dose Rates From Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Global dust storms can engulf Mars and distribute dust throughout the atmosphere. The change in composition and density of the atmosphere due to dust storms affects the ionization rate due to cosmic rays impinging on Mars. To model the effect of dust storms on the Martian ionization profile, five solar energetic proton event models are used as inputs into the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model. NAIRAS is a cosmic ray irradiation model adapted for fast computations and has been applied to the Martian atmosphere. Full atmosphere ionization profiles for both dust storms and quiet times are reported at multiple sites on Mars, including the Gale Crater, site of the Curiosity rover landing. Variation in the ionization profile and surface dose rates is observed as a function of input event spectrum, atmospheric dust load, and elevation. Variation in the dose rate at the surface due to dust loading is bounded by approximately 25% for large integral fluence events with a soft spectral shape, while variation due to input spectrum and elevation can be two orders of magnitude. In addition, it is demonstrated that solar energetic proton events can create ionization rates large enough at the appropriate altitudes to account for the observed radio blackouts by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft.

  11. Impact of Middle Eastern dust storms on indoor and outdoor composition of bioaerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimani, Zahra; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Sorooshian, Armin; Marzouni, Mohammad Bagherian; Maleki, Heidar

    2016-08-01

    The presence of microbes in airborne aerosol particles, especially dust, is a major public health concern in desert regions. This study is the first of its kind to examine the effect of dust storms on indoor and outdoor microbial air quality at a hospital on the western side of Iran (city of Ahvaz), which is notorious for being highly vulnerable to dust emissions. Air samples were collected inside and outside of the hospital environment for six months, with the unique advantage of this study being that the region and duration of measurements allow for a clear comparison between dusty and normal days. On normal days, the average concentrations (outdoor/indoor) of bacteria and fungi were 423/329 cfu m-3 and 596/386 cfu m-3, respectively, which increased to 1257/406 cfu m-3 and 1116/550 cfu m-3 on dust event days. Indoor/Outdoor ratios for bacteria and fungi are lower on dust event days (0.26-0.60) versus normal days (0.44-0.95). Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., Streptomyces spp., and Staphylococcus spp. were the dominant bacteria both indoors and outdoors on normal and dust event days. Gram positive bacteria exhibited higher concentrations than Gram negative bacteria in both outdoor and indoor air samples as well as during both normal and dust event days. The data suggest that Gram positive bacteria are more resistant to undesirable outdoor conditions (e.g., high incident solar radiation) as compared to Gram negative ones. These results have implications for other populated arid regions where more stringent control of indoor air quality can greatly benefit public health.

  12. The Association between Dust Storms and Daily Non-Accidental Mortality in the United States, 1993–2005

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, James Lewis; Cascio, Wayne E.; Percy, Madelyn S.; Reyes, Jeanette; Neas, Lucas M.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The impact of dust storms on human health has been studied in the context of Asian, Saharan, Arabian, and Australian storms, but there has been no recent population-level epidemiological research on the dust storms in North America. The relevance of dust storms to public health is likely to increase as extreme weather events are predicted to become more frequent with anticipated changes in climate through the 21st century. Objectives: We examined the association between dust storms and county-level non-accidental mortality in the United States from 1993 through 2005. Methods: Dust storm incidence data, including date and approximate location, are taken from the U.S. National Weather Service storm database. County-level mortality data for the years 1993–2005 were acquired from the National Center for Health Statistics. Distributed lag conditional logistic regression models under a time-stratified case-crossover design were used to study the relationship between dust storms and daily mortality counts over the whole United States and in Arizona and California specifically. End points included total non-accidental mortality and three mortality subgroups (cardiovascular, respiratory, and other non-accidental). Results: We estimated that for the United States as a whole, total non-accidental mortality increased by 7.4% (95% CI: 1.6, 13.5; p = 0.011) and 6.7% (95% CI: 1.1, 12.6; p = 0.018) at 2- and 3-day lags, respectively, and by an average of 2.7% (95% CI: 0.4, 5.1; p = 0.023) over lags 0–5 compared with referent days. Significant associations with non-accidental mortality were estimated for California (lag 2 and 0–5 day) and Arizona (lag 3), for cardiovascular mortality in the United States (lag 2) and Arizona (lag 3), and for other non-accidental mortality in California (lags 1–3 and 0–5). Conclusions: Dust storms are associated with increases in lagged non-accidental and cardiovascular mortality. Citation: Crooks JL, Cascio WE, Percy MS, Reyes

  13. The Martian annual atmospheric pressure cycle - Years without great dust storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillman, James E.; Johnson, Neal C.; Guttorp, Peter; Percival, Donald B.

    1993-01-01

    A model of the annual cycle of pressure on Mars for a 2-yr period, chosen to include one year at the Viking Lander 2 and to minimize the effect of great dust storms at the 22-deg N Lander 1 site, was developed by weighted least squares fitting of the Viking Lander pressure measurements to an annual mean, and fundamental and the first four harmonics of the annual cycle. Close agreement was obtained between the two years, suggesting that an accurate representation of the annual CO2 condensation-sublimation cycle can be established for such years. This model is proposed as the 'nominal' Martian annual pressure cycle, and applications are suggested.

  14. Characterization and radiative impact of dust aerosols over northwestern part of India: a case study during a severe dust storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Tiwari, Shani; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan; Tiwari, Suresh; Srivastava, Atul Kumar; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    The present study focused on examining the impact of a severe dust storm (DS) on aerosol properties over Patiala (30.33°N, 76.4°E), a site located in the northwestern part of India during 20th-23rd March, 2012. On 20th March, average PM10 mass concentration increased abruptly from 182 to 817 µg m-3 along with significant increase in the number density of coarser particles (diameter >0.45 µm). During DS, spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases significantly with more increase at longer wavelengths resulting in weak wavelength dependence (AOD at 380 nm increases by ~210 % and at 870 nm by ~270 % on 20th March). Significant decrease in Ångström exponent (AE; α 380-870) from 0.56 to 0.11 and fine-mode fraction (FMF; PM2.5/PM10) from 0.49 to 0.25 indicates dominance of coarser particles over the station. Net short wave (SW) radiation flux has been decreased by ~20 % and single scattering albedo (SSA675) has been increased from 0.86 (19th March) to 0.90 (20th March). This observation is attributed to additional loading of scattering type aerosols on arrival of DS. Wavelength dependence of SSA reverses during DS and it increases with wavelength due to dominance of coarse-mode particles. Atmospheric aerosol radiative forcing (ATM ARF) during DS ranged from +45 to +77 W m-2, consequently heating the lower atmosphere up to 2.2 K day-1. Significant atmospheric heating rate due to severe dust storm may affect the regional atmospheric dynamics and hence the climate system.

  15. A New Look to Interactions of Saharan Dust with Waves in the Tropical Atlantic Storm Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses mechanisms of the interactions between light-absorbing aerosols and transient atmospheric waves, including their feedback onto the mean-circulation in one of the most meteorologically sensitive areas of the world: the tropical western African/eastern Atlantic Ocean. Evidence of these interactions are presented based on analyses of an ensemble of NASA satellite data sets, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), as well as an atmospheric reanalysis from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a simulation of The Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. We analyzed the components of the rate of change of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) to explore the possible role of dust aerosol radiative forcing on reinforcing energetic terms associated with the African easterly waves (AEWs) during boreal summer seasons when the activity of AEWs peaks. This study shows that the anomalous perturbations in concentration of dust in the oceanic Saharan Air Layer (OSAL) precede amplified growth and decay of the subsequent waves compared to waves occurring prior to dust outbreaks. The amplified EKE associated with dust outbreaks are followed by seeding of new wave packets through enhanced divergence and convergence of ageostrophic geopotential height fluxes in the tropical Atlantic storm track. Meanwhile, the enhanced forcing of the mean-circulation associated with the increased momentum fluxes of the high frequency eddies at the northern track of AEWs occurs with a time-lag after the peak of dust concentration in the OSAL. We suggest that dust radiative heating in the OSAL may act as an additional energy source to amplify the thermal/mechanical activity of eddies in the northern track of the AEWs.

  16. Electron Microanalysis of Aerosols Collected at Mauna Loa Observatory During an Asian Dust Storm Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Willis, R. D.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Colton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Located in the remote marine free troposphere, the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) represents a clean airshed that can be used to study anthropogenic pollution influences and long-range transport of aerosol particles from the Asian mainland. Because of the global nature of Asian dust storms, the radiative properties of these particles transported long-range can significantly impact global climate. It has been proposed that aerosols transported to MLO during upslope wind conditions (typically daytime) are local in origin while aerosols transported during downslope conditions (typically nighttime) represent long-range transport in the free troposphere. Twelve PM10 samples (six daytime/nightime pairs) were collected on polycarbonate filters for 72 hours each between March 15 and April 26, 2011. Bulk samples of dust from local sources (road dust, parking lot, lava fields) were collected as well in order to assess the PM10 contribution from local dusts. On March 19-20 the Korea Meteorological Administration documented a significant dust event over the Korean peninsula. Back-trajectory analyses from MLO coupled with local wind speed and wind direction data suggest that this dust event may have been captured during the MLO sampling campaign. MLO samples were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and particles were sorted into compositionally-distinct particle types which were then compared across the sample set. Concentrations of particle types expected to be associated with Asian dust were observed to peak in one pair of daytime/nighttime samples collected between March 22 and March 28. Manual microscopic characterization of suspected Asian dust particles and local dust particles was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in conjunction with EDX and focussed ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) in an effort to characterize differences in physicochemical or radiative properties of

  17. Geochemical investigation of dry- and wet-deposited dust during the same dust-storm event in Harbin, China: Constraint on provenance and implications for formation of aeolian loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuanyun; Chi, Yunping

    2016-04-01

    A strong dust-storm event occurred in Harbin, China on May 11, 2011. The dry- and wet-deposited dust depositions in this dust-storm event, together with the surface sediments from the potential sources, were collected to study grain size distributions, carbonate content and carbon isotopic composition of carbonate, major element, trace element and rare earth elements (REE), and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions. The results indicate as follows. The dry-deposited dusts are characterized by bimodal grain-size distributions with a fine mode at 3.6 μm and a coarse mode at 28 μm whereas the wet-deposited dusts are indicative of unimodal grain-size modes with a fine mode at 6 μm. The dust-storm depositions are influenced to a certain extent by sedimentary sorting and are of a derivation from the recycled sediments. Based on identifying the immobility of element pairs before constraining sources of dust-storm deposits using geochemical elements, in conjunction with REE and especially Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, the primary and strengthening sources for the dust-storm event were detected, respectively. The Hunsandake Sandy Land as the primary source and the Horqin Sandy Land as the strengthening source were together responsible for the derivation of dust depositions during dust-storm event. The Hunsandake Sandy Land, however, contributes less dust to the dust-storm event in Harbin compared to the Horqin Sandy Land, and the Hulun Buir Sandy Land is undoubtedly excluded from being one of the sources for dust-storm depositions in Harbin. There are not notable differences in geochemical (especially Sr-Nd isotopic) compositions between dry- and wet-deposited dusts, indicating that the wet-deposited dust is of identical derivation to the dry-deposited dust. Based on our observations, it is of interest to suggest that fine and coarse particles in the CLP (Chinese Loess Plateau) loess possibly have the same sources.

  18. Ambient Influenza and Avian Influenza Virus during Dust Storm Days and Background Days

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Shih; Tsai, Feng Ta; Lin, Chien Kun; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Young, Chea-Yuan; Lee, Chien-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Background The spread of influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1) presents a significant threat to human health. Avian influenza outbreaks in downwind areas of Asian dust storms (ADS) suggest that viruses might be transported by dust storms. Objectives We developed a technique to measure ambient influenza and avian influenza viruses. We then used this technique to measure concentrations of these viruses on ADS days and background days, and to assess the relationships between ambient influenza and avian influenza viruses, and air pollutants. Methods A high-volume air sampler was used in parallel with a filter cassette to evaluate spiked samples and unspiked samples. Then, air samples were monitored during ADS seasons using a filter cassette coupled with a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. Air samples were monitored during ADS season (1 January to 31 May 2006). Results We successfully quantified ambient influenza virus using the filtration/real-time qPCR method during ADS days and background days. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the concentration of influenza virus in ambient air. In both the spiked and unspiked samples, the concentration of influenza virus sampled using the filter cassette was higher than that using the high-volume sampler. The concentration of ambient influenza A virus was significantly higher during the ADS days than during the background days. Conclusions Our data imply the possibility of long-range transport of influenza virus. PMID:20435545

  19. The threat of Asian dust storms on asthma patients: a population-based study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Ho; Chen, Chin-Shyan; Lin, Chung-Liang

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between Asian dust storms (ADSs), asthma hospital admissions and average medical cost discharge. We adopt the hospitalisation data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance research database covering the period from 2000 to 2009. The autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous variables (ARIMAX) analyses were performed to explore the relationship between ADS and asthma hospital admissions, adjusting for temperature, air pollutants and season dummy. The results show that ADS events do generate a critical influence upon the occurrences of asthma on post-ADS events from days 1 through 3, with an average of 17-20 more hospitalised admissions, and have stronger effects on preschool children, middle-aged people and the elderly. From the perspective of medical expenses, the cost of hospitalised admissions for asthma substantially rises daily, on average, by NT$634,698 to NT$787,407 during ADS event days. This study suggests that government should establish a forecast and alert system and release warnings about dust storms, so that the individuals predisposed to asthma can take precautionary measures to reduce their outdoor exposure. Consequently, personal risk and medical expenditure could be reduced significantly, especially for preschool children, middle-aged people and the elderly with asthma. PMID:25186129

  20. Influences of dust aerosols on regional aerosol optical properties, radiation budget and tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season dust storm in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Madronich, S.; Naja, M. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Brasseur, G. P.; Ojha, N.; Sarangi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of dust aerosols on the regional aerosol optical properties, radiation budget and tropospheric chemistry during a typical pre-monsoon season (April-June) dust storm event in northern India are analyzed. The MOZCART chemical mechanism of WRF-Chem is extended to simulate heterogeneous chemistry on dust surface and F-TUV photolysis scheme is updated to account for effects of dust aerosols on photolysis rates. The dust storm event lasted from 17 to 22 April 2010 and large changes (>50%) in local to regional scale aerosol optical properties are observed in both AERONET and satellite observations during this period. The extended version of WRF-Chem model captured several important features of the spatio-temporal distributions of dust plumes, aerosol optical properties and trace gases during the dust storm. Model results show that dust particles cool the surface and the top of the atmosphere, and warm the atmosphere. The regionally averaged radiative perturbation due to dust aerosols is estimated as -2.0×3.0 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 2.3×1.8 W m-2 in the atmosphere and -4.4×3.1 W m-2 at the surface. The impact of these radiative perturbations on the surface energy budget is estimated to be small on a regional scale but significant locally. The dust storm acted as a sink for many key trace gases including ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen oxides, methanol, acetic acid and formaldehyde, and significantly perturbed their spatial and vertical distributions. The reductions in these gases are estimated as 5-99% and more than 80% of this reduction came from the heterogeneous chemistry. The RH dependence of reactive uptake coefficient is found to have a significant impact on the distributions of trace gases. A set of sensitivity analyses revealed that dust aging can play an important role in heterogeneous chemistry. Model experiments based on laboratory measurements of changes in the uptake of ozone by dust with aging showed that dust aging can lead to

  1. The radioactivity of seasonal dust storms in the Middle East: the May 2012 case study in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamadneh, Hamed S; Ababneh, Zaid Q; Hamasha, Khadeejeh M; Ababneh, Anas M

    2015-02-01

    Dust storms in the Middle East are common during spring. Some of these storms are massive and carry a large amount of dust from faraway regions, which pose health and pollution risks. The huge dust storm event occurred in early May, 2012 was investigated for its radioactive content using gamma ray spectroscopy. Dust samples were collected from Northern Jordan and it was found that the storm carried a large amount of both artificial and natural radioactivity. The average activity concentration of fallout (137)Cs was 17.0 Bq/kg which is larger than that found in soil (2.3 Bq/kg), and this enrichment is attributed to particle size effects. (7)Be which is of atmospheric origin and has a relatively short half-life, was detected in dust with relatively large activity concentrations, as it would be expected, with an average of 2860 Bq/kg, but it was not detected in soil. Despite the large activity concentration of (7)Be, dose assessment showed that it does not contribute significantly to the effective dose through inhalation. The concentrations of the primodial nuclides (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were 547, 30.0 and 49.3 Bq/kg, respectively. With the exception of (40)K, these were comparable to what was found in soil.

  2. The radioactivity of seasonal dust storms in the Middle East: the May 2012 case study in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hamadneh, Hamed S; Ababneh, Zaid Q; Hamasha, Khadeejeh M; Ababneh, Anas M

    2015-02-01

    Dust storms in the Middle East are common during spring. Some of these storms are massive and carry a large amount of dust from faraway regions, which pose health and pollution risks. The huge dust storm event occurred in early May, 2012 was investigated for its radioactive content using gamma ray spectroscopy. Dust samples were collected from Northern Jordan and it was found that the storm carried a large amount of both artificial and natural radioactivity. The average activity concentration of fallout (137)Cs was 17.0 Bq/kg which is larger than that found in soil (2.3 Bq/kg), and this enrichment is attributed to particle size effects. (7)Be which is of atmospheric origin and has a relatively short half-life, was detected in dust with relatively large activity concentrations, as it would be expected, with an average of 2860 Bq/kg, but it was not detected in soil. Despite the large activity concentration of (7)Be, dose assessment showed that it does not contribute significantly to the effective dose through inhalation. The concentrations of the primodial nuclides (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U were 547, 30.0 and 49.3 Bq/kg, respectively. With the exception of (40)K, these were comparable to what was found in soil. PMID:25461517

  3. Characterisation of bio-aerosols during dust storm period in N-NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sudesh; Chauhan, M. S.; Sharma, Anupam

    Bio-investigations for pollen and spores were performed on dry free-fall dust and PM 10 aerosol samples, collected from three different locations separated by a distance of 600 km, situated in dust storm hit region of N-NW India. Presence of pollen of trees namely Prosopis ( Prosopis juliflora and Prosopis cinearia), Acacia, Syzygium, Pinus, Cedrus, Holoptelea and shrubs namely Ziziphus, Ricinus, Ephedra and members of Fabaceae, Oleaceae families was recorded but with varying proportions in the samples of different locations. Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Brassicaceae and Cyperaceae (sedges) were some of the herb pollen identified in the samples. Among the fungal spores Nigrospora was seen in almost all samples. Nigrospora is a well known allergen and causes health problems. The concentration of trees and shrubs increases in the windward direction just as the climate changes from hot arid to semiarid. The higher frequency of grasses (Poaceae) or herbs could either be a result of the presence of these herbs in the sampling area and hence the higher production of pollen/spores or due to the resuspension from the exposed surface by the high-intensity winds. But we cannot ascertain the exact process at this stage. The overall similarity in the pollen and spore assemblage in our dust samples indicates a common connection or source(s) to the dust in this region. Presence of the pollen of the species of Himalayan origin in our entire samples strongly point towards a Himalayan connection, could be direct or indirect, to the bioaerosols and hence dust in N-NW India. In order to understand the transport path and processes involved therein, present study needs further extension with more number of samples and with reference to meteorological parameters.

  4. A Climatology of Dust-Emission Events over North Africa Based on 27 Years of Surface Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Schepanski, K.

    2012-04-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from North Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global radiation budget, clouds, the carbon cycle and can even act as a fertilizer to rain forests in South America. Current model estimates of dust production from North Africa are uncertain. At the heart of this problem is insufficient understanding of key dust emitting processes such as haboobs (cold pools generated through evaporation of convective precipitation), low-level jets (LLJs), and dry convection (dust devils and dust plumes). Scarce observations in this region, in particular in the Sahara, make model evaluation difficult. This work uses long-term surface observations from the MIDAS data set (~120 stations in the arid part of North Africa) to explore the diurnal, seasonal, decadal and geographical variations in dust emission events and their associated wind thresholds. The threshold values are determined from probability density functions of observed 10-minute anemomenter wind speeds. Emission events are defined using the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports. These codes represent events of smaller intensity such as "Dust or sand raised by wind" to severe dust storms. During the 27-year study period (1984-2011) stations are required to have a minimum of 1000 dust observations to be included in the analysis. Dust emission frequency (DEF) is calculated for different time intervals (e.g. monthly, 3-hourly) taking into account the different number of measurements available at each station. North of 25°N a maximum during March-May is evident and relatively consistent over the whole North African region. Wind-speed thresholds for dust emission north of 25°N are higher than south of 25°N in the Sahel, where station-to-station variability is larger, and enhanced DEF activity during February-March is observed. The variability in this region is closely linked to the

  5. Radiative Effects of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Forest Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance. They scatter the incoming solar radiation and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Although it has been recognized that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate (Twomey et al. 1984), this effect has received much less attention than the radiative forcings due to clouds and greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing due to aerosols is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign (Houghton et al. 1990). Atmospheric aerosol particles generated from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are important regional climatic variables. A recent study by Penner et al. (1992) proposed that smoke particles from biomass burning may have a significant impact on the global radiation balance. They estimate that about 114 Tg of smoke is produced per year in the tropics through biomass burning. The direct and indirect effects of smoke aerosol due to biomass burning could add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 W/sq m. Ackerman and Chung (1992) used model calculations and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data to show that in comparison to clear days, the heavy dust loading over the Saudi Arabian peninsula can change the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) clear sky shortwave and longwave radiant exitance by 40-90 W/sq m and 5-20 W/sq m, respectively. Large particle concentrations produced from these types of events often are found with optical thicknesses greater than one. These aerosol particles are transported across considerable distances from the source (Fraser et al. 1984). and they could perturb the radiative balance significantly. In this study, the regional radiative effects of aerosols produced from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are examined using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Local Area

  6. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the <50 m China seas because atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54-0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36). These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas.

  7. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the <50 m China seas because atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54-0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36). These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas. PMID:23460892

  8. Discriminating dusts and dusts sources using magnetic properties and hematite:Goethite ratios of surface materials and dust from North Africa, the Atlantic and Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldfield, F.; Chiverrell, R. C.; Lyons, R.; Williams, E.; Shen, Z.; Bristow, C.; Bloemendal, J.; Torrent, J.; Boyle, J. F.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic measurements and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy are used in an attempt to differentiate dusts and dust sources in North Africa, over the Atlantic and in Barbados. Special attention is paid to dusts and to lacustrine clay and diatomite samples from the Bodélé Depression, in view of its alleged importance in trans-Atlantic and global dust generation. The results indicate that dusts from the Bodélé Depression can be distinguished from other dusts and potential sources in Niger, Chad, Burkina and Mali on the basis of their magnetic properties, notably their low magnetic concentrations, negligible frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility and distinctive IRM demagnetization characteristics. Dust from over the Atlantic and from Barbados, obtained from meshes in the 1960s and ’70s have high frequency dependent susceptibility values, are quite distinctive from the Bodélé Depression samples and are more closely comparable to samples from elsewhere in the Sahara and especially the Sahel. The Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy data, though of limited value here, are not inconsistent with the inferences based on the magnetic measurements. Overall, the results obtained point to a wide range of sources for dusts both over North Africa itself and across the Atlantic. They do not offer support to the view that dusts from the Bodélé Depression have dominated supply across the Atlantic over the last five decades.

  9. Characterisation of the major dust storm that traversed over eastern Australia in September 2009; a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deckker, Patrick; Munday, Chris I.; Brocks, Jochen; O'Loingsigh, Tadhg; Allison, Gwen E.; Hope, Janet; Norman, Marc; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Tapper, Nigel J.; van der Kaars, Sander

    2014-12-01

    In September 2009, a major dust storm passed over the southeast coast of Australia and covered the large city of Sydney that is located on the eastern coast of Australia. It was referred to as the 'Red Dawn' event. Along its course across the state of New South Wales, the dust plume passed over Canberra, the capital of Australia located some 300 km from Sydney. In this study we identified the sources of the dust and tracked the progression of the dust storm using satellite imagery. We also examined the meteorological conditions that led to the formation of the dust plume. We also investigated the microbial and lipid composition, grain-size distribution, pollen content and geochemical composition of several samples of the dust that fell in Canberra (called 'Canberra dust'), with particular attention paid to the ratio of some rare earth elements as well as strontium and neodymium isotopes. This was done to identify a geochemical and palynological 'fingerprint' of this dust to determine the source of the material. Collectively, the meteorological and fingerprinting analyses identified the principal location of dust entrainment as between the large playa Lakes Gairdner and Torrens in arid South Australia, some 1600 km away from Canberra. We also determined through Sr isotope analyses and other elements measured in the dust that fell in Canberra and the township of Eden, located south of Sydney, that the dust changed composition slightly over a few hours, being the consequence of local dust entrainment along the path of the dust plume across South Australia and New South Wales. In addition, we present a scenario which explains dust transport away from the direction of the major dust plume. Those investigations carried out on the Canberra dust are compared with a previously documented event when dust was also sampled in Canberra in 2002. The origin and composition of the 2002 dust plume was clearly different from that which occurred in 2009, as demonstrated by the

  10. The "wind of 120 days" and dust storm activity over the Sistan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.; Zawar-Reza, P.; Sturman, A.

    2014-06-01

    Mesoscale features play a critical role in creating the strong "wind of 120 days" common in eastern Iran and western Afghanistan. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model is used with the available observations to investigate the "wind of 120 days", dust storm activity over the Sistan Basin, and major sources of dust influencing Iran. The winds are strong from mid-May to mid-September when a persistent high-pressure system over the high mountains of the Hindu Kush in northern Afghanistan, combined with a summertime thermal low over desert lands of eastern Iran and western Afghanistan, produce a strong pressure gradient. The winds become accelerated by the channeling effect of the surrounding orography. A northerly low level jet (LLJ) along the Iran-Afghanistan border has a peak at 300-500 m and is strongest in July with the nighttime monthly averaged wind speed of 20 m s- 1, and extends across a broad latitudinal area along the Iran-Afghanistan border. The strong near-surface wind speed along with the LLJ results in substantial dust emission from the Sistan Basin and subsequent long-range meridional transport. Dried Hamoun Lake in the Sistan Basin contains large amounts of erodible sediment that is required for dust entrainment. The LLJ is persistent throughout the night, but is weakened during the day. A pronounced diurnal cycle in the near-surface wind speed has been identified with a peak in the mid-morning in association with momentum transfer from the jet level down to the surface as the daytime mixed layer evolves.

  11. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Bucher, Enrique H; Stein, Ariel F

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons. PMID:27258088

  12. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ariel F.

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic “fluffy” surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons. PMID:27258088

  13. Investigation on the Lung Function of General Population in Ilam, West of Iran, as a City Exposed to Dust Storm

    PubMed Central

    Amarloei, Ali; Jafari, Ahmad Jonidi; Mahabadi, Hassan Asilian; Asadollahi, Kheirollah; Nourmoradi, Heshmatollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dust storm is one of the most important natural sources of air pollution in the Middle East that has caused a major concern in recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the respiratory tract function of people living in Ilam city (Iran) during dust storm. Methods: A sample size of 250 people was selected and the cluster sampling was randomly used from 13 health centers in Ilam city. Pulmonary function test (PFT) was determined via a standard spirometry apparatus. Vital capacity (VC), Forced Vital capacity (FVC), FVC in first second (FEV1), FEV1/VC, FEV1/FVC, peek expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75%), forced expiratory flow (FEF25–75%), forced expiratory flow (FEF75–85%), forced mid flow time (FMFT) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) were measured. Results: Mean values of respiratory capacities measured in all participants excluding FEV1/VC and FMFT were less than predicted mean values by ECCS reference. 21.6% of the population suffered from obstructive lesions. This value among males (24.1%) was more than females (19.6%). This could be related to more exposure (outdoor jobs) of males with dust storms. Conclusion: The results also showed a negative significant relationship between duration of inhabitance in Ilam city and all respiratory capacities. Further studies are needed for confident confirmation of whether reduction of respiratory capacities among Ilamian people is only related to dust storms. PMID:25948466

  14. Large Salt Dust Storms Follow a 30-Year Rainfall Cycle in the Mar Chiquita Lake (Córdoba, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Bucher, Enrique H; Stein, Ariel F

    2016-01-01

    Starting in 2006, a new source of intense salt dust storms developed in Mar Chiquita (Córdoba, Argentina), the largest saline lake in South America. Storms originate from vast mudflats left by a 30-year expansion-retreat cycle of the lake due to changes in the regional rainfall regime. The annual frequency of salt dust storms correlated with the size of the salt mudflats. Events were restricted to the coldest months, and reached up to 800 km from the source. Occurrence of dust storms was associated with specific surface colors and textures easily identifiable in satellite images. High-emission surfaces were characterized by the presence of sodium sulfate hydrous/anhydrous crystals (mirabilite and thenardite), and a superficial and variable water table, which may result in the periodic development of a characteristic "fluffy" surface derived from salt precipitation-dissolution processes. HYSPLIT model simulation estimates a deposition maximum near the sources (of about 2.5 kg/ha/yr), and a decreasing trend from the emission area outwards, except for the relative secondary maximum modeled over the mountain ranges in southern Bolivia and northern Argentina due to an orographic effect. The 2009 total deposition of salt dust generated in Mar Chiquita was estimated at 6.5 million tons.

  15. Satellite Monitoring of Long-Range Transport of Asian Dust Storms from Sources to Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N.; Tsay, S.; Jeong, M.; King, M.; Holben, B.

    2007-05-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of spring-time cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such popu-lation centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces people indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been dif-ficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. Deep Blue algorithm has recently been integrated into the MODIS processing stream and began to provide aerosol products over land as part of the opera-tional MYD04 products. In this talk, we will show the comparisons of the MODIS Deep Blue products with data from AERONET sunphotometers on a global ba-sis. The results indicate reasonable agreements between these two. These new

  16. Modeling the Seasonal South Polar Cap Sublimation Rates at Dust Storm Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; Benson, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the principal component of the Martian atmosphere and its interaction with the polar caps forms the CO2 seasonal cycle on the planet. A significant fraction of the atmospheric constituent condenses on the surface during the polar winter and sublimes back during spring. The basic aspects of the CO2 cycle have been outlined by Leighton and Murray and a number of follow-up theoretical models ranging from energy balance to general circulation models have been used to study the physical processes involved in the cycle. This paper presents a modeling study on the seasonal south polar cap subliminiation rate under dust storm conditions. Mars Global Surveyor observations are also presented.

  17. Response of the Water Cycle of West Africa and Atlantic to Radiative Forcing by Saharan Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Yogesh C.; Walker, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence in support of the "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summer, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feed back triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are enhanced over the West Africa/Easter Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean. region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while long wave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over Nest Africa and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the induced deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerlies flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the Nest African land and the eastern Atlantic, and a warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at 0.95 or higher.

  18. How important are cyclones for emitting mineral dust aerosol in North Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Schepanski, K.; Knippertz, P.; Heinold, B.; Tegen, I.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents the first quantitative estimate of the mineral dust emission associated to atmospheric depressions and migrating, long-lived cyclones in North Africa. Results from a tracking algorithm are combined with dust emission flux calculations based on ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts for 1989-2008. The results highlight that depressions are abundant and associated with 55% of the dust emission amount annually and spatially averaged over North African dust sources. Even larger contributions to dust emission from depressions are found south of the Atlas Mountains during spring with regionally up to 90%. It is spring when the largest monthly totals of 250-380 g m-2 of dust emission occur in North Africa. The remaining months have a total dust emission smaller than 80 g m-2. In summer, depressions, particularly Saharan heat lows, coincide with up to 90% of the seasonal total dust emission over wide areas of North Africa. In contrast to depressions, migrating cyclones that live for more than two days are rare and are associated to 4% of the annual and spatial dust emission average. Migrating cyclones over North Africa occur primarily in spring north of 20° N with eastwards trajectories and typical life times of three to seven days. Regionally larger seasonal totals of dust emission are associated to cyclones with up to 25% over Libya. In summer, near-surface signatures of African Easterly Waves (AEWs) emit regionally up to 15% of the total emission. The diurnal cycle of dust emission underlines that emission associated to cyclones at mid-day is substantially larger than at night by a factor of three to five. Soil moisture weakens dust emission during cyclone passage by 10%. Despite the overall small contribution of migrating cyclones to dust emission, cyclones coincide with particularly intense dust emission events exceeding the climatological mean flux by a factor of four to eight. This implies, that both

  19. Elemental and ionic composition of atmospheric aerosols in the dust storm season in Mongolian Gobi Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyol-Erdene, T. O.; Shagjjamba, D.; Hong, S.; Sarangerel, E.; Byambatsogt, K.

    2014-12-01

    TSP (Total Suspended Particulate) PM10 (particle size smaller than 10 μm) and PM2.5 (particle size smaller than 2.5 μm) aerosol samples in the dust storm session in Mongolian Gobi Desert were collected and their water soluble ionic and elemental composition were elaborated in demonstrating the mixing of mineral aerosol with pollution aerosol. During the sampling period (5-15 April, 2014) the dust storm peaked on 14 April, in which the highest concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 250.1 and 33.4 respectively. The water soluble anions (SO42-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- and PO43-) and cations (Na+, K+, NH4+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Li+) of the samples were determined by ion chromatograph. Elemental composition for 48 elements determined by using X-ray fluorescence analyzer. For the PM2.5 samples, concentrations of V, Ge, As, Se, Br, Ag, Hg, Tl, Bi were less than instrumental detection limit and Cr, Co, Cu, Nb, Mo, Sb, I, Ba, Ce, Hf, W, Au, Pb were determined only in a few samples. Other elements were observed in most samples. For the PM2.5-10 samples, concentrations of Ge, As, Se, Br, Ag, Hf, Tl were less than instrumental detection limit and V, Co, Nb, Mo, I, Ce, W, Pb were determined only small samples. Others are determined in most samples. Aerosol sources, sources fractions (mineral and pollution), and mixing of aerosols from various sources will be investigated by further data analyses.

  20. Effect of the temperature variation between Mediterranean Sea and Syrian deserts on the dust storm occurrence in the western half of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanollahi, Jamil; Kaboodvandpour, Shahram; Qhavami, Samira; Mohammadi, Bakhtiyar

    2015-03-01

    Recent dust storms have caused crises in western Iran, which necessitate the prediction of these storms a few days before their occurrence. This is the first study of its type that analyzes the effect of temperature differences between the Mediterranean Sea surface and Syrian deserts (creation zone of the dusts storms) on the formation of dust storms in the west of Iran. The study also seeks to identify any changes in the atmospheric temperature created by the extreme dust storm of July 5, 2009 in west of Iran (Sanandaj City). In this study, the MODIS images from 2000 to 2008, and particulate matter data of the Sanandaj station from 2008 to 2012 were utilized to identify the dust storm days. The Mediterranean Sea surface temperature data were extracted from NOAA satellites for dust storm days up to four days preceding them. The web site of world weather was used to obtain the temperature of Damascus, Syria station as the selected land station. According to the results, significant differences were acquired between surface temperatures of Damascus station and the Mediterranean Sea in the dust storm days and up to three days before them. As the dust storm days approached, a rising trend was observed in changes of the temperature difference between land and sea. Thermal map analysis of the atmosphere of the Syrian deserts on July 5, 2009 showed significant decrease in the levels of 1000 hPa and 500 hPa but for the days preceding it no significant changes were observed. It can be concluded that the temperature difference between the Mediterranean Sea surface and the Syrian deserts four days before the dust storm occurrences is the important factor in predicting this event.

  1. Dust generation and drought patterns in Africa from helium-4 in a modern Cape Verde coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Kreycik, P.

    2008-10-01

    We show that helium-4 (4He) concentrations in a modern Porites coral from Cape Verde provides a robust reconstruction of mineral dust loading over the Eastern Tropical Atlantic from mid-1950's to mid-1990's. The 4He record demonstrates pronounced increases in dust emission from North Africa associated with the severe droughts in the Sahel. Our record provides direct evidence that dust emission rates in the 1950's, prior to the onset of the Sahel droughts, were a factor of nine lower than during 1980-84. This large change in dust emission rate indicates global aerosol contents would have increased by ~45% over this period, which may have contributed to a reduction in solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. We find that dust emission from North Africa is most closely related to drought patterns, rather than to changes in atmospheric circulation patterns resulting from climate oscillations, such as North Atlantic Oscillations and El Nino/Southern Oscillation.

  2. Observing a Severe Dust Storm Event over China using Multiple Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Xue, Yong; Guang, Jie; Mei, Linlu

    2013-04-01

    A severe dust storm (SDS) event occurred from 19 to 21 March 2010 in China, originated in western China and Mongolia and propagated into eastern/southern China, affecting human's life in a large area. As reported by National Meteorological Center of CMA (China Meteorological Administration), 16 provinces (cities) of China were hit by the dust storm (Han et al., 2012). Satellites can provide global measurements of desert dust and have particular importance in remote areas where there is a lack of in situ measurements (Carboni et al., 2012). To observe a dust, it is necessary to estimate the spatial and temporal distributions of dust aerosols. An important metric in the characterisation of aerosol distribution is the aerosol optical depth (AOD) (Adhikary et al., 2008). Satellite aerosol retrievals have improved considerably in the last decade, and numerous satellite sensors and algorithms have been generated. Reliable retrievals of dust aerosol over land were made using POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance instrument-POLDER (Deuze et al., 2001), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-MODIS (Kaufman et al., 1997; Hsu et al., 2004), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer-MISR (Martonchik et al., 1998), and Cloud-aerosol Lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observations (CALIPSO). However, intercomparison exercises (Myhre et al., 2005) have revealed that discrepancies between satellite measurements are particularly large during events of heavy aerosol loading. The reason is that different AOD retrieval algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. For MISR, POLDER and MODIS instrument, the multi-angle approaches, the polarization measurements and single-view approaches were used to retrieval AOD respectively. Combining of multi-sensor AOD data can potentially create a more consistent, reliable and complete picture of the space-time evolution of dust storms (Ehlers, 1991). In order to

  3. A case study of Asian dust storm particles: chemical composition, reactivity to SO2 and hygroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; Liu, Chang; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Mineral dust comprises a great fraction of the global aerosol loading, but remains the largest uncertainty in predictions of the future climate due to its complexity in composition and physico-chemical properties. In this work, a case study characterizing Asian dust storm particles was conducted by multiple analysis methods, including SEM-EDS, XPS, FT-IR, BET, TPD/mass and Knudsen cell/mass. The morphology, elemental fraction, source distribution, true uptake coefficient for SO2, and hygroscopic behavior were studied. The major components of Asian dust storm particles are aluminosilicate, SiO2 and CaCO3, with organic compounds and inorganic nitrate coated on the surface. It has a low reactivity towards SO2 with a true uptake coefficient, 5.767 x 10(-6), which limits the conversion of SO2 to sulfate during dust storm periods. The low reactivity also means that the heterogeneous reactions of SO2 in both dry and humid air conditions have little effect on the hygroscopic behavior of the dust particles. PMID:22783615

  4. Enrichment of Mineral Dust Storm Particles with Sea Salt Elements - Using bulk and Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamane, Y.; Perrino, C.; Yossef, O.

    2009-12-01

    Mineral aerosol emitted from African and Asian deserts plays an important role in the atmosphere. During their long-range transport, the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust particles change due to heterogeneous reactions with trace gases, coagulation with other particles, and in-cloud processing. These processes affect the optical and hygroscopic properties of dust particles, and in general influencing the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Four African and Arabian dust storm episodes affecting the East Mediterranean Coast in the spring of 2006 have been characterized, to determine if atmospheric natural dust particles are enriched with sea salt and anthropogenic pollution. Particle samplers included PM10 and manual dichotomous sampler that collected fine and coarse particles. Three sets of filters were used: Teflon filters for gravimetric, elemental and ionic analyses; Pre-fired Quartz-fiber filters for elemental and organic carbon; and Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy analysis. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (Philips XL 30 ESEM) was used to analyze single particle, for morphology, size and chemistry of selected filter samples. A detailed chemical and microscopical characterization has been performed for the particles collected during dust event days and during clear days. The Saharan and Arabian air masses increased significantly the daily mass concentrations of the coarse and the fine particle fractions. Carbonates, mostly as soil calcites mixed with dolomites, and silicates are the major components of the coarse fraction, followed by sea salt particles. In addition, the levels of anthropogenic heavy metals and sea salt elements registered during the dust episode were considerably higher than levels recorded during clear days. Sea salt elements contain Na and Cl, and smaller amounts of Mg, K, S and Br. Cl ranges from 300 to 5500 ng/m3 and Na from 100 to almost 2400 ng/m3. The Cl to Na ratio on dusty days in

  5. The Dust Storm Index (DSI): A method for monitoring broadscale wind erosion using meteorological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loingsigh, T.; McTainsh, G. H.; Tews, E. K.; Strong, C. L.; Leys, J. F.; Shinkfield, P.; Tapper, N. J.

    2014-03-01

    Wind erosion of soils is a natural process that has shaped the semi-arid and arid landscapes for millennia. This paper describes the Dust Storm Index (DSI); a methodology for monitoring wind erosion using Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM) meteorological observational data since the mid-1960s (long-term), at continental scale. While the 46 year length of the DSI record is its greatest strength from a wind erosion monitoring perspective, there are a number of technical challenges to its use because when the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) recording protocols were established the use of the data for wind erosion monitoring was never intended. Data recording and storage protocols are examined, including the effects of changes to the definition of how observers should interpret and record dust events. A method is described for selecting the 180 long-term ABM stations used in this study and the limitations of variable observation frequencies between stations are in part resolved. The rationale behind the DSI equation is explained and the examples of temporal and spatial data visualisation products presented include; a long term national wind erosion record (1965-2011), continental DSI maps, and maps of the erosion event types that are factored into the DSI equation. The DSI is tested against dust concentration data and found to provide an accurate representation of wind erosion activity. As the ABM observational records used here were collected according to WMO protocols, the DSI methodology could be used in all countries with WMO-compatible meteorological observation and recording systems.

  6. Synoptic conditions favouring the occurrence of dust transport from Africa toward Sardinia Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canu, Annalisa; Pellizzaro, Grazia; Pintus, Gabriella; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    Dust events that reach Italy have usually origin in the Sahara and Sahel regions (north-western part of Africa), which represent the dust sources nearest to Italy. In those regions the dust-lifting activity occurs in a remarkable way. Every dust event is different from the others; in fact dust transport and dust concentration in the air can vary remarkably depending on the synoptic situation. In Sardinia, dust events are more frequent in the May-November period, but they can also take place in the December-April period. The main aim of this work was to describe dust outbreaks in Sardinia and to identify the main meteorological scenarios that originate the transport of dust towards the central and western Mediterranean Basin. The evaluation of the geographical dispersion of Saharan dust was performed by using MODIS satellite data and Meteosat imagery combined with SKIRON forecasting model. The origin and the trajectory of the dust carried by winds towards Italy were inferred by the NOAA HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model). In addition, PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter of less than 10 μm) and meteorological data registered by the ARPAS (Regional Environmental Protection Agency of Sardinia) monitoring stations were used to highlight the arrival of African air masses in Sardinia. The study was carried out during the 2014. A total of five events occurred during the year (two in spring and three in autumn) were analyzed. The origin of air masses loaded with dust from North Africa was confirmed by satellite imagery and 3-days air mass backward trajectories calculated by the NOAA HYSPLIT model. The analysis of the PM10 daily pattern registered at northern and southern Sardinia sites showed a rising of values during the dust event. The arrival of air masses from Africa caused the daily mean air temperature to rise whereas relative humidity values decreased. Finally, the results showed that all the event analyzed were

  7. An early South Asian dust storm during March 2012 and its impacts on Indian Himalayan foothills: a case study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Soni, V K; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kanawade, V P; Singh, N; Tiwari, S; Attri, S D

    2014-09-15

    The impacts of an early South Asian dust storm that originated over the western part of the Middle East and engulfed northwest parts of India during the third week of March 2012 have been studied at four different stations covering India and Pakistan. The impacts of this dust storm on aerosol optical properties were studied in detail at Delhi, Jodhpur, Lahore and Karachi. The impact could also be traced up to central Himalayan foothills at Manora Peak. During dust events, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm reached a peak value of 0.96, 1.02, 2.17 and 0.49 with a corresponding drop in Ångström exponent (AE for 440-870 nm) to 0.01, -0.02, 0.00 and 0.12 at Delhi, Jodhpur, Lahore and Karachi, respectively. The single scattering albedo (SSA) at 675 nm was relatively lower at Delhi (0.87) and Jodhpur (0.86), with absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) less than 1.0, but a large value of SSA was observed at Lahore (0.98) and Karachi (0.93), with AAE value greater than 1.0 during the event. The study of radiative impact of dust aerosols revealed a significant cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere (with corresponding large heating rate) at all the stations during dust event. The effect of this dust storm was also seen at Manora Peak in central Himalayas which showed an enhancement of ~28% in the AOD at 500 nm. The transport of dust during such events can have severe climatic implications over the affected plains and the Himalayas. PMID:24973722

  8. An early South Asian dust storm during March 2012 and its impacts on Indian Himalayan foothills: a case study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A K; Soni, V K; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kanawade, V P; Singh, N; Tiwari, S; Attri, S D

    2014-09-15

    The impacts of an early South Asian dust storm that originated over the western part of the Middle East and engulfed northwest parts of India during the third week of March 2012 have been studied at four different stations covering India and Pakistan. The impacts of this dust storm on aerosol optical properties were studied in detail at Delhi, Jodhpur, Lahore and Karachi. The impact could also be traced up to central Himalayan foothills at Manora Peak. During dust events, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm reached a peak value of 0.96, 1.02, 2.17 and 0.49 with a corresponding drop in Ångström exponent (AE for 440-870 nm) to 0.01, -0.02, 0.00 and 0.12 at Delhi, Jodhpur, Lahore and Karachi, respectively. The single scattering albedo (SSA) at 675 nm was relatively lower at Delhi (0.87) and Jodhpur (0.86), with absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) less than 1.0, but a large value of SSA was observed at Lahore (0.98) and Karachi (0.93), with AAE value greater than 1.0 during the event. The study of radiative impact of dust aerosols revealed a significant cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere (with corresponding large heating rate) at all the stations during dust event. The effect of this dust storm was also seen at Manora Peak in central Himalayas which showed an enhancement of ~28% in the AOD at 500 nm. The transport of dust during such events can have severe climatic implications over the affected plains and the Himalayas.

  9. The impact of Dust Storms on both Solar Radiation and Sky temperature in Tabouk Saudi Arabia, theoretical Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman

    2016-04-01

    Dust particles affect both solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering and absorption and are therefore considered to be a significant climate-forcing factor. Dust storms are a very frequent phenomenon in Saudi Arabia. Several dust storm events occurred in Tabouk, northern region of Saudi Arabia, during the period between 2014-2015. In this study, simulations using the SMART model were conducted to investigate how the dusty conditions affected the solar irradiances during these events. Additionally, theoretical simulations were carried out using MODTRAN program to examine the changes in the infrared sky temperature during dusty conditions. The Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) measurements at (500 nm) were used as an input into both programs. The analysis showed that the dusty conditions significantly decrease the global and direct irradiances and increase the diffuse component compared with clear sky days. Also it was found that the dust storms increase the sky temperature in the atmospheric window (8-14 μm) such that the window emissions resembled those of a blackbody and the atmospheric window was almost closed.

  10. Aerosol's optical and physical characteristics and direct radiative forcing during a shamal dust storm, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, T. M.; Al-Dashti, H.; Spyrou, C.

    2014-04-01

    Dust aerosols are analyzed for their optical and physical properties during an episode of a dust storm that blew over Kuwait on 26 March 2003 when the military Operation Iraqi Freedom was in full swing. The intensity of the dust storm was such that it left a thick suspension of dust throughout the following day, 27 March. The synoptic sequence leading to the dust storm and the associated wind fields are discussed. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical thickness reached 3.617 and 4.17 on 26 and 27 March respectively while the Ångstrom coefficient, α870/440, dropped to -0.0234 and -0.0318. Particulate matter concentration of 10 μm diameter or less, PM10, peaked at 4800 μg m-3 during dust storm hours of 26 March. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) by Deep Blue algorithm and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index (AI) exhibited high values. Latitude-longitude maps of AOD and AI were used to deduce source regions of dust transport over Kuwait. The vertical profile of the dust layer was simulated using the SKIRON atmospheric model. Instantaneous net direct radiative forcing is calculated at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface level. The thick dust layer of 26 March resulted in cooling the TOA by -60 Wm-2 and surface level by -175 Wm-2 for a surface albedo of 0.35. Slightly higher values were obtained for 27 March due to the increase in aerosol optical thickness. Radiative heating/cooling rates in the shortwave and longwave bands were also examined. Shortwave heating rate reached a maximum value of 2 K day-1 between 3 and 5 km, dropped to 1.5 K day-1 at 6 km and diminished at 8 km. Longwave radiation initially heated the lower atmosphere by a maximum value of 0.2 K day-1 at surface level, declined sharply at increasing altitude and diminished at 4 km. Above 4 km longwave radiation started to cool the atmosphere slightly reaching a maximum rate of -0.1 K day-1 at 6 km.

  11. Multiplatform analysis of the radiative effects and heating rates for an intense dust storm on 21 June 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Johnson, Ben T.

    2013-08-01

    Dust radiative effects and atmospheric heating rates are investigated for a Saharan dust storm on 21 June 2007 using a combination of multiple satellite data sets and ground and aircraft observations as input into a delta-four stream radiative transfer model (RTM). This combines the strengths of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations and CloudSat satellites and in situ aircraft data to characterize the vertical structure of the dust layers (5 km in height with optical depths between 1.5 and 2.0) and underlying low-level water clouds. These observations were used, along with Aerosol Robotic Network retrievals of aerosol optical properties, as input to the RTM to assess the surface, atmosphere, and top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave aerosol radiative effects (SWAREs). Our results show that the dust TOA SWARE per unit aerosol optical depth was -56 W m-2 in cloud-free conditions over ocean and +74 W m-2 where the dust overlay low-level clouds, and show heating rates greater than 10 K/d. Additional case studies also confirm the results of the 21 June case. This study shows the importance of identifying clouds beneath dust as they can have a significant impact on the radiative effects of dust, and hence assessments of the role of dust aerosol on the energy budget and climate.

  12. Dust from southern Africa: rates of emission and biogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Zobeck, T. M.; Okin, G. S.; Dintwe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The stabilized linear dunefields in the southern Kalahari show signs of reactivation due to reduced vegetation cover owing to drought and/or overgrazing. It has been demonstrated with a laboratory dust generator that the southern Kalahari soils are good emitters of dust and that large-scale dune reactivation can potentially make the region an important dust source in the relatively low-dust Southern Hemisphere. We show that emergence of the southern Kalahari as a new dust source may affect ocean biogeochemistry as the soils are rich in soluble iron and the dust from the southern Kalahari commonly reaches the Southern Ocean. We investigate the biogeochemical properties of the fine fraction of soil from the Kalahari dunes and compare them to those of currently active dust sources such as the Makgadikgadi and the Etosha pans as well as other smaller pans in the region. Using field measurements of sediment fluxes and satellite images, we calculate the rates of dust emission from the southern Kalahari under different land cover scenarios. To assess the reversibility of dune reactivation in the southern Kalahari, we investigate the resilience of dunefield vegetation by looking at changes in soil nutrients, fine soil fractions, and seed bank in areas affected by intense denudation.

  13. Dust from southern Africa: rate of emission and biogeochemical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilized linear dunefields in the southern Kalahari show signs of reactivation due to reduced vegetation cover owing to drought and/or overgrazing. It has been demonstrated with a laboratory dust generator that the southern Kalahari soils are good emitters of dust and that large-scale dune rea...

  14. How important are atmospheric depressions and mobile cyclones for emitting mineral dust aerosol in North Africa?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Schepanski, K.; Knippertz, P.; Heinold, B.; Tegen, I.

    2014-09-01

    This study presents the first quantitative estimate of the mineral dust emission associated with atmospheric depressions and mobile cyclones in North Africa. Atmospheric depressions are automatically tracked at 925 hPa based on ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts for 1989-2008. A set of filter criteria is applied to identify mobile cyclones, i.e. migrating and long-lived cyclones. The shorter term cyclone is used as a synonym for mobile cyclones. Dust emission is calculated with a dust emission model driven by 10 m winds and soil moisture from ERA-Interim. Emission peaks during winter and spring with spatial averages of 250-380 g m-2 per month. Comparison of the dust source activation frequency from the model against SEVIRI satellite observation shows a good agreement in the Bodélé Depression but differences in the north and west of North Africa. Depressions are abundant, particularly in summer when the Saharan heat low is situated over West Africa and during spring in the lee of the Atlas Mountains. Up to 90% (55% annually and spatially averaged) of dust emission occurs within 10 degrees of these depressions, with embedded mechanisms such as nocturnal low-level jets playing a role. Cyclones are rarer and occur primarily north of 20° N in spring in agreement with previous studies and over summertime West Africa consistent with near-surface signatures of African Easterly Waves. Dust emission within 10 degrees of cyclones peaks over Libya with up to 25% in spring. Despite the overall small contribution of 4% annually and spatially averaged, cyclones coincide with particularly intense dust emission events exceeding the climatological mean by a factor of four to eight. Soil moisture weakens dust emission during cyclone passage by about 10%.

  15. Superthermal electrons at Mars: Photoelectrons, solar wind electrons, and dust storm influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui

    Mars is unique in the solar system in terms of its interaction with solar wind because it lacks of a significant intrinsic global magnetic field but possesses localized strong crustal fields. This interaction results in a very complex magnetic topology at Mars so that superthermal electrons, mainly including photoelectrons and solar wind electrons, can be distinctively important for such a complicated planetary space environment. These energetic electrons (1-1000 electron volts) can carry and rapidly redistribute energy along the magnetic field lines. They are also a reliable tool to deduce the Martian magnetic topology, which is critical to understand the electromagnetic dynamics of the Martian space environment. The investigation methodology involves both data analysis and modeling. This dissertation mainly investigates three topics of superthermal electrons at Mars. (1) This dissertation confirms that the long-lived influence of Martian low-altitude dust storms on high-altitude photoelectron fluxes is common for a wide range of energy and pitch angles and determines that this effect originates from the thermosphere-ionosphere source region of the photoelectrons, rather than at exospheric altitudes at or above MGS. Through simulations, the results suggest that the global dust storm altered the photoelectron fluxes by causing CO2 to be the dominant species at a much larger altitude range than usual. (2) Because the integral of the production rate above the superthermal electron exobase is about the same for all solar zenith angles, quite counterintuitively, it is found, observationally and numerically/theoretically, that the high-altitude photoelectron fluxes are quite independent of solar zenith angle. (3) Based on the energy spectral (flux against energy) difference between photoelectrons and solar wind electrons, a statistical approach is taken to distinguish the two populations and also allows us to quantify the occurrence rate of solar wind electron

  16. Study of Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms with the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Majid, W. A.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Tamppari, L. K.; Renno, N. O.; Ruf, C.; Trinh, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Evidence for non-thermal emission produced by electrostatic discharges in a deep Martian dust storm has been reported by Ruf et al. 2009 [1]. Such discharges had been detected with an innovative kurtosis detector installed in a 34m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in June of 2006. The kurtosis (the fourth central moment of the signal normalized by the square of the second central moment) is extremely sensitive to the presence of non-thermal radiation, but is insensitive to variations in the intensity of the thermal radiation and instrument gain. The non-thermal radiation was detected while a 35 Km deep Martian dust storm was within the field of view of the radio telescope and presented signatures of modulation by the Martian Schumann Resonance. Encouraged by this discovery, several attempts have been made within the DSN to confirm the detection using the R&D antenna (DSS-13) and other antennas in the Madrid and Goldstone complexes, but using a very limited receiver, in terms of recorded data rates, the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (VSR). We are planning to initiate an extensive monitoring of Mars emission in a noninterfering basis while our antennas are tracking various Mars probes, using the Wideband Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (WVSR). The WVSR is a very flexible open-loop digital backend that is used for radio science and spacecraft navigation support in the DSN. This instrument allows us to sample a larger bandwidth than with previously used detectors. The processing to look for the kurtosis signature will be performed in software, limited only by the computer capacity. Additionally there are plans to develop an even more powerful custom-built detector based in CASPER technology and Graphic Processing Units for enhance computational power. This contribution will describe how we plan to select the target Mars tracking passes from the DSN schedule. An automated process will generate

  17. Dust forecast over North Africa: verification with satellite and ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Aditi; Kumar, Sumit; George, John P.

    2016-05-01

    Arid regions of North Africa are considered as one of the major dust source. Present study focuses on the forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of dust over different regions of North Africa. NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM) produces dust AOD forecasts at different wavelengths with lead time upto 240 hr, based on 00UTC initial conditions. Model forecast of dust AOD at 550 nm up to 72 hr forecast, based on different initial conditions are verified against satellite and ground based observations of total AOD during May-June 2014 with the assumption that except dust, presence of all other aerosols type are negligible. Location specific and geographical distribution of dust AOD forecast is verified against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station observations of total and coarse mode AOD. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) dark target and deep blue merged level 3 total aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrieved dust AOD at 532 nm are also used for verification. CALIOP dust AOD was obtained by vertical integration of aerosol extinction coefficient at 532 nm from the aerosol profile level 2 products. It is found that at all the selected AERONET stations, the trend in dust AODs is well predicted by NCUM up to three days advance. Good correlation, with consistently low bias (~ +/-0.06) and RMSE (~ 0.2) values, is found between model forecasts and point measurements of AERONET, except over one location Cinzana (Mali). Model forecast consistently overestimated the dust AOD compared to CALIOP dust AOD, with a bias of 0.25 and RMSE of 0.40.

  18. Orbit-Spin Coupling Accelerations and Global Dust Storm Intermittency on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischna, M. A.; Shirley, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of global dust storms (GDS) in some Mars years and not in others is recognized as an outstanding unsolved problem of atmospheric physics. While GDS exhibit a clear seasonality as to when they occur (centered loosely around Mars' perihelion), prior efforts to replicate GDS phenomena using general circulation models (GCMs) have not been entirely successful. A recently developed non-tidal orbit-spin coupling hypothesis predicts that variations in the orbital angular momentum of Mars may give rise to instantaneously small but cumulatively significant changes in the circulation of the Mars atmosphere. Through the use of the MarsWRF GCM, we are able to quantify the time-varying magnitude of this 'coupling term acceleration' (CTA) and relate it to changes in the martian atmospheric circulation and subsequently to observations of the presence or absence of a GDS in particular Mars years. The MarsWRF output shows interannual variability that is derived largely from year-to-year differences in the CTA magnitude and direction, which varies significantly with time and exhibits variable phasing with respect to Mars' annual insolation cycle. A record of the definitive occurrence or non-occurrence of GDS on Mars dating back to 1924 is used in this study. Conditions favorable for the occurrence of GDS, specifically including a constructive strengthening of the overturning meridional circulation, and an enhancement of near-surface wind speed and surface stress, are reproduced by the GCM in all of the Mars years in which a solstice-season GDS was positively identified. In a majority of the Mars years lacking GDS, CTA during the southern summer season are found to be small or nonexistent, or interfere destructively with the meridional overturning circulation, thereby inhibiting GDS initiation. We continue to explore the relationships between the CTA and the martian dust cycle and the modulation of large-scale circulatory flows on Mars due to orbit-spin coupling.

  19. Influence of planetary-scale topography on the diurnal thermal tide during the 1971 Martian dust storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data obtained with the Mariner 9 infrared spectroscopy experiment during the Martian Dust Storm of 1971 to 1972 are examined for evidence of topographic influence on the atmospheric thermal structure. Temperature perturbations which are well correlated with the planetary scale topography are found superposed on the large amplitude diurnal thermal tide. Applications of tidal theory to the data indicate that the observed perturbations result from the kinematic interaction of the westward traveling diurnal wave with the large scale components of topography. The dominant mode is excited by the wave-number two topography component and is a vertically evanescent eastward traveling wave with an equivalent depth comparable to the atmospheric scale height. The principle dynamic effect of this mode is the enhancement of the amplitude of the near-surface diurnal wind to over 40m/sec in limited areas near 30 deg south latitude. It appears likely that dust was injected into the atmosphere in these regions during the storm.

  20. PM10 concentration levels at an urban and background site in Cyprus: the impact of urban sources and dust storms.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Souzana; Evans, John S; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K; Kleanthous, Savvas; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros

    2014-12-01

    Air quality in Cyprus is influenced by both local and transported pollution, including desert dust storms. We examined PM10 concentration data collected in Nicosia (urban representative) from April 1, 1993, through December 11, 2008, and in Ayia Marina (rural background representative) from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2008. Measurements were conducted using a Tapered Element Oscillating Micro-balance (TEOM). PM10 concentrations, meteorological records, and satellite data were used to identify dust storm days. We investigated long-term trends using a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) after controlling for day of week, month, temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity. In Nicosia, annual PM10 concentrations ranged from 50.4 to 63.8 μg/m3 and exceeded the EU annual standard limit enacted in 2005 of 40 μg/m3 every year A large, statistically significant impact of urban sources (defined as the difference between urban and background levels) was seen in Nicosia over the period 2000-2008, and was highest during traffic hours, weekdays, cold months, and low wind conditions. Our estimate of the mean (standard error) contribution of urban sources to the daily ambient PM10 was 24.0 (0.4) μg/m3. The study of yearly trends showed that PM10 levels in Nicosia decreased from 59.4 μg/m3 in 1993 to 49.0 μg/m3 in 2008, probably in part as a result of traffic emission control policies in Cyprus. In Ayia Marina, annual concentrations ranged from 27.3 to 35.6 μg/m3, and no obvious time trends were observed. The levels measured at the Cyprus background site are comparable to background concentrations reported in other Eastern Mediterranean countries. Average daily PM10 concentrations during desert dust storms were around 100 μg/m3 since 2000 and much higher in earlier years. Despite the large impact ofdust storms and their increasing frequency over time, dust storms were responsible for a small fraction of the exceedances of the daily PM10 limit. Implications: This

  1. Assessing exposure risk for dust storm events-associated lung function decrement in asthmatics and implications for control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Liao, Chung-Min

    2013-04-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) events are seasonally-based meteorological phenomena that exacerbate chronic respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess human health risk from airborne dust exposure during ADS events in Taiwan. A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on exposure and experimental data to quantify ADS events induced lung function decrement. The study reanalyzed experimental data from aerosol challenge in asthmatic individuals to construct the dose-response relationship between inhaled dust aerosol dose and decreasing percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (%FEV1). An empirical lung deposition model was used to predict deposition fraction for size specific dust aerosols in pulmonary regions. The toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models were used to simulate dust aerosols binding kinetics in lung airway in that %FEV1 change was also predicted. The mask respirators were applied to control the inhaled dose under dust aerosols exposure. Our results found that only 2% probability the mild ADS events were likely to cause %FEV1 decrement higher than 5%. There were 50% probability of decreasing %FEV1 exceeding 16.9, 18.9, and 7.1% in north, center, and south Taiwan under severe ADS events, respectively. Our result implicates that the use of activated carbon of mask respirators has the best efficacy for reducing inhaled dust aerosol dose, by which the %FEV1 decrement can be reduced up to less than 1%.

  2. Long-range Transport of Asian Dust Storms: A Satellite/Surface Perspective on Societal and Scientific Influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Among the many components contributing to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative forcing effect on the weather/climate system. As much as one-third to half of the global dust emissions, estimated about 800 Tg, are introduced annually into Earth's atmosphere from various deserts in China. Asian dust storm outbreaks are believed to have persisted for hundreds and thousands years over the vast territory of north and northwest China, but not until recent decades that many studies reveal the compelling evidence in recognizing the importance of these eolian dust particles for forming Chinese Loess Plateau and for biogeochemical cycling in the North Pacific Ocean to as far as in the Greenland ice-sheets through long-range transport. The Asian dust and air pollution aerosols can be detected by its colored appearance on current Earth observing satellites and its evolution monitored by satellite and surface network. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm, called Deep Blue, to retrieve aerosol properties, particularly but not limited to, over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Recently, many field campaigns were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. We will provide an overview of the outbreak of Asian dust storms, near source/sink and their evolution along transport pathway, from space and surface observations. The climatic effects and societal impacts of the Asian dusts will be addressed in depth. (to be presented in the International Workshop on Semi-Arid Land Surface-

  3. The spatial distribution of mineral dust and its shortwave radiative forcing over North Africa. Modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Johnson, Ben; McFarlane, Sally A.; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-09-20

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model (WRF-Chem) with the implementation of two dust emission schemes (GOCART and DUSTRAN) into two aerosol models (MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC) is applied over North Africa to investigate the modeling sensitivities to dust emissions and aerosol size treatments in simulating mineral dust and its shortwave (SW) radiative forcing. Model results of the spatial distribution of mineral dust and its radiative forcing are evaluated using measurements from the AMMA SOP0 campaign in January and February of 2006 over North Africa. Our study suggests that the size distribution of emitted dust can result in significant differences (up to 100%) in simulating mineral dust and its SW radiative forcing. With the same dust emission and dry deposition processes, two aerosol models, MADE/SORGAM and MOSAIC, can yield large difference in size distributions of dust particles due to their different aerosol size treatments using modal and sectional approaches respectively. However, the difference between the two aerosol models in simulating the mass concentrations and the SW radiative forcing of mineral dust is small (< 10%). The model simulations show that mineral dust increases AOD by a factor of 2, heats the lower atmosphere (1-3 km) with a maximum rate of 0.7±0.5 K day-1 below 1 km, and reduces the downwelling SW radiation by up to 25 W m-2 on 24-hour average at surface, highlighting the importance of including dust radiative impact in understanding the regional climate of North Africa. When compared to the available measurements, WRF-Chem simulations can generally capture the measured features of mineral dust and its radiative properties over North Africa, suggesting that the model can be used to perform more extensive simulations of regional climate over North Africa.

  4. Aeolian dust emissions in Southern Africa: field measurements of dynamics and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard; King, James; Eckardt, Frank; Bryant, Robert; Nield, Joanna; Dansie, Andrew; Baddock, Matthew; Haustein, Karsten; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; von Holdt, Johannah; Hipondoka, Martin; Seely, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Airborne dust derived from the world's deserts is a critical component of Earth System behaviour, affecting atmospheric, oceanic, biological, and terrestrial processes as well as human health and activities. However, very few data have been collected on the factors that control dust emission from major source areas, or on the characteristics of the dust that is emitted. Such a paucity of data limits the ability of climate models to properly account for the radiative and dynamical impacts triggered by atmospheric dust. This paper presents field data from the DO4 Models (Dust Observations for Models) project that aims to understand the drivers of variability in dust emission processes from major source areas in southern Africa. Data are presented from three field campaigns undertaken between 2011 and 2015. We analysed remote sensing data to identify the key geomorphological units in southern Africa which are responsible for emission of atmospheric dust. These are the Makgadikgadi pans complex in northern Botswana, the ephemeral river valleys of western Namibia, and Etosha Pan in northern Namibia. Etosha Pan is widely recognised as perhaps the most significant source of atmospheric dust in the southern hemisphere. We deployed an array of field equipment within each source region to measure the variability in and dynamics of aeolian erosivity, as well as dust concentration and flux characteristics. This equipment included up to 11 meteorological stations measuring wind shear stress and other standard climatic parameters, Cimel sun photometers, a LiDAR, sediment transport detectors, high-frequency dust concentration monitors, and dust flux samplers. Further data were gathered at each site on the dynamics of surface characteristics and erodibility parameters that impact upon erosion thresholds. These data were augmented by use of a Pi-Swerl portable wind tunnel. Our data represent the first collected at source for these key dust emission areas and highlight the

  5. Satellite-based Dust Source Identification over North Africa: Diurnal Cycle, Meteorological Controls, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Tegen, Ina; Macke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. For a better representation of dust-related processes in numerical models and climate change projections the knowledge on the natural variability of dust source activity has to be improved. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for identifying active dust sources. The accuracy of dust source identification using such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. Here, a data set on the spatial (1°x1°) and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled by analyzing 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images since March 2006. The index is designed using radiances measured by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) on-board MSG at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm which are converted to brightness temperatures (BTs). To strengthen the dust signal, differences of BTs are used to compute RGB-composite images. This newly data set providing information on the diurnal cycle of dust emission has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of DSAs. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources become active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJs for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a regional modeling study. Four years of DSA observations indicate an interannual variability in

  6. Iceland Dust Storms Linked to Glacial Outwash Deposits and to Sub-Glacial Flood (Jökulhlaup) Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, J. M.; Arnalds, Ó.; Olafsson, H.; Bullard, J.; Hodgkins, R.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of Arctic snow and ice cores reveal large temporal changes in dust concentrations, especially over glacial-interglacial cycles. Most efforts to model dust variability with climate have focused on sources in tropical and mid-latitude arid regions and have neglected high latitude emissions because of a lack of information on possible sources. Here we report on aerosol measurements which show that dust storms are common on Iceland and that major events are associated with glacial sedimentary environments. In July 1991 we established an aerosol sampling site on Heimaey, a small island located 18 km off the southeast coast of Iceland, with the objective of studying the transport of pollutant species to the Arctic. We found that although concentrations of nitrate and non-sea-salt sulfate were generally quite low, there were sporadic peaks that were primarily attributed to pollutant transport from Europe [Prospero et al., 1995]. Recently we expanded our analyses to include mineral dust, covering the period 1997 through 2004. Dust is present during much of the year (annual average 3.9 μg m-3) with a strong seasonal cycle (maximum in April, 14.0 μg m-3). However there are many spikes in the dust record, some exceeding 100 μg m-3, which are not associated with pollutant transport peaks. A search of NASA satellite web archives yielded six "dust storm" images that were acquired during our data period. These show prominent dust plumes streaming off the coast of Iceland. Here we show that each image could be closely linked to a major dust peak in our record (although there were many more peaks than satellite images). Most of these dust events were associated with dust emitted from glacial outwash (sandur) deposits. Some of the largest dust peaks were linked to jökulhlaups, an Icelandic term for sub-glacially generated outburst floods. The dust clouds were typically comprised of a series of well-defined plumes emitted from large "point" sources, mostly associated with

  7. The transatlantic dust transport from North Africa to the Americas—Its characteristics and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläser, Gregor; Wernli, Heini; Kerkweg, Astrid; Teubler, Franziska

    2015-11-01

    Transport of Saharan dust over the Atlantic to the Americas is a relevant process since dust is a nutrient for marine and terrestrial ecosystems. It is therefore important to better quantify the frequency and amount of transatlantic dust transport, its preferred altitude and duration, and the regions of dust origin. This study uses a novel combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics, applied to a previously validated 5 year simulation of the fifth generation European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast-Hamburg-model (ECHAM5)/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry model, to quantify these dust transport characteristics and their seasonal variations. Results confirm the previously found preferred transatlantic dust pathways: in boreal winter and spring, African dust is mainly transported below 800 hPa toward South America, whereas in summer and autumn the preferred pathway is to the Caribbean and occurs in a layer up to 500 hPa. The averaged transport duration from dust emission to deposition is 10 days in winter for deposition in the Amazon region and almost 12 days in summer for deposition in the Caribbean. These estimates were obtained by combining correlation analyses of Eulerian dust fluxes and trajectory calculations. The latter were also essential to identify the main source regions of transatlantic dust transport, which were found in all seasons in northwestern Africa (Algeria, Mali, and Mauritania) but not farther east, e.g., in the Bodélé Depression. A specific Lagrangian analysis for this dust emission hot spot suggests that wet deposition associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone in winter and the African monsoon in summer inhibits Bodélé dust to leave the African continent.

  8. PM10 Concentration levels at an urban and background site in Cyprus: The impact of urban sources and dust storms

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Souzana; Evans, John S.; Yiallouros, Panayiotis K.; Kleanthous, Savvas; Schwartz, Joel; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Air quality in Cyprus is influenced by both local and transported pollution including desert dust storms. We examined PM10 concentration data collected in Nicosia (urban representative) from April 1, 1993 through December 11, 2008, and Ayia Marina (rural background representative) from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2008. Measurements were conducted using a Tapered Element Oscillating Micro-balance (TEOM). PM10 concentrations, meteorological records and satellite data were used to identify dust storm days. We investigated long term trends using a Generalized Additive Model (GAM) after controlling for day of week, month, temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity. In Nicosia, annual PM10 concentrations ranged from 50.4 to 63.8 μg/m3 and exceeded the EU annual standard limit enacted in 2005 of 40 μg/m3 every year. A large, statistically significant impact of urban sources (defined as the difference between urban and background levels) was seen in Nicosia over the period 2000–2008, and was highest during traffic hours, weekdays, cold months, and low wind conditions. Our estimate of the mean (standard error) contribution of urban sources to the daily ambient PM10 was 24.0 (0.4) μg/m3. The study of yearly trends showed that PM10 levels in Nicosia decreased from 59.4 μg/m3 in 1993 to 49.0 μg/m3 in 2008, probably in part as a result of traffic emission control policies in Cyprus. In Ayia Marina, annual concentrations ranged from 27.3 to 35.6 μg/m3, and no obvious time trends were observed. The levels measured at the Cyprus background site are comparable to background concentrations reported in other Eastern Mediterranean countries. Average daily PM10 concentrations during desert dust storms were around 100 μg/m3 since 2000 and much higher in earlier years. Despite the large impact of dust storms and their increasing frequency over time, dust storms were responsible for a small fraction of the exceedances of the daily PM10 limit. PMID:25562931

  9. Radiative impact of mineral dust on monsoon precipitation variability over West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

    2011-03-01

    The radiative forcing of dust and its impact on precipitation over the West Africa monsoon (WAM) region is simulated using a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem). During the monsoon season, dust is a dominant contributor to AOD over West Africa. In the standard simulation, on 24-hour domain average, dust has a cooling effect (-6.11 W/m2) at the surface, a warming effect (6.94 W/m2) in the atmosphere, and a relatively small TOA forcing (0.83 W/m2). Dust modifies the surface energy budget and atmospheric diabatic heating and hence causes lower atmospheric cooling in the daytime but warming in the nighttime. As a result, atmospheric stability is increased in the daytime and reduced in the nighttime, leading to a reduction of late afternoon precipitation by up to 0.14 mm/hour (30%) and an increase of nocturnal and early morning precipitation by up to 0.04 mm/hour (23%) over the WAM region. Dust-induced reduction of diurnal precipitation variation improves the simulated diurnal cycle of precipitation when compared to measurements. However, daily precipitation is only changed by a relatively small amount (-0.14 mm/day or -4%). On the other hand, sensitivity simulations show that, for weaker-to-stronger absorbing dust, dust longwave warming effect in the nighttime surpasses its shortwave cooling effect in the daytime at the surface, leading to a less stable atmosphere associated with more convective precipitation in the nighttime. As a result, the dust-induced change of daily WAM precipitation varies from a significant reduction of -0.40 mm/day (-12%, weaker absorbing dust) to a small increase of 0.05 mm/day (1%, stronger absorbing dust). This variation originates from the competition between dust impact on daytime and nighttime precipitation, which depends on dust shortwave absorption. Dust reduces the diurnal variation of precipitation regardless of its absorptivity, but more reduction is associated with stronger absorbing dust.

  10. Chemical composition of PM10 and its in vitro toxicological impacts on lung cells during the Middle Eastern Dust (MED) storms in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Naimabadi, Abolfazl; Ghadiri, Ata; Idani, Esmaeil; Babaei, Ali Akbar; Alavi, Nadali; Shirmardi, Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali; Marzouni, Mohammad Bagherian; Ankali, Kambiz Ahmadi; Rouhizadeh, Ahmad; Goudarzi, Gholamreza

    2016-04-01

    Reports on the effects of PM10 from dust storm on lung cells are limited. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and in vitro toxicological impacts of PM10 suspensions, its water-soluble fraction, and the solvent-extractable organics extracted from Middle Eastern Dust storms on the human lung epithelial cell (A549). Samples of dust storms and normal days (PM10 < 200 μg m(-3)) were collected from December 2012 until June 2013 in Ahvaz, the capital of Khuzestan Province in Iran. The chemical composition and cytotoxicity were analyzed by ICP- OES and Lactase Dehydrogenase (LDH) reduction assay, respectively. The results showed that PM10 suspensions, their water-soluble fraction and solvent-extractable organics from both dust storm and normal days caused a decrease in the cell viability and an increase in LDH in supernatant in a dose-response manner. Although samples of normal days showed higher cytotoxicity than those of dust storm at the highest treated dosage, T Test showed no significant difference in cytotoxicity between normal days and dust event days (P value > 0.05). These results led to the conclusions that dust storm PM10 as well as normal day PM10 could lead to cytotoxicity, and the organic compounds (PAHs) and the insoluble particle-core might be the main contributors to cytotoxicity. Our results showed that cytotoxicity and the risk of PM10 to human lung may be more severe during dust storm than normal days due to inhalation of a higher mass concentration of airborne particles. Further research on PM dangerous fractions and the most responsible components to make cytotoxicity in exposed cells is recommended.

  11. Chemical composition of PM10 and its in vitro toxicological impacts on lung cells during the Middle Eastern Dust (MED) storms in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Naimabadi, Abolfazl; Ghadiri, Ata; Idani, Esmaeil; Babaei, Ali Akbar; Alavi, Nadali; Shirmardi, Mohammad; Khodadadi, Ali; Marzouni, Mohammad Bagherian; Ankali, Kambiz Ahmadi; Rouhizadeh, Ahmad; Goudarzi, Gholamreza

    2016-04-01

    Reports on the effects of PM10 from dust storm on lung cells are limited. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and in vitro toxicological impacts of PM10 suspensions, its water-soluble fraction, and the solvent-extractable organics extracted from Middle Eastern Dust storms on the human lung epithelial cell (A549). Samples of dust storms and normal days (PM10 < 200 μg m(-3)) were collected from December 2012 until June 2013 in Ahvaz, the capital of Khuzestan Province in Iran. The chemical composition and cytotoxicity were analyzed by ICP- OES and Lactase Dehydrogenase (LDH) reduction assay, respectively. The results showed that PM10 suspensions, their water-soluble fraction and solvent-extractable organics from both dust storm and normal days caused a decrease in the cell viability and an increase in LDH in supernatant in a dose-response manner. Although samples of normal days showed higher cytotoxicity than those of dust storm at the highest treated dosage, T Test showed no significant difference in cytotoxicity between normal days and dust event days (P value > 0.05). These results led to the conclusions that dust storm PM10 as well as normal day PM10 could lead to cytotoxicity, and the organic compounds (PAHs) and the insoluble particle-core might be the main contributors to cytotoxicity. Our results showed that cytotoxicity and the risk of PM10 to human lung may be more severe during dust storm than normal days due to inhalation of a higher mass concentration of airborne particles. Further research on PM dangerous fractions and the most responsible components to make cytotoxicity in exposed cells is recommended. PMID:26774778

  12. An air quality forecasting system in Beijing--application to the study of dust storm events in China in May 2008.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qijie; Laurent, Benoit; Velay-Lasry, Fanny; Ngo, Richard; Derognat, Claude; Marticorena, Béatrice; Albergel, Armand

    2012-01-01

    An air pollution forecast system, ARIA Regional, was implemented in 2007-2008 at the Beijing Municipality Environmental Monitoring Center, providing daily forecast of main pollutant concentrations. The chemistry-transport model CHIMERE was coupled with the dust emission model MB95 for restituting dust storm events in springtime so as to improve forecast results. Dust storm events were sporadic but could be extremely intense and then control air quality indexes close to the source areas but also far in the Beijing area. A dust episode having occurred at the end of May 2008 was analyzed in this article, and its impact of particulate matter on the Chinese air pollution index (API) was evaluated. Following our estimation, about 23 Tg of dust were emitted from source areas in Mongolia and in the Inner Mongolia of China, transporting towards southeast. This episode of dust storm influenced a large part of North China and East China, and also South Korea. The model result was then evaluated using satellite observations and in situ data. The simulated daily concentrations of total suspended particulate at 6:00 UTC had a similar spatial pattern with respect to OMI satellite aerosol index. Temporal evolution of dust plume was evaluated by comparing dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) calculated from the simulations with AOD derived from MODIS satellite products. Finally, the comparison of reported Chinese API in Beijing with API calculated from the simulation including dust emissions had showed the significant improvement of the model results taking into account mineral dust correctly. PMID:22783620

  13. Transport of dusts from East Asian and non-East Asian sources to Hong Kong during dust storm related events 1996-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Yang, Xun; Wenig, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Over a twelve year period from 1996 to 2007, 76 dust storm related events (as days) in Hong Kong were selected for study, based on Aluminium and Calcium concentrations in PM 10. Four of the 76 events reach episodic levels with exceedances of the Hong Kong air quality standards. The purpose of the study is to identify and characterize dust sources impacting Hong Kong. Global distribution of aerosols in NASA's daily aerosol index images from TOMS and OMI, are compared to plots generated by NRL(US)'s Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System. Possible source areas are assigned by computing air parcel backward trajectories to Hong Kong using the NOAA HYSPLIT model. PM 10 and elemental data are analyzed for crustal mass concentrations and element mass ratios. Our analysis reveals that 73 out of the 76 dust events (96%) involve non-East Asian sources-the Thar, Central/West Asian, Arabian and Sahara deserts (Saharan influence is found in 63 events), which are previously not known to affect Hong Kong. The Gobi desert is the most frequent origin of dust, affecting 68 dust events while the Taklamakan desert impacts only 30 of the dust events. The impact of the Gobi desert in March and December is apparently associated with the northeast monsoon in East Asia. Our results also show a seasonal pattern in dust impact from both East Asian and more remote sources, with a maximum in March. Dust event occurrences are conspicuously absent from summer. Dust transport to Hong Kong is commonly associated with the passage of frontal low-pressure systems. The coarse size fraction of PM 10 concentrations were, as indicated by Al, Ca and Fe concentrations, about 4-8 times higher during dust events. The mean Ca/Al ratios of sources involving the Taklamakan desert are notably higher than those for non-East Asian sources owing to a higher Ca content of most of the East Asian deserts. The Fe/Al ratios follow a similar trend. Contributions from the desert sources are grossly estimated where

  14. Spatial and temporal distributions of Martian north polar cold spots before, during, and after the global dust storm of 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornwall, C.; Titus, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970s, Mariner and Viking observed features in the Mars northern polar region that were a few hundred kilometers in diameter with 20 fj,m brightness temperatures as low as 130 K (considerably below C02 ice sublimation temperatures). Over the past decade, studies have shown that these areas (commonly called "cold spots") are usually due to emissivity effects of frost deposits and occasionally to active C02 snowstorms. Three Mars years of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer data were used to observe autumn and wintertime cold spot activity within the polar regions. Many cold spots formed on or near scarps of the perennial cap, probably induced by adiabatic cooling due to orographic lifting. These topographically associated cold spots were often smaller than those that were not associated with topography. We determined that initial grain sizes within the cold spots were on the order of a few millimeters, assuming the snow was uncontaminated by dust or water ice. On average, the half-life of the cold spots was 5 Julian days. The Mars global dust storm in 2001 significantly affected cold spot activity in the north polar region. Though overall perennial cap cold spot activity seemed unaffected, the distribution of cold spots did change by a decrease in the number of topographically associated cold spots and an increase in those not associated with topography. We propose that the global dust storm affected the processes that form cold spots and discuss how the global dust storm may have affected these processes. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Observation of Dust Aging Processes During Transport from Africa into the Caribbean - A Lagrangian Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; Sauer, D. N.; Walser, A.; Dollner, M.; Reitebuch, O.; Gross, S.; Chouza, F.; Ansmann, A.; Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Kandler, K.; Schäfler, A.; Baumann, R.; Tegen, I.; Heinold, B.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are regularly transported over long distances impacting air quality, health, weather and climate thousands of kilometers downwind of the source. During transport, particle properties are modified thereby changing the associated impact on the radiation budget. Although mineral dust is of key importance for the climate system many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during long-range transport, the role of wet and dry removal mechanisms, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. In June/July 2013, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted to study the transport and transformation of Saharan mineral dust. Besides ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments deployed on Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was equipped with an extended aerosol in-situ instrumentation, a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar and instruments for standard meteorological parameters. During SALTRACE, five large dust outbreaks were studied by ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements between Senegal, Cape Verde, the Caribbean, and Florida. Highlights included the Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados. Between Cape Verde and Barbados, the aerosol optical thickness (500 nm) decreased from 0.54 to 0.26 and the stratification of the dust layers changed significantly from a rather homogenous structure near Africa to a 3-layer structure with embedded cumulus clouds in the Caribbean. In the upper part of the dust layers in the Caribbean, the aerosol properties were similar to the observations near Africa. In contrast, much more variability in the dust properties was observed between 0.7 and 2.5 km altitude probably due to interaction of the mineral dust with clouds. In our

  16. Health impact from climatic extremes: a case study of Asian dust storms in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Yi-Jen; Chien, Lung-Chang; Yang, Chiang-Hsin; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2013-04-01

    Asian dust storm (ADS) originates in the deserts of Mongolia and northern China in every winter and spring seasons, and its impacts on adverse human health were widely investigated and discussed. Recent records show that the frequency and magnitude of ADS are increasing due to changes of environmental and climatic conditions. It is worthwhile to investigate the health impact of these environmental extremes. This study applies a structural spatiotemporal modeling approach to investigate the changes of spatiotemporal variation of a health indicator during and after ADS periods. The health indicator is the daily clinic visits of conjunctivitis in the children population during 2002-2007 among 41 districts across Taipei City and New Taipei City in Taiwan. Results show positively significant effects of children's conjunctivitis clinic visits happened during ADS periods with elevated percentages of relative rate by 1.48% (95% CI = 0.79, 2.17) for preschool children (0~6 years of age) and 9.48% (95% CI = 9.03, 9.93) for schoolchildren (7~14 years of age). The impact even lasted one week after ADS finished by 2.32% (95% CI = 1.98, 2.66) for schoolchildren, but not for preschool children. Moreover, air pollutants NO2 and O3 also contributed significant influence. The spatial pattern of children's conjunctivitis clinic visits demonstrates that stronger spatial vulnerabilities occurred in most populated metropolitan districts in Taipei. Hence, we concluded that ADS may significantly increase the risks of children's conjunctivitis during ADS periods and one week after ADS periods, especially in schoolchildren.

  17. Spatial vulnerability under extreme events: a case of Asian dust storm's effects on children's respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Yang, Chiang-Hsing; Chien, Lung-Chang

    2013-04-01

    Asian dust storm (ADS) events have raised concerns regarding their adverse impact on human health. Whether ADS events can result in the heterogeneity of health impacts on children across space and time has not been studied. The goal of this study is to examine the spatial vulnerability impact of ADS events on children's respiratory health geographically and to analyze any patterns related to ADS episodes. From 1998 to 2007, data from both preschool children's and schoolchildren's daily respiratory clinic visits, gathered from patients located in 41 districts of Taipei City and New Taipei City, are analyzed in a Bayesian spatiotemporal model in order to investigate the interaction between spatial effects and ADS episodes. When adjusting for the temporal effect, air pollutants, and temperature, the spatial pattern explicitly varies during defined study periods: non-ADS periods, ADS periods, and post-ADS periods. Compared to non-ADS periods, the relative rate of children's respiratory clinic visits significantly reduced 0.74 to 0.99 times in most districts during ADS periods, while the relative rate rose from 1.01 to 1.11 times in more than half of districts during post-ADS periods, especially in schoolchildren. This spatial vulnerability denotes that the significantly increased relative rate of respiratory clinic visits during post-ADS periods is primarily located in highly urbanized areas for both children's populations. Hence, the results of this study suggest that schoolchildren are particularly more vulnerable to the health impacts of ADS exposure in terms of higher excessive risks over a larger spatial extent than preschool children, especially during post-ADS periods. PMID:23403144

  18. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. Ths paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  19. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  20. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  1. Enhanced carbon dioxide causing the dust storm-related increase in high-altitude photoelectron fluxes at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaosui; Liemohn, Michael; Bougher, Stephen; Mitchell, David

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have shown that the Martian global dust storm occurred in 2001 had a long-term influence on high-altitude photoelectron fluxes by analyzing the observations of the magnetometer/electron reflectometer instrument on board Mars Global Surveyor, most likely because the dust altered the neutral atmosphere in a significant way in terms of photoelectron production and loss. This study investigates candidate atmospheres that can replicate observations, especially focusing on the role that thermospheric composition and density play in high-altitude photoelectrons. Through the simulations of our SuperThermal Electron Transport model, it is found that high-altitude photoelectron fluxes at more field-aligned pitch angles are very sensitive to composition change and surprisingly independent of density. For more perpendicular pitch angles, both composition and density take part in determining photoelectron fluxes. Also, a CO2 atmosphere is the only one of the tested atmospheres that can qualitatively match the observation, which suggests that the global dust storm might have altered the photoelectron fluxes via causing CO2 to be the dominant species at a much larger altitude range than usual.

  2. Size and elemental composition of dry-deposited particles during a severe dust storm at a coastal site of Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Zhang, Daizhou; Hu, Wei; Shi, Jinhui; Li, Ruipeng; Gao, Huiwang; Pian, Wei; Hu, Min

    2016-02-01

    Dry-deposited particles were collected during the passage of an extremely strong dust storm in March, 2010 at a coastal site in Qingdao (36.15 °N, 120.49 °E), a city located in Eastern China. The size, morphology, and elemental composition of the particles were quantified with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray instrument (SEM-EDX). The particles appeared in various shapes, and their size mainly varied from 0.4 to 10 μm, with the mean diameters of 0.5, 1.5, and 1.0 μm before, during, and after the dust storm, respectively. The critical size of the mineral particles settling on the surface in the current case was about 0.3-0.4 μm before the dust storm and about 0.5-0.7 μm during the dust storm. Particles that appeared in high concentration but were smaller than the critical size deposited onto the surface at a small number flux. The elements Al, Si and Mg were frequently detected in all samples, indicating the dominance of mineral particles. The frequency of Al in particles collected before the dust storm was significantly lower than for those collected during and after the dust storm. The frequencies of Cl and Fe did not show obvious changes, while those of S, K and Ca decreased after the dust arrival. These results indicate that the dust particles deposited onto the surface were less influenced by anthropogenic pollutants in terms of particle number. PMID:26969556

  3. Size and elemental composition of dry-deposited particles during a severe dust storm at a coastal site of Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Zhang, Daizhou; Hu, Wei; Shi, Jinhui; Li, Ruipeng; Gao, Huiwang; Pian, Wei; Hu, Min

    2016-02-01

    Dry-deposited particles were collected during the passage of an extremely strong dust storm in March, 2010 at a coastal site in Qingdao (36.15 °N, 120.49 °E), a city located in Eastern China. The size, morphology, and elemental composition of the particles were quantified with a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray instrument (SEM-EDX). The particles appeared in various shapes, and their size mainly varied from 0.4 to 10 μm, with the mean diameters of 0.5, 1.5, and 1.0 μm before, during, and after the dust storm, respectively. The critical size of the mineral particles settling on the surface in the current case was about 0.3-0.4 μm before the dust storm and about 0.5-0.7 μm during the dust storm. Particles that appeared in high concentration but were smaller than the critical size deposited onto the surface at a small number flux. The elements Al, Si and Mg were frequently detected in all samples, indicating the dominance of mineral particles. The frequency of Al in particles collected before the dust storm was significantly lower than for those collected during and after the dust storm. The frequencies of Cl and Fe did not show obvious changes, while those of S, K and Ca decreased after the dust arrival. These results indicate that the dust particles deposited onto the surface were less influenced by anthropogenic pollutants in terms of particle number.

  4. Dust Optical Properties Over North Africa and Arabian Peninsula Derived from the AERONET Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.; Chin, M.; Yu, H.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Dust optical properties over North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are extracted from the quality assured multi-year datasets obtained at 14 sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We select the data with (a) large aerosol optical depth (AOD >= 0.4 at 440 nm) and (b) small Angstrom exponent (A(sub ext)<= 0.2) for retaining high accuracy and reducing interference of non-dust aerosols. The result indicates that the major fraction of high aerosol optical depth days are dominated by dust over these sites even though it varies depending on location and time. We have found that the annual mean and standard deviation of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, real refractive index, and imaginary refractive index for Saharan and Arabian desert dust is 0.944 +/- 0.005, 0.752 +/- 0.014, 1.498 +/- 0.032, and 0.0024 +/- 0.0034 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively. Dust aerosol selected by this method is less absorbing than the previously reported values over these sites. The weaker absorption of dust from this study is consistent with the studies using remote sensing techniques from satellite. These results can help to constrain uncertainties in estimating global dust shortwave radiative forcing.

  5. Integration of multi-source measurements to monitor sand-dust storms over North China: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Niu, Tao; Wang, Fu; Deng, Minjun; Wang, Yaqiang

    2013-08-01

    The aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Satellite Aqua, along with the altitude-resolved aerosol subtypes product from the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), as well as surface PM10 measurements, were utilized to investigate the dust activities common in springtime of northern China. Specifically, a dust storm episode that occurred over the North China Plain (NCP) during 17-21 March 2010 was identified. The PM10 concentration at Beijing (39.8°N, 116.47°E) reached the peak value of 283 µg m-3 on 20 March 2010 from the background value of 15 µg m-3 measured on 17 March 2010, then dropped to 176 µg m-3 on 21 March 2010. Analysis of the CALIOP aerosol subtypes product showed that numerous large dust plumes floated over northern China, downwind of main desert source regions, and were lifted to altitudes as high as 3.5 km during this time period. The MODIS AOD data provided spatial distributions of dust load, broadly consistent with ground-level PM10, especially in cloud free areas. However, inconsistency between the MODIS AOD and surface PM10 measurements under cloudy conditions did exist, further highlighting the unique capability of the CALIOP lidar. CALIOP can penetrate the cloud layer to give unambiguous and altitude-resolved dust measurements, albeit a relatively long revisit period (16 days) and narrower swath (90 m). A back trajectory simulation using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was performed, and it was found that the sand-dust storm originated from the Gobi Desert on 18 March 2010 travelled approximately 1200-1500 km day-1 eastward and passed over the NCP on 19 March 2010, in good agreement with previous findings. In addition, the multi-sensor measurements integrated with the HYSPLIT model output formed a three-dimensional view of the transport pathway for this dust episode, indicating that this episode was largely

  6. Association between Ambient Air Pollution and Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases in Spring Dust Storm Season in Lanzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuxia; Xiao, Bingshuang; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Yuxin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Air pollution has become a major global public health problem. A number of studies have confirmed the association between air pollutants and emergency room (ER) visits for respiratory diseases in developed countries and some Asian countries, but little evidence has been seen in Western China. This study aims to concentrate on this region. Methods: A time-series analysis was used to examine the specific effects of major air pollutants (PM10, SO2 and NO2) on ER visits for respiratory diseases from 2007 to 2011 in the severely polluted city of Lanzhou. We examined the effects of air pollutants for stratified groups by age and gender, accounting for the modifying effect of dust storms in spring to test the possible interaction. Results: Significant associations were found between outdoor air pollution concentrations and respiratory diseases, as expressed by daily ER visits in Lanzhou in the spring dust season. The association between air pollution and ER visits appeared to be more evident on dust days than non-dust days. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs per 10 µg/m3 increase in 3-day PM10 (L3), 5-day SO2 (L5), and the average of current and previous 2-day NO2 (L01) were 1.140 (1.071–1.214), 1.080 (0.967–1.205), and 1.298 (1.158–1.454), respectively, on dust days. More significant associations between PM10, SO2 and NO2 and ER visits were found on dust days for elderly females, elderly males and adult males, respectively. Conclusions: This study strengthens the evidence of dust-exacerbated ER visits for respiratory diseases in Lanzhou. PMID:27338430

  7. Results of current Mars studies at the IAU Planetary Research Center. [global dust storms, seasonal variations, and polar cap dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ground based images obtained hourly by seven observatories are used to study Martian phenomena. Maps of global dust storms show the degree of activity of the storm depends both on the region and on the time of day. Statistical analysis of regional contrast variations on the images supports the opinion that the contrasts in the brightness of the light and dark areas depends on the Martian season. Residual differences may be due to a phase angle dependence. Diagrams confirm the earlier finding that there is a systematic trend of regional contrast with the time of the Martian day and that the afternoon is not symmetric with the morning. The dissipation of Martian polar caps is also discussed.

  8. Revisiting haboobs in the southwestern United States: An observational case study of the 5 July 2011 Phoenix dust storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Aishwarya; Arellano, Avelino F.; Brost, John J.

    2014-06-01

    Convectively-driven dust storms (or haboobs) are common phenomena in the southwestern United States. However, studies about haboobs in this region are limited. Here, we investigate the state and fate of a massive haboob that hit Phoenix, Arizona on 5 July 2011 using satellite, radar, and ground-based observations. This haboob was a result of strong outflow boundaries (with peak wind gusts of 29 m s-1) from storms that were initiated in the southeast of Tucson. In particular, we find three major outflow systems (based on radar data) that were generated by forward propagating storms, ultimately merging near Phoenix. This resulted in peak hourly PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations of 1974 μg m-3 and 907 μg m-3 at US EPA stations near Phoenix. The high PM concentration is consistent in space and time with the dust wall movement based on our analysis of radar data on hydrometeor classification. Enhanced aerosol loadings over metropolitan Phoenix were also observed on 6 July from NASA Terra/Aqua MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals (AOD > 0.8). We infer from CALIOP vertical feature masks and HYSPLIT back trajectories that remnants of the haboob were transported to northwest of Phoenix on 6 July at 2-4 km above ground level. Ratios of PM2.5 to PM10 from IMPROVE stations also imply low-level transport to the east of Phoenix on 8 July. Finally, we find that this haboob, which had local and regional impacts, is atypical of other dust events in this region. We note from this analysis that extreme events such as this haboob require an integrated air quality observing system to provide a more comprehensive assessment of these events.

  9. Asian Dust Storm Events of 2001 and Associated Pollution Observed in New England by the AIRMAP Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debell, L. J.; Vozzella, M. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Atmospheric Investigation, Regional Modeling, Analysis and Prediction (AIRMAP) program is operating 4 monitoring sites in New Hampshire, located at Fort Constitution (FC)(43.07oN, 70.71oW, 5m elevation), Thompson Farm (TF) (43.11oN, 70.95oW, 21m elevation), Castle Springs (CS) (43.75oN,71.35oW, 406m elevation) and Mount Washington (MW)(44.267oN, 71.30oW, 1909m elevation). Three chemically distinct, statistically extreme, regional scale dust aerosol events were observed at all four AIRMAP monitoring stations in NH between 4/18/01 and 5/13/01 (UTC). All three events, at all four sites, had days where the 24 hr bulk aerosol samples had Ca2+ concentrations that exceeded at least the 95th percentile of the site-specific, multi-year datasets. NO3- and SO42- were also enhanced above typical levels, ranging from above the 75th to above the 99th percentile. During all three events, mixing ratios of the gas phase pollutants O3 and CO were compared to mixing ratios on either side of the events. During event 1,enhancements above background levels were approximately 130 ppbv for CO and 30 ppbv for O3, very similar to the CO values in apparent Asian dust plumes sampled over Colorado at 6-7 km by aircraft measurements (http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/info/asiandust.html); enhancements during events 2 and 3 were similar to event 1. The maximum elemental carbon value ever observed at TF, 0.97 μg/m3, occurred during the peak day of event 1. Elemental carbon was not substantially elevated during event 2 and no data were collected during event 3. Elemental ratios, determined by PIXE, on filters from events 1 and 3 were compared pairwise to each other and to published samples attributed to Asian dust storms. The AIRMAP samples collected on the same date at different sites showed good statistical agreement whereas samples collected at the same site on different dates show only moderate correlation. Of 17 published samples of Asian dust storm aerosol, collected well outside of the major

  10. [Chemical characteristics in airborne particulate matter (PM10) during a high pollution spring dust storm episode in Beijing, Tianjin and Zhangjiakou, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yang; Liu, Yan-Ju; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Mei-Gen; Wang, Cun-Mei

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) was collected at sampling locations of Beijing, Tianjin and Zhangjiakou from April 1st to May 24th, 2012. The mass concentration of PM10 and concentrations of ions, elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) in PM10 were determined. The results showed that average mass concentration of PM10 were 233.82 microg x m(-3) for Beijing, 279.64 microg x (-3) for Tianjin and 238.13 microg x m(-3) for Zhangjiakou, respectively. Backward trajectories results confirmed dust storm events occurred from 27th to 29th April. The maximum daily mass concentrations of PM10 were 755.54 microg x m(-3) for Beijing, 831.32 microg x m(-3) for Tianjin and 582.82 microg x m(-3) for Zhangjiakou during the dust storm episodes, respectively. Water-soluble ions (Na+, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-)), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were major aerosol components during the dust storm episodes, and their concentrations were higher than non-dust storm days. In addition, dust storm caused increases in NO3-, SO4(2-) and enrichment of secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentration relative to OC, suggesting that chemical reaction processes involving gas-particle conversion occurred during the long-distance transport of aerosol particles. PMID:25338350

  11. [Chemical characteristics in airborne particulate matter (PM10) during a high pollution spring dust storm episode in Beijing, Tianjin and Zhangjiakou, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yang; Liu, Yan-Ju; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Mei-Gen; Wang, Cun-Mei

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM10) was collected at sampling locations of Beijing, Tianjin and Zhangjiakou from April 1st to May 24th, 2012. The mass concentration of PM10 and concentrations of ions, elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) in PM10 were determined. The results showed that average mass concentration of PM10 were 233.82 microg x m(-3) for Beijing, 279.64 microg x (-3) for Tianjin and 238.13 microg x m(-3) for Zhangjiakou, respectively. Backward trajectories results confirmed dust storm events occurred from 27th to 29th April. The maximum daily mass concentrations of PM10 were 755.54 microg x m(-3) for Beijing, 831.32 microg x m(-3) for Tianjin and 582.82 microg x m(-3) for Zhangjiakou during the dust storm episodes, respectively. Water-soluble ions (Na+, NH4+, Ca2+, K+, F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-)), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were major aerosol components during the dust storm episodes, and their concentrations were higher than non-dust storm days. In addition, dust storm caused increases in NO3-, SO4(2-) and enrichment of secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentration relative to OC, suggesting that chemical reaction processes involving gas-particle conversion occurred during the long-distance transport of aerosol particles.

  12. Mortality associated with particulate concentration and Asian dust storms in Metropolitan Taipei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates mortality risks from all causes, circulatory diseases, and respiratory diseases associated with particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) concentrations and Asian dust storms (ADS) from 2000 to 2008 in Metropolitan Taipei. This study uses a distributed lag non-linear model with Poisson distribution to estimate the cumulative 5-day (lags 0-4) relative risks (RRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) of cause-specific mortality associated with daily PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations, as well as ADS, for total (all ages) and elderly (≥65 years) populations based on study periods (ADS frequently inflicted period: 2000-2004; and less inflicted period: 2005-2008). Risks associated with ADS characteristics, including inflicted season (winter and spring), strength (the ratio of stations with Pollutant Standard Index >100 is <0.5 or ≥0.5), and duration (ADS persisted for 1-3 or ≥4 days), were also evaluated. Nonlinear models showed that an increase in PM10 from 10 μg/m3 to 50 μg/m3 was associated with increased all-cause mortality risk with cumulative 5-day RR of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.17) for the total population and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.18) for elders. Mortality from circulatory diseases for the elderly was related to increased PM2.5 from 5 μg/m3 to 30 μg/m3, with cumulative 5-day RR of 1.21 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.44) from 2005 to 2008. Compared with normal days, the mortality from all causes and circulatory diseases for the elderly population was associated with winter ADS with RRs of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.08) and 1.08 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.15), respectively. Moreover, all-cause mortality was associated with shorter and less area-affected ADS with an RR of 1.04 for total and elderly populations from 2000 to 2004. Population health risk differed not only with PM concentration but also with ADS characteristics.

  13. Dust in the Mediterranean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 24, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), acquired this true-color image of a large cloud of dust blowing from northern Africa across the Mediterranean Sea. The dust storm has persisted in the region for at least a week. In this image, the brownish dust plume appears to originate about 260 miles (400 km) east of Algiers, Algeria, and is blowing toward the northwest coast of Sardinia, Italy. SeaWiFS flies aboard the OrbView-2 Satellite. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and ORBIMAGE

  14. Desert dust in rural western US; the influence of dust storms, large particles, and land-use change on aerosol loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, D.; MacDonald, A. E.; Rosen, R. D.; Edmonds, H. N.; Key, E.; Swanberg, N.; Wiseman, W. J.; Sandgathe, S. A.; Neff, J. C.; Fernandez, D.; Munson, S.; Reynolds, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are common in urban settings as well as dryland rural environments and are important to both climate and biogeochemical cycling. Most urban and far traveled aerosols are less than 10 micrometers in diameter with many particles in the less than 2.5 or 1 micrometer-size classes. Small aerosols, including many generated by industrial activity, are the focus of federal environmental law and have a major impact on human health. In rural areas of the western US, however, these small industrially derived particles appear to make up a small part of the overall aerosol load. Rather, dust in the rural West is dominated by mineral aerosols including a large amount of particles that range in size from 10 to 40 microns. These particles can travel for hundreds of kilometers, particularly during periods when dust storms are common. In the dusty spring and summer periods in and around Canyonlands and Mesa Verde National Parks, large particles (particles greater than 10 micrometers in diameter) appear to contribute between 50 and 90% to the overall particle load several meters above the ground. During large dust storms, concentrations of total suspended particulates increase by a factor of 8 to 10 while particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter are minimally affected. The presence of large particles in the atmosphere of the rural West is notable for several reasons. First, the majority of the existing aerosol monitoring networks focus on the small particle-size classes of less than 2.5 and 10 microns. Because many aerosol-collection instruments are designed with specific particle-size cutoff criteria, these instruments and the networks that depend on them are effectively blind to the larger particles that can dominate aerosol loads in the West. Second, for large portions of the year including the spring and summer months when dust storms are common, large particles likely play a major role in visibility restrictions across the protected airsheds of the

  15. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, J. C.; Reynolds, R. L.; Munson, S. M.; Fernandez, D.; Belnap, J.

    2013-10-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m-3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m-3 in 2009, 113 µg m-3 in 2010, and 134 µg m-3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5-10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m-3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m-3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  16. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m−3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m−3 in 2009, 113 µg m−3 in 2010, and 134 µg m−3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5–10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m−3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m−3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  17. Short-term effect of dust storms on the risk of mortality due to respiratory, cardiovascular and all-causes in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Taiar, Abdullah; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dust storms on short-term mortality in Kuwait. We analyzed respiratory and cardiovascular mortality as well as all-cause mortality in relation to dust storm events over a 5-year study period, using data obtained through a population-based retrospective ecological time series study. Dust storm days were identified when the national daily average of PM10 exceeded 200 μg/m(3). Generalized additive models with Poisson link were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of age-stratified daily mortality associated with dust events, after adjusting for potential confounders including weather variables and long-term trends. There was no significant association between dust storm events and same-day respiratory mortality (RR = 0.96; 95%CI 0.88-1.04), cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.98; 95%CI 0.96-1.012) or all-cause mortality (RR = 0.99; 95%CI 0.97-1.00). Overall our findings suggest that local dust, that most likely originates from crustal materials, has little impact on short-term respiratory, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality. PMID:23329278

  18. An empirical equation to estimate mineral dust concentrations from visibility observations in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, C.; Cuevas, E.; Basart, S.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Baldasano, J. M.; Terradellas, E.; Marticorena, B.; Rodríguez, S.; Berjón, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a new empirical equation relating horizontal visibility and PM10 dust concentrations. The new empirical equation (IZO-Eq) is derived from observations performed at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (IZO, 28.30°N, 16.49°W, 2367 m a.s.l., Tenerife, Spain), recorded during Saharan dust outbreaks from 2003 to 2010. A filter based on relative humidity, present-weather and aerosol optical properties is applied to identify dust events. IZO-Eq is validated in the Sahel region during the dry and wet seasons (2006-2008) using data from two PM10 monitoring stations from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) International Project, and data from the nearest meteorological synoptic stations. The estimated PM10 derived from IZO-Eq is compared against that those obtained by other empirical equations and dust surface concentrations from NMMB/BSC-Dust model. IZO-Eq presents better performance than the other equations in both dry and wet seasons when compared with observed PM10 at two Sahelian sites. IZO-Eq is also able to reproduce the surface concentration variability simulated by NMMB/BSC-Dust. Above 10 km of horizontal visibility, empirical equations cannot be used to estimate PM10, since above this threshold equations estimate a nearly constant PM10 value, regardless of the visibility range. A comparison between the PM10 spatial distributions derived from visibility SYNOP observations through IZO-Eq, the modelled values from the NMMB/BSC-Dust model and aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS is performed for the 2006-2008 period. The different spatial distributions present a rather good agreement among them as well as to reproduce the characteristic seasonal dust features over North Africa.

  19. [Characterization and reconstruction of aerosol light scattering coefficient at Chengdu during biomass burning and dust storm period in spring].

    PubMed

    Yue, Jian-Hua; Tao, Jun; Lin, Ze-Jian; Zhu, Li-Hua; Cao, Jun-Ji; Luo, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Aerosol samples for PM2.5 were collected from 19 April to 17 May in 2009 at Chengdu. The concentrations of organic carbon, element carbon, water-solubility ions, crustal elements and levoglucosan of all particle samples were determined by thermal/ optical carbon analyzer,ion chromatography, X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and high performance anion exchange chromatography, respectively. In-situ scattering coefficients (b(sp)) and meteorological parameters for this period were also conducted. Ambient scattering coefficients were reconstructed by IMPROVE formula and compared with measured scattering coefficients. The results showed that the average mass concentration of PM2.5 and measured b(sp) were 133.2 microg x m(-3) and 530 Mm(-1), respectively. Levoglucosan and crustal elements were good traces for biomass burning and dust storm events, respectively. The calculated b'sp was 504 Mm(-1) during campaigning period. The major contributors to scattering coefficients included: (NH4)2SO4 (26%), NH4NO3 (15%), OM (53%), FS (4%) and CM (2%), respectively. The calculated b'sp was 575 Mm(-1) and the dominant species were FS (17%) and CM (21%) during dust storm period (DS). The calculated b'sp was 635 Mm(-1) and OM contributed 62% during biomass burning (BB) period. PMID:23002585

  20. Assessments for the impact of mineral dust on the meningitis incidence in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, Nadège; Chiapello, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Recently, mineral dust has been suspected to be one of the important environmental risk factor for meningitis epidemics in West Africa. The current study is one of the first which relies on long-term robust aerosol measurements in the Sahel region to investigate the possible impact of mineral dust on meningitis cases (incidence). Sunphotometer measurements, which allow to derive aerosol and humidity parameters, i.e., aerosol optical thickness, Angström coefficient, and precipitable water, are combined with quantitative epidemiological data in Niger and Mali over the 2004-2009 AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program period. We analyse how the extremely high aerosol loads in this region may influence both the calendar (onset, peaks, end) and the intensity of meningitis. We highlight three distinct periods: (i) from November to December, beginning of the dry season, humidity is weak, there is no dust and no meningitis cases; (ii) from January to April, humidity is still weak, but high dust loads occur in the atmosphere and this is the meningitis season; (iii) from May to October, humidity is high and there is no meningitis anymore, in presence of dust or not, which flow anyway in higher altitudes. More specifically, the onset of the meningitis season is tightly related to mineral dust flowing close to the surface at the very beginning of the year. During the dry, and the most dusty season period, from February to April, each meningitis peak is preceded by a dust peak, with a 0-2 week lead-time. The importance (duration, intensity) of these meningitis peaks seems to be related to that of dust, suggesting that a cumulative effect in dust events may be important for the meningitis incidence. This is not the case for humidity, confirming the special contribution of dust at this period of the year. The end of the meningitis season, in May, coincides with a change in humidity conditions related to the West African Monsoon. These results, which are

  1. Satellite Monitoring of Asian Dust Storms from SeaWiFS and MODIS: Source, pathway and Interannual Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina

    2007-01-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of springtime cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such population centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces people indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness with data from AERONET sunphotometers over desert and semi-desert regions. The comparisons show reasonable agreements between these two. These new satellite products will allow scientists to determine quantitatively the aerosol properties near sources using high spatial resolution measurements from SeaWiFS and MODIS

  2. Satellite Monitoring of Asian Dust Storms from SeaWiFS and MODIS: Source, Pathway, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, N.; Tsay, S.; Jeong, M.; Holben, B.

    2006-12-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of spring-time cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such popu-lation centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces people indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been dif-ficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness with data from AERONET sunphotometers over desert and semi-desert regions. The compari-sons show reasonable agreements between these two. These new satellite prod-ucts will allow scientists to determine quantitatively the aerosol properties near sources using high spatial resolution measurements from SeaWiFS and

  3. Satellite Monitoring of Asian Dust Storms from SeaWiFS and MODIS: Source, Pathway, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, S.-C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Salustro, C.; Jeong, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochernical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of springtime cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such population centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces people indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be transported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as SeaWiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness with data from AERONET sunphotometers over desert and semi-desert regions. The comparisons show reasonable agreements between these two. These new satellite products will allow scientists to determine quantitatively the aerosol properties near sources using high spatial resolution measurements from SeaWiFS and MODIS

  4. Satellite Monitoring of Asian Dust Storms from SeaWiFS and MODIS: Source, Pathway, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, S.-C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Among the many components that contribute to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative-forcing effect on the climate system. In East Asia, dust storms frequently accompany the cold and dry air masses that occur as part of springtime cold front systems. China's capital, Beijing, and other large cities are on the primary pathway of these dust storm plumes, and their passage over such population centers causes flight delays, pushes grit through windows and doors, and forces peop Ie indoors. Furthermore, during the spring these anthropogenic and natural air pollutants, once generated over the source regions, can be tran sported out of the boundary layer into the free troposphere and can travel thousands of kilometers across the Pacific into the United States and beyond. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over brightreflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as Sea WiFS and MODIS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness with data from AERONET sunphotometers over desert and semi-desert regions. The comparisons show reasonable agreements between these two. These new satellite products will allow scientists to determine quantitatively the aerosol properties near sources using high spatial resolution measurements from Sea WiFS and

  5. Numerical simulation of a continental-scale Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yaping; Fink, Andreas H.; Klose, Martina

    2010-07-01

    Using an integrated dust-storm modeling system, we simulate the severe Saharan dust episode between 1 and 10 March 2004. The simulations are compared with surface synoptic data and satellite images and are found to agree well with the observations. The synoptic systems that generated the dust storms and the evolution of the dust patterns are analyzed. It is revealed that a cyclogenesis over central Sahara, accompanied by an anticyclone over the Atlantic and a monsoon trough in the tropics, was responsible for the widespread continental-scale dust storms in North Africa. Dust first appeared in west Sahara, then in east Sahara and much of the dust emitted from east Sahara was transported to the monsoon trough, resulting in high concentrations of suspended dust over the Sahel (column dust load up to 10 g m-2). The main dust source regions were (1) Mauritania, (2) Chad and Niger, and (3) Libya, Egypt, and Sudan. The region between 10°N and 17°N was one of net dust deposition. We estimate that 715.8 megatons (Mt) of dust was emitted from North Africa during the episode, 608.2 Mt of which was deposited to the continent, and the net dust emission was 107.6 Mt. Of the 107.6 Mt, with respect to the model domain, 7.3 Mt was deposited to the ocean, 79.8 Mt was transported across the domain boundaries, and 20.5 Mt was suspended in the atmosphere.

  6. Emergency hospital visits in association with volcanic ash, dust storms and other sources of ambient particles: a time-series study in Reykjavík, Iceland.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Hanne Krage; Gislason, Thorarinn; Forsberg, Bertil; Meister, Kadri; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Jóhannsson, Thorsteinn; Finnbjornsdottir, Ragnhildur; Oudin, Anna

    2015-04-13

    Volcanic ash contributed significantly to particulate matter (PM) in Iceland following the eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011. This study aimed to investigate the association between different PM sources and emergency hospital visits for cardiorespiratory causes from 2007 to 2012. Indicators of PM10 sources; "volcanic ash", "dust storms", or "other sources" (traffic, fireworks, and re-suspension) on days when PM10 exceeded the daily air quality guideline value of 50 µg/m3 were entered into generalized additive models, adjusted for weather, time trend and co-pollutants. The average number of daily emergency hospital visits was 10.5. PM10 exceeded the air quality guideline value 115 out of 2191 days; 20 days due to volcanic ash, 14 due to dust storms (two days had both dust storm and ash contribution) and 83 due to other sources. High PM10 levels from volcanic ash tended to be significantly associated with the emergency hospital visits; estimates ranged from 4.8% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.6, 9.2%) per day of exposure in unadjusted models to 7.3% (95% CI: -0.4, 15.5%) in adjusted models. Dust storms were not consistently associated with daily emergency hospital visits and other sources tended to show a negative association. We found some evidence indicating that volcanic ash particles were more harmful than particles from other sources, but the results were inconclusive and should be interpreted with caution.

  7. Emergency hospital visits in association with volcanic ash, dust storms and other sources of ambient particles: a time-series study in Reykjavík, Iceland.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Hanne Krage; Gislason, Thorarinn; Forsberg, Bertil; Meister, Kadri; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Jóhannsson, Thorsteinn; Finnbjornsdottir, Ragnhildur; Oudin, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic ash contributed significantly to particulate matter (PM) in Iceland following the eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011. This study aimed to investigate the association between different PM sources and emergency hospital visits for cardiorespiratory causes from 2007 to 2012. Indicators of PM10 sources; "volcanic ash", "dust storms", or "other sources" (traffic, fireworks, and re-suspension) on days when PM10 exceeded the daily air quality guideline value of 50 µg/m3 were entered into generalized additive models, adjusted for weather, time trend and co-pollutants. The average number of daily emergency hospital visits was 10.5. PM10 exceeded the air quality guideline value 115 out of 2191 days; 20 days due to volcanic ash, 14 due to dust storms (two days had both dust storm and ash contribution) and 83 due to other sources. High PM10 levels from volcanic ash tended to be significantly associated with the emergency hospital visits; estimates ranged from 4.8% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.6, 9.2%) per day of exposure in unadjusted models to 7.3% (95% CI: -0.4, 15.5%) in adjusted models. Dust storms were not consistently associated with daily emergency hospital visits and other sources tended to show a negative association. We found some evidence indicating that volcanic ash particles were more harmful than particles from other sources, but the results were inconclusive and should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25872017

  8. The Effect of Dust Storm on the Microbial Quality of Ambient Air in Sanandaj: A City Located in the West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nourmoradi, Heshmatollah; Moradnejadi, Kambiz; Moghadam, Fazel Mohammadi; Khosravi, Behdad; Hemati, Lida; Khoshniyat, Ramin; Kazembeigi, Farogh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in the dust storm can cause diseases such as Asthma, Pneumonia, and respiratory infections. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between air-borne particles with airborne microorganisms in normal and dusty days in Sanandaj, a city located in the west of Iran. Materials and Methods: Air sampling was conducted during the normal and dusty days through Andersen single-stage impactor (28.3 L/min) for 2.5 min. Air particles concentration (PM10) was measured daily and microbial sampling was also conducted on every six days and on the dusty days. Finally, the data was analyzed by SPSS-16 (ANOVA and paired T-tests). Results: The concentration of airborne microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) was increased by an increase of the airborne particles. Particles concentration in May, June and July (twice per month) was more than of the standard value. The predominant species of bacteria and fungi during the occurrence of Dust storm was Bacillus spp. (56.2% of total bacteria) and Mycosporium spp. (28.6% of total fungi), respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: The results showed that the number of airborne microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) increased during the dust storm. Therefore, the microorganisms in the dust storm can cause biological harmful effects on human health. PMID:26153211

  9. The importance of rare, high‐wind events for dust uplift in northern Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marsham, John H.; Knippertz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dust uplift is a nonlinear thresholded function of wind speed and therefore particularly sensitive to the long tails of observed wind speed probability density functions. This suggests that a few rare high‐wind events can contribute substantially to annual dust emission. Here we quantify the relative roles of different wind speeds to dust‐generating winds using surface synoptic observations of dust emission and wind from northern Africa. The results show that winds between 2 and 5 m s−1 above the threshold cause the most emission. Of the dust‐generating winds, 25% is produced by very rare events occurring only at 0.1 to 1.4% of the time, depending on the region. Dust‐producing winds are underestimated in ERA‐I, since it misses the long tail found in observations. ERA‐I overpredicts (underpredicts) the frequency of emission strength winds in the southern (northern) regions. These problems cannot be solved by simple tunings. Finally, we show that rare events make the largest contribution to interannual variability in dust‐generating winds and that ERA severely underestimates this interannual variability. PMID:27667872

  10. The Effect of Dust Storm on Deep Convection over the Tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Dessler, A. E.

    2004-12-01

    The effect of the Saharan mineral dust on deep convection over the tropical North Atlantic were investigated by anlayzing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-2 retrievals. Brightness temperature at 11 μ m were used to indicate the occurrence of deep convection and the tropospheric aerosol loading was represented by the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.55 μ m. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the brightness temperature were constructed for a region offshore the African west coast for August-September 2002, when dust was frequently blown off the Saharan desert and transported across the North Atlantic. For conditions of high aerosol loading (AOT > 0.8), the frequency of brightness temperatures less than 230 K was reduced by a factor of 5-6 from the value associated with conditions of low aerosol loading (AOT < 0.5). The atmospheric effect of the aerosols lasts at least one day after the passage of the aerosols.

  11. Calibration of GOES-VISSR, visible-band satellite data and its application to the analysis of a dust storm at Owens Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKinnon, D.J.; Chavez, P.S.; Fraser, R. S.; Niemeyer, T.C.; Gillette, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a joint Russian/American dust-storm experiment, GOES-VISSR (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Visible-Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer), data from a visible-band satellite image of a large dust storm emanating from Owens Lake, California were acquired on March 10 and 11, 1993. The satellite data were calibrated to targets of known ground reflectance factors and processed with radiative transfer techniques to yield aerosol (dust) optical depth at those stages of the dust storm when concurrent ground-based measurements of optical depth were made. Calibration of the satellite data is crucial for comparing surficial changes in remotely sensed data acquired over a period of time from the same area and for determining accurate concentrations of atmospheric aerosols using radiative transfer techniques. The calibration procedure forces the distribution of visible-band, DN (digital number) values, acquired on July 1, 1992, at 1731 GMT from the GOES-VISSR sensor over a large test area, to match the distribution of visible-band, DN values concurrently acquired from a Landsat MSS (Multispectral Scanner) sensor over the same test area; the Landsat MSS DN values were directly associated with reflectance factors measured from ground targets. The calibrated GOES-VISSR data for July 1, 1992, were then used to calibrate other GOES-VISSR data acquired on March 10 and 11, 1993, during the dust storm. Uncertainties in location of ground targets, bi-directional reflectance and atmospheric attenuation contribute an error of approximately ??0.02 in the satellite-inferred ground reflectance factors. On March 11 at 1031 PST the satellite-received radiances during the peak of the storm were 3 times larger than predicted by our radiative transfer model for a pure clay dust plume of infinite optical depth. This result supported ground-based measurements that the plume at that time was composed primarily of large salt grains, probably sodium sulfate, which could not be

  12. Summer African Dust and Florida Thunder Storms: Are CRYSTAL-FACE Anvils Typical of the Subtropics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, K.; Campbell, J. R.; Prospero, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    The Florida peninsula can be viewed as an outdoor laboratory for the study of the indirect effects of aerosols on the properties of deep convective clouds, and the possible subsequent impact on precipitation. Depending on the seasonal weather patters affecting the area, sources of aerosols can be continental, smoke-produced, oceanic, and, as long known, of Saharan Desert origin. During the recent CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign, a variety of in situ and remote sensing evidence shows that after transport across the mid-Atlantic Ocean, episodes of African dust were widespread in the region. This is a well-known summer-time phenomenon. In one study using aircraft ice nuclei (IN) data and ground-based polarization lidar measurements, the dust was observed to induce the glaciation of a slightly (about -5.0 to -8.0 degrees C) supercooled altocumulus cloud. Extrapolating the finding that African dust particles are especially active IN, it follows that the ingestion of boundary-layer Saharan aerosol could have a strong potential for modifying the microphysical content, dynamics and precipitation of summer thunderstorms in southern Florida. In the current study, we will attempt to identify connections between the characteristics of the intensively-studied thunderstorms and the nature of the dominant aerosols involved in cloud particle formation. As a first step, the near-continuous data record from the Micropulse Lidar, supplemented by Polarization Diversity Lidar data, will be used to monitor aerosol conditions. Backtrack and satellite analyzes, along with the University of Miami surface aerosol sampling record, will identify their source and likely cloud particle forming characteristics. The final stage of this research will search for correlations in in situ-derived cloud microphysical properties such as ice crystal concentration and type. If such connections are found, it must be recognized that the CRYSTAL-FACE dataset may not be representative of subtropical thunderstorms

  13. A radiogenic isotope tracer study of transatlantic dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, A.; Abouchami, W.; Galer, S.J.G.; Garrison, V.H.; Williams, E.; Andreae, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that long-range transport of African desert dusts across the Atlantic Ocean occurs, delivering key nutrients and contributing to fertilization of the Amazon rainforest. Here we utilize radiogenic isotope tracers – Sr, Nd and Pb – to derive the provenance, local or remote, and pathways of dust transport from Africa to the Caribbean. Atmospheric total suspended particulate (TSP) matter was collected in 2008 on quartz fibre filters, from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean at three different locations: in Mali (12.6°N, 8.0°W; 555 m a.s.l.), Tobago (11.3°N, 60.5°W; 329 m a.s.l.) and the U.S. Virgin Islands (17.7°N, 64.6°W; 27 m a.s.l.). Both the labile phase, representative of the anthropogenic signal, and the refractory detrital silicate fraction were analysed. Dust deposits and soils from around the sampling sites were measured as well to assess the potential contribution from local sources to the mineral dust collected. The contribution from anthropogenic sources of Pb was predominant in the labile, leachate phase. The overall similarity in Pb isotope signatures found in the leachates is attributed to a common African source of anthropogenic Pb, with minor inputs from other sources, such as from Central and South America. The Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions in the silicate fraction were found to be systematically more radiogenic than those in the corresponding labile phases. In contrast, Nd and Sr isotopic compositions from Mali, Tobago, and the Virgin Islands are virtually identical in both leachates and residues. Comparison with existing literature data on Saharan and Sahelian sources constrains the origin of summer dust transported to the Caribbean to mainly originate from the Sahel region, with some contribution from northern Saharan sources. The source regions derived from the isotope data are consistent with 7-day back-trajectory analyses, demonstrating the usefulness of radiogenic isotopes in tracing dust provenance and

  14. Epifluorescent direct counts of bacteria and viruses from topsoil of various desert dust storm regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Teigell-Perez, Nuria; Lyles, Mark; Valladares, Basilio; Griffin, Dale W.

    2013-01-01

    Topsoil from arid regions is the main source of dust clouds that move through the earth's atmosphere, and microbial communities within these soils can survive long-range dispersion. Microbial abundance and chemical composition were analyzed in topsoil from various desert regions. Statistical analyses showed that microbial direct counts were strongly positively correlated with calcium concentrations and negatively correlated with silicon concentrations. While variance between deserts was expected, it was interesting to note differences between sample sites within a given desert region, illustrating the 'patchy' nature of microbial communities in desert environments.

  15. Epifluorescent direct counts of bacteria and viruses from topsoil of various desert dust storm regions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Teigell-Perez, Nuria; Lyles, Mark; Valladares, Basilio; Griffin, Dale W

    2013-01-01

    Topsoil from arid regions is the main source of dust clouds that move through the earth's atmosphere, and microbial communities within these soils can survive long-range dispersion. Microbial abundance and chemical composition were analyzed in topsoil from various desert regions. Statistical analyses showed that microbial direct counts were strongly positively correlated with calcium concentrations and negatively correlated with silicon concentrations. While variance between deserts was expected, it was interesting to note differences between sample sites within a given desert region, illustrating the 'patchy' nature of microbial communities in desert environments.

  16. Epifluorescent direct counts of bacteria and viruses from topsoil of various desert dust storm regions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Teigell-Perez, Nuria; Lyles, Mark; Valladares, Basilio; Griffin, Dale W

    2013-01-01

    Topsoil from arid regions is the main source of dust clouds that move through the earth's atmosphere, and microbial communities within these soils can survive long-range dispersion. Microbial abundance and chemical composition were analyzed in topsoil from various desert regions. Statistical analyses showed that microbial direct counts were strongly positively correlated with calcium concentrations and negatively correlated with silicon concentrations. While variance between deserts was expected, it was interesting to note differences between sample sites within a given desert region, illustrating the 'patchy' nature of microbial communities in desert environments. PMID:22989672

  17. A GCM Investigation of Dust Aerosol Impact on the Regional Climate of North Africa and South/East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Xue, Y.; De Sales, F.; Liou, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between dust and other physical processes have been found to play an important role in the dust-induced climate change. However, there are large uncertainties regarding whether, where, and how the dust enhances or suppresses precipitation. The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa and South/East Asia have been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model, NCEP/GCM/SSiB (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model) and the three-dimensional aerosol data simulated by the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GCM simulations show that due to the scattering and absorption of solar radiation by dust particles, surface temperature decreases over both regions, accompanied by a reduced sensible heat flux. However, precipitation responses are different in these two regions. Due to differences in dust location and the associated heating with respect to the rainfall band and circulation, the effect of dust could either enhance or suppress precipitation. Over the North Africa region where dust particles are mainly located to the north of rainfall band, heating of the air column by dust particles forces a stronger ascent motion over dust layers, which induces an anomalous subsidence (or a weakened upward motion) and suppressed cyclonic circulation to its south where precipitation reduces. In South/East Asia, dust particles are located in the upper troposphere over the major rainfall band during the monsoon season, especially Southwest India and the coastal area of Bay of Bengal. Heating of the air column increases upward motion and strengthens cyclonic circulation. Therefore, cloud and precipitation increase over South/East Asia associated with dust effect. During the pre-monsoon season, when dust particles are located to the north of the monsoon rainfall band, the heating effect results in shifting precipitation northward. The anomalous upward motion over dust regions will induce a subsidence to its south and

  18. Properties of the size-resolved and individual cloud droplets collected in western Japan during the Asian dust storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Tohno, Susumu; Kasahara, Mikio; Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    With the point of view of the removal mechanism of Asian dust storm particles, in order to study the physiochemical properties of clouds a field campaign was conducted in western Japan during the Asian dust storm event. The polymeric water absorbent film and collodion film replication techniques were employed in the measurements of size-fractionated precipitation cloud and individual cloud droplets, respectively. In addition, to investigate the source profiles of the elements retained in cloud samples, the original desert sand was collected. Particle-induced X-ray emission was applied for the elemental analysis of size-resolved cloud droplets and desert sand. Also for the quantification analysis of the ultra trace elements in residual particles in individual cloud droplets, the X-ray microprobe system equipped at Super Photon ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) BL-37XU was newly applied. Soil derived components like Si, Ca, and Fe show higher mass concentrations in small droplets (<6.4 μm) than in large droplets (>6.4 μm), while S and Cl dominate at droplet size larger than 20 μm. Three cloud samples have liquid water content ranging from 0.04 to 0.11 g m -3. The number size distribution of droplets collected at cloud base is monomodal with the maximum level around 15 μm. The size distribution of cloud droplets is widespread (up to 60 μm). The droplet residues mainly consisting of crustal components were successively reconstructed as elemental maps by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analytical technique. From these XRF elemental maps, it can be understood that crustal components are significantly distributed on and/or in the residual particles in individual cloud droplets. The plotting of enrichment factors calculated from the elemental composition of original desert sand in China not only indicates the good correlationship between elemental masses in residual particles of cloud base droplets and those of precipitation cloud, but also classify elements into soil

  19. Difference in the wind speeds required for initiation versus continuation of sand transport on mars: implications for dunes and dust storms.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jasper F

    2010-02-19

    Much of the surface of Mars is covered by dunes, ripples, and other features formed by the blowing of sand by wind, known as saltation. In addition, saltation loads the atmosphere with dust aerosols, which dominate the Martian climate. We show here that saltation can be maintained on Mars by wind speeds an order of magnitude less than required to initiate it. We further show that this hysteresis effect causes saltation to occur for much lower wind speeds than previously thought. These findings have important implications for the formation of dust storms, sand dunes, and ripples on Mars.

  20. A GCM investigation of dust aerosol impact on the regional climate of North Africa and South/East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Xue, Y.; De Sales, F.; Liou, K. N.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa and South/East Asia have been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model, NCEP/GCM/SSiB (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model) and the three-dimensional aerosol data simulated by the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GCM simulations show that due to the scattering and absorption of solar radiation by dust particles, surface temperature decreases over both regions, accompanied by a reduced sensible heat flux. However, precipitation responses are different in these two regions. Due to differences in dust location and the associated heating with respect to the rainfall band and circulation, the effect of dust could either enhance or suppress precipitation. Over the North Africa region where dust particles are mainly located to the north of rainfall band, heating of the air column by dust particles forces a stronger ascent motion over dust layers, which induces an anomalous subsidence (or a weakened upward motion) and suppressed cyclonic circulation to its south where precipitation reduces. Furthermore, both humidity and cloud decrease due to the heating in the middle troposphere (semi-direct effect). In South/East Asia, dust particles are located in the upper troposphere over the major rainfall band during the monsoon season, especially Southwest India and the coastal area of Bay of Bengal. Heating of the air column increases upward motion and strengthens cyclonic circulation. Humidity also increases due to the draw-in of the low level moist air. Therefore, cloud and precipitation increase over South/East Asia associated with dust effect. During the pre-monsoon season, when dust particles are located to the north of the monsoon rainfall band, the heating effect results in shifting precipitation northward. The heating of air column due to dust particles, not surface cooling, plays the major role in precipitation changes. The anomalous upward motion over dust regions will

  1. El Niño-Southern Oscillation influence on the dust storm activity in Australia: Can the past provide a key to the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudmenzky, C.; Stone, R.; Allan, R.; Butler, H.

    2011-12-01

    Wind erosion is an internationally recognised land degradation problem and affects approximately 28% of the global land area. The Australian continent is the largest dust source in the Southern Hemisphere with an emission rate of around 100 Tg yr-1 or approximate 5% of the global total. The climate (especially eastern Australian climate) is greatly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) which is the strongest natural fluctuation of climate on interannual time-scales and also affects climate conditions globally. ENSO is the core driver of extreme weather events such as drought, flooding, bushfires, dust storms and tropical cyclones and up to 50% of annual rainfall variability in northern and eastern Australia is linked to ENSO. These drier conditions will reduce vegetation cover and result in an increased dust storm activity in the future in central eastern Australia during dry El Niño phases of the Southern Oscillation. The Lake Eyre Basin, Channel Country and the Mallee region are the main dust source areas and severe dust storms have the potential to transport millions of tonnes of fertile topsoil from inland Australia to places as far as New Zealand, New Caledonia and Antarctic. The research project will investigate the influence of the ENSO on dust storm activity in Australia. This will be achieved through major reanalysis of past climate conditions for the past 150 years or more using the global 'Atmospheric Circulation Reconstruction over the Earth' (ACRE) project outputs which will reconstruct both upper-air dynamics, surface conditions and then all major dust storm events of the past. Australia has one of the most variable rainfall climates in the world and observational and modelling results suggest that more frequent or stronger ENSO events are possible in the future. Drought in Australia is probably the most economically costly climate event and has environmental and social impacts by reducing agricultural output and having social

  2. Operational retrieval of Asian sand and dust storm from FY-2C geostationary meteorological satellite and its application to real time forecast in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X. Q.; Lu, N. M.; Niu, T.; Zhang, P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes an operational retrieval algorithm for the sand/dust storm (SDS) from FY-2C/S-VISSR (Stretched - Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer) developed at the National Satellite Meteorological Center (NSMC) of China. This algorithm, called Dust Retrieval Algorithm based on Geostationary Imager (DRAGI), is based on the optical and radiative physical properties of SDS in mid-infrared and thermal infrared spectral regions as well as the observation of all bands in the geostationary imager, which include the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) in split window channels, Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI) and the ratio of middle infrared reflectance to visible reflectance. It also combines the visible and water vapor bands observation of the geostationary imager to identify the dust clouds from the surface targets and meteorological clouds. The output product is validated by and related to other dust aerosol observations such as the synoptic weather reports, surface visibility, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-based PM10 observations. Using the SDS-IDDI data and a data assimilation scheme, the dust forecast model CUACE/Dust achieved a substantial improvement to the SDS predictions in spring 2006.

  3. Operational retrieval of Asian sand and dust storm from FY-2C geostationary meteorological satellite and its application to real time forecast in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X. Q.; Lu, N. M.; Niu, T.; Zhang, P.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an operational retrieval algorithm for the sand/dust storm (SDS) from FY-2C/S-VISSR (Stretched-Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer) developed at the National Satellite Meteorological Center (NSMC) of China. This algorithm, called Dust Retrieval Algorithm based on Geostationary Imager (DRAGI), is based on the optical and radiative physical properties of SDS in mid-infrared and thermal infrared spectral regions as well as the observation of all bands in the geostationary imager, which include the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD) in split window channels, Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI) and the ratio of middle infrared reflectance to visible reflectance. It also combines the visible and water vapor bands observation of the geostationary imager to identify the dust clouds from the surface targets and meteorological clouds. The output product is validated by and related to other dust aerosol observations such as the synoptic weather reports, surface visibility, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-based PM10 observations. Using the SDS-IDD product and a data assimilation scheme, the dust forecast model CUACE/Dust achieved a substantial improvement to the SDS predictions in spring 2006.

  4. Lorentz-Shaped Comet Dust Trail Cross Section from New Hybrid Visual and Video Meteor Counting Technique - Implications for Future Leonid Storm Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Crawford, Chris; Butow, Steven J.; Nugent, David; Koop, Mike; Holman, David; Houston, Jane; Jobse, Klaas; Kronk, Gary

    2000-01-01

    A new hybrid technique of visual and video meteor observations was developed to provide high precision near real-time flux measurements for satellite operators from airborne platforms. A total of 33,000 Leonids. recorded on video during the 1999 Leonid storm, were watched by a team of visual observers using a video head display and an automatic counting tool. The counts reveal that the activity profile of the Leonid storm is a Lorentz profile. By assuming a radial profile for the dust trail that is also a Lorentzian, we make predictions for future encounters. If that assumption is correct, we passed 0.0003 AU deeper into the 1899 trailet than expected during the storm of 1999 and future encounters with the 1866 trailet will be less intense than. predicted elsewhere.

  5. Acute increase of children's conjunctivitis clinic visits by Asian dust storms exposure - a spatiotemporal study in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Lien, Yi-Jen; Yang, Chiang-Hsin; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health impacts of Asian dust storms (ADS) have been widely investigated and discussed in respiratory disease, but no study has examined the association between ADS events and their impact on eye diseases, especially in children. The impact of ADS events on the incidence of children's conjunctivitis is examined by analyzing the data from children's clinic visits registered in the 41 districts of Taipei area in Taiwan during the period 2002-2007. The structural additive regression modeling approach was used to assess the association between ADS events and clinic visits for conjunctivitis in children with consideration of day-of-the-week effects, temperature, and air quality levels. This study identifies an acute increase in the relative rate for children's conjunctivitis clinic visits during ADS periods with 1.48% (95% CI = 0.79, 2.17) for preschool children (aged <6 years old) and 9.48% (95% CI = 9.03, 9.93) for schoolchildren (aged ≥6 years old), respectively. The relative rates during post-ADS periods were still statistically significant, but much lower than those during ADS periods. The spatial analysis presents geographic heterogeneity of children's conjunctivitis clinic visits where higher relative rates were more likely observed in the most populated districts Compared to previous ADS studies related to respiratory diseases, our results reveals significantly acute impacts on children's conjunctivitis during ADS periods, and much influence on schoolchildren. Vulnerable areas were also identified in high density population.

  6. Lichen elemental composition distinguishes anthropogenic emissions from dust storm inputs and differs among species: Evidence from Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Jie; Fang, Shi-Bo; Liu, Si-Wa; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Jiang, Yun-Jun; Hu, Jian-Sen; Liu, Xiao-Di; Xia, Yu; Wang, Yi-Dan; Wu, Qing-Feng

    2016-01-01

    To test the applicability of lichens in the biomonitoring of atmospheric elemental deposition in a typical steppe zone of Inner Mongolia, China, six foliose lichens (Physcia aipolia, PA; P. tribacia, PT; Xanthoria elegans, XE; X. mandschurica, XM; Xanthoparmelia camtschadalis, XPC; and Xp. tinctina, XPT) were sampled from the Xilin River Basin, Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia, China. Twenty-five elements (Al, Ba, Cd, Ce, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Tb, Th, Ti, Tl, V and Zn) in the lichens were analysed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results show that Cd, Pb and Zn were mainly atmospheric in origin, whereas the other elements were predominantly of crustal origin. Compared with other studies, our data were higher in crustal element concentrations and lower in atmospheric element concentrations, matching with the frequent, severe dust storms and road traffic in the area. The elemental concentrations in lichens are both species- and element-specific, highlighting the importance of species selection for biomonitoring air pollution using lichens. We recommend PT, XE, XM and XPT for monitoring atmospheric deposition of crustal elements; XPC and XPT for Cd and Pb; PA for Cd and Zn; and PT for Cd. PMID:27698382

  7. Asian dust storm elevates children's respiratory health risks: a spatiotemporal analysis of children's clinic visits across Taipei (Taiwan).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chien, Lung-Chang; Yang, Chiang-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about the adverse impact of Asian dust storms (ADS) on human health; however, few studies have examined the effect of these events on children's health. Using databases from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency, this study investigates the documented daily visits of children to respiratory clinics during and after ADS that occurred from 1997 to 2007 among 12 districts across Taipei City by applying a Bayesian structural additive regressive model controlled for spatial and temporal patterns. This study finds that the significantly impact of elevated children's respiratory clinic visits happened after ADS. Five of the seven lagged days had increasing percentages of relative rate, which was consecutively elevated from a 2-day to a 5-day lag by 0.63%∼2.19% for preschool children (i.e., 0∼6 years of age) and 0.72%∼3.17% for school children (i.e., 7∼14 years of age). The spatial pattern of clinic visits indicated that geographical heterogeneity was possibly associated with the clinic's location and accessibility. Moreover, day-of-week effects were elevated on Monday, Friday, and Saturday. We concluded that ADS may significantly increase the risks of respiratory diseases consecutively in the week after exposure, especially in school children. PMID:22848461

  8. Asian dust storm elevates children's respiratory health risks: a spatiotemporal analysis of children's clinic visits across Taipei (Taiwan).

    PubMed

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chien, Lung-Chang; Yang, Chiang-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about the adverse impact of Asian dust storms (ADS) on human health; however, few studies have examined the effect of these events on children's health. Using databases from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency, this study investigates the documented daily visits of children to respiratory clinics during and after ADS that occurred from 1997 to 2007 among 12 districts across Taipei City by applying a Bayesian structural additive regressive model controlled for spatial and temporal patterns. This study finds that the significantly impact of elevated children's respiratory clinic visits happened after ADS. Five of the seven lagged days had increasing percentages of relative rate, which was consecutively elevated from a 2-day to a 5-day lag by 0.63%∼2.19% for preschool children (i.e., 0∼6 years of age) and 0.72%∼3.17% for school children (i.e., 7∼14 years of age). The spatial pattern of clinic visits indicated that geographical heterogeneity was possibly associated with the clinic's location and accessibility. Moreover, day-of-week effects were elevated on Monday, Friday, and Saturday. We concluded that ADS may significantly increase the risks of respiratory diseases consecutively in the week after exposure, especially in school children.

  9. Study on size distribution of total aerosol and water-soluble ions during an Asian dust storm event at Jeju Island, Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Song, C B; Kim, M C; Kwon, S B; Lee, K W

    2004-01-01

    Soil dust particles transported from loess regions of the Asian continent, called Asian dust, highly influences the air quality of north-eastern Asia and the northern Pacific Ocean. In order to investigate the effects of these dust storms on the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol particles with different size, measurements of size distributions of total aerosol and major ion species were carried out on Jeju Island, Korea during April 2001. Juju Island was chosen for the study because the levels of emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants are very low. A 5-stage cascade impactor was used to sample size-fractionated aerosol particles. Samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ions using Dionex DX-120 ion chromatograph. The average mass concentration of total aerosol was found to be 24.4 and 108.3 microg m(-3) for non-Asian dust and Asian dust periods, respectively. The total aerosol size distribution, measured during the non-Asian dust period, was bimodal, whereas the coarse particles dominated the size distribution of total aerosol during the Asian dust period. It was found that SO4(2-), NH4+ and K+ were mainly distributed in fine particles, while Cl-, NO3-, Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were in coarse particles. Although SO4(2-) was mainly distributed in fine particles, during the Asian dust period, the concentrations in coarse particles were significantly increased. This indicates heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on wet surfaces of basic soil dust particles. The NH4+ was found to exist as (NH4)2SO4 in fine particles, with a molar ratio of NH4+ to SO4(2-) of 2.37 and 1.52 for non-Asian dust and Asian dust periods, respectively. Taking into account the proximity of the sampling site to the sea, and the observed chloride depletion, coarse mode nitrate, during the non-Asian dust period, is assumed to originate from the reaction of nitric acid with sodium chloride on the surfaces of sea-salt particles although the chloride depletion was not shown to be large enough to

  10. Observed particle sizes and fluxes of Aeolian sediment in the near surface layer during sand-dust storms in the Taklamakan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wen; He, Qing; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xinghua; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Fuyin; Mamtimin, Ali; Liu, Xinchun; Wang, Mingzhong; Zhao, Yong; Zhi, Xiefei

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring, modeling and predicting the formation and movement of dust storms across the global deserts has drawn great attention in recent decades. Nevertheless, the scarcity of real-time observations of the wind-driven emission, transport and deposition of dusts has severely impeded progress in this area. In this study, we report an observational analysis of sand-dust storm samples collected at seven vertical levels from an 80-m-high flux tower located in the hinterland of the great Taklamakan Desert for ten sand-dust storm events that occurred during 2008-2010. We analyzed the vertical distribution of sandstorm particle grain sizes and horizontal sand-dust sediment fluxes from the near surface up to 80 m high in this extremely harsh but highly representative environment. The results showed that the average sandstorm grain size was in the range of 70 to 85 μm. With the natural presence of sand dunes and valleys, the horizontal dust flux appeared to increase with height within the lower surface layer, but was almost invariant above 32 m. The average flux values varied within the range of 8 to 14 kg m-2 and the vertical distribution was dominated by the wind speed in the boundary layer. The dominant dust particle size was PM100 and below, which on average accounted for 60-80 % of the samples collected, with 0.9-2.5 % for PM0-2.5, 3.5-7.0 % for PM0-10, 5.0-14.0 % for PM0-20 and 20.0-40.0 % for PM0-50. The observations suggested that on average the sand-dust vertical flux potential is about 0.29 kg m-2 from the top of the 80 m tower to the upper planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere through the transport of particles smaller than PM20. Some of our results differed from previous measurements from other desert surfaces and laboratory wind-dust experiments, and therefore provide valuable observations to support further improvement of modeling of sandstorms across different natural environmental conditions.

  11. Extremely high aerosol loading over Arabian Sea during June 2008: The specific role of the atmospheric dynamics and Sistan dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Rashki, A.; Houssos, E. E.; Goto, D.; Nastos, P. T.

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on analyzing the extreme aerosol loading and the mechanisms, source areas and meteorological conditions that favored the abnormal dust exposure towards Arabian Sea during June 2008. The analysis reveals that the spatial-averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) over Arabian Sea in June 2008 is 0.5 (78.2%) higher than the 2000-2013 mean June value and is mostly attributed to the enhanced dust activity and several (18) dust storms originated from the Sistan region (Iran-Afghanistan borders). Landsat images show that the marshy lakes in Sistan basin got dried during the second half of June 2008 and the alluvial silt and saline material got easily eroded by the intense Levar winds, which were stronger (>15-20 m s-1) than the climatological mean for the month of June. These conditions led to enhanced dust exposure from Sistan that strongly affected the northern and central parts of the Arabian Sea, as forward air-mass trajectories show. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis reveals an abnormal intensification and spatial expansion of the Indian low pressure system towards northern Arabian Sea in June 2008. This suggests strengthening of the convection over the arid southwest Asia and exposure of significant amount of dust, which can reach further south over Arabian Sea favored by the enhanced cyclonic circulation. MODIS imagery highlighted several dust storms originated from Sistan and affecting Arabian Sea during June 2008, while the SPRINTARS model simulations of increased AOD and dust concentration over Sistan and downwind areas are in agreement with ground-based and satellite observations.

  12. Detection and Preliminary Assessment of Source Areas of the 15 December 2003 Dust Storm in the Chihuahuan Desert, Southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, N. I.; Gill, T. E.; Bleiweiss, M. P.; Hand, J. L.; Dominguez A., M.; Ruiz, A.; Perez, A. E.; Emmert, S. P.; Lee, J. A.; Mulligan, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Dust storms can disperse large quantities of fine aeolian sediment regionally and even globally. These extreme aerosol events frequently originate with multiple dust plumes developing simultaneously over a large region. Dust outbreaks originating in the southwestern USA and northern Mexico seasonally transport aerosols long distances across continental North America. However, dust sources in this region are not well characterized. Remote sensing data can be used to assess the frequency and magnitude of these dust events for potential impacts on climate, visibility and health-related air quality issues. We applied a technique that consists of examining visible spectral bands, as well as difference "split-window" images for far-infrared (far-IR) channels using a variety of satellite imagery (NOAA/GOES/GVAR/Imager, NOAA/POES/AVHRR and NASA/TERRA/MODIS). This technique was used to locate the origin of multiple dust plumes in the Chihuahuan Desert region of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico during a significant dust event that occurred on December 15, 2003. After dust sources were identified, we superimposed their locations on Landsat-7 images to assess surface features of these aeolian "hotspots," and visited many of these sites to determine the geomorphology, soil/sediment properties, and land use associated with these dust sources. Dust plumes in the Chihuahuan Desert on 15 December 2003 emanated from several land types, including saline playas, bare desert soils, disturbed/abandoned lands, and agricultural areas. In Mexico, sources included several sites along the edges of pluvial Lake Palomas near the contacts between sand sheets and lacustrine sediments, small dry lake beds (lagunas secas) and several sites in the Casas Grandes river basin in Chihuahua. In the United States, dust emission hotspots included dry, unvegetated saline playas (the White Sands near the E and SE edges of Lake Lucero, New Mexico, and the northern Salt Basin west of the

  13. Distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and dust particle size fractions adherent to skin in indoor dust, Pretoria, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kefeni, Kebede Keterew; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2014-03-01

    In order to determine human exposure to the indoor toxicant, selection of dust fraction and understanding dust particle size distribution in settled indoor dust are very important. This study examined the influence of dust particle size on the concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) congeners, assessed the distribution of dust particle size and characterized the main indoor emission sources of PBDEs. Accordingly, the concentrations of PBDE congeners determined in different indoor dust fractions were found to be relatively higher in the order of dust particle size: 45-106 μm>(<45 μm)>106-150 μm. The finding shows arbitrary selection of dust fractions for exposure determination may result in wrong conclusions. Statistically significant moderate correlation between the concentration of Σ9PBDEs and organic matter content calculated with respect to the total dust mass was also observed (r=0.55, p=0.001). On average, of total dust particle size <250 μm, 93.4 % (m/m%) of dust fractions was associated with less than 150 μm. Furthermore, of skin adherent dust fractions considered (<150 μm), 86 % (v/v%) is in the range of particle size 9.25-104.7 μm. Electronic materials treated with PBDEs were found the main emission sources of PBDE congeners in indoor environment. Based on concentrations of PBDEs determined and mass of indoor dust observed, 150 μm metallic sieve is adequate for human exposure risk assessment. However, research in this area is very limited and more research is required to generalize the fact.

  14. High-throughput sequencing analysis of the bacteria in the dust storm which passed over Canberra, Australia on 22-23 September 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, Chris; De Deckker, Patrick; Tapper, Nigel; Allison, Gwen

    2014-05-01

    Following a prolonged drought in Australia in the first decade of the 21st century, several dust storms affected the heavily populated East coast of Australia. The largest such storm occurred on 22-23 September 2009 and had a front of an estimated 3000km. A 24hr average PM10 concentration of over 2,000μg/m3 was recorded in several locations and an hourly peak of over 15,000μg/m3 was recorded (Leys et al. 2011). Over two time periods duplicate aerosol samples were collected on 47mm diameter cellulose nitrate membranes at a location removed from anthropogenic influences. One set of samples was collected in the afternoon the dust event started and another was collected overnight. Additionally, overnight rainfall was collected in a sterile bottle.DNA was directly extracted one membrane from each time point for molecular cloning and high throughput sequencing, while the other was cultivated on Tryptic Soy Agar (TSA). High throughput sequencing was performed using the 454 Titanium platform. From the three samples, 19,945 curated sequences were obtained representing 942 OTUS, with the three samples approximately equal in number. Unclassified Rhizobiales and Stenotrophomonas were the most abundant groups which could be attributed names. A total of 942 OTUs were identified (cutoff = 0.03), and despite the temporal relation of the samples, only eleven were found in all three samples, indicating that the dust storm evolved in composition as it passed over the region. Approximately 800 and 500 CFU/m3 were found in the two cultivated samples, tenfold more than was collected from previous dust events (Lim et al, 2011). Identification of cultivars revealed a dominance of the gram positive Firmicutes phylum, while the clone library showed a more even distribution of taxa, with Actinobacteria the most common and Firmicutes comprising less than 10% of sequences. Collectively, the analyses indicate that the concentration of cultivable organisms during the dust storm dramatically

  15. Field Observation of Heterogeneous Formation of Dicarboxylic acids, Keto-carboxylic acids, α-Dicarbonyls and Nitrate in Xi'an, China during Asian dust storm periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wang, J.; Ren, Y.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on dust surfaces, this study investigated the concentrations and compositions of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), keto-carboxylic acids (C3-C7), α-dicarbonyls and inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols (9-stages) collected in Xi'an, China during the nondust storm and dust storm periods of 2009 and 2011. During the events the ambient particulate dicarboxylic acids were 932-2240 ng m-3, which are comparable and even higher than those in nondust periods. Molecular compositions of the above SOA are similar to those in nondust periods with oxalic acid being the leading species. In the presence of the dust storms, all the above mentioned SOA species in Xi'an were predominantly enriched on the coarse particles (>2.1μm), and oxalic acid well correlated with NO3- (R2=0.72, p<0.001) rather than SO42-.This phenomenon differs greatly from the SOA in any other nondust period that is characterized by an enrichment of oxalic acid in fine particles and a strong correlation of oxalic acid with SO42-. Our results further demonstrate that NO3- in the dust periods in Xi'an was mostly derived from secondary oxidation, whereas SO42- during the events was largely derived from surface soil of Gobi deserts. We propose a formation pathway to explain these observations, in which nitric acid and/or nitrogen oxides react with dust to produce Ca(NO3)2 and form a liquid phase on the surface of dust aerosols via water vapor-absorption of Ca(NO3)2, followed by a partitioning of the gas-phase water-soluble organic precursors (e.g.,glyoxal and methylglyoxal) into the aqueous-phase and a subsequent oxidation into oxalic acid. To the best of our knowledge, we found for the first time the enrichment of glyoxal and methylglyoxal on dust surface. Our data suggest an important role of nitrate in the heterogeneous formation process of SOA on the surface of Asian dust.

  16. A GCM Study of Responses of the Atmospheric Water Cycle of West Africa and the Atlantic to Saharan Dust Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2009-01-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence of an "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summerr, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feedback triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are ehanIed over the West Africa/Eastern Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while longwave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over West Africa and the eastern Atlantic. As the warm air rises, it spawns a large-scale onshore flow carrying the moist air from the eastern Atlantic and the Gulf of Guinea. The onshore flow in turn enhances the deep convection over West Africa land, and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the ensuing deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in a northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerlies flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface westerly jet underneath the dust layer overr the Sahara. The dust radiative forcing also leads to significant changes in surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the West African land and the eastern Atlantic, and warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at0

  17. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.; Müller, D.; Tesche, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Schladitz, A.

    2012-03-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Pérez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  18. Atmospheric Dust Modeling from Meso to Global Scales with the Online NMMB/BSC-Dust Model Part 2: Experimental Campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haustein, K.; Perez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.; Muller, D.; Tesche, M.; Weinzierl, B.; Esselborn, M.; Schladitz, A.

    2012-01-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Perez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodele Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  19. The effect of a storm surge event on the macrophytes of a temporarily open/closed estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddin, T.; Adams, J. B.

    2010-09-01

    Temporarily open/closed estuaries typically open to the sea due to freshwater inflow coupled with storm surge events. In September 2008, in the absence of freshwater inflow, the mouth of the East Kleinemonde Estuary breached in response to a storm surge. The mouth of the estuary closed the following day at a high level. Marine overwash events following the breach introduced large volumes of saline water into the estuary and raised the water level by 0.07-0.33 m. Salinity was significantly higher in the 15 month closed phase after the breach (31 ± 0.9) compared to 21.9 ± 0.9 in the closed brackish phase before the breach. The historical average salinity for the estuary during a closed period is 23-25. The increase in salinity has reduced submerged macrophytes Ruppia cirrhosa and Chara vulgaris cover by 38.1%. Macroalgal cover of species such as Dictyota dichotoma, Caulacanthus ustulatus, Codium tenue and Ulva spp. have increased by 7.9%. The saline high water levels have also significantly reduced supratidal salt marsh cover by 15.2%, and reed and sedge cover by 19.7%. Loss of these habitats may result in bank destabilisation and erosion. This is the first record of an extended saline period in the 15 years the estuary has been monitored. Sea level rise in association with climate change, together with localised freshwater inflow reduction is likely to result in an increase in marine overwash events. The frequency and duration of closed saline periods are likely to increase in this type of estuary. A loss of submerged macrophytes may have significant impacts on faunal composition and abundance and on the subsequent functioning of temporarily open/closed estuaries. This has serious ecological implications since these estuaries represent 70% of the different types of estuaries found in South Africa.

  20. Emergency Hospital Visits in Association with Volcanic Ash, Dust Storms and Other Sources of Ambient Particles: A Time-Series Study in Reykjavík, Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Hanne Krage; Gislason, Thorarinn; Forsberg, Bertil; Meister, Kadri; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Jóhannsson, Thorsteinn; Finnbjornsdottir, Ragnhildur; Oudin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic ash contributed significantly to particulate matter (PM) in Iceland following the eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011. This study aimed to investigate the association between different PM sources and emergency hospital visits for cardiorespiratory causes from 2007 to 2012. Indicators of PM10 sources; “volcanic ash”, “dust storms”, or “other sources” (traffic, fireworks, and re-suspension) on days when PM10 exceeded the daily air quality guideline value of 50 µg/m3 were entered into generalized additive models, adjusted for weather, time trend and co-pollutants. The average number of daily emergency hospital visits was 10.5. PM10 exceeded the air quality guideline value 115 out of 2191 days; 20 days due to volcanic ash, 14 due to dust storms (two days had both dust storm and ash contribution) and 83 due to other sources. High PM10 levels from volcanic ash tended to be significantly associated with the emergency hospital visits; estimates ranged from 4.8% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.6, 9.2%) per day of exposure in unadjusted models to 7.3% (95% CI: −0.4, 15.5%) in adjusted models. Dust storms were not consistently associated with daily emergency hospital visits and other sources tended to show a negative association. We found some evidence indicating that volcanic ash particles were more harmful than particles from other sources, but the results were inconclusive and should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25872017

  1. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model - Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, K.; Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; Washington, R.

    2011-11-01

    The new online NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. The companion paper Pérez et al., 2011 develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical distribution. The mixing height is underestimated which may be attributed to poor soil initial conditions. For the BoDEx period, particular attention is paid to understand the dust model behavior in relation with the low level jet (LLJ) in the Bodélé. The diurnal temperature cycle depends strongly on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The daily maximum surface wind speeds are underestimated up to 50% in some days even

  2. Radiative Effects and Feedbacks of Saharan Dust and Biomass Burning Aerosol over West Africa and the Northern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina; Bauer, Stefan; Wendisch, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    Soil dust aerosol from the world's arid and semi-arid regions and land fire smoke represent major components of the atmospheric aerosol load. They influence the climate system by changing the atmospheric radiation balance through direct and indirect effects and play an important role in the biogeochemical and hydrological cycle. However, in particular the magnitude and sign of the radiative effects are highly uncertain due to still existing uncertainties in their optical properties and the variability and complexity of the spatio-temporal distribution. The dust and biomass burning aerosol from Africa is of particular interest since the continent harbours the largest and most active sources of both aerosol types. The Saharan and Sahel regions contribute at least 50% to the global dust emissions and a considerable amount of smoke originates from active biomass burning areas in west and central Africa. Within continuous aerosol outbreaks, the Saharan dust and land fire smoke are transported towards the West African Monsoon region and across the tropical Atlantic Ocean. In boreal winter, when the most land fires are active, the Saharan dust layer merges with the West African smoke plumes resulting in a complex aerosol layering. Here, the results of a regional model study on direct radiative forcing and dynamic atmospheric response due to dust and biomass burning aerosol will be presented. Particular focus will be on radiative impacts on regional circulation patterns and implications for the aerosol transport. For simulations of the complex spatial distribution of the West African aerosol and estimates of direct radiative effects and feedbacks, the regional model system COSMO-MUSCAT is used. The model allows online interaction of the computed dust and biomass burning aerosol load with the solar and thermal radiation and with the model dynamics. The simulations are performed for the second field campaign of the SAharan Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) that was conducted

  3. Informing Reactive Vaccination Strategies for Meningococcal Meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa using Dust and Climate Predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Thomson, M. C.; Stanton, M. C.; Diggle, P. J.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Ceccato, P.

    2014-12-01

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis occur in sub-Saharan Africa during the dry season, a period when the region is affected by the Harmattan, a dry and dusty northeasterly trade wind blowing from the Sahara into the Gulf of Guinea. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, the location and seasonality of meningitis epidemics suggest that environmental factors, such as low absolute or relative humidity, high temperatures, and dusty atmospheric conditions play an important role. Using a 20-year time series of meningitis incidence in Niger we examined the potential of statistical models to predict seasonal incidence based on data that would be operationally available, such as climate and dust, population and previous incidence. We used surface dust concentration estimates from a model given the paucity of direct in situ measurements especially at district level. The soil dust aerosol component of the model was thoroughly evaluated with existing satellite and in situ data over the region of interest showing daily aerosol optical depth correlations around 0.6 (p < 0.05). Our results show that wind and dust information along with incidence in the early dry season predict a significant part of the year-to-year variability of the seasonal incidence at both national and district levels. Such a model could provide an early-season alert when wind, dust, and other conditions are conducive to an epidemic. We additionally discuss how this research has focused at "getting science into practice" by engaging with practitioner communities to inform operational decision-making for reactive vaccination.

  4. Determination and human exposure assessment of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and tetrabromobisphenol A in indoor dust in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Abafe, Ovokeroye A; Martincigh, Bice S

    2016-04-01

    The concentration of TBBPA in dust samples from automobiles (n = 14), computer laboratories (n = 8), homes (n = 7), and offices (n = 7), and, also, PBDE concentrations in the indoor dust of 19 personal and previously owned automobiles in Durban, South Africa, were determined. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was applied for the separation, identification, and quantitation of TBBPA and PBDEs. The median concentrations of TBBPA were 1156, 269, 120, and 492 ng g(-1) in automobiles, computer laboratories, homes, and offices, respectively. The ∑ n = 8 PBDE in 19 automobile samples ranged from 573 to 11,833 ng g(-1). BDE-209 accounted for approximately 42% of ∑ n = 8 PBDE in the samples. Household characteristics influenced the distribution of TBBPA in the various microenvironments. By assuming an average dust ingestion rate, and a median TBBPA concentration, the ∑DED (in ng kg(-1) bw day(-1)) of TBBPA is 0.08, 0.08, and 0.60, for an adult, teenager, and toddler, respectively. These doses are similar to dust ingestion intakes reported for Asian countries where there is a high demand for TBBPA as a flame retardant. Similarly, automobiles provide ample opportunity for human exposure to PBDEs via dust ingestion, particularly for toddlers and occupationally exposed adults. PMID:26743646

  5. Evaluation of a regional mineral dust model over Northern Africa, Southern Europe and Middle East with AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, S.; Pérez, C.; Cuevas, E.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    A variety of regional and global models of the dust aerosol cycle have been developed since early 1990s. Dust models are essential to complement dust-related observations, understand the dust processes and predict the impact of dust on surface level PM concentrations. Dust generation and the parameterization of its deposition processes shows a high variability on spatial and temporal scales. It responds, in a non-linear way, to a variety of environmental factors, such as soil moisture content, the type of surface cover or surface atmospheric turbulence. Thus the modelling of this very complex process is a challenge. DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model; Nickovic et al., 2001) provides operational dust forecasts for Northern Africa, Europe and Middle East, as well as for the East-Asia regions. DREAM is operated and further developed in the Barcelona Supercomputing Center. DREAM is fully inserted as one of the governing equations in the NCEP/Eta atmospheric model and simulates all major processes of the atmospheric dust cycle. In order to implement new model versions for operational applications there is a need for extensive checking and validation against real observations. The present study focuses on the evaluation of forecasting capacity of the new version of DREAM by means of a model-to-observation comparison of the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over Northern Africa, Southern Europe and Middle East for one year. The model provides 72h forecasts initialized at 12UTC of each day with outputs every 1 hour at horizontal resolution of about 1/3° and 24 z-vertical layers in the troposphere. Comparisons against 47 selected AERONET sites are used. Eight size bins between 0.1 and 10 µm are considered, and dust-radiation interactions are included (Pérez et al., 2006). Wet deposition scheme has been also improved. The simulation has been performed over one year (2004); statistics and time series for the model outputs and AERONET data are used to evaluate the ability of

  6. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    SciTech Connect

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  7. Enhancing weak transient signals in SEVIRI false colour imagery: application to dust source detection in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Jon E.; Brindley, Helen E.; Bryant, Robert G.; Russell, Jacqui E.; Jenkins, Katherine F.

    2013-04-01

    pixel basis. These composite signals are subtracted from each observation in the relevant channels to enhance weak transient signals associated with low levels of dust emission. Different channel combinations are then rendered in false colour imagery to better identify dust source locations and activity. We have applied this new clear-sky difference (CSD) algorithm over three key source regions in southern Africa: the Makgadikgadi Basin, Etosha Pan, and the Namibian and western South African coast. Case studies indicate that advantages associated with the CSD approach include an improved ability to detect dust and distinguish multiple sources, the observation of source activation earlier in the diurnal cycle, and an improved ability to pinpoint dust source locations. These advantages are confirmed by a survey of four-years of data, comparing the results obtained using the CSD technique with those derived from LR2008 dust imagery. On average the new algorithm more than doubles the number of dust events identified, with the greatest improvement for the Makgadigkadi Basin and coastal regions. We anticipate exploiting this new activation record derived using the CSD approach to better understand the surface and meteorological conditions controlling dust uplift and subsequent atmospheric transport.

  8. Analysis of two Saharan dust events of North Africa in the Mediterranean region by Using SKIRON/Eta model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaouda, D.; Kallos, G.; Azzi, A.; Louka, P.; Benlefki, A.

    2009-04-01

    aerosol is involved in many important processes in Earth's climate system, with important implications for air quality, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and the biosphere, and different impacts on human health. The relative importance of mineral dust in particulate matter depends on location, season and particle size, mainly concentrated in the coarse fraction. Its impacts on climate and environment have increased years after years and needs to be more understood. In the present work, the relationships between the meteorological conditions and dust transport phenomena from the Saharan regions of north Africa and their transport, deposition in both modes, dry and wet deposition in the Mediterranean region, and the Atlantic Ocean, during two dust events namely: case I (01/03/04 - 06/03/04), case II (29/05/05 - 03/06/05), that have been analysed and their major characteristics have been discussed. This analysis has been performed with the aid of the SKIRON modelling system of the University of Athens. The dust module of SKIRON/Eta model incorporates the state of the art parameterization of all the major phases of the desert dust cycle such as production, diffusion, advection and removal. Model results have been compared with TOMS-AI (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrophotometer Aerosol Index) data for a qualitative comparison of the model. The work has been conducted at the framework of TEMPUS project MADEPODIM.

  9. Performance evaluation of CESM in simulating the dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, S. P.; Yang, Z. L.; Kocurek, G.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust in the atmosphere has implications for Earth's radiation budget, biogeochemical cycles, hydrological cycles, human health and visibility. Mineral dust is injected into the atmosphere during dust storms when the surface winds are sufficiently strong and the land surface conditions are favorable. Dust storms are very common in specific regions of the world including the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, which contains more than 50% of the global dust sources. In this work, we present simulation of the dust cycle under the framework of CESM1.2.2 and evaluate how well the model captures the spatio-temporal characteristics of dust sources, transport and deposition at global scale, especially in dust source regions. We conducted our simulations using two existing erodibility maps (geomorphic and topographic) and a new erodibility map, which is based on the correlation between observed wind and dust. We compare the simulated results with MODIS satellite data, MACC reanalysis data, and AERONET station data. Comparison with MODIS satellite data and MACC reanalysis data shows that all three erodibility maps generally reproduce the spatio-temporal characteristics of dust optical depth globally. However, comparison with AERONET station data shows that the simulated dust optical depth is generally overestimated for all erodibility maps. Results vary greatly by region and scale of observational data. Our results also show that the simulations forced by reanalysis meteorology capture the overall dust cycle more realistically compared to the simulations done using online meteorology.

  10. What do we know about effects of desert dust on air quality and human health in West Africa compared to other regions?

    PubMed

    De Longueville, Florence; Hountondji, Yvon-Carmen; Henry, Sabine; Ozer, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to compare, on the one hand, the geographical distribution of the desert dust source areas, their contribution to quantities emitted into the atmosphere, the trajectories and the quantities deposited, with on the other hand the areas of research interest focused on the desert dust impacts on air quality and/or human health. Based on a systematic review of the literature using the ISI Web of Knowledge database, we found 231 articles published over the last decade on the desert dust impacts on air quality. Of these, 48% concerned Asian dust and 39% Saharan dust, with the remaining 13% divided between the other dust source areas. However, only one of these studies addressed the worsening air pollution in West Africa, even though it is very close to the Sahara, the greatest contributor to the global dust budget. Moreover, there have been very few studies (41) looking at the direct links between desert dust and human health; in this context too, no interest has been shown in West Africa. Yet this region is also among the areas in which morbidity rates have been noted to be far higher than those found in other regions of the world, and where respiratory infections alone account for more than 20% of the causes of infant mortality. This survey highlights a clear imbalance between those areas most exposed to dust and the most studied areas in terms of dust impacts. Given these findings and the often alarming results published about other regions of the world, we advocate a revival of interest in research on West Africa in order to achieve a better understanding of the desert dust impacts on air quality and health among the populations of this region.

  11. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm   ... CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, ...

  12. Poleward transport of Saharan dust initiated by a Saharan cyclone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam Francis, Diana Bou; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Cuesta, Juan

    2016-04-01

    To enhance the understanding of the role of Saharan mineral dust in the Arctic climate system, this study focuses on dust emission and poleward transport associated with an intense Saharan cyclone that occurred over North Africa in early April 2011. Satellites observations at high spatio-temporal resolution are used in this study in order to characterize qualitatively (using MSG-SEVIRI and CALIPSO/CloudSat) and quantitatively (using MODIS and OMI) the dust activity over North Africa associated with the Saharan cyclone as well as the transport of dust toward the northern pole. Beside the observations, a simulation at high resolution is performed using the MesoNh model in order to estimation the dust load transported northward and to evaluate the dust deposition north to 60°N and its impact on the Albedo. In this study, we identify in new and important mechanism for the transport of dust over long distances toward the northern pole: the poleward migration of Saharan cyclones, in which the dust is transported toward the Arctic following a newly identified path; across the Northern Atlantic Ocean around the Icelandic Low. This path is to be added to the two preferable paths mentioned in previous studies i.e. through transport across Northern Europe and across the Atlantic Ocean around the Bermuda High. Key words: Arctic, North Africa, dust storm, dust deposition, surface albedo.

  13. Chemical characteristics of PM2.5-0.3 and PM0.3 and consequence of a dust storm episode at an urban site in Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgie, Mireille; Ledoux, Frédéric; Dagher, Zeina; Verdin, Anthony; Cazier, Fabrice; Courcot, Lucie; Shirali, Pirouz; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Courcot, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Located on the eastern side of the Mediterranean Basin at the intersection of air masses circulating between three continents, the agglomeration of Beirut, capital of Lebanon is an important investigating area for air pollution and more studies are needed to elucidate the composition of the smallest particles classified as carcinogenic to humans. PM2.5-0.3 and PM0.3 samples were collected during the spring-summer period in an urban background site of Beirut, after a dust storm episode occurred, and their chemical composition was determined. Our findings showed that components formed by gas to particle conversion (SO42 - and NH4+) and related to combustion processes are mainly found in the PM0.3 fraction. Typical crustal (Ca2+, Fe, Ti, Mg2+), sea-salt (Na+, Cl-, Mg2+, Sr) species, and NO3- are mainly associated with the PM2.5-0.3 fraction. We have also evidenced that the dust episode which occurred in Lebanon in May 2011 originated from the Iraqian and Syrian deserts, which are the least studied, and had a direct influence on the composition of PM2.5-0.3 during the beginning of the first sampling period, and then an indirect and persistent influence by the re-suspension of deposited dust particles. Moreover, PAHs concentrations were much higher in PM0.3 than in PM2.5-0.3 and their composition appeared influenced by diesel (buses, trucks and generator sets) and gasoline (private cars) emissions.

  14. Effects of dust storms on microwave radiation based on satellite observation and model simulation over the Taklamakan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Huang, J.; Weng, F.; Sun, W.

    2008-04-01

    Effects of dust particles on microwave radiation over the Taklamakan desert are studied with use of measurements from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on the EOS Aqua satellite and a microwave radiation transfer model. Eight observed cases show that the signal from atmospheric dust can be separated from the surface radiation by the fact that the dust particles produce stronger scattering at high frequencies and depolarize the background desert signature. This result of satellite data is consistent with the model simulation.

  15. Effects of dust storms on microwave radiation based on satellite observation and model simulation over the Taklamakan desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Huang, J.; Weng, F.; Sun, W.

    2008-08-01

    Effects of dust particles on microwave radiation over the Taklamakan desert are studied with use of measurements from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on the EOS Aqua satellite and a microwave radiation transfer model. Eight observed cases show that the signal from atmospheric dust can be separated from the surface radiation by the fact that the dust particles produce stronger scattering at high frequencies and depolarize the background desert signature. This result of satellite data is consistent with the model simulation.

  16. Climatic controls on the interannual to decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust activity: Toward the development of a seasonal dust prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Wang, Fuyao; Alkolibi, Fahad; Fadda, Eyad; Bakhrjy, Fawzieh

    2015-03-01

    The observed climatic controls on springtime and summertime Saudi Arabian dust activities during 1975-2012 are analyzed, leading to development of a seasonal dust prediction model. According to empirical orthogonal function analysis, dust storm frequency exhibits a dominantly homogeneous pattern across Saudi Arabia, with distinct interannual and decadal variability. The previously identified positive trend in remotely sensed aerosol optical depth since 2000 is shown to be a segment of the decadal oscillation in dust activity, according to long-duration station record. Regression and correlation analyses reveal that the interannual variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is regulated by springtime rainfall across the Arabian Peninsula and summertime Shamal wind intensity. The key drivers of Saudi Arabian dust storm variability are identified. Winter-to-spring La Niña enhances subsequent spring dust activity by decreasing rainfall across the country's primary dust source region, the Rub' al Khali Desert. A relatively cool tropical Indian Ocean favors frequent summer dust storms by producing an anomalously anticyclonic circulation over the central Arabian Peninsula, which enhances the Shamal wind. Decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency is associated with North African rainfall and Sahel vegetation, which regulate African dust emissions and transport to Saudi Arabia. Mediterranean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) also regulate decadal dust variability, likely through their influence on Sahel rainfall and Shamal intensity. Using antecedent-accumulated rainfall over the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa, and Mediterranean SSTs, as low-frequency predictors, and tropical eastern Pacific and tropical Indian Ocean SSTs as high-frequency predictors, Saudi Arabia's seasonal dust activity is well predicted.

  17. What is driving changes in long-range transport of dust from Africa to the Americas? A 30 year synthesis of the GEOS-Chem model and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Sahara and Sahelian regions produce approximately half of the world's dust emissions, resulting in significant radiative effects, air quality issues and mineral deposition, not only in Africa, but across the Atlantic and in the Americas. Determining how these impacts may change in the future requires a thorough understanding of the processes controlling emission, transport and deposition of dust. Long-term records of dust concentration measured in the Caribbean have, until the nineties, correlated with Sahelian precipitation and climatic indicators, potentially providing ways to predict changes in dust. However, this relationship is no longer clear and there are significant changes in the seasonality of dust transported to the Americas currently with no obvious explanation. We use the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with NASA GMAO meteorological re-analyses (MERRA) to simulate the 30 year period 1979 - 2008. A synthesis of observations from multiple satellite and surface-based platforms is used to evaluate the model, primarily in terms of its ability to simulate the long-range transport of mineral dust from Africa. We then investigate what drives the changes in long-range transport of African dust to the Americas over diurnal to decadal timescales. This enables understanding of the relative importance of the individual processes controlling these changes, and the sensitivity of air quality and dust deposition downwind. This work aims to determine 1) how sensitive air quality and dust deposition in the Americas is to changes in African dust emissions, 2) the role of meteorological variables affecting the inter-annual variability of dust emission and deposition, and 3) the impact that land use changes and desertification in the Sahel may have in terms of the influence on dust transported to the Americas.

  18. In Brief: Agreement signed for NSF participation in IODP; Asian dust storms' intensity, scale grow; Continued use of methyl bromide allowed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Judith; Showstack, Randy

    2004-04-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation on 30 March signed a cooperative agreement with the Joint Oceanographic Institutions (JOI) in Washington, D.C., to lead U.S. participation in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Large-scale, destructive dust and sand storms that originate in the dry regions of northern China and Mongolia are plaguing the Korean peninsula, Japan and other parts of northeast Asia nearly five times more frequently than in the 1950s, participants in a meeting sponsored by the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) learned on 30 March. Twelve countries have received ``critical use exemptions'' to continue using limited amounts of the pesticide methyl bromide in 2005.

  19. The change in wind vector and dust storm in the Middle East in last 32 years and their correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.; Yang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    [1] Winds play an important role in dust aerosols emission, transport, and deposition. Using NCEP reanalysis2 data, the changes in wind direction and speed during 1948 and 2010 were analyzed over the Middle East (the Gulf of Omen and Eastern Saudi Arabia abbreviated as R1). Wind patterns from R1 were compared with those in South Asia Monsoon Area (R2), East China (R3), and East China Sea (R4). The Weather Research and Forecasting model with online chemistry (WRF-Chem) was used to study the effects of winds change on dust emissions over the period from 1979 to 2010. Modifications to soil types and land cover types were implemented to the default WRF-Chem MOSAIC dust scheme to ensure realistic simulations of dust emissions. In all the four regions, the yearly average wind speed decreased. In R1 and R3, winds greater than 2.5 m/s exhibited a decreasing trend throughout the year; while in R2 and R4, the decreasing trend was found only in spring and summer. The model simulations were compared with available observations including satellite data (e.g. AERONET and Calipso) and continual improvements are being made to revise the dust emission scheme within WRF-Chem.

  20. Application of a PC analysis of remote sensing spectral reflectance data to determine source regions for dust storms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, R. E.; Zhou, L.; Sokolik, I.

    2006-12-01

    The source regions of deserts over which dust is lifted into the air occur on relatively small scales and hve been difficult to characterize geographically. The research programs supporting NASA's terra and aqua satellites have pioneered the development of quality controlled climatologies of surface information, that should include features characteristic of dust source regions. With quality satellite data, patterns can be distinguished that are likely to indicate real geophysical features. Zhou et al. (2005) applied a principle component (PC) analysis to the North African desert that revealed intriguing spatial structures. It represents the spatial patterns with a limited number of PC's that maximize the covariances between spectral bands averaged over space. Such analysis acts as a filter of nonphysical information and should highlight commonly occurring small scale features, some of which are likely connected to dust source regions. We present a new such analysis for the Taklamakan desert of China. The first 2 or 3 modes are removed as being of too coarse a spatial scale to represent source regions. Features of the remaining 3 or 4 patterns of significant amplitude are examined for their possible relevancy to dust uplifting. In particular, patterns that show seasonality of vegetation are deemed unlikely to be so relevant. Distinctions in the spectral patterns and MODIS BRDF kernels of remaining terms are examined for their likely indication of a dust source region.

  1. Effects of Saharan Mineral Dust Aerosols on the Dynamics of an Idealized African Easterly Jet-African Easterly Wave System over North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, Dustin Francis Phillip

    The central objective of this work is to examine the direct radiative effects of Saharan mineral dust aerosols on the dynamics of African easterly waves (AEWs) and the African easterly jet (AEJ). Achieving this objective is built around two tasks that use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled to an online dust model (WRF-dust model). The first task (Chapter 2) examines the linear dynamics of AEWs; the second task (Chapter 3) examines the nonlinear evolution of AEWs and their interactions with the AEJ. In Chapter 2, the direct radiative effects of dust on the linear dynamics of AEWs are examined analytically and numerically. The analytical analysis combines the thermodynamic equation with a dust continuity equation to form an expression for the generation of eddy available potential energy (APE) by the dust field. The generation of eddy APE is a function of the transmissivity and spatial gradients of the dust, which are modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency. The expression predicts that for a fixed dust distribution, the wave response will be largest in regions where the dust gradients are maximized and the Doppler-shifted frequency vanishes. The numerical analysis calculates the linear dynamics of AEWs using zonally averaged basic states for wind, temperature and dust consistent with summertime conditions over North Africa. For the fastest growing AEW, the dust increases the growth rate from ~15% to 90% for aerosol optical depths ranging from tau=1.0 to tau=2.5. A local energetics analysis shows that for tau=1.0, the dust increases the maximum barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions by ~50% and ~100%, respectively. The maxima in the generation of APE and conversions of energy are co-located and occur where the meridional dust gradient is maximized near the critical layer, i.e., where the Doppler-shifted frequency is small, in agreement with the prediction from the analytical analysis. In Chapter 3, the direct radiative effects of dust

  2. Three-dimensional dust aerosol distribution and extinction climatology over northern Africa simulated with the ALADIN numerical prediction model from 2006 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, M.; Tulet, P.; Fischer, C.; Bouteloup, Y.; Bouyssel, F.; Brachemi, O.

    2015-08-01

    The seasonal cycle and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols in northern Africa were simulated for the period from 2006 to 2010 using the numerical atmospheric model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) coupled to the surface scheme SURFEX (SURFace EXternalisée). The particularity of the simulations is that the major physical processes responsible for dust emission and transport, as well as radiative effects, are taken into account on short timescales and at mesoscale resolution. The aim of these simulations is to quantify the dust emission and deposition, locate the major areas of dust emission and establish a climatology of aerosol optical properties in northern Africa. The mean monthly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by ALADIN is compared with the AOTs derived from the standard Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) algorithms of the Aqua-MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products over northern Africa and with a set of sun photometer measurements located at Banizoumbou, Cinzana, Soroa, Mbour and Cape Verde. The vertical distribution of dust aerosol represented by extinction profiles is also analysed using CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) observations. The annual dust emission simulated by ALADIN over northern Africa is 878 Tg year-1. The Bodélé Depression appears to be the main area of dust emission in northern Africa, with an average estimate of about 21.6 Tg year-1. The simulated AOTs are in good agreement with satellite and sun photometer observations. The positions of the maxima of the modelled AOTs over northern Africa match the observed positions, and the ALADIN simulations satisfactorily reproduce the various dust events over the 2006-2010 period. The AOT climatology proposed in this paper provides a solid database of optical properties and consolidates the existing climatology over this region derived from satellites, the AERONET network and regional climate

  3. NMMB/BSC-DUST: model validation at regional scale in Northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Pérez, Carlos; Jorba, Oriol; María Baldasano, José; Janjic, Zavisa; Black, Tom; Slobodan, Nickovic; Prigent, Catherine; Laurent, Benoit

    2010-05-01

    While mineral dust distribution and effects are important at global scales, they strongly depend on dust emissions that are controlled on small spatial and temporal scales. Indeed, the accuracy of surface wind speed used in dust models is crucial. Due to the cubic higher-order power dependency on wind friction velocity and the threshold behaviour of dust emissions, small errors on surface wind speed lead to large dust emission errors. Most global dust models use prescribed wind fields provided by meteorological centres (e.g., NCEP and ECMWF) and their spatial resolution is currently never better than about 1°×1°. Such wind speeds tend to be strongly underestimated over large arid and semi-arid areas and do not account for reflect mesoscale character of systems responsible for a significant fraction of dust emissions regionally and globally. Other Another strong uncertainties in dust emissions from such approaches are related to the missrepresentation originates from of coarse representation of high subgrid-scale spatial heterogeneity in soil and vegetation boundary conditions, mainly in semi-arid areas. With the development of the new model NMMB-BSC/DUST [Pérez et al., 2008], we are now focusing on the evalution of the model sensitivity to several processes related to dust emissions. The results presented here are an intermediate step to provide global dust forecasts up to 7 days at sub-synoptic resolutions in the near future. NMMB-BSC/DUST is coupled online with the NOAA/NCEP/EMC global/regional NMMB atmospheric model [Janjic, 2005] extending from meso to global scales an being fully embedded into the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). We performed regional simulations for the Northern African domain, including the Arabian peninsula and southern/central Europe (0 to 65°N and 25°W to 55°E) at 1/3°x1/3° and 1/6x1/6° horizontal resolution with 64 vertical layers. The model is initialized with 6-hourly updated NCEP 1x1° analysis data with a dust spin

  4. Remote-sensing-based analysis of landscape change in the desiccated seabed of the Aral Sea--a potential tool for assessing the hazard degree of dust and salt storms.

    PubMed

    Löw, F; Navratil, P; Kotte, K; Schöler, H F; Bubenzer, O

    2013-10-01

    With the recession of the Aral Sea in Central Asia, once the world's fourth largest lake, a huge new saline desert emerged which is nowadays called the Aralkum. Saline soils in the Aralkum are a major source for dust and salt storms in the region. The aim of this study was to analyze the spatio-temporal land cover change dynamics in the Aralkum and discuss potential implications for the recent and future dust and salt storm activity in the region. MODIS satellite time series were classified from 2000-2008 and change of land cover was quantified. The Aral Sea desiccation accelerated between 2004 and 2008. The area of sandy surfaces and salt soils, which bear the greatest dust and salt storm generation potential increased by more than 36 %. In parts of the Aralkum desalinization of soils was found to take place within 4-8 years. The implication of the ongoing regression of the Aral Sea is that the expansion of saline surfaces will continue. Knowing the spatio-temporal dynamics of both the location and the surface characteristics of the source areas for dust and salt storms allows drawing conclusions about the potential hazard degree of the dust load. The remote-sensing-based land cover assessment presented in this study could be coupled with existing knowledge on the location of source areas for an early estimation of trends in shifting dust composition. Opportunities, limits, and requirements of satellite-based land cover classification and change detection in the Aralkum are discussed.

  5. Remote-sensing-based analysis of landscape change in the desiccated seabed of the Aral Sea--a potential tool for assessing the hazard degree of dust and salt storms.

    PubMed

    Löw, F; Navratil, P; Kotte, K; Schöler, H F; Bubenzer, O

    2013-10-01

    With the recession of the Aral Sea in Central Asia, once the world's fourth largest lake, a huge new saline desert emerged which is nowadays called the Aralkum. Saline soils in the Aralkum are a major source for dust and salt storms in the region. The aim of this study was to analyze the spatio-temporal land cover change dynamics in the Aralkum and discuss potential implications for the recent and future dust and salt storm activity in the region. MODIS satellite time series were classified from 2000-2008 and change of land cover was quantified. The Aral Sea desiccation accelerated between 2004 and 2008. The area of sandy surfaces and salt soils, which bear the greatest dust and salt storm generation potential increased by more than 36 %. In parts of the Aralkum desalinization of soils was found to take place within 4-8 years. The implication of the ongoing regression of the Aral Sea is that the expansion of saline surfaces will continue. Knowing the spatio-temporal dynamics of both the location and the surface characteristics of the source areas for dust and salt storms allows drawing conclusions about the potential hazard degree of the dust load. The remote-sensing-based land cover assessment presented in this study could be coupled with existing knowledge on the location of source areas for an early estimation of trends in shifting dust composition. Opportunities, limits, and requirements of satellite-based land cover classification and change detection in the Aralkum are discussed. PMID:23564411

  6. Roles of surface wind, NDVI and snow cover in the recent changes in Asian dust storm occurrence frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Jae; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the recent variations in dust outbreak during the period from 1996 to 2007 over the Asian dust source regions. The Asian dust source regions were divided into four sub-regions; S1, Taklamakan; S2, Gobi; S3, Inner Mongolia-Manchuria; and S4, Loess, and the WMO SYNOP observation and satellite data were employed to analyze the features of recently changed dust outbreak frequencies (DOFs). There was no particular variation in region S1, but the recent spatiotemporal variations in DOFs over S2-S4 were well characterized by a severe and widespread increase in 2001-2002, and significant decreasing in 2003-2004 over the most source regions, with a steadily increasing trend again during 2005-2007. Seasonal features showed that the highest DOFs occurred in March-April before 2002, but was delayed by a month toward April-May during the next five years because of the shift in the month of highest strong wind-speed frequencies (SWFs). A secondary peak of DOF was also found, occurring in October-November since the year 2000. Over all the source regions, the primary controlling factor for explaining the spatiotemporal DOF patterns was the SWF, with a pattern correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.66-0.76. Other secondary controlling factors varied from region to region. For example, the DOFs observed in region S2-S3 showed relatively greater sensitivity to the snow-cover fraction, and region S4 showed a better correlation with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) than the other regions. Other recent significant changes in DOFs over the Asian dust source regions and their causes are also discussed in this study.

  7. The Impact of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Volcanoes Upon the Earth's Radiative Energy Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for detecting aerosols from biomass burning and dust is developed. The radiative forcing of aerosols is estimated over four major ecosystems in South America. A new smoke and fire detection scheme is developed for biomass burning aerosols over South America. Surface shortware irradiance calculations are developed in the presence of biomass burning aerosols during the SCAR-B experiment. This new approach utilizes ground based, aircraft, and satellite measurements.

  8. Evolution of Martian polar landscapes - Interplay of long-term variations in perennial ice cover and dust storm intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A.; Blasius, K. R.; Roberts, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The discovery of a new type of Martian polar terrain, called undulating plain, is reported and the evolution of the plains and other areas of the Martian polar region is discussed in terms of the trapping of dust by the perennial ice cover. High-resolution Viking Orbiter 2 observations of the north polar terrain reveal perennially ice-covered surfaces with low relief, wavelike, regularly spaced, parallel ridges and troughs (undulating plains) occupying areas of the polar terrain previously thought to be flat, and associated with troughs of considerable local relief which exhibit at least partial annual melting. It is proposed that the wavelike topography of the undulating plains originates from long-term periodic variations in cyclical dust precipitation at the margin of a growing or receding perennial polar cap in response to changes in insolation. The troughs are proposed to originate from areas of steep slope in the undulating terrain which have lost their perennial ice cover and have become incapable of trapping dust. The polar landscape thus appears to record the migrations, expansions and contractions of the Martian polar cap.

  9. Investigation of aged aerosols in size-resolved Asian dust storm particles transported from Beijing, China to Incheon, Korea using low-Z particle EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Hwang, H. J.; Liu, X.; Dong, S.; Ro, C.-U.

    2013-10-01

    This is the first study of Asian dust storm (ADS) particles collected in Beijing, China and Incheon, Korea during the same spring ADS event. Using a seven-stage May impactor and a quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA, also known as low-Z particle EPMA), we examined the composition and morphology of 4200 aerosol particles at stages 1-6 (with a size cut-off of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 μm in equivalent aerodynamic diameter, respectively) collected during an ADS event on 28-29 April 2005. The results showed that there were large differences in the chemical compositions between particles in sample S1 collected in Beijing immediately after the peak time of the ADS and in samples S2 and S3, which were collected in Incheon approximately 5 h and 24 h later, respectively. In sample S1, mineral dust particles accounted for more than 88% in relative number abundance at stages 1-5, and organic carbon (OC) and reacted NaCl-containing particles accounted for 24% and 32%, respectively, at stage 6. On the other hand, in samples S2 and S3, in addition to approximately 60% mineral dust, many sea salt particles reacted with airborne SO2 and NOx, often mixed with mineral dust, were encountered at stages 1-5, and (C, N, O, S)-rich particles (likely a mixture of water-soluble organic carbon with (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) and K-containing particles were abundantly observed at stage 6. This suggests that the secondary aerosols and the internal mixture of mineral dust with sea spray aerosol increased when the ADS particles passed over the Yellow Sea. In the reacted or aged mineral dust and sea salt particles, nitrate-containing and both nitrate- and sulfate-containing species vastly outnumbered the sulfate-containing species, implying that ambient nitrogen oxides had a greater influence on the atmospheric particles during the ADS episode than SO2. In addition to partially- or totally-reacted CaCO3, reacted or aged Mg-containing aluminosilicates (likely including amesite

  10. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This publication explores issues related to Africa. It examines the U.S. response to the Barbary pirate states (Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli) in the early 19th century; the current AIDS crisis in Africa; and 14th century Mali and other Islamic lands through the eyes of Ibn Battuta, who traveled throughout the Muslim world. Each article…

  11. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Happel, Sue; Loeb, Joyce

    Although the activities in this unit are designed primarily for students in the intermediate grades, the document's text, illustrations, and bibliographic references are suitable for anyone interested in learning about Africa. Following a brief introduction and map work, the document is arranged into six sections. Section 1 traces Africa's history…

  12. Investigations of the March 2006 African dust storm using ground-based column-integrated high spectral resolution infrared (8-13 μm) and visible aerosol optical thickness measurements: 2. Mineral aerosol mixture analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M.; Gautier, C.

    2009-07-01

    The mineral aerosol mixture composition for the March 2006 Saharan dust storm is assessed in this paper on the basis of the analysis of visible to near-infrared (VIS-NIR) and infrared (IR) aerosol optical thickness (AOT) spectra obtained during the Portable Infrared Aerosol Transmission Experiment (PIRATE). The AOT spectra from 8 to 13 μm were determined using column-integrated solar transmission measurements using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. To determine the mineralogy and mixture composition of the dust, we determined the expected mineralogy of dust from the Algerian source region in a dust storm environment. Then we computed the modeled VIS-IR AOT spectra using Mie theory for external and internal mixtures. We compared the modeled VIS-NIR AOT spectra and derived index of refraction and single-scattering albedo with the measured values from AERONET and compared the modeled IR AOT spectra with the values from our IR measurements. The fit between the measured and modeled values was best when we used an extinction resonance correction to the Mie theory results to better account for the exact wavelengths and shapes of some of the AOT peaks for mineral particles. The mineralogy and mixture composition of the best dust model includes external mixtures, internal mixtures, and mineralogy dominated by quartz, illite, and calcite. The modeled mean radius was determined, and several modes were computed in agreement with AERONET results.

  13. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... Thyroid storm occurs due to a major stress such as trauma, heart attack , or infection. In rare cases, thyroid ...

  14. Difference in Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Responses Induced in THP1 Cells by Particulate Matter Collected on Days with and without ASIAN Dust Storms

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Sano, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Akira; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The associations between particulate matter from Asian dust storms (ADS) and health disorders differ among studies, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, ADS and non-ADS particles were tested for their potential to induce pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with adverse respiratory effects. Particulate matter was collected in Japan during four periods in 2013 (2 × ADS periods; 2 × non-ADS). THP1 cells were exposed to this particulate matter, and the levels of various interleukins (ILs), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured. Levels of IL-2 increased significantly following exposure to all particulate matter samples (compared to levels in a solvent control). Increased levels of IL-10 and TNF-α were also observed following exposure to particles collected during three (one ADS and two non-ADS) and two (one ADS and one non-ADS) collection periods, respectively. Thus, the effects of particulate matter on cytokine responses differed according to collection period, and the effects of ADS particles differed for each ADS event. Additionally, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by ADS particles were not always higher than those induced by non-ADS particles. PMID:26184251

  15. Difference in Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Responses Induced in THP1 Cells by Particulate Matter Collected on Days with and without ASIAN Dust Storms.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Kurai, Jun; Sano, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Akira; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    The associations between particulate matter from Asian dust storms (ADS) and health disorders differ among studies, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, ADS and non-ADS particles were tested for their potential to induce pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with adverse respiratory effects. Particulate matter was collected in Japan during four periods in 2013 (2 × ADS periods; 2 × non-ADS). THP1 cells were exposed to this particulate matter, and the levels of various interleukins (ILs), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were measured. Levels of IL-2 increased significantly following exposure to all particulate matter samples (compared to levels in a solvent control). Increased levels of IL-10 and TNF-α were also observed following exposure to particles collected during three (one ADS and two non-ADS) and two (one ADS and one non-ADS) collection periods, respectively. Thus, the effects of particulate matter on cytokine responses differed according to collection period, and the effects of ADS particles differed for each ADS event. Additionally, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by ADS particles were not always higher than those induced by non-ADS particles. PMID:26184251

  16. The Influence of Martian Global Dust Storm 2001A on CO2 Hot Band Emission As Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, W. C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Conrath, B. J.; Kutepov, A. A.; Christensen, P. R.

    2002-09-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer on Mars Global Surveyor observed the genesis and evolution of a major dust storm beginning on 26 June 2001 at areocentric longitude Ls = 185 deg. The atmospheric temperature at 0.5 mbar ( 25 km above the surface) reached a maximum for 200 deg < Ls < 220 deg( 23 July 2001 to 23 August 2001). The middle atmosphere temperature was 40K warmer during this time than the corresponding Ls interval ( 4 September 1999 to 6 October 1999) in the previous Martian year. (Smith et al., Icarus 157 , 259-263 (2001)). The altitude of the region of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission from the 10μ m CO2 hot bands rose 10 km compared to the earlier time. We present preliminary modeling of this emission region, comparing it to our previous modeling of non-LTE CO2 hot band seasonal variation (Maguire et al., J.G.R. 107, 10.1029/2001JE001516, 2002). This work was supported in part by the NASA Mars Data Analysis Program.

  17. DREAMS: a payload on-board the ExoMars EDM Schiaparelli for the characterization of Martian environment during the statistical dust storm season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfese, Cesare; Esposito, Francesca; Debei, Stefano; Bettanini, Carlo; Arruego Rodríguez, Ignacio; Colombatti, Giacomo; Harri, Ari-Matty.; Montmessin, Franck; Wilson, Colin; Aboudan, Alessio; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Marchetti, Ernesto; Witasse, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    , the dust opacity, and the atmospheric electric properties close to the surface of Mars. It will fly in January 2016 on-board the Schiaparelli Entry, Descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM) of the ExoMars space mission. It is foreseen to land on Mars in late October 2016 during the statistical dust storm season. Therefore, DREAMS might have the unique chance to make scientific measurements to characterize the Martian environment in a dusty scenario also performing the first ever measurements of atmospheric electric field on Mars. The relationship between the process of dust entrainment in the atmosphere during dust events and the enhancement of atmospheric electric field has been widely studied in an intense field test campaign in the Sahara desert. In order to better characterize this physical process, we performed atmospheric and environmental measurements comparable to those that DREAMS will acquire on Mars. Preliminary results will be discussed. DREAMS is in a high development state. A first model has been delivered to ESA and has been integrated in the EDM Flight Model. Integration tests are on-going. The DREAMS Flight Model will be delivered at the end of March this year.

  18. Investigation of aged aerosols in size-resolved Asian dust storm particles transported from Beijing, China, to Incheon, Korea, using low-Z particle EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Hwang, H.; Liu, X.; Dong, S.; Ro, C.-U.

    2014-04-01

    This is the first study of Asian dust storm (ADS) particles collected in Beijing, China, and Incheon, Korea, during a spring ADS event. Using a seven-stage May impactor and a quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA, also known as low-Z particle EPMA), we examined the composition and morphology of 4200 aerosol particles at stages 1-6 (with a size cut-off of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 μm in equivalent aerodynamic diameter, respectively) collected during an ADS event on 28-29 April 2005. The results showed that there were large differences in the chemical compositions between particles in sample S1 collected in Beijing immediately after the peak time of the ADS and in samples S2 and S3, which were collected in Incheon approximately 5 h and 24 h later, respectively. In sample S1, mineral dust particles accounted for more than 88% in relative number abundance at stages 1-5; and organic carbon (OC) and reacted NaCl-containing particles accounted for 24% and 32%, respectively, at stage 6. On the other hand, in samples S2 and S3, in addition to approximately 60% mineral dust, many sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles reacted with airborne SO2 and NOx (accounting for 24% and 14% on average in samples S2 and S3, respectively), often mixed with mineral dust, were encountered at stages 1-5, and (C, N, O, S)-rich particles (likely a mixture of water-soluble organic carbon with (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) were abundantly observed at stage 6 (accounting for 68% and 51% in samples S2 and S3, respectively). This suggests that an accumulation of sea-salt components on individual ADS particles larger than 1 μm in diameter occurred and many secondary aerosols smaller than 1 μm in diameter were formed when the ADS particles passed over the Yellow Sea. In the reacted or aged mineral dust and SSA particles, nitrate-containing and both nitrate- and sulfate-containing species vastly outnumbered the sulfate-containing species, implying that ambient NOx had a greater influence on the

  19. Trans boundary transport of pollutants by atmospheric mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Erel, Yigal; Dayan, Uri; Rabi, Reut; Rudich, Yinon; Stein, Mordechai

    2006-05-01

    The transport of anthropogenic pollution by desert dust in the Eastern Mediterranean region was studied by analyzing major and trace element composition, organic species, and Pb isotope ratios in suspended dust samples collected in Jerusalem, Israel. Dust storms in this region are associated with four distinct synoptic conditions (Red Sea Trough (RS), Eastern High (EH), Sharav Cyclone (SC), and Cold Depression (Cyprus low, CD)) that carry dust mostly from North African (SC, CD, EH) and Arabian and Syrian (RS, EH) deserts. Substantial contamination of dust particles by Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni is observed, while other elements (Na, Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr, Rb, REE, U, and Th) display natural concentrations. Sequential extraction of the abovementioned elements from the dust samples shows that the carbonate and sorbed fractions contain most of the pollution, yet the Al-silicate fraction is also contaminated, implying that soils and sediments in the source terrains of the dust are already polluted. We identified the pollutant sources by using Pb isotopes. It appears that before the beginning of the dust storm, the pollutants in the collected samples are dominated by local sources but with the arrival of dust from North Africa, the proportion of foreign pollutants increases. Organic pollutants exhibit behavior similar and complementary to that of the inorganic tracers, attesting to the importance of anthropogenic-pollutant addition en route of the dust from its remote sources. Pollution of suspended dust is observed under all synoptic conditions, yet it appears that easterly winds carry higher proportions of local pollution and westerly winds carry pollution emitted in the Cairo basin. Therefore, pollution transport by mineral dust should be accounted for in environmental models and in assessing the health-related effects of mineral dust.

  20. African Dust Blows over the Caribbean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Shuttle astronauts frequently track Saharan dust storms as they blow from north Africa across the Atlantic Ocean. Dust palls blowing from Africa take about a week to cross the Atlantic. Recently, researchers have linked Saharan dust to coral disease, allergic reactions in humans, and red tides. The top photograph, a classic image showing African dust over the Caribbean, was taken at a time when few scientists had considered the possibility. The image was taken by Space Shuttle astronauts on July 11, 1994 (STS065-75-47). This photograph looks southwest over the northern edge of a large trans-Atlantic dust plume that blew off the Sahara desert in Africa. In this view, Caicos Island in the Bahamas and the mountainous spines of Haiti are partly obscured by the dust. Closer to the foreground, (about 26 degrees north latitude), the skies are clear. The lower photograph (STS105-723-7) was taken by Space Shuttle astronauts while docked to the International Space Station on August 19, 2001. The spacecraft is over the Atlantic Ocean at roughly 45oN, 60oW. The astronauts were looking obliquely to the south; the boundaries of the dust plumes can be traced visually by the abrupt change from clear to hazy atmosphere-the hazy line marks the northern edge of the dust pall near the Caribbean. Images provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  1. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crofts, Marylee

    1986-01-01

    Reviews myths, misconceptions, and unintentional biases about Africa in United States K-12 social studies textbooks. Summarizes common topics and recommends additions. Provides the names, addresses and phone numbers of 10 university-based African Studies centers. Concludes that improvements to textbooks must continue. (JDH)

  2. African Dust Storms Reaching Puerto Rican Coast Stimulate the Secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 and Cause Cytotoxicity to Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (BEAS-2B).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G; Rivera-Ramírez, Evasomary; Méndez, Loyda B; Dávila, Julio C; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D

    2013-10-01

    African dust storm events (ADE) travel across the Atlantic Ocean (ADEAO) and reach the Puerto Rican coast (ADEPRC), potentially impacting air quality and human health. To what extent seasonal variations in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) size fractions, composition and sources trigger respiratory-adverse effects to Puerto Ricans is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of PM samples harvested during ADEAO (PM10), ADEPRC (PM2.5 and PM10) and Non-ADE (Preand Post-ADEAO and Non-ADEPRC), using BEAS-2B cells. Endotoxins (ENX) in PM2.5 and PM10 extracts and traces of metals (TMET) in PM2.5 extracts were also examined. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion and cytotoxicity were used as endpoints. ADEAO and ADEPRC extracts were found to be more cytotoxic than Non-ADE and ADEAO were more toxic than ADEPRC extracts. PM10 extracts from ADEAO and Post-ADEAO caused significant secretion of IL-8. IL-6 and IL-8 secretion was higher following treatment with PM10 and PM2.5 ADEPRC than with Non-ADEPRC extracts. ENX levels were found to be higher in PM10 ADEAO than in the rest of the samples tested. TMET levels were higher in PM2.5 ADEPRC than in Non-ADEPRC extracts. Deferoxamine significantly reduced cytotoxicity and IL-6 and IL-8 secretion whereas Polymyxin B did not. TMET in PM2.5 fractions is a major determinant in ADEPRC-induced toxicity and work in conjunction with ENX to cause toxicity to lung cells in vitro. ENX and TMET may be responsible, in part, for triggering PM-respiratory adverse responses in susceptible and predisposed individuals. PMID:25002916

  3. The Barcelona Dust Forecast Center: The first WMO regional meteorological center specialized on atmospheric sand and dust forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Terradellas, Enric; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Benincasa, Francesco; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (WMO SDS-WAS, http://sds-was.aemet.es/) project has the mission to enhance the ability of countries to deliver timely and quality sand and dust storm forecasts, observations, information and knowledge to users through an international partnership of research and operational communities. The good results obtained by the SDS-WAS Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe (NAMEE) Regional Center and the demand of many national meteorological services led to the deployment of operational dust forecast services. On June 2014, the first WMO Regional Meteorological Center Specialized on Atmospheric Sand and Dust Forecast, the Barcelona Dust Forecast Center (BDFC; http://dust.aemet.es/), was publicly presented. The Center operationally generates and distributes predictions for the NAMEE region. The dust forecasts are based on the NMMB/BSC-Dust model developed at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS). The present contribution will describe the main objectives and capabilities of BDFC. One of the activities performed by the BDFC is to establish a protocol to routinely exchange products from dust forecast models as dust load, dust optical depth (AOD), surface concentration, surface extinction and deposition. An important step in dust forecasting is the evaluation of the results that have been generated. This process consists of the comparison of the model results with multiple kinds of observations (i.e. AERONET and MODIS) and is aimed to facilitate the understanding of the model capabilities, limitations, and appropriateness for the purpose for which it was designed. The aim of this work is to present different evaluation approaches and to test the use of different observational products in the evaluation system.

  4. Airborne bacteria transported with Sahara dust particles from Northern Africa to the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, A.; Meola, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Sahara Desert is the most important source of aerosols transported across the Mediterranean towards Europe. Airborne microorganisms associated with aerosols may be transported over long distances and act as colonizers of distant habitats. However, little is known on the composition and viability of such microorganisms, due to difficulties related to their detection, collection and isolation. Here we describe an in-depth assessment of the bacterial communities associated with Sahara dust (SD) particles deposited on snow. Two distinct SD events reaching the European Alps in February and May 2014 were preserved as distinct ochre-coloured layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples from a snow profile at 3621 m a.s.l. close to the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps). SD particles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). Backward trajectories were calculated using the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Bacterial communities were charac-terized by MiSeq Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial physiological profiles were assessed by incubation of samples on BIOLOG plates. The SD-layers were generally enriched in illite and kaolinite particles as compared to the adjacent snow layers. The source of SD could be traced back to Algeria. We observed distinct bacterial community structures in the SD-layers as compared to the clean snow layers. While sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers, low abundant (<1%) phyla such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bioindicators for SD. Both phyla are adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation and thus are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-distance airborne transport. Our results show that bacteria are viable and metabolically active after the trek to the European Alps.

  5. Validation of the METEOSAT storm detection and nowcasting system Cb-TRAM with lightning network data - Europe and South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, T.; Forster, C.; de Coning, E.; Betz, H.-D.

    2013-02-01

    In this manuscript, recent changes to the DLR METEOSAT thunderstorm TRacking And Monitoring algorithm (Cb-TRAM) are presented as well as a validation of Cb-TRAM against the European ground-based LIghtning NETwork data (LINET) of Nowcast GmbH and Lightning Detection Network (LDN) data of the South African Weather Service (SAWS). The validation is conducted along the well known skill scores probability of detection (POD) and false alarm ratio (FAR) on the basis of METEOSAT/SEVIRI pixels as well as on the basis of thunderstorm objects. The values obtained demonstrate the limits of Cb-TRAM in specific as well as the limits of satellite methods in general which are based on thermal emission and solar reflectivity information from thunderstorm tops. Although the climatic conditions and the occurence of thunderstorms is quite different for Europe and South Africa, the quality score values are similar. Our conclusion is that Cb-TRAM provides robust results of well-defined quality for very different climatic regimes. The POD for a thunderstorm with intense lightning is about 80% during the day. The FAR for a Cb-TRAM detected thunderstorm which is not at least close to intense lightning activity is about 50%; if the proximity to any lightning activity is evaluated the FAR is even much lower at about 15%. Pixel-based analysis shows that the detected thunderstorm object size is not indiscriminately large, but well within the physical limitations of the method. Nighttime POD and FAR are somewhat worse as the detection scheme can not use high resolution visible information. Nowcasting scores show useful values up to approximatelly 30 min.

  6. Validation of the Meteosat storm detection and nowcasting system Cb-TRAM with lightning network data - Europe and South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, T.; Forster, C.; de Coning, E.; Betz, H.-D.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, recent changes to the Meteosat thunderstorm TRacking And Monitoring algorithm (Cb-TRAM) are presented as well as a validation of Cb-TRAM against data from the European ground-based LIghtning NETwork (LINET) of Nowcast GmbH and the South African Weather Service Lightning Detection Network (SAWS LDN). Validation is conducted along the well-known skill measures probability of detection (POD) and false alarm ratio (FAR) on the basis of Meteosat/SEVIRI pixels as well as on the basis of thunderstorm objects. The values obtained demonstrate specific limitations of Cb-TRAM, as well as limitations of satellite methods in general which are based on thermal emission and solar reflectivity information from thunderstorm cloud tops. Although the climatic conditions and the occurrence of thunderstorms are quite different for Europe and South Africa, quality score values are similar. Our conclusion is that Cb-TRAM provides robust results of well-defined quality for very different climatic regimes. The POD for a thunderstorm with intense lightning is about 80% during the day. The FAR for a Cb-TRAM detection which is not even close to intense lightning is about 50%. If only proximity to any lightning activity is required, FAR is much lower at about 15%. Pixel-based analysis shows that detected thunderstorm object size is not indiscriminately large, but well within physical limitations of the satellite method. Night-time POD and FAR are somewhat worse as the detection scheme does not use the high-resolution visible information during night-time hours. Nowcasting scores show useful values up to approximately 30 min in advance.

  7. The role of deep convection and nocturnal low-level jets for dust emission in summertime West Africa: Estimates from convection-permitting simulations

    PubMed Central

    Heinold, B; Knippertz, P; Marsham, JH; Fiedler, S; Dixon, NS; Schepanski, K; Laurent, B; Tegen, I

    2013-01-01

    [1] Convective cold pools and the breakdown of nocturnal low-level jets (NLLJs) are key meteorological drivers of dust emission over summertime West Africa, the world’s largest dust source. This study is the first to quantify their relative contributions and physical interrelations using objective detection algorithms and an off-line dust emission model applied to convection-permitting simulations from the Met Office Unified Model. The study period covers 25 July to 02 September 2006. All estimates may therefore vary on an interannual basis. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) approximately 40% of the dust emissions are from NLLJs, 40% from cold pools, and 20% from unidentified processes (dry convection, land-sea and mountain circulations); (b) more than half of the cold-pool emissions are linked to a newly identified mechanism where aged cold pools form a jet above the nocturnal stable layer; (c) 50% of the dust emissions occur from 1500 to 0200 LT with a minimum around sunrise and after midday, and 60% of the morning-to-noon emissions occur under clear skies, but only 10% of the afternoon-to-nighttime emissions, suggesting large biases in satellite retrievals; (d) considering precipitation and soil moisture effects, cold-pool emissions are reduced by 15%; and (e) models with parameterized convection show substantially less cold-pool emissions but have larger NLLJ contributions. The results are much more sensitive to whether convection is parameterized or explicit than to the choice of the land-surface characterization, which generally is a large source of uncertainty. This study demonstrates the need of realistically representing moist convection and stable nighttime conditions for dust modeling. Citation: Heinold, B., P. Knippertz, J. H. Marsham, S. Fiedler, N. S. Dixon, K. Schepanski, B. Laurent, and I. Tegen (2013), The role of deep convection and nocturnal low-level jets for dust emission in summertime West Africa: Estimates from convection

  8. Observation of atmospheric aerosols at Mt. Hua and Mt. Tai in central and east China during spring 2009 - Part 2: Impact of dust storm on organic aerosol composition and size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.; Li, J. J.; Cheng, C. L.; Zhou, B. H.; Xie, M. J.; Hu, S. Y.; Meng, J. J.; Sun, T.; Ren, Y. Q.; Cao, J. J.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Zhao, Z. Z.

    2012-05-01

    PM10 and size-resolved particles (9-stage) were simultaneously collected at Mt. Hua and Mt. Tai in central and east China during the spring of 2009 including a massive dust storm occurring on 24 April (named as DS II), and determined for organic compounds to investigate the impact of dust storm on organic aerosols. High molecular weight (HMW) n-alkanes, fatty acids, and fatty alcohols and trehalose sharply increased and almost entirely stayed in coarse particles when dust storm was present, suggesting that high level of organic aerosols in the mountain atmospheres during the event largely originated from Gobi desert plants. However, most anthropogenic aerosols (e.g. PAHs, and aromatic and dicarboxylic acids) during the event significantly decreased due to a dilution effect, indicating that anthropogenic aerosols in the mountain atmospheres during the nonevent period largely originated from local/regional sources rather than from long-range transport. Trehalose, a metabolism product enriched in biota in dry conditions, was 62 ± 78 and 421 ± 181 ng m-3 at Mt. Hua and Mt. Tai during DS II, 10-30 times higher than that in the nonevent time, indicating that trehalose may be a tracer for dust emissions from Gobi desert regions. Molecular compositions of organic aerosols in the mountain samples demonstrate that domestic coal burning is still the major source of PAHs in China. n-Alkanes and fatty acids showed a bimodal size distribution during the nonevent with a major peak in fine mode (<2.1 μm) and a small peak in coarse mode (>2.1 μm). The coarse mode significantly increased and even dominated over the whole size range when dust was present. Glucose and trehalose were also dominant in the coarse mode especially in the DS II time. PAHs and levoglucosan concentrated in fine particles with no significant changes in size distribution when dust storm occurred. However, phthalic and succinic acids showed bimodal size distribution pattern with an increase in coarse mode

  9. Observation of atmospheric aerosols at Mt. Hua and Mt. Tai in Central and East China during spring 2009 - Part 2: Impact of dust storm on organic aerosol composition and size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.; Li, J. J.; Cheng, C. L.; Zhou, B. H.; Xie, M. J.; Hu, S. Y.; Meng, J. J.; Sun, T.; Ren, Y. Q.; Cao, J. J.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Zhao, Z. Z.

    2011-12-01

    PM10 and size-resolved particles (9-stage) were simultaneously collected at Mt. Hua and Mt. Tai in Central and East China during the spring of 2009 including a massive dust storm occurring on April 24th (named as DS II), and determined for organic compounds to investigate the impact of dust storm on organic aerosols. High molecular weight (HMW) n-alkanes, fatty acids, and fatty alcohols and trehalose sharply increased and almost entirely stayed in coarse particles when dust storm was present, suggesting that high level of organic aerosols in the mountain atmospheres during the event originated from biogenic sources in the Gobi desert. However, most anthropogenic aerosols (e.g., PAHs, aromatic acids and dicarboyxlic acids) during the event significantly decreased due to a dilution effect, indicating that anthropogenic aerosols in the mountain air during the nonevent period are largely derived from local/regional sources rather than from long-range transport. Our results indicate that trehalose can be taken as a new tracer for dust emissions from desert regions since trehalose was negligible in the nonevent but abundant in the event. Molecular compositions of organic aerosols in the mountain samples further demonstrate that domestic coal burning is still the major source of PAHs in China. n-Alkanes and fatty acids showed a bimodal size distribution during the nonevent with a major peak in fine mode (<2.1 μm) and a small peak in coarse mode (>2.1 μm). The coarse mode significantly increased and even dominated over the whole size range when dust was present. Glucose and trehalose were also dominant in the coarse mode especially in the DS II time. PAHs and levoglucosan concentrated in fine particles with no significant changes in size distribution when dust storm occurred. However, phthalic and succinic acids showed bimodal size distribution pattern with an increase in coarse mode during the event, because both are formed via a gas phase oxidation and a subsequent

  10. Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

    2012-02-15

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is

  11. Sand and Dust on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Haberle, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Mars is a planet of high scientific interest. Various studies are currently being made that involve vehicles that have landed on Mars. Because Mars is known to experience frequent wind storms, mission planners and engineers require knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of Martian windblown sand and dust, and the processes involved in the origin and evolution of sand and dust storms.

  12. Decadal variability of NAO during the last millennium inferred from Saharan dust in Alpine ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwikowski, Margit; Sigl, Michael; Gäggeler, Heinz W.; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Boutron, Claude

    2010-05-01

    Interannual variability of North African atmospheric dust is strongly linked to drought conditions in the Sahel and to the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Dust generation and transport are enhanced during winter NAO(+) phases when the North African dust source regions are controlled by high pressure situations leading to less precipitation, and thus to stronger wind erosion of soil material. However, direct Saharan dust observations are limited to the last decades only. Here, we present a first highly resolved ice core record of Saharan dust from the Alps, spanning the last 1,000 years. We focus thereby on concentrations of Fe, Al, Sr, and Ca which are typical elements present in long-range transported Saharan dust. We show that the mineral dust transport to the Southern Alps is primarily controlled by drought conditions in Northern Africa and by the winter NAO. Mean dust concentrations of the last 20 years are unprecedented in the context of the last 1,000 years. These elevated Saharan dust concentrations are consistent with the observed widespread increase in dustiness and dust storm frequencies over Northern Africa from direct measurements or from satellite based observations over the last decades. In contrast, between AD 1050 and 1400, when persistent arid conditions in the main source regions of dust in Northern Africa were deduced from tree-ring data and linked to a pervasive positive NAO mode over centuries, no according imprint is recorded in the ice core mineral dust record. We assume that the low-frequency variability of the tree-ring based reconstruction of Moroccan droughts (which also form the basis for the NAO reconstruction) is biased by the method applied to remove the non-climatic growth trends from the tree-ring series. Based on the ice core data we suggest that decadal-scale variability of the NAO (Moroccan droughts) prevailed over the last 1,000 years.

  13. Dominance of goethite over hematite in iron oxides of mineral dust from Western Africa: Quantitative partitioning by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, P.; Caquineau, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Klaver, A.; Desboeufs, K.; Rajot, J. L.; Belin, S.; Briois, V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on the X-ray absorption analysis of samples of mineral dust emitted from or transported to Western Africa. We found that iron oxides account, by mass, for 38% to 72% of the total elemental iron. They are composed of minerals in the Fe(III) oxidation state: goethite (FeO·OH) and hematite (Fe2O3). The apparent fraction of iron oxide attributed to goethite is higher than hematite regardless of the source region from which the dust originated. The goethite percent content of iron oxides is in the range 52-78% (by mass), the highest values being measured for dust originating in the Sahel. The limited number of samples analyzed and the sample-to-sample variability prevent us from concluding firmly on the regional variability of the goethite-to-hematite ratio. Based on the experimental data on mineralogical composition and on concurrent measurements of the number size distribution, the optical properties of mineral dust have been calculated in a Mie approximation for homogeneous spherical particles. At 550 nm, the single-scattering albedo ω0 ranges between 0.89 and 0.93, the asymmetry factor g ranges between 0.76 and 0.8 and the mass extinction efficiency kext varies between 0.5 and 1.1 m2 g-1; these values are all in the range of those from independent direct measurements. Neglecting the partitioning between hematite and goethite and the assimilation of iron oxides by hematite, as it is often done with models, lowers the single-scattering albedo and increases the asymmetry factor in the UV-visible spectral region below 550 nm. The mass extinction efficiency is insensitive to the nature of the iron oxides but rather responds to variations in the number size distribution. The mineralogy of iron oxides should therefore be taken into account when assessing the effect of mineral dust on climate and atmospheric chemistry, in particular via interactions involving photolysis.

  14. Evolution of aerosol chemistry in Xi'an, inland China, during the dust storm period of 2013 - Part 1: Sources, chemical forms and formation mechanisms of nitrate and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.; Cheng, C. L.; Huang, Y.; Tao, J.; Ren, Y. Q.; Wu, F.; Meng, J. J.; Li, J. J.; Cheng, Y. T.; Cao, J. J.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, R.; Chen, Y. B.

    2014-11-01

    A total suspended particulate (TSP) sample was collected hourly in Xi'an, an inland megacity of China near the Loess Plateau, during a dust storm event of 2013 (9 March 18:00-12 March 10:00 LT), along with a size-resolved aerosol sampling and an online measurement of PM2.5. The TSP and size-resolved samples were determined for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and nitrogen (WSON), inorganic ions and elements to investigate chemistry evolution of dust particles. Hourly concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+ and Ca2+ in the TSP samples reached up to 34, 12, 180, 72 and 28 μg m-3, respectively, when dust peak arrived over Xi'an. Chemical compositions of the TSP samples showed that during the whole observation period NH4+ and NO3- were linearly correlated with each other (r2=0.76) with a molar ratio of 1 : 1, while SO42- and Cl- were well correlated with Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ (r2 > 0.85). Size distributions of NH4+ and NO3- presented a same pattern, which dominated in the coarse mode (> 2.1 μm) during the event and predominated in the fine mode (< 2.1 μm) during the non-event. SO42- and Cl- also dominated in the coarse mode during the event hours, but both exhibited two equivalent peaks in both the fine and the coarse modes during the non-event, due to the fine-mode accumulations of secondarily produced SO42- and biomass-burning-emitted Cl- and the coarse-mode enrichments of urban soil-derived SO42- and Cl-. Linear fit regression analysis further indicated that SO42- and Cl- in the dust samples possibly exist as Na2SO4, CaSO4 and NaCl, which directly originated from Gobi desert surface soil, while NH4+ and NO3- in the dust samples exist as NH4NO3. We propose a mechanism to explain these observations in which aqueous phase of dust particle surface is formed via uptake of water vapor by hygroscopic salts such as Na2SO4 and NaCl, followed by heterogeneous formation of nitrate on the liquid phase and subsequent absorption

  15. Glacial flour dust storms in the Gulf of Alaska: hydrologic and meteorological controls and their importance as a source of bioavailable iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, J.; Schroth, A.W.; Gasso, S.; Moy, C.M.; Levy, R.C.; Gatica, M.

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient that limits primary productivity in much of the ocean, including the Gulf of Alaska (GoA). However, the processes that transport iron to the ocean surface are poorly quantified. We combine satellite and meteorological data to provide the first description of widespread dust transport from coastal Alaska into the GoA. Dust is frequently transported from glacially-derived sediment at the mouths of several rivers, the most prominent of which is the Copper River. These dust events occur most frequently in autumn, when coastal river levels are low and riverbed sediments are exposed. The dust plumes are transported several hundred kilometers beyond the continental shelf into iron-limited waters. We estimate the mass of dust transported from the Copper River valley during one 2006 dust event to be between 25–80 ktons. Based on conservative estimates, this equates to a soluble iron loading of 30–200 tons. We suggest the soluble Fe flux from dust originating in glaciofluvial sediment deposits from the entire GoA coastline is two to three times larger, and is comparable to the annual Fe flux to GoA surface waters from eddies of coastal origin. Given that glaciers are retreating in the coastal GoA region and in other locations, it is important to examine whether fluxes of dust are increasing from glacierized landscapes to the ocean, and to assess the impact of associated Fe on marine ecosystems.

  16. Dragon Breath in the American West: Inter-Annual Correlations Between Dust Storms in Asia and PM10 in the Western U.S. as Seen by IMPROVE and MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Hsu, N. C.; Jaffe, D. A.; Jeong, M.; Gong, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    The deserts of western China and Mongolia are large sources of atmospheric dust on a hemispheric scale especially during spring when meteorological conditions are most favorable for lofting and long range transport. Specific case studies and long-term records have shown that there can be significant surface particulate matter impacts in North America from Asian dust. Our preliminary analysis using the number of Asian dust storms each spring indicates a strong correlation with PM10 in the western United States. In this work we extend this analysis to include MODIS maps of aerosol properties determined from the Deep Blue algorithm. We use area- averaged aerosol optical thickness (AOD) over the two main dust source regions, the Taklamakan Desert and the Gobi Desert, with surface aerosol observations from the IMPROVE network in the western United States. The Deep Blue algorithm provides an enhanced measure of AOD over these highly reflective dust source regions, while the IMPROVE data provides a policy-relevant measure of aerosol concentrations in the United States. Preliminary results based on three years of data show a strong correspondence between the inter-annual variations in area-averaged AOD over the Asian deserts and seasonally averaged PM10 and fine Ca2+ mass in the western United State. This work is being extended to include spring 2000 through 2006. The additional data will provide insight into factors responsible for the relationship between these two distant but related measures of air quality. We hypothesize that these factors will include meteorological conditions, transport pathways, and satellite sampling frequency.

  17. Understanding the Role of the Saharan Heat Low in Modifying Atmospheric Dust Distributions - Observations From Two Research Aircraft Flying Simultaneously Over Western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelstaedter, S.; Washington, R.; Allen, C.; Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.-P.; Kocha, C.; Lavaysse, C.

    2012-04-01

    The near-surface low pressure system that develops over western Africa in Boreal summer (know as the Saharan Heat Low) is thought to have a significant influence on regional and global climate due to its links with the Monsoon, the Northern Atlantic and the Mediterranean climate system. The SHL is associated with the deepest atmospheric boundary layer on the planet and is co-located with the highest dust loadings in the world. The processes that link the heat low and dust distribution are only poorly understood. Improving the representation of the heat low and the processes that control the emission and atmospheric distribution of dust in climate and NWP models is crucial if we are to reduce known systematic errors in climate predictions and weather forecasts. In collaboration with European partners, the UK-based consortium project "Fennec - The Saharan Climate System" aims at improving our understanding of this complex climate system by integrating for the first time coordinated ground and aircraft observations from the central Sahara, newly developed satellite products, and the application of regional and global models. On 22 June 2011, two research aircraft operating out of Fuerteventura (Spain) surveyed the Saharan Heat Low centred over Mauritania-Mali border. The aircraft flew simultaneously in the morning and in the afternoon on two different tracks thereby sampling each track four times on that day. Both aircraft were equipped with a downward looking LIDAR for aerosol detection. In total, 51 sondes were dropped during the flights making this the most comprehensive dataset to study the spatio-temporal diurnal evolution of the heat low including the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer and dust distributions. Combining LIDAR observations, satellite imagery and back-trajectory modelling we show that an aged dust layer was present in the heat low region resulting from previous day's dust activity associated with a south-moving density current from

  18. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Mohammed, Azad; Massey Simonich, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9–126 ng/m3 (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05–0.71 ng/m3 (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1–3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  19. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Garrison, V H; Majewski, M S; Foreman, W T; Genualdi, S A; Mohammed, A; Massey Simonich, S L

    2014-01-15

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9-126 ng/m(3) (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05-0.71 ng/m(3) (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses. PMID:24055669

  20. The response of the ionosphere to intense geomagnetic storms in 2012 using GPS-TEC data from East Africa longitudinal sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesema, F.; Damtie, B.; Nigussie, M.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the ionosphere to intense magnetic storms has been studied using total electron content (TEC). TEC data recorded by a series of GPS receivers at a longitude ∼ 35 ° E covering a wide range of latitudes (32 ° S to 68 ° N, geographic) is analyzed to study spatio-temporal modifications of the vertical TEC (vTEC) during storms on 07 and 09 March 2012 and on 14 July 2012. We have observed main phase positive response at equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crests and mid latitude regions in all the storms. These main phase positive responses are associated with vertical drift enhancement (intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ)) and the mechanical effect of equatorward neutral wind after an auroral activity. A daytime substantial depletion of TEC at low latitude region was observed on 08 March 2012. This is due to the combined effects of oversheilding and disturbance dynamo electric field that drive large downward drifts during the day. The low latitude and equatorial ionospheric response in the recovery phase days of March storm is found to be largely associated with the disturbance dynamo field that suppressed the upward E × B drift from EEJ observations. The summer negative and winter positive response in July storm as well as mid latitude positive response in March storm was associated with the composition changes as depicted by the O to N2 ratio from GUVI measurements.

  1. Simulation of the mineral dust emission over Northern Africa and Middle East using an aerodynamic roughness length map derived from the ASCAT/PARASOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Prigent, Catherine; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2014-05-01

    Aeolian aerodynamic roughness length in arid regions is a key parameter to predict the vulnerability of the surface to wind erosion, and, as a consequence, the related production of mineral aerosol (e.g. Laurent et al., 2008). Recently, satellite-derived roughness length at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity to use them in advanced emission schemes in global and regional models (i.e. Menut et al., 2013). A global map of the aeolian aerodynamic roughness length at high resolution (6 km) is derived, for arid and semi-arid regions merging PARASOL and ASCAT data to estimate aeolian roughness length. It shows very good consistency with the existing information on the properties of these surfaces. The dataset is available to the community, for use in atmospheric dust transport models. The present contribution analyses the behaviour of the NMMB/BSC-Dust model (Pérez et al., 2011) when the ASCAT/PARASOL satellite-derived global roughness length (Prigent et al, 2012) and the State Soil Geographic database Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) is used. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the dust emission scheme) and the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length. An annual evaluation of NMMB/BSC-Dust (for the year 2011) over Northern Africa and the Middle East using observed aerosol optical depths (AODs) from Aerosol Robotic Network sites and aerosol satellite products (MODIS and MISR) will be discussed. Laurent, B., Marticorena, B., Bergametti, G., Leon, J. F., and Mahowald, N. M.: Modeling mineral dust emissions from the Sahara desert using new surface properties and soil database, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D14218, doi:10.1029/2007JD009484, 2008. Menut, L., C. Pérez, K. Haustein, B. Bessagnet, C. Prigent, and S. Alfaro, Impact of surface roughness and soil texture on mineral dust emission

  2. Radiative Effect of Saharan Mineral Dust on the Nonlinear Dynamics of African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, D.; Nathan, T. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative effects of Saharan mineral dust aerosols on the nonlinear dynamics of African easterly waves (AEWs) are examined using the Weather Research and Forecasting Dust (WRFD) model. The WRFD model is governed by the Advanced Research WRF dynamical core, and continuity equations for twelve dust particle sizes that represent the spectrum of mineral dust aerosols observed in the atmosphere. To incorporate dust radiative effects in the model, aerosol optical properties (i.e. optical depth, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric parameters) for all dust sizes are inputted into the shortwave and longwave radiation schemes. By choosing zonal-mean distributions of zonal wind and temperature that are consistent with summer over Northwest Africa, idealized dry simulations explore the nonlinear behavior of AEWs in the presence of dust. The initial zonal-mean dust fields are represented as simple distributions that vary in structure and concentration, which are consistent with observed dust events over Africa. Specific AEW features investigated in the simulations include the evolution of wave energy, Eliassen-Palm fluxes, and spatial structures. Among the questions to be addressed are the following: How does the concentration and spatial distribution of the dust field affect the strength and timing of AEW amplitude saturation? What impact will the dust induced wave fluxes have on the horizontal or vertical shear of the zonal-mean AEJ? Does the interaction between the AEJ, AEW and dust affect the timing and location of the AEW trough, and thus the formation of critical latitudes? Answers to these questions will aid in the understanding and forecasting of AEWs, and their possible subsequent development into tropical storms.

  3. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  4. Geochemical and mineralogical evidence for Sahara and Sahel dust additions to Quaternary soils on Lanzarote, eastern Canary Islands, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Skipp, G.; Prospero, J.M.; Patterson, D.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the most important source of dust in the world today, and dust storms are frequent on the nearby Canary Islands. Previous workers have inferred that the Sahara is the most important source of dust to Canary Islands soils, with little contribution from the Sahel region. Soils overlying a late Quaternary basalt flow on Lanzarote, Canary Islands, contain, in addition to volcanic minerals, quartz and mica, exotic to the island's bedrock. Kaolinite in the soils also likely has an exotic origin. Trace-element geochemistry shows that the soils are derived from varying proportions of locally derived basalt and African dust. Major-element geochemistry, clay mineralogy and interpretation of satellite imagery suggest that dust additions to the Canary Islands come not only from the Sahara Desert, but also from the Sahel region. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Satellite Observations from SEVIRI of Saharan dust over West Africa, within the context of the Fennec project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, J.; Brindley, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the summer months, the atmosphere over the western half of the Sahara carries some of the highest dust loadings on the planet. This situation develops when intense solar heating over the dry desert creates a deep and hot low pressure system (the Saharan Heat Low, SHL), which allows a strong vertical mixing of dust. The Fennec* consortium project aims to address the deficiency in observations from the sparsely populated western Sahara through the use of field campaign measurements made in June 2011, incorporating observations from ground instruments, aircraft, and from satellite instruments such as SEVIRI, in combination with climate modelling. Fennec aims to study the poorly understood behaviour of the SHL, and the processes which take place within it. Due to their high temporal resolution, observations from SEVIRI can offer new insights into the timing of activation of specific dust sources, and the processes governing their behaviour. Here we employ a multi-year, high time-resolution record of dust detection and aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from SEVIRI using an algorithm developed at Imperial College to both identify areas of high dust loading and diagnose diurnal patterns in their activation. We will present results from the SEVIRI record alongside results from other satellite instruments such as MODIS, and place these findings in the context of the initial ground-based and in-situ observations available from the Fennec field campaign. We will also identify surface features which can contaminate the dust detection retrieval, due to their emissivities in the 8.7 micron channel. New techniques can be used to filter out these features, based on the difference between the brightness temperatures at 10.8 and 8.7 microns. Using surface visibility measurements and AERONET data, we will evaluate the consequences of this on the dust detection and AOD record. * Fennec is a consortium project which includes groups from the universities of Oxford, Imperial

  6. African dust carries microbes across the ocean: are they affecting human and ecosystem health?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Griffin, Dale W.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric transport of dust from northwest Africa to the western Atlantic Ocean region may be responsible for a number of environmental hazards, including the demise of Caribbean corals; red tides; amphibian diseases; increased occurrence of asthma in humans; and oxygen depletion (eutrophication) in estuaries. Studies of satellite images suggest that hundreds of millions of tons of dust are trans-ported annually at relatively low altitudes across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean Sea and southeastern United States. The dust emanates from the expanding Sahara/Sahel desert region in Africa and carries a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the NASA/Goddard Spaceflight Center, is conducting a study to identify microbes--bacteria, fungi, viruses--transported across the Atlantic in African soil dust. Each year, millions of tons of desert dust blow off the west African coast and ride the trade winds across the ocean, affecting the entire Caribbean basin, as well as the southeastern United States. Of the dust reaching the U.S., Florida receives about 50 percent, while the rest may range as far north as Maine or as far west as Colorado. The dust storms can be tracked by satellite and take about one week to cross the Atlantic.

  7. 1983 Transatlantic Dust Event

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization (prepared in 2001) shows dust being blown westward over the Atlantic from northern Africa in early 1983, from aerosol measurements taken by Nimbus 7's TOMS instrument. Saharan du...

  8. Evolution of aerosol chemistry in Xi'an, inland China during the dust storm period of 2013 - Part 1: Sources, chemical forms and formation mechanisms of nitrate and sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. H.; Huang, Y.; Tao, J.; Ren, Y. Q.; Wu, F.; Cheng, C. L.; Meng, J. J.; Li, J. J.; Cheng, Y. T.; Cao, J. J.; Liu, S. X.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, R.

    2014-06-01

    In the current work TSP sample was hourly collected in Xi'an, an inland mega-city of China near the Loess Plateau, during a dust storm event of 2013 (9 March 18:00-12 March 10:00 LT), along with a size-resolved aerosol sampling and an online measurement of PM2.5. The TSP and size-resolved samples were determined for EC, OC, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and nitrogen (WSON), inorganic ions and elements to investigate aerosol chemistry evolution. Hourly concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+ and Ca2+ in the TSP samples reached up to 34, 12, 180, 72 and 28 μg m-3, respectively, when dust peak arrived over Xi'an. Chemical compositions of the TSP samples showed that NH4+ and NO3- strongly correlated each other in the whole observation period (r2=0.76), while SO42- and Cl- well correlated with Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ (r2>0.85). Size distributions of NH4+ and NO3- presented a same pattern, which dominated in the coarse mode (>2.1 μm during the event and predominated in the fine mode (<2.1 μm) during the non-event. SO42- and Cl- also dominated in the coarse mode during the event, but both exhibited two equivalent peaks in the fine and coarse modes during the non-event, respectively, due to the fine mode accumulations of secondarily produced SO42- and biomass burning emitted Cl- and the coarse mode enrichments of urban soil-derived SO42- and Cl-. Linear fit regression analysis further indicated that SO42- and Cl- in the dust samples possibly exist as Na2SO4, CaSO4 and NaCl, which directly originated from Gobi desert surface soil, while NH4+ and NO3- in the dust samples exist as NH4NO3. We propose a mechanism to explain these observations in which aqueous phase of dust particle surface is formed via uptake of water vapor by hygroscopic Na2SO4, CaSO4 and NaCl, followed by heterogeneous formation of nitrate on the liquid phase and subsequent absorption of ammonia. Our data indicate that 54 ± 20% and 60 ± 23% of NH4+ and NO3- during the dust period were secondarily

  9. Investigating Sensitivity to Saharan Dust in Tropical Cyclone Formation Using Nasa's Adjoint Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming of the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  10. Investigating sensitivity to Saharan dust in tropical cyclone formation using NASA's adjoint model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    As tropical cyclones develop from easterly waves coming off the coast of Africa they interact with dust from the Sahara desert. There is a long standing debate over whether this dust inhibits or advances the developing storm and how much influence it has. Dust can surround the storm and absorb incoming solar radiation, cooling the air below. As a result an energy source for the system is potentially diminished, inhibiting growth of the storm. Alternatively dust may interact with clouds through micro-physical processes, for example by causing more moisture to condense, potentially increasing the strength. As a result of climate change, concentrations and amount of dust in the atmosphere will likely change. It it is important to properly understand its effect on tropical storm formation. The adjoint of an atmospheric general circulation model provides a very powerful tool for investigating sensitivity to initial conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently developed an adjoint version of the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) dynamical core, convection scheme, cloud model and radiation schemes. This is extended so that the interaction between dust and radiation is also accounted for in the adjoint model. This provides a framework for examining the sensitivity to dust in the initial conditions. Specifically the set up allows for an investigation into the extent to which dust affects cyclone strength through absorption of radiation. In this work we investigate the validity of using an adjoint model for examining sensitivity to dust in hurricane formation. We present sensitivity results for a number of systems that developed during the Atlantic hurricane season of 2006. During this period there was a significant outbreak of Saharan dust and it is has been argued that this outbreak was responsible for the relatively calm season. This period was also covered by an extensive observation campaign. It is shown that the

  11. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  12. Scientists Track 'Perfect Storm' on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Two dramatically different faces of our Red Planet neighbor appear in these comparison images showing how a global dust storm engulfed Mars with the onset of Martian spring in the Southern Hemisphere. When NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged Mars in June, the seeds of the storm were caught brewing in the giant Hellas Basin (oval at 4 o'clock position on disk) and in another storm at the northern polar cap.

    When Hubble photographed Mars in early September, the storm had already been raging across the planet for nearly two months obscuring all surface features. The fine airborne dust blocks a significant amount of sunlight from reaching the Martian surface. Because the airborne dust is absorbing this sunlight, it heats the upper atmosphere. Seasonal global Mars dust storms have been observed from telescopes for over a century, but this is the biggest storm ever seen in the past several decades.

    Mars looks gibbous in the right photograph because it is 26 million miles farther from Earth than in the left photo (though the pictures have been scaled to the same angular size), and our viewing angle has changed. The left picture was taken when Mars was near its closest approach to Earth for 2001 (an event called opposition); at that point the disk of Mars was fully illuminated as seen from Earth because Mars was exactly opposite the Sun.

    Both images are in natural color, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

  13. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Ragaini, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  14. Potential implications of mine dusts on human health: A case study of Mukula Mine, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Momoh, Abuh; E. Mhlongo, Sphiwe; Abiodun, Olukoga; Muzerengi, Confidence; Mudanalwo, Matamela

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the levels of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) in ambient air within Mukula mine and the potential risks to mineworkers and inhabitants of the adjoining Mukula community’s health. Methods : An SPM was used to measure the levels of particulate matter (PM10) in and around the mining site. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to determine significance level of PM10 in ambient air. Results: Suspended particulate matter in the air ranged from 60.25 to 1820.45 µg/m3. The lowest value of SPM was more than four times the required World Health Organisation’s allowable level in ambient air, which the mine workers and locals would be inhaling. Conclusion: Continuous inhalation of mine dusts by mine workers and locals could result in pulmonary fibrosis, silicosis and lung cancer. The findings from this study support the need to have in place the necessary control measures that will drastically reduce SPM in the air. Such measure includes wet drilling and blasting, sprinkling of water on the mine roads and planting of vegetation around the mines and neighbouring communities. PMID:24550971

  15. Organic Extracts from African Dust Storms Stimulate Oxidative Stress and Induce Inflammatory Responses in human lung cells through Nrf2 but not NF-kB

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I.; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G.; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D.

    2015-01-01

    The health impact of the global African dust event (ADE) phenomenon in the Caribbean has been vaguely investigated. Heavy metals in ADE and Non-ADE extracts were evaluated for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant capacity by cells using, deferoxamine mesylate (DF) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Results show that ADE particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) induces ROS and stimulates oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with DF reduces ROS in ADE and Non-ADE extracts and in lung cells demonstrating that heavy metals are of utmost importance. Glutathione-S-transferase and Heme Oxygenase 1 mRNA levels are induced with ADE PM and reduced by DF and NAC. ADE extracts induced Nrf2 activity and IL-8 mRNA levels significantly more than Non-ADE. NF-κB activity was not detected in any sample. Trace elements and organic constituents in ADE PM2.5 enrich the local environment load, inducing ROS formation and activating antioxidant-signaling pathways increasing pro-inflammatory mediator expressions in lung cells. PMID:25769104

  16. Environmental factors controlling the seasonal variability in particle size distribution of modern Saharan dust deposited off Cape Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Carmen A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Merkel, Ute; Iversen, Morten H.; Fischer, Gerhard; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2016-09-01

    The particle sizes of Saharan dust in marine sediment core records have been used frequently as a proxy for trade-wind speed. However, there are still large uncertainties with respect to the seasonality of the particle sizes of deposited Saharan dust off northwestern Africa and the factors influencing this seasonality. We investigated a three-year time-series of grain-size data from two sediment-trap moorings off Cape Blanc, Mauritania and compared them to observed wind-speed and precipitation as well as satellite images. Our results indicate a clear seasonality in the grain-size distributions: during summer the modal grain sizes were generally larger and the sorting was generally less pronounced compared to the winter season. Gravitational settling was the major deposition process during winter. We conclude that the following two mechanisms control the modal grain size of the collected dust during summer: (1) wet deposition causes increased deposition fluxes resulting in coarser modal grain sizes and (2) the development of cold fronts favors the emission and transport of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. Individual dust-storm events throughout the year could be recognized in the traps as anomalously coarse-grained samples. During winter and spring, intense cyclonic dust-storm events in the dust-source region explained the enhanced emission and transport of a larger component of coarse particles off Cape Blanc. The outcome of our study provides important implications for climate modellers and paleo-climatologists.

  17. Climatic controls of the interannual to decadal variability in Saudi Arabian dust activity: Towards the development of a seasonal prediction tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Notaro, M.; Liu, Z.; Alkolibi, F.; Fadda, E.; Bakhrjy, F.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric dust significantly influences the climate system, as well as human life in Saudi Arabia. Skillful seasonal prediction of dust activity with climatic variables will help prevent some negative social impacts of dust storms. Yet, the climatic regulators on Saudi Arabian dust activity remain largely unaddressed. Remote sensing and station observations show consistent seasonal cycles in Saudi Arabian dust activity, which peaks in spring and summer. The climatic controls on springtime and summertime Saudi Arabian dust activity during 1975-2010 are studied using observational and reanalysis data. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) of the observed Saudi Arabian dust storm frequency shows a dominant homogeneous pattern across the country, which has distinct interannual and decadal variations, as revealed by the power spectrum. Regression and correlation analyses reveal that Saudi Arabian dust activity is largely tied to precipitation on the Arabian Peninsula in spring and northwesterly (Shamal) wind in summer. On the seasonal-interannual time scale, warm El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase (El Niño) in winter-to-spring inhibits spring dust activity by increasing the precipitation over the Rub'al Khali Desert, a major dust source region on the southern Arabian Peninsula; warm ENSO and warm Indian Ocean Basin Mode (IOBM) in winter-to-spring favor less summer dust activity by producing anomalously low sea-level pressure over eastern north Africa and Arabian Peninsula, which leads to the reduced Shamal wind speed. The decadal variation in dust activity is likely associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which impacts Sahel rainfall and North African dust, and likely dust transport to Saudi Arabia. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and tropical Indian Ocean SST also have influence on the decadal variation in Saudi Arabian dust activity, by altering precipitation over the Arabian Peninsula and summer Shamal wind speed. Using eastern

  18. Dust transport into Martian polar latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere, and its return to the planet's surface, is implicated in the formation of the polar layered terrain and the dichotomy in perennial CO2 polar cap retention in the two hemispheres. A three dimensional model was used to study Martian global dust storms. The model accounts for the interactive feedbacks between the atmospheric thermal and dynamical states and an evolving radiatively active suspended dust load. Results from dust storm experiments, as well as from simulations in which there is interest in identifying the conditions under which surface dust lifting occurs at various locations and times, indicate that dust transport due to atmospheric eddy motions is likely to be important in the arrival of suspended dust at polar latitudes. The layered terrain in both polar regions of Mars is interpreted as the reality of cyclical episodes of volatile (CO2, H2O) and dust deposition.

  19. Atmospheric microbiology in coastal northern California during Asian dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Rhodes, K. A.; Griffin, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    Each year, billions of tons of dust are swept from deserts in China and Africa across the globe to the US and Caribbean. Microorganisms are likely hitchhikers aboard this aerosolized dust, with potential human health and ecological impacts. In order to investigate the presence of bacteria and fungi in dust storms from Asia, atmospheric samples for cultivatable microbiological analysis were collected during the NASA Extended- Modis Validation Experiment (EVE), occurring April 21-30, 2004 and coinciding with seasonal Asian dust storm activity. Samples were taken by Twin Otter aircraft along the coast of northern California ( ˜100 km offshore of Monterey to San Francisco). An ˜100 km horizontal leg was flown at ˜100 km altitude, typically in the marine boundary layer, followed by a vertical spiral to the dust layer (as indicated by aerosol extinction monitoring) and a second horizontal leg in the dust layer at higher altitudes (2,100-4,200 m). Air samples were taken via Venturi tube inlets with sterile Millipore filter holders outfitted with 47 mm diameter test filters connected to a vacuum pump system. Total sample time varied and was based on flight conditions and EVE objectives. Typical flow rates were 40 lpm and average sample times were ˜1hr in the marine layer and ˜30 minutes in the dust layer. Control samples for handling and contamination were also obtained. Microbial culture of the filters was conducted using sterile techniques and R2A agar, with filters incubated in the dark at room temperature and monitored for growth over a 2-week period. Fungi and bacterial colonies were further isolated on fresh plates of R2A and Tryptic Soy Broth for the purpose of cataloging/storage. No isolates were obtained from samples of dust layers at altitude. This result may be explained by: i) inadequate sample volumes to detect extremely low bacterial numbers, though sample volumes ranged from 750-2100 liters, ii) light dust layer concentrations during the sampling period

  20. Investigations of the March 2006 African dust storm using ground-based column-integrated high spectral resolution infrared (8-13 μm) and visible aerosol optical thickness measurements: 1. Measurement procedures and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M.; Gautier, C.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    2009-06-01

    The infrared (IR) aerosol optical thickness (AOT) spectra of Saharan dust measured during the Portable Infrared Aerosol Transmission Experiment (PIRATE) are reported. Saharan dust optical thickness (extinction) spectra from 8 to 13 μm were obtained using column-integrated solar transmission measurements in Puerto Rico in July 2005 and Senegal in January and March 2006 (during a dust plume) using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The FTIR measured the solar spectral irradiance in the IR in the presence of Saharan dust, and the AOT was determined by comparing the measured spectra to modeled downwelling spectra without dust for the same atmospheric temperature profile, solar zenith angle, water vapor, and ozone concentrations. The modeled dust-free spectra are generated using the Santa Barbara Disort Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) program. The measured dust AOT is compared with modeled AOT spectra obtained using Mie theory with dust indices of refraction from Volz and Fouquart with assumed lognormal size distributions. When the visible AOT values from nearby Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sensors are compared to the IR AOT values, results from various dust loadings show that the IR dust AOT at 9.5 μm is typically only one third that of the visible (670 nm) dust AOT, but there is some evidence that this ratio could increase for larger dust size distributions. The surface IR dust forcing is determined to be about -0.4 W/m2 by summing the dusty and clear irradiance differences.

  1. Richness and Diversity in Dust Stormborne Biomes at the Southeast Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katra, Itzhak; Arotsker, Luba; Krasnov, Helena; Zaritsky, Arieh; Kushmaro, Ariel; Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-06-01

    Dust storms include particulate matter that is transported over land and sea with biota that could impact downwind ecosystems. In addition to the physico-chemical compositions, organismal diversities of dust from two storm events in southern Israel, December 2012 (Ev12) and January 2013 (Ev13), were determined by pyro-sequencing using primers universal to 16S and 18S rRNA genes and compared. The bio-assemblages in the collected dust samples were affiliated with scores of different taxa. Distinct patterns of richness and diversity of the two events were influenced by the origins of the air masses: Ev13 was rich with reads affiliated to Betaproteobacteria and Embryophyta, consistent with a European origin. Ev12, originated in north-Africa, contained significantly more of the Actinobacteria and fungi, without conifers. The abundance of bacterial and eukaryotic reads demonstrates dissemination of biological material in dust that may impose health hazards of pathogens and allergens, and influence vegetation migration throughout the world.

  2. Richness and diversity in dust stormborne biomes at the southeast mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Katra, Itzhak; Arotsker, Luba; Krasnov, Helena; Zaritsky, Arieh; Kushmaro, Ariel; Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Dust storms include particulate matter that is transported over land and sea with biota that could impact downwind ecosystems. In addition to the physico-chemical compositions, organismal diversities of dust from two storm events in southern Israel, December 2012 (Ev12) and January 2013 (Ev13), were determined by pyro-sequencing using primers universal to 16S and 18S rRNA genes and compared. The bio-assemblages in the collected dust samples were affiliated with scores of different taxa. Distinct patterns of richness and diversity of the two events were influenced by the origins of the air masses: Ev13 was rich with reads affiliated to Betaproteobacteria and Embryophyta, consistent with a European origin. Ev12, originated in north-Africa, contained significantly more of the Actinobacteria and fungi, without conifers. The abundance of bacterial and eukaryotic reads demonstrates dissemination of biological material in dust that may impose health hazards of pathogens and allergens, and influence vegetation migration throughout the world. PMID:24919765

  3. Richness and diversity in dust stormborne biomes at the southeast mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Katra, Itzhak; Arotsker, Luba; Krasnov, Helena; Zaritsky, Arieh; Kushmaro, Ariel; Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-06-12

    Dust storms include particulate matter that is transported over land and sea with biota that could impact downwind ecosystems. In addition to the physico-chemical compositions, organismal diversities of dust from two storm events in southern Israel, December 2012 (Ev12) and January 2013 (Ev13), were determined by pyro-sequencing using primers universal to 16S and 18S rRNA genes and compared. The bio-assemblages in the collected dust samples were affiliated with scores of different taxa. Distinct patterns of richness and diversity of the two events were influenced by the origins of the air masses: Ev13 was rich with reads affiliated to Betaproteobacteria and Embryophyta, consistent with a European origin. Ev12, originated in north-Africa, contained significantly more of the Actinobacteria and fungi, without conifers. The abundance of bacterial and eukaryotic reads demonstrates dissemination of biological material in dust that may impose health hazards of pathogens and allergens, and influence vegetation migration throughout the world.

  4. Richness and Diversity in Dust Stormborne Biomes at the Southeast Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Katra, Itzhak; Arotsker, Luba; Krasnov, Helena; Zaritsky, Arieh; Kushmaro, Ariel; Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Dust storms include particulate matter that is transported over land and sea with biota that could impact downwind ecosystems. In addition to the physico-chemical compositions, organismal diversities of dust from two storm events in southern Israel, December 2012 (Ev12) and January 2013 (Ev13), were determined by pyro-sequencing using primers universal to 16S and 18S rRNA genes and compared. The bio-assemblages in the collected dust samples were affiliated with scores of different taxa. Distinct patterns of richness and diversity of the two events were influenced by the origins of the air masses: Ev13 was rich with reads affiliated to Betaproteobacteria and Embryophyta, consistent with a European origin. Ev12, originated in north-Africa, contained significantly more of the Actinobacteria and fungi, without conifers. The abundance of bacterial and eukaryotic reads demonstrates dissemination of biological material in dust that may impose health hazards of pathogens and allergens, and influence vegetation migration throughout the world. PMID:24919765

  5. Dust Mitigation for Martian Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Blakeley Shay

    2011-01-01

    One of the efforts of the In-Situ Resource Utilization project is to extract oxygen, fuel, and water from the Martian air. However, the surface of Mars is covered in a layer of dust, which is uploaded into the atmosphere by dust devils and dust storms. This atmospheric dust would be collected along with the air during the conversion process. Thus, it is essential to extract the dust from the air prior to commencing the conversion. An electrostatic precipitator is a commonly used dust removal technology on earth. Using this technology, dust particles that pass through receive an electrostatic charge by means of a corona discharge. The particles are then driven to a collector in a region of high electric field at the center of the precipitator. Experiments were conducted to develop a precipitator that will function properly in the Martian atmosphere, which has a very low pressure and is made up . of primarily carbon dioxide.

  6. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  7. The Martian dust cycle: A proposed model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of study of martian dust storms, many of their characteristics and associated processes remain enigmatic, including the mechanisms for dust raising, modes of settling, and the nature of dust deposits. However, observations of Mars dust, considerations of terrestrial analogs, theoretical models, and laboratory simulations permit the formulation of a Martian Dust Cycle Model, which consists of three main processes: (1) suspension threshold, (2) transportation, and (3) deposition; two associated processes are also included: (4) dust removal and (5) the addition of new dust to the cycle. Although definitions vary, dust includes particles less than 4 to approx. 60 microns in diameter, which by terrestrial usage includes silt, loess, clay, and aerosolic dust particles. The dust cycle model is explained.

  8. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Cloud Spirals and Outflow in Tropical Storm Katrina     View Larger Image ... heights and cloud-tracked wind velocities for Tropical Storm Katrina, as the center of the storm was situated over the Tennessee ...

  9. Forecast for the Remainder of the Leonid Storm Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The dust trails of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle lead to Leonid storms on Earth, threatening satellites in orbit. We present a new model that accounts in detail for the observed properties of dust tails evolved by the comet at previous oppositions. The prediction model shows the 1767-dust trail closer to Earth's orbit in 2001 than originally thought; increasing expected peak rates for North America observers. Predictions for the 2002 storms are less affected. We demonstrate that the observed shower profiles can be understood as a projection of the comet lightcurve.

  10. Ground/satellite observations and atmospheric modeling of dust storms originating in the high Puna-Altiplano deserts (South America): Implications for the interpretation of paleo-climatic archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiero, D. M.; Simonella, L.; Gassó, S.; Gili, S.; Stein, A. F.; Sosa, P.; Becchio, R.; Arce, J.; Marelli, H.

    2013-05-01

    This study provides a detailed description of the sources, transport, dispersion, and deposition of two major dust events originating from the high-altitude subtropical Puna-Altiplano Plateau (15-26°S; 65-69°W) in South America. A long and severe drought provided the right conditions for the onset of both events in July 2009 and 2010. Dust was transported SE and deposited over the Pampas region and was observed to continue to the Atlantic Ocean. Dust monitoring stations located downwind recorded both events, and samples were characterized through chemical and textural analysis. Through a combination of meteorological data and satellite observations (CALIPSO and MODIS detectors), we estimate the emission flux for the 2010 event. This estimate was used to constrain the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) transport model and simulate the dust event. Both satellite imagery and model results agree in the location and extension of the dust cloud. CALIPSO detected dust between ~6000 and ~8500 m a.s.l., which remained at this height during most of its trajectory. The dust cloud mixed with a strong convective system in the region, and the associated precipitation brought down significant amounts of dust to the ground. Dust particle size analysis for both events indicates that near the sources dust samples show median modes of 12.4-14.1 µm, similar to modes observed 1300 km away. Chemical composition of sediments from potential dust sources shows distinct signatures within the Puna-Altiplano Plateau, the Puna sector being clearly different from the Altiplano area. In addition, both sources are markedly different from the Patagonian chemical fingerprint. These results have important implications to improve the interpretation of paleo-environmental archives preserved on the Argentine loess, Antarctic ice cores, and Southern Ocean marine sediments.

  11. Is a change in roughness length the cause of the recent decrease in Sahelian dust emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J.

    2012-04-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from North Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global energy and carbon budgets and on air quality. Previous studies have documented changes in the dust output from North Africa on inter-annual to decadal time scales, but the exact reasons for this variability are still a matter of debate. This work uses long-term observations from seven Sahelian surface stations with almost continuous records and frequent dust storms between 1984 and 2010 to explore the trends in mean wind, dust uplift potential (DUP) and dust emission frequency (DEF). DEF is inferred from the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports. The synchronous measurement of wind allows an estimate of a local dust-uplift threshold velocity. DUP is a novel diagnostic that takes into account the non-linear relationship between wind-speed and dust uplift assuming a constant threshold velocity. ECMWF ERA-Interim 10m winds are also used for comparison. There is little evidence in the station data that the increase in vegetation and soil moisture has significantly increased the threshold velocity for dust uplift, suggesting a dominant control by atmospheric processes. Averaged over the seven stations, there is a significant decreasing trend in mean wind over the study period for all seasons, and even more so for DUP and DEF, which are highly correlated. ERA-Interim mean wind, analysed over an area encompassing the seven stations, however, shows a much weaker downward trend, largely confined to the cooler half of the year. It is hypothesized that this cool-season signal is caused by a downward trend in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which is correlated to wind and dust activity on an inter-annual basis during this time of year. The remaining large discrepancies between ERA-Interim and the station observations are unexpected and are thought to be related to recent wetter

  12. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jasper F; Parteli, Eric J R; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-10-01

    The transport of sand and dust by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This paper presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  13. Quantifying the contribution of long-range Saharan dust transport on particulate matter concentrations in Houston, Texas, using detailed elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Prospero, Joseph M; Fraser, Matthew P; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-09-17

    The trans-Atlantic transport of North African dust by summertime trade winds occasionally increases ambient particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Texas above air quality standards. Exemptions from such exceedences can be sought for episodic events that are beyond regulatory control by providing qualitative supportive information such as satellite images and back-trajectories. Herein we demonstrate that chemical mass balancing can successfully isolate, differentiate, and quantify the relative contributions from local and global mineral dust sources through detailed measurements of a wide suite of elements in ambient PM. We identified a major dust storm originating in Northwest Africa in mid-July 2008 which eventually impacted air quality in Houston during July 25, 26, and 27, 2008. Daily PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected at two sites in Houston over a 2-week period encompassing the Saharan dust episode to quantify the transported mineral dust concentrations during this peak event. Average PM concentrations more than doubled during the Saharan intrusion compared with non-Saharan. Relative concentrations of several elements often associated with anthropogenic sources were significantly diluted by crustal minerals coincident with the large-scale Saharan dust intrusion. During non-Saharan days, local mineral dust sources including cement manufacturing and soil and road dust contributed in total 26% to PM2.5 mass and 50% to PM10 mass; during the three-day Saharan episode the total dust contribution increased to 64% for PM2.5 and 85% for PM10. Importantly, this approach was also able to determine that local emissions of crustal minerals dominated the period immediately following the Saharan dust episode: simple quantification of bulk crustal materials may have misappropriated this elevated PM to trans-Atlantic transport of Saharan dust. PMID:23957269

  14. Quantifying the contribution of long-range Saharan dust transport on particulate matter concentrations in Houston, Texas, using detailed elemental analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozlaker, Ayse; Prospero, Joseph M; Fraser, Matthew P; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2013-09-17

    The trans-Atlantic transport of North African dust by summertime trade winds occasionally increases ambient particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Texas above air quality standards. Exemptions from such exceedences can be sought for episodic events that are beyond regulatory control by providing qualitative supportive information such as satellite images and back-trajectories. Herein we demonstrate that chemical mass balancing can successfully isolate, differentiate, and quantify the relative contributions from local and global mineral dust sources through detailed measurements of a wide suite of elements in ambient PM. We identified a major dust storm originating in Northwest Africa in mid-July 2008 which eventually impacted air quality in Houston during July 25, 26, and 27, 2008. Daily PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected at two sites in Houston over a 2-week period encompassing the Saharan dust episode to quantify the transported mineral dust concentrations during this peak event. Average PM concentrations more than doubled during the Saharan intrusion compared with non-Saharan. Relative concentrations of several elements often associated with anthropogenic sources were significantly diluted by crustal minerals coincident with the large-scale Saharan dust intrusion. During non-Saharan days, local mineral dust sources including cement manufacturing and soil and road dust contributed in total 26% to PM2.5 mass and 50% to PM10 mass; during the three-day Saharan episode the total dust contribution increased to 64% for PM2.5 and 85% for PM10. Importantly, this approach was also able to determine that local emissions of crustal minerals dominated the period immediately following the Saharan dust episode: simple quantification of bulk crustal materials may have misappropriated this elevated PM to trans-Atlantic transport of Saharan dust.

  15. Characterisation of mineral dust emission in the Middle EAST using the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennen, M.; Shahgedanova, M.; White, K.

    2015-12-01

    Using the Spinning Enhanced Visual and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on-board Meteosat's second generation satellite (MSG), mineral dust emissions from the Middle East were observed at a high temporal and spatial resolution between the years 2006 and 2013. This research provides a subjective derivation of mineral dust source locations in the Middle East using the thermal infrared Dust RGB product. Focusing on the brightness temperature difference around 10.8 µm channel and their spectral contrast with clear sky conditions, the Dust RGB product has been recognised as a major asset in detecting dust. While the product has already been used to map dust emissions in Sahara and south Africa, this research is the first to map dust emissions in the Middle East using SEVIRI, one of the dustiest regions in the world second only to the Sahara Desert. For every dust storm activation within the Middle East, the point of first emission is derived from visual inspection of each 15 minute image, these points were then recorded in a dust source climatology (DSC) database, along with time and direction of dust movement. To take account of potential errors inherent in this subjective detection method, a degree of confidence is associated with each data point with relevance to time of day (which has a strong effect on ability to detect dust in these products) and weather conditions, in particular presence of clouds. These results are compared with an automated retrieval using Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements form the Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS); which, due to its sun-synchronous orbit allows a measurement of dust in the atmosphere once a day. Differences in the spatial distribution of SEVIRI dust sources and MODIS inferred dust source regions can be explained by inherent transport bias in the latter's low sampling rate and prevailing wind conditions. This database will provide an important tool in further understanding dust emission processes in the region

  16. Aeolian dust experiment on climate impact: An overview of Japan China joint project ADEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, M.; Shi, G. Y.; Uno, I.; Yabuki, S.; Iwasaka, Y.; Yasui, M.; Aoki, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Kurosaki, Y.; Masuda, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Matsuki, A.; Sakai, T.; Takemi, T.; Nakawo, M.; Seino, N.; Ishizuka, M.; Satake, S.; Fujita, K.; Hara, Y.; Kai, K.; Kanayama, S.; Hayashi, M.; Du, M.; Kanai, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Zhang, X. Y.; Shen, Z.; Zhou, H.; Abe, O.; Nagai, T.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Chiba, M.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was initiated in April 2000 as a joint five-year Japan-China project. The goal was to understand the impact of aeolian dust on climate via radiative forcing (RF). Field experiments and numerical simulations were conducted from the source regions in northwestern China to the downwind region in Japan in order to understand wind erosion processes temporal and spatial distribution of dust during their long-range transportation chemical, physical, and optical properties of dust and the direct effect of radiative forcing due to dust. For this, three intensive observation periods (IOP) were conducted from April 2002 to April 2004. The in situ and network observation results are summarized as follows: (1) In situ observations of the wind erosion process revealed that the vertical profile of moving sand has a clear size dependency with height and saltation flux and that threshold wind velocity is dependent on soil moisture. Results also demonstrated that saltation flux is strongly dependent on the parent soil size distribution of the desert surface. (2) Both lidar observations and model simulations revealed a multiple dust layer in East Asia. A numerical simulation of a chemical transport model, CFORS, illustrated the elevated dust layer from the Taklimakan Desert and the lower dust layer from the Gobi Desert. The global-scale dust model, MASINGAR, also simulated the dust layer in the middle to upper free troposphere in East Asia, which originated from North Africa and the Middle East during a dust storm in March 2003. Raman lidar observations at Tsukuba, Japan, found the ice cloud associated with the dust layer at an altitude of 6 to 9 km. Analysis from lidar and the radio-sonde observation suggested that the Asian dust acted as ice nuclei at the ice-saturated region. These results suggest the importance of dust's climate impact via the indirect effect of radiative forcing due to the activation of dust into ice nuclei

  17. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  18. Impact-Mobilized Dust in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemtchinov, I. V.; Shuvalov, V. V.; Greeley, R.

    2002-01-01

    We consider dust production and entrainment into the atmosphere of Mars by impacts. Numerical simulations based on the multidimensional multimaterial hydrocode were conducted for impactors 1 to 100 m in size and velocities 11 and 20 kilometers per second. The size distribution of particles was based on experimentrr wing TNT explosions. Dust can be mobilized even when the impactor does not reach the ground through the release of energy in the atmosphere, We found that the blast produced winds entrained dust by a mechanism similar to boundary layer winds as determined from the wind-tunnel tests. For a l-m radius stony asteroid releasing its energy in the atmosphere the lifted mass of dust is larger than that in a typical dust devil and could trigger local dust storms, For a 100-m-radius meteoroid the amount of injected dust is comparable with the tota! mass of a global dust storm.

  19. New dust opacity mapping from Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Richardson, M. I.

    1993-06-01

    Global dust opacity mapping for Mars has been carried forward using the approach described by Martin (1986) for Viking IR Thermal Mapper data. New maps are presented for the period from the beginning of Viking observations, until Ls 210 deg in 1979 (1.36 Mars years). This range includes the second and more extensive planet-encircling dust storm observed by Viking, known as storm 1977b. Improvements in approach result in greater time resolution and smaller noise than in the earlier work. A strong local storm event filled the Hellas basin at Ls 170 deg, prior to the 1977a storm. Dust is retained in equatorial regions following the 1977b storm far longer than in mid-latitudes. Minor dust events appear to raise the opacity in northern high latitudes during northern spring. Additional mapping with high time resolution has been done for the periods of time near the major storm origins in order to search for clues to the mechanism of storm initiation. The first evidence of the start of the 1977b storm is pushed back to Ls 274.2 deg, preceding signs of the storm in images by about 15 hours.

  20. Utilities weather the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Lihach, N.

    1984-11-01

    Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

  1. Assessment of Iceland as a dust source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has extremely active dust sources that result in large-scale emissions and deposition on land and at sea. The dust has a volcanogenic origin of basaltic composition with about 10% Fe content. We used two independent methods to quantify dust emission from Iceland and dust deposition at sea. Firstly, the aerial extent (map) of deposition on land was extended to ocean areas around Iceland. Secondly, surveys of the number of dust events over the past decades and calculations of emissions and sea deposition for the dust storms were made. The results show that total emissions range from 30.5 (dust-event-based calculation) to 40.1 million t yr

  2. Climatology of dust distribution over West Asia from homogenized remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabavi, Seyed Omid; Haimberger, Leopold; Samimi, Cyrus

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade, West Asia has witnessed more frequent and intensified dust storms affecting Iran and Persian Gulf countries. Employing a varying threshold that takes into account systematic differences between TOMS and OMI data, TOMS-OMI Aerosol Index data are used to identify long-term changes in the horizontal distribution of dust storms in West Asia from 1980 to present. The northwest of Iraq and east of Syria are identified as emerging dusty areas, whereas east of Saudi Arabia and southeast of Iraq are identified as permanent dusty areas, including both dust sources and affected areas. Whereas the frequency of dust events increased slightly in the permanent dusty areas, it increased markedly in the emerging dusty areas. As expected, the frequency of dust events is highest in June and July. The dust source areas are identified as the Iraq-Saudi Arabia boundary region and (recently) the northwest of Iraq, using MODIS deep blue aerosol optical depth data. Subsequently, a lagged correlation was implemented between identified dust sources and whole West Asia to determine the main paths and receptors of intense dust storms. Accordingly, southwest of Iran and Persian Gulf countries were determined as main receptors of summertime dust storms in West Asia. During spring, dust storms mostly hit the northern half of the region and reach to the Caspian Sea. Analyzing atmospheric patterns, Shamal and Frontal patterns were found as dominant atmospheric circulations simultaneous with summertime and springtime dust storms, respectively.

  3. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  4. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  5. A new inventory for middle east dust source points.

    PubMed

    Moridnejad, Ali; Karimi, Neamat; Ariya, Parisa A

    2015-09-01

    We use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on both Terra and Aqua satellites to present new high-resolution mapping of major atmospheric dust source points in the Middle East region on the basis of the improved version of the recently developed Middle East Dust Index (MEDI) applied to 70 dust storms, which occurred during the period between 2001 and 2012. Results indicate that 247 different source points have participated in dust storm generation in the Middle East region in which Iraq and Syria are the highest efficient sites for dust storm generation in this region, respectively. Using extracted indices for Deep Blue algorithm, identified dust sources were classified into three levels of intensity. The frequency of occurrence approach, the relationship between high atmospheric dust content and its number of occurrences, is also used to identify sensitive source points. High-intensity dust storms are mainly located west of Iraq and the border of Iraq and Syria. We will discuss the implications of our results in understanding the global dust cycle. PMID:26297415

  6. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  7. Dust Obscures Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The dust cloud over eastern Asia was so thick on March 21, 2002, that the Korean Peninsula completely disappeared from view in this Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) image of the region. Parts of South Korea report that visibility at the surface is less than 50 m (165 feet). Airports throughout the region canceled flights due to the poor visibility. Eyewitnesses in China report that the dust was so thick in Beijing at times that visibility was limited to 100 m (330 feet), while in parts of the Gansu Province visibility was reported at less than 10 m (33 feet). Chinese officials say this is the worst dust storm to hit in more than 10 years. Dust from an earlier event still colors the air to the east of Japan. (The island of Honshu is just peeking out from under the cloud cover in these images.) Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  8. Modification of Saharan Mineral Dust during Transport across the Atlantic Ocean - Overview and Results from the SALTRACE Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Reitebuch, Oliver; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Groß, Silke; Sauer, Daniel; Althausen, Dietrich; Toledano, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    under different atmospheric conditions. On the eastern side of the Atlantic, dust plumes were quite homogenous and extended up to 6-7 km altitude. In contrast, the dust layers in the Caribbean showed three layers with different dust characteristics and were mainly below 4.5 km altitude. In the upper part of the dust layers in the Caribbean, the aerosol properties were similar to the observations near Africa. In contrast, much more variability in the dust microphysical and optical properties was observed between 0.7 and 2.5 km altitude. The aerosol optical thickness of the dust outbreaks studied in the Barabados area ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 at 500 nm. Highlights during SALTRACE included the Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados. The event was also captured by the ground-based lidar and in-situ instrumentation. Another highlight was the formation of tropical storm Chantal in the dusty environment. In our presentation, we give an overview of the SALTRACE study and investigate the impact of dust aging processes between the Cape Verde region and the Caribbean on dust microphysical and optical properties. We show vertical profiles of dust size distributions, CCN and dust optical properties and compare our results with the ground-based in-situ, sun photometer and lidar measurements. In particular, we show the results from the trans-Atlantic Lagrangian dust study and discuss similarities and differences of the dust plumes observed over Cape Verde and in the Caribbean.

  9. Desert dust and human health disorders.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2014-02-01

    Dust storms may originate in many of the world's drylands and have an effect not only on human health in the drylands themselves but also in downwind environments, including some major urban centres, such as Phoenix, Kano, Athens, Madrid, Dubai, Jedda, Tehran, Jaipur, Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, Taipei, Tokyo, Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne. In some parts of the world dust storms occur frequently throughout the year. They can transport particulate material, pollutants, and potential allergens over thousands of km from source. The main sources include the Sahara, central and eastern Asia, the Middle East, and parts of the western USA. In some parts of the world, though not all, the frequency of dust storms is changing in response to land use and climatic changes, and in such locations the health implications may become more severe. Data on the PM10 and P2.5 loadings of dust events are discussed, as are various pollutants (heavy metals, pesticides, etc.) and biological components (spores, fungi, bacteria, etc.). Particulate loadings can far exceed healthy levels. Among the human health effects of dust storms are respiratory disorders (including asthma, tracheitis, pneumonia, allergic rhinitis and silicosis) cardiovascular disorders (including stroke), conjunctivitis, skin irritations, meningococcal meningitis, valley fever, diseases associated with toxic algal blooms and mortality and injuries related to transport accidents.

  10. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  11. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  12. Wind modeling of Chihuahuan Desert dust outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, Nancy I.; Gill, Thomas E.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Bleiweiss, Max P.; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.

    The Chihuahuan Desert region of North America is a significant source of mineral aerosols in the Western Hemisphere, and Chihuahuan Desert dust storms frequently impact the Paso del Norte (El Paso, USA/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico) metropolitan area. A statistical analysis of HYSPLIT back trajectory residence times evaluated airflow into El Paso on all days and on days with synoptic (non-convective) dust events in 2001-2005. The incremental probability—a measure of the areas most likely to have been traversed by air masses arriving at El Paso during dusty days—was only strongly positively associated with the region west-southwest of the city, a zone of known dust source areas. Focused case studies were made of major dust events on 15 April and 15 December 2003. Trajectories approached the surface and MM5 (NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model) wind speeds increased at locations consistent with dust sources observed in satellite imagery on those dates. Back trajectory and model analyses suggested that surface cyclones adjacent to the Chihuahuan Desert were associated with the extreme dust events, consistent with previous studies of dust storms in the Southern High Plains to the northeast. The recognition of these meteorological patterns serves as a forecast aid for prediction of dust events likely to impact the Paso del Norte.

  13. Saharan dust, lightning and tropical cyclones in the eastern tropical Atlantic during NAMMA-06

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.; Pratt, Aaron

    2008-06-01

    During the summer of 2006, the downstream component of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses Campaign (NASA-AMMA (NAMMA)) examined African Easterly Waves (AEWs) emerging from the coast of Africa. Six of these disturbances went on to become named systems in the Tropical Atlantic. Two of the six systems (Tropical storm Debby and Hurricane Helene) developed in the extreme eastern Atlantic and were associated with dust outbreaks, elevated ice contents and frequent lightning. Here we show that in the early tropical cyclo-genesis stages of these systems there were thousands of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes as measured by a ground-lightning network. TRMM overpasses show high precipitation ice content above the freezing level and high latent heat release. Super-cooled water can be inferred in the lower parts of cloud systems in concert with observed high ice concentrations at high altitudes creating charge separation based on the large numbers of CG flashes.

  14. Simulations of Mineral Dust Content With CHIMERE-Dust Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmechtig, C.; Marticorena, B.; Menut, L.; Bergametti, G.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations of the mineral dust cycle have been performed whith CHIMERE-Dust model over a domain that includes North Africa, the Mediterranean basin and the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean (10S-60N and 90W-90E) with a 1°x1° resolution using the ECMWF (European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) meteorological fields for two years, 2000 and 2001. As a validation, we compare the simulated dust concentration fields with photometric data from the AERONET network. From the comparisons between the simulated and measured aerosol optical depth for several stations of the Mediterranean basin, the model appears to reproduce correctly the intensity and occurrences of the dust events. Over Western Africa, the results are not as satisfying since some of the most intense dust events observed on the continent and downwind are not captured by the model. In addition, the simulated events are generally underestimated compared to the measured ones. It appears that these differences in the model performances are connected to the origin of the dust plumes. For example, dust plumes coming from Libya are well simulated while dust plumes originating from the Bodélé depression not as frequent as intense as the observations suggest. Soil properties in these two regions are comparable and typical of very erodible surfaces. We thus focused on the comparison between the ECMWF 10m wind speed fields and 10m wind speed measured at the meteorological stations located in both areas. We noticed that over Libya, the measured and ECMWF 10m wind speed are in very good agreement, while the meteorological model does not reproduce the extrema of the measured wind speed in the Bodélé depression. We found that a crude empirical correction of the 10m wind field in the Bodélé Depression significantly improve the simulations in terms of occurrence and of intensity.

  15. Concentrations of Semivolatile Organic Compounds Associated with African Dust Air Masses in Mali, Cape Verde, Trinidad and Tobago, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, 2001-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mohammed, Azad; Simonich, Staci Massey

    2011-01-01

    Every year, billions of tons of fine particles are eroded from the surface of the Sahara Desert and the Sahel of West Africa, lifted into the atmosphere by convective storms, and transported thousands of kilometers downwind. Most of the dust is carried west to the Americas and the Caribbean in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). Dust air masses predominately impact northern South America during the Northern Hemisphere winter and the Caribbean and Southeastern United States in summer. Dust concentrations vary considerably temporally and spatially. In a dust source region (Mali), concentrations range from background levels of 575 micrograms per cubic meter (mu/u g per m3) to 13,000 mu/u g per m3 when visibility degrades to a few meters (Gillies and others, 1996). In the Caribbean, concentrations of 200 to 600 mu/u g per m3 in the mid-Atlantic and Barbados (Prospero and others, 1981; Talbot and others, 1986), 3 to 20 mu/u g per m3 in the Caribbean (Prospero and Nees, 1986; Perry and others, 1997); and >100 mu/u g per m3 in the Virgin Islands (this dataset) have been reported during African dust conditions. Mean dust particle size decreases as the SAL traverses from West Africa to the Caribbean and Americas as a result of gravitational settling. Mean particle size reaching the Caribbean is <1 micrometer (mu/u m) (Perry and others, 1997), and even finer particles are carried into Central America, the Southeastern United States, and maritime Canada. Particles less than 2.5 mu/u m diameter (termed PM2.5) can be inhaled deeply into human lungs. A large body of literature has shown that increased PM2.5 concentrations are linked to increased cardiovascular/respiratory morbidity and mortality (for example, Dockery and others, 1993; Penn and others, 2005).

  16. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  17. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  18. EXTREME DUST AND SMOKE EVENTS OVER THE U.S. IN 1998

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dust storms and forest fires are major PM events that occur several times a year over different parts of the US. Such events also originate outside the US, e.g., dust from Sahara and the Asian deserts and smoke from forest fires in Central America and Canada. Such dust and smok...

  19. The global transport of dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    By some estimates as much as two billion metric tons of dust are lifted into the Earth's atmosphere every year. Most of this dust is stirred up by storms, the more dramatic of which are aptly named dust storms. But more than mere dirt is carried aloft. Drifting with the suspended dust particles are soil pollutants such as herbicides and pesticides and a significant number of microorganisms-bacteria, viruses and fungi. We can gain some appreciation of how much microbial life is actually floating i