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Sample records for africa taiwan thailand

  1. 76 FR 38691 - Certain Pipe and Tube From Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... FR 8341 and tube/Thailand. 5/12/86 Welded carbon steel pipe 731-TA-271 51 FR 17384 and tube/India. 5... imports of certain pipe and tube from Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey (65 FR... carbon steel pipe from India, Thailand and Turkey (71 FR 44996). Effective August 9, 2006,...

  2. 76 FR 19788 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... determined on January 4, 2011 that it would conduct expedited reviews (76 FR 5205). The Commission... COMMISSION Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand... fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand would be likely to lead to continuation...

  3. 77 FR 66078 - Hot-Rolled Steel Products From China, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-01

    ... hot-rolled steel products from China, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine (66 FR 59561, 59563, 59562, and... of hot-rolled steel products from India and Indonesia (66 FR 60197, 60194, 60198, 60192, and 60198..., subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009)....

  4. 78 FR 24435 - Hot-Rolled Steel Products From China, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... reviews were such that a full review pursuant to section 751(c)(5) of the Act should proceed (78 FR 11901... took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's...-Rolled Steel Products From China, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine Scheduling of full...

  5. 75 FR 81309 - Stainless Steel Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade... stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice...

  6. 76 FR 50495 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan Determinations On the.... 1675(c)), that revocation of the countervailing duty order on stainless steel plate from South Africa..., South Africa, and Taiwan. \\3\\ Commissioner Charlotte R. Lane dissents with respect to the...

  7. 75 FR 59744 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade... countervailing duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan. SUMMARY:...

  8. 76 FR 65748 - Certain Pipe and Tube From Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (76 FR 38691, July 1, 2011...)] Certain Pipe and Tube From Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey; Commission... countervailing duty order on welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey, the antidumping duty orders on...

  9. 77 FR 2318 - Certain Circular Welded Pipe and Tube From Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... proceed (76 FR 65748, October 24, 2011). A record of the Commissioners' votes, the Commission's statement... took effect on November 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's...)] Certain Circular Welded Pipe and Tube From Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and...

  10. 78 FR 30271 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, South Africa, and Taiwan: Notice of Court Decision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Orders: Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from Belgium, Italy and South Africa, 64 FR 25288 (May 11, 1999... Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan, 64 FR 27756 (May 21, 1999); Notice of Amended Antidumping Duty Orders..., and Taiwan, 68 FR 11520 (March 11, 2003); and Notice of Amended Countervailing Duty Orders;...

  11. Labor force status transitions at older ages in the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand, 1970-1990.

    PubMed

    Raymo, J M; Cornman, J C

    1999-09-01

    While there is considerable evidence of a trend toward earlier retirement in the United States and Europe, trends in rapidly growing economies in other parts of the world have not been closely examined. This paper traces the labor force participation rates of older men and women in four Asian countries, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand, over the period of 1970 to 1990. Aggregate census data are used to calculate net transitions into and out of the labor force so as to permit the analysis of differences by country and cohort as well as change over time. Results show that, although men exhibit a general trend toward earlier net labor force exit, labor force participation rates at older ages remain high. Older women are found to be increasingly engaged in economic activity, especially in Singapore and Taiwan.

  12. 75 FR 30434 - Stainless Steel Plate From Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ...), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847... FR 25288). On May 21, 1999, Commerce issued antidumping duty orders on imports of certain stainless steel plate from Belgium, Canada, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan (64 FR 27756). On March...

  13. 75 FR 61699 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea... orders on stainless steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and..., South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See Initiation of...

  14. Under-recognized pertussis in adults from Asian countries: a cross-sectional seroprevalence study in Malaysia, Taiwan and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Koh, M T; Liu, C-S; Chiu, C-H; Boonsawat, W; Watanaveeradej, V; Abdullah, N; Zhang, Xh; Devadiga, R; Chen, J

    2016-04-01

    Surveillance data on the burden of pertussis in Asian adults are limited. This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of serologically confirmed pertussis in adults with prolonged cough in Malaysia, Taiwan and Thailand. Adults (⩾19 years) with cough lasting for ⩾14 days without other known underlying cause were enrolled from outpatient clinics of seven public and/or private hospitals. Single blood samples for anti-pertussis toxin antibodies (anti-PT IgG) were analysed and economic impact and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) questionnaires assessed. Sixteen (5·13%) of the 312 chronically coughing adults had serological evidence of pertussis infection within the previous 12 months (anti-PT IgG titre ⩾62·5 IU/ml). Three of them were teachers. Longer duration of cough, paroxysms (75% seroconfirmed, 48% non-seroconfirmed) and breathlessness/chest pain (63% seroconfirmed, 36% non-seroconfirmed) were associated with pertussis (P < 0·04). Of the seroconfirmed patients, the median total direct medical cost per pertussis episode in public hospitals (including physician consultations and/or emergency room visits) was US$13 in Malaysia, US$83 in Taiwan (n = 1) and US$26 in Thailand. The overall median EQ-5D index score of cases was 0·72 (range 0·42-1·00). Pertussis should be considered in the aetiology of adults with a prolonged or paroxysmal cough, and vaccination programmes considered.

  15. Thailand.

    PubMed

    1988-03-01

    Focus in this discussion of Thailand is on the following: geography; the people; history; government; the economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between Thailand and the US. In 1987, the population totaled 54 million with an annual growth rate of less than 1.6%. The infant mortality rate is 45/1000 with a life expectancy of 64.2 years. Thailand's society is relatively homogeneous with more than 85% of the people speaking a dialect of Thai and sharing a common culture. According to recent archeological studies, communities in Thailand had emerged as centers of early bronze metallurgy as early as 4000 B.C. Together with the cultivation of wet rice, this provided the impetus for social and political organization. The Thai date the founding of their nation to the 13th century. A revolution in 1932 transformed the government of Thailand from an absolute to a constitutional monarchy. This transition was smooth and nonviolent. The 1978 constitution, the 4th since 1932, provides that the kind is formally the head of state. He has little direct power but is an important popular symbol of national identity and unity. A 14-member Privy Council is appointed by the kind to advise him and, under certain conditions, to appoint a regent for the exercise of royal powers. Other state organs mandated in the constitution are the National Assembly, the Council of Ministers, the courts, and the local government. The office of the prime minister is the center of political power. Thailand is endowed with considerable natural resources, and the economy has demonstrated impressive growth. Foreign trade and investment are key aspects of the economy. Agriculture is the most important economic activity; more than 60% of the population live in rural areas. Industry and the service sector also are important and have contributed to the consistently rapid growth of the economy. Official relations between the US and Thailand date from 1833. Thailand has received US military equipment

  16. Taiwan.

    PubMed

    1988-03-01

    Attention in this discussion of Taiwan is directed to the following: geography; the people -- education, languages, religions, and cultural background; history; administration; political conditions; the economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Taiwan. In 1987 the population was estimated to be 19.7 million with an annual growth rate of 1.07%. The infant mortality rate in 1986 was 0.7% with a life expectancy of 70.8 for men and 75.8 for women. Taipei, which continues its claim of sovereignty over all of China in the name of the "Republic of China," exercises control only over the island of Taiwan, the Penghu Islands, and about 20 offshore islands, most near the China mainland. Most native Taiwanese speak a variant of the Amoy (Hokkien) dialect of Southern Fujian. The predominant religion is a combination of Buddhism and Taoism. Chinese sources show migration to Taiwan began as early as A.D. 500. Dutch traders 1st claimed the island in 1624 as a base for Dutch commerce with Japan and the China coast. The 1st major influx of migrants from the Chinese mainland came during the Dutch period. In 1664, a Chinese fleet led by the Ming loyalist Zheng Chenggong retreated from the mainland and occupied Taiwan. Zheng expelled the Dutch and established Taiwan as a base in his attempt to restore the Ming Dynasty. After his death in 1683, his successors submitted to Manchu control. Manchu China ruled Taiwan as a frontier district until it was declared a separate Chinese province in 1886. The authorities in Taipei claim to be the government of all China, including Taiwan. When President Chiang Ching-kuo died in 1988, he was succeeded by Vice President Lee Teng-hui, who had been elected along with Chiang by the National Assembly to a 6-year term. Until 1986, Taiwan's political system was effectively 1 party. Before elections in 1986, many "nonpartisans" grouped together to form Taiwan's 1st new political party in over 4 decades -- the Democratic

  17. Health-care data collecting, sharing, and using in Thailand, China mainland, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Aljunid, Syed Mohamed; Srithamrongsawat, Samrit; Chen, Wen; Bae, Seung Jin; Pwu, Raoh-Fang; Ikeda, Shunya; Xu, Ling

    2012-01-01

    This article sought to describe the health-care data situation in six selected economies in the Asia-Pacific region. Authors from Thailand, China mainland, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia present their analyses in three parts. The first part of the article describes the data-collection process and the sources of data. The second part of the article presents issues around policies of data sharing with the stakeholders. The third and final part of the article focuses on the extent of health-care data use for policy reform in these different economies. Even though these economies differ in their economic structure and population size, they share some similarities on issues related to health-care data. There are two main institutions that collect and manage the health-care data in these economies. In Thailand, China mainland, Taiwan, and Malaysia, the Ministry of Health is responsible through its various agencies for collecting and managing the health-care data. On the other hand, health insurance is the main institution that collects and stores health-care data in South Korea and Japan. In all economies, sharing of and access to data is an issue. The reasons for limited access to some data are privacy protection, fragmented health-care system, poor quality of routinely collected data, unclear policies and procedures to access the data, and control on the freedom on publication. The primary objective of collecting health-care data in these economies is to aid the policymakers and researchers in policy decision making as well as create an awareness on health-care issues for the general public. The usage of data in monitoring the performance of the heath system is still in the process of development. In conclusion, for the region under discussion, health-care data collection is under the responsibility of the Ministry of Health and health insurance agencies. Data are collected from health-care providers mainly from the public sector. Routinely collected data are

  18. Aerosol transport from Chiang Mai, Thailand to Mt. Lulin, Taiwan - Implication of aerosol aging during long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Engling, Guenter; Chang, Shih-Yu; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chang, You-Jia; Hong, Guo-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosol from Indochina may cause a potential effect on climate change in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Western Pacific. Up to now, the understanding of BB aerosol composition modification during long-range transport (LRT) is still very limited due to the lack of observational data. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at the Suthep/Doi Ang Khang (DAK) mountain sites in Chiang Mai, Thailand and the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (Mt. Lulin) in central Taiwan from March to April 2010 and from February to April 2013, respectively. During the study period, an upwind and downwind relationship between the Suthep/DAK and Lulin sites (2400 km apart) was validated by backward trajectories. Comprehensive aerosol properties were resolved for PM2.5 water-soluble inorganic ions, carbonaceous content, water-soluble/insoluble organic carbon (WSOC/WIOC), dicarboxylic acids and their salts (DCAS), and anhydrosugars. A Modification Factor (MF) is proposed by employing non-sea-salt potassium ion (nss-K+) or fractionalized elemental carbon evolved at 580 °C after pyrolized OC correction (EC1-OP) as a BB aerosol tracer to evaluate the mass fraction changes of aerosol components from source to receptor regions during LRT. The MF values of nss-SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, OC1 (fractionalized organic carbon evolved from room temperature to 140 °C), OP (pyrolized OC fraction), DCAS, and WSOC were above unity, which indicated that these aerosol components were enhanced during LRT as compared with those in the near-source region. In contrast, the MF values of anhydrosugars ranged from 0.1 to 0.3, indicating anhydrosugars have degraded during LRT.

  19. 78 FR 11901 - Hot-Rolled Steel Products From China, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... interested party group response to its notice of institution (77 FR 66078, November 1, 2012) was adequate and... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-405, 406, and 408 and 731-TA-899-901 and 906-908 (Second Review)] Hot... countervailing duty orders on hot-rolled steel products from India, Indonesia, and Thailand and the revocation...

  20. 76 FR 8345 - Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan... Antidumping Duty Orders Correction In notice document 2011-2884 appearing on pages 7151-7152 in the issue of Wednesday, February 9, 2011, make the following correction: On page 7152, in the first column, in...

  1. 76 FR 7151 - Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Order; Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, 51 FR 45152 (December 17, 1986... International Trade Administration Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan... sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil,...

  2. 75 FR 60814 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Investigation No. F.R. cite 12/17/86 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-308 51 FR 45152. weld pipe fittings/ Brazil. 12/17/86 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-310 51 FR 45152. weld pipe fittings/ Taiwan. 2/10/87 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-309 52 FR 4167. weld pipe fittings/ Japan. 7/6/92 Carbon steel butt- 731-TA-520 57...

  3. Copyright Perspectives from Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sereebenjapol, Piyathida

    2010-01-01

    Foreign students often have different conceptions of copyright than do American students. This article summarizes Thailand's Copyright Act B.E. 2537 (1994). Also included are guidelines for fair use from a Thai university, as well as a literature review discussing copyright issues in Taiwan and Japan.

  4. Health financing lessons from Thailand for South Africa on the path towards universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Mark; Pillay, Anban; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn; Panichkriangkrai, Warisa; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Teerawattananon, Yot; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Davén, Jonatan

    2016-06-01

    Five years after the release of its Green Paper on National Health Insurance (NHI),years after the institution of NHI pilot sites and following the recent release of the White Pa 4 per on NHI, South Africa (SA) needs to move beyond the phase 1 plans of policy making and healthening activities to phase 2 - putting into place the legal and institutional frameth system strengworks and systems for implementation of its universal health coverage (UHC) system. In doing so, SA can draw on considerable practical lessons from other countries' reforms in managing UHC with favourable equity outcomes over the past decade. We outline some potentially significant lessons from the Thai health financing system for SA. PMID:27245713

  5. Evolutionary relationships and reproductive isolating mechanisms in the rice frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) species complex from Sri Lanka, Thailand, Taiwan and Japan, inferred from mtDNA gene sequences, allozymes, and crossing experiments.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Masayuki; Kotaki, Manabu; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Djong, Tjong Hon; Igawa, Takeshi; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Matsui, Masafumi; Anslem, De Silva; Khonsue, Wichase; Nishioka, Midori

    2007-06-01

    The rice frog (Fejervarya limnocharis) species complex is widely distributed, from India to Japan, and most prevalently in Southeast Asia. Conspicuous morphological variation has been reported for this species complex throughout its distribution range. In the present study, we used mtDNA gene sequence and allozyme analyses to infer evolutionary affinities within this species complex using eight populations (Sri Lanka; Bangkok and Ranong in Thailand; Taiwan; and Hiroshima, Okinawa, Ishigaki and Iriomote in Japan). We also conducted crossing experiments among four populations from Japan, Thailand, and Sri Lanka in order to find out more about the reproductive isolating mechanisms that might exist among the East, Southeast, and South Asian populations of this species complex. The crossing experiments revealed that the Sri Lanka population is reproductively isolated from the Hiroshima, Bangkok, and Ranong populations by complete hybrid inviability, and that the Bangkok population may be reproductively isolated from the Hiroshima population by partial hybrid inviability. Thus, it is not unreasonable to regard the Sri Lanka population as a species separated from F. limnocharis. The mtDNA and allozyme data showed that the Ranong population is most closely related to the Bangkok population in nuclear genome, but more similar to the Okinawa and Taiwan populations in mtDNA genome. The present, preliminary survey may raise questions about the species status of these particular populations and also about the nature of the biological species concept.

  6. Was the economic crisis 1997-1998 responsible for rising suicide rates in East/Southeast Asia? A time-trend analysis for Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Sen; Gunnell, David; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Lu, Tsung-Hsueh; Cheng, Andrew T A

    2009-04-01

    In 1997-1998 a widespread economic crisis hit the economies of many East/Southeast Asian countries; its impact on suicide rates across the region has not been systematically documented. We investigated the impact of the Asian economic crisis (1997-1998) on suicide in Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore and Thailand. Suicide and population data for the period 1985-2006 were extracted from the World Health Organisation's mortality database and Taiwanese mortality statistics. Sex-specific age-standardised suicide rates for people aged 15years or above were analysed using joinpoint regression. Trends in divorce, marriage, unemployment, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita and alcohol consumption were compared with trends in suicide rates graphically and using time-series analysis. Suicide mortality decreased in the late 1980s and early 1990s but subsequently increased markedly in all countries except Singapore, which had steadily declining suicide rates throughout the study period. Compared to 1997, male rates in 1998 rose by 39% in Japan, 44% in Hong Kong and 45% in Korea; rises in female rates were less marked. Male rates also rose in Thailand, but accurate data were incomplete. The economic crisis was associated with 10,400 more suicides in 1998 compared to 1997 in Japan, Hong Kong and Korea. Similar increases in suicide rates were not seen in Taiwan and Singapore, the two countries where the economic crisis had a smaller impact on GDP and unemployment. Time-series analyses indicated that some of the crisis's impact on male suicides was attributable to increases in unemployment. These findings suggest an association of the Asian economic crisis with a sharp increase in suicide mortality in some, but not all, East/Southeast Asian countries, and that these increases were most closely associated with rises in unemployment.

  7. Health diplomacy the adaptation of global health interventions to local needs in sub-Saharan Africa and Thailand: Evaluating findings from Project Accept (HPTN 043)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Study-based global health interventions, especially those that are conducted on an international or multi-site basis, frequently require site-specific adaptations in order to (1) respond to socio-cultural differences in risk determinants, (2) to make interventions more relevant to target population needs, and (3) in recognition of ‘global health diplomacy' issues. We report on the adaptations development, approval and implementation process from the Project Accept voluntary counseling and testing, community mobilization and post-test support services intervention. Methods We reviewed all relevant documentation collected during the study intervention period (e.g. monthly progress reports; bi-annual steering committee presentations) and conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with project directors and between 12 and 23 field staff at each study site in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Thailand and Tanzania during 2009. Respondents were asked to describe (1) the adaptations development and approval process and (2) the most successful site-specific adaptations from the perspective of facilitating intervention implementation. Results Across sites, proposed adaptations were identified by field staff and submitted to project directors for review on a formally planned basis. The cross-site intervention sub-committee then ensured fidelity to the study protocol before approval. Successfully-implemented adaptations included: intervention delivery adaptations (e.g. development of tailored counseling messages for immigrant labour groups in South Africa) political, environmental and infrastructural adaptations (e.g. use of local community centers as VCT venues in Zimbabwe); religious adaptations (e.g. dividing clients by gender in Muslim areas of Tanzania); economic adaptations (e.g. co-provision of income generating skills classes in Zimbabwe); epidemiological adaptations (e.g. provision of ‘youth-friendly’ services in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania), and

  8. Human intestinal capillariasis in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Saichua, Prasert; Nithikathkul, Choosak; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt and Taiwan; major outbreaks have occurred in the Philippines and Thailand. This article reviews the epidemiology, history and sources of C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports indicated that 82 accumulated cases of intestinal capillariasis were found in Thailand from 1994-2006. That made Thailand a Capillaria-prevalent area. Sisaket, in northeast Thailand, was the first province which has reported intestinal capillariasis. Moreover, Buri Ram presented a high prevalence of intestinal capillariasis, totaling 24 cases from 1994-2006. About half of all cases have consumed raw or undercooked fish. However, even if the numbers of the intestinal capillariasis cases in Thailand is reduced, C. philippinensis infection cases are still reported. The improvement of personal hygiene, specifically avoiding consumption of undercooked fish and promoting a health education campaign are required. These strategies may minimize or eliminate C. philippinensis infection in Thailand. PMID:18203280

  9. Project Accept (HPTN 043): A Community-Based Intervention to Reduce HIV Incidence in Populations at Risk for HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Morin, Stephen F.; Fritz, Katherine; Charlebois, Edwin D.; van Rooyen, Heidi; Chingono, Alfred; Modiba, Precious; Mrumbi, Khalifa; Visrutaratna, Surasing; Singh, Basant; Sweat, Michael; Celentano, David D.; Coates, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Background Changing community norms to increase awareness of HIV status and reduce HIV-related stigma has the potential to reduce the incidence of HIV-1 infection in the developing world. Methods We developed and implemented a multi-level intervention providing community-based HIV mobile voluntary counseling and testing (CBVCT), community mobilization (CM), and post-test support services (PTSS). Forty-eight communities in Tanzania, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Thailand were randomized to receive the intervention or standard clinic-based VCT (SVCT), the comparison condition. We monitored utilization of CBVCT and SVCT by community of residence at 3 sites, which was used to assess differential uptake. We also developed Quality Assurance procedures to evaluate staff fidelity to the intervention. Findings In the first year of the study a four-fold increase in testing was observed in the intervention versus comparison communities. We also found an overall 95% adherence to intervention components. Study outcomes, including prevalence of recent HIV infection and community-level HIV stigma, will be assessed after three years of intervention. Conclusion The provision of mobile services, combined with appropriate support activities, may have significant effects on utilization of VCT. These findings also provide early support for community mobilization as a strategy for increasing testing rates. PMID:18931624

  10. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This publication explores issues related to Africa. It examines the U.S. response to the Barbary pirate states (Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli) in the early 19th century; the current AIDS crisis in Africa; and 14th century Mali and other Islamic lands through the eyes of Ibn Battuta, who traveled throughout the Muslim world. Each article…

  11. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Happel, Sue; Loeb, Joyce

    Although the activities in this unit are designed primarily for students in the intermediate grades, the document's text, illustrations, and bibliographic references are suitable for anyone interested in learning about Africa. Following a brief introduction and map work, the document is arranged into six sections. Section 1 traces Africa's history…

  12. Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crofts, Marylee

    1986-01-01

    Reviews myths, misconceptions, and unintentional biases about Africa in United States K-12 social studies textbooks. Summarizes common topics and recommends additions. Provides the names, addresses and phone numbers of 10 university-based African Studies centers. Concludes that improvements to textbooks must continue. (JDH)

  13. 78 FR 52213 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of July 10, 2013 (78 FR..., Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and Vietnam: Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... reason of imports from India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey,...

  14. Hepatitis B epidemiology in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

    PubMed

    André, F

    2000-02-18

    Asia and Africa have previously been classified as areas of high endemicity for hepatitis B virus (HBV), but in some countries highly effective vaccination programmes have shifted this pattern towards intermediate or low endemicity. Thus, China is now the only country in Asia where HBV endemicity is high. Countries with intermediate endemicity include India, Korea, the Philippines, Taiwan and Thailand, and those with low endemicity include Japan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Singapore, Sri Lanka and Malaysia. Most countries in Africa have high HBV endemicity, with the exceptions of Tunisia and Morocco, which have intermediate endemicity. Zambia has borderline intermediate/high endemicity. In the Middle East, Bahrain, Iran, Israel and Kuwait are areas of low endemicity, Cyprus, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates have intermediate endemicity, and Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Palestine, Yemen and Saudi Arabia have high endemicity. All of these Middle East countries reach a large proportion of their population with hepatitis B vaccination, which is reducing the infection rate, particularly in Saudi Arabia. The vaccination programme in Taiwan has also greatly reduced the HBV infection rate. Future vaccination programmes must take into account the mode of transmission of HBV, the healthcare infrastructure to deliver vaccination, and the socioeconomic and political factors in each individual country, to determine the most cost-effective way of infection control.

  15. Clandestine labor migration to Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsay, C

    1992-01-01

    "Illegal migration to Taiwan is a recent phenomenon but with a rapid rate of increase. Most illegal foreign workers enter on visitor's visas and overstay. This paper's detailed analysis of official data reveals that Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand are the major sources, providing a stock of mostly male workers numbering around 40,000. Sociodemographic and attitudinal changes among Taiwanese workers coupled with labor shortages in low-skilled jobs are pressuring the Taiwanese government to formulate plans for a systematic importation of foreign labor." PMID:12285774

  16. Clandestine labor migration to Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsay, C

    1992-01-01

    "Illegal migration to Taiwan is a recent phenomenon but with a rapid rate of increase. Most illegal foreign workers enter on visitor's visas and overstay. This paper's detailed analysis of official data reveals that Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand are the major sources, providing a stock of mostly male workers numbering around 40,000. Sociodemographic and attitudinal changes among Taiwanese workers coupled with labor shortages in low-skilled jobs are pressuring the Taiwanese government to formulate plans for a systematic importation of foreign labor."

  17. Spotlight Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sasat, Siriphan; Bowers, Barbara J

    2013-10-01

    Thailand is a Buddhist country located on the mainland of southeast Asia, where 3-generation homes are still common. Care of older adults is primarily a family responsibility. Recent policy changes mean that all Thais are now eligible for services through the national health care system. Almost half the population has no retirement pension, leaving responsibility for support of older adults largely to extended family. Long-term care is becoming a serious concern as the population ages, women move into the workforce, and family size decreases. Thai researchers have focused on issues related to health and nutrition, income security, housing, general population aging, local and community care and services, information and education, and quality of life. There is currently no formal long-term care system.

  18. Detection of Zika Virus Infection in Thailand, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Buathong, Rome; Hermann, Laura; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Nisalak, Ananda; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Akrasewi, Passakorn; Plipat, Tanarak

    2015-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen with reported cases in Africa, Asia, and large outbreaks in the Pacific. No autochthonous ZIKV infections have been confirmed in Thailand. However, there have been several cases reported in travelers returning from Thailand. Here we report seven cases of acute ZIKV infection in Thai residents across the country confirmed by molecular or serological testing including sequence data. These endemic cases, combined with previous reports in travelers, provide evidence that ZIKV is widespread throughout Thailand. PMID:26101272

  19. Detection of Zika Virus Infection in Thailand, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Buathong, Rome; Hermann, Laura; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Manasatienkij, Wudtichai; Nisalak, Ananda; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Akrasewi, Passakorn; Plipat, Tanarak

    2015-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne pathogen with reported cases in Africa, Asia, and large outbreaks in the Pacific. No autochthonous ZIKV infections have been confirmed in Thailand. However, there have been several cases reported in travelers returning from Thailand. Here we report seven cases of acute ZIKV infection in Thai residents across the country confirmed by molecular or serological testing including sequence data. These endemic cases, combined with previous reports in travelers, provide evidence that ZIKV is widespread throughout Thailand.

  20. Thailand's downstream projects proliferate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-03

    Thailand continues to press expansion and modernization of its downstream sector. Among recent developments: Construction of an olefins unit at Thailand's second major petrochemical complex and a worldscale aromatics unit in Thailand is threatened by rising costs. Thailand's National Petrochemical Corp (NPC) let a 9 billion yen contract to Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. and C. Itoh and Co. for a dual fuel cogeneration power plant at its Mab Ta Phud, Rayong province, petrochemical complex. Financing is in place to flash a green light for a $530 million Belgian-Thai joint venture sponsoring a worldscale polyvinyl chloride/vinyl chloride monomer plant in Thailand. Work is more than 50% complete on the $345 million second phase expansion of Thai Oil's Sri Racha refinery in Chon Buri province. Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT) endorsed a plan to install two more natural gas processing plants in Thailand to meet rapidly growing domestic demand for petroleum gas.

  1. Quantitative bedrock geology of east and Southeast Asia (Brunei, Cambodia, eastern and southeastern China, East Timor, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, North Korea, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, far-eastern Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Miller, Mark W.

    2004-01-01

    We quantitatively analyze the area-age distribution of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic bedrock based on data from the most recent digital geologic maps of East and Southeast Asia (Coordinating Committee for Coastal and Offshore Geosciences Programmes in East and Southeast Asia (CCOP) and the Geologic Survey of Japan, 1997; 1:2,000,000), published as Digital Geoscience Map G-2 by the Geological Survey of Japan. Sedimentary rocks, volcanic rocks, plutonic rocks, ultramafic rocks and metamorphic rocks cover 73.3%, 8.5%, 8.8%, 0.9%, and 8.6% of the surface area, respectively. The average ages of major lithologic units, weighted according to bedrock area, are as follows: sedimentary rocks (average stratigraphic age of 123 Myr/median age of 26 Myr), volcanic rocks (84 Myr/20 Myr), intrusive rocks (278 Myr/195 Myr), ultramafic rocks (unknown) and metamorphic rocks (1465 Myr/1118 Myr). The variability in lithologic composition and age structure of individual countries reflects the complex tectonic makeup of this region that ranges from Precambrian cratons (e.g., northeast China and North Korea) to Mesozoic-Cenozoic active margins (e.g., Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia and New Guinea). The spatial resolution of the data varies from 44 km2 per polygon (Japan) to 1659 km2 per polygon (Taiwan) and is, on average (490 km2/polygon), similar to our previous analyses of the United States of America and Canada. The temporal and spatial resolution is sufficiently high to perform age-area analyses of individual river basins larger than ˜10,000 km2 and to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between bedrock geology and river chemistry. As many rivers draining tropical, mountainous islands of East and Southeast Asia have a disproportionate effect on the dissolved and particulate load delivered to the world oceans, bedrock geology in such river drainage basins disproportionately affect ocean chemistry.

  2. Educational Reform in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Nicholas

    1975-01-01

    Recommendations for the reform of the administrative structure, curriculum and methods, and equality of Thailand's educational system are provided. This journal is available from the Unesco Regional Office for Education in Asia, Darakarn Building, 920 Sukhumvit Road, P.O. Box 1425, Bangkok, Thailand.

  3. Adult Education in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry G.; Torricelli, James

    To develop background for examining the past, present, and future of adult education in Thailand, the author initially sketches an economic and geographic profile of the country. In the second of five sections, Thailand's adult education movement is traced by examining the influences of kings, the Buddhist religion, various governments, and the…

  4. Potato production in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato production has increased dramatically in recent years in Thailand. Consumer demand for fresh and processed potatoes has driven this trend. Most potatoes are produced in northern Thailand in either double cropping highland zones or as a single winter crop following rice in lowland regions. Maj...

  5. Filariasis in Thailand*

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, M. O. T.

    1953-01-01

    Endemic filariasis in Thailand is restricted to the flat, low-lying, rural areas in the eastern coastal belt of peninsular Thailand. A large number of villages was surveyed, and 4,112 persons were examined, of whom 863 were found to be positive for microfilariae in the peripheral blood and 215 to have filarial disease. The chief manifestation was elephantiasis of the leg, which was sometimes associated with elephantiasis of the arm. The causative organism of endemic filariasis in Thailand is Wuchereria malayi. Nine species of mosquito (four of Mansonia and five of Anopheles) are vectors of W. malayi infection in Thailand. They are found naturally infected with the larval stages of W. malayi, the infection rates in the different vector species ranging between 3% and 17%. These mosquitos occur in large numbers and breed in the extensive marshes in the vicinity of the villages. The author discusses the feasibility of different measures for the control of filariasis. Under the conditions prevailing in the endemic areas of Thailand, the author considers that halting transmission by spraying dwellings with residual insecticides would be feasible as well as economical. This method was tried experimentally in a restricted area, and it was found that spraying all dwellings in a village with DDT, in a dosage of 170 mg per square foot (approximately 1.8 g per m2), effectively controlled the transmission of filarial infection and considerably lowered the incidence of vector mosquitos. PMID:13141129

  6. Thailand: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Khin, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that, out of 104 new concessions offered during 1990 by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, 33 concession blocks were recently awarded to 17 oil companies. Thailand and Vietnam also agreed last December to set up a joint committee as soon as possible to study exploration possibilities in the overlapping area both claim in the eastern Gulf of Thailand. PTT Exploration and Production (PTTEP) also is planning the joint development of an offshore area claimed by Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. If it materializes, all benefits and costs will be split three ways. The area between Thailand and Cambodia is thought to have high potential for hydrocarbons.

  7. Taiwan: country profile.

    PubMed

    Spain, D

    1984-03-01

    This discussion of Taiwan focuses on population growth, regions and cities, ethnicity and religion, households and families, housing, education, labor force, income, communication, and sources of information. Taiwan, founded in 1949, took a census in 1980. Its household registration system is efficient and provides population data on a yearly basis. In 1981 the population totaled 18.1 million, an increase of about 20% from the 1971 total of 15 million. Taiwan's population grew 1.9% in 1981, a decline from the 2.2% growth rate of 1971. The birthrate is 23 births/1000 population and the death rate is 5/1000. Taiwan's birthrate is similar to that of China's and both are higher than those of Japan or Hong Kong. Almost 1/3 of Taiwan's population is under 15. Only 4% of the population is aged 65 or over. The entire country is divided into 48 commuting rings associated with specific central cities. The capital city of Taipei and Kaohsiung are special municipalities, and certain offshore islands of Fukien Province are included in population totals. The country is further divided into 5 administrative districts for the household registration system. The Han Chinese constitute 98% of Taiwan's population. Approximately 250,000 aborigines (less than 2% of the population) live in the mountainous central and eastern parts of the island. They are believed to be of Malayan stock. Taiwan's predominant religion is a mixture of Buddhism and Taoism, introduced centuries ago by the original settlers. The family household is composed mainly of family members, including lodgers and hired workers living in the same place under the same household head. Between 1971 and 1980, the number of households in Taiwan increased from 2.6 million to 3.7 million. In 1980, 99% of all households were family households. Average was 4.8 persons for family households and 26.5 persons for nonfamily households. There were 3.7 million housing units in Taiwan in 1980. Taiwan's literacy rate was 86% in 1980, up

  8. Malaysian Students Visit Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Understanding at School, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Five students and one coordinator from the Unesco Associated Schools Project undertook a study visit to Bangkok to exchange views and experiences. Future joint projects/activities were discussed, and the students gained some insight into the life of their counterparts in Thailand. (RM)

  9. Educational Reorganization in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gue, Leslie R.

    The Comprehensive School Project, the benchmark in the steady trend toward diversification of the Thailand secondary school curriculum, is the focus of this paper. In the first part three stages of educational development are examined and discussed, followed by education in the present period, the 1960 national scheme of education, and the…

  10. Country Profiles, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkin, Gordon W.; And Others

    A profile of Thailand is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  11. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2010-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk…

  12. Sex tourism in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Many foreigners visit Thailand in search of sex. While long-distance tourism was long enjoyed by members of more privileged social classes, even the lower economical classes of Japan, Malaysia, Europe, America, and Australia can now afford to travel over long distances. This relatively new breed of tourist is more likely to be of lower socioeconomic and educational status and less likely to use condoms when having sex. An estimated 30,000 sex workers are active in Bangkok, of whom 7000/10,000 are females who work specifically in the tourism sector. 1/2-1/3 of the 600 commercial sex establishments in the city are visited by foreigners. Phuket, Pattaya, Koh Samui, and Chiangmai are also well-frequented by sex tourists. Overall, a large, diverse, inexpensive, and accessible commercial sex market exists in Thailand. One may meet sex workers quasi-ubiquitously and be assured to find someone capable of meeting one's sexual needs. With these attributes, Thailand strongly attracts tourists in search of sex. A certain degree of recklessness also prevails among those on vacation. Away from the peers and social mores of their native lands, tourists may engage in sexually activities without criticism. Likewise, Thai sex workers who cater to foreigners, especially females, enjoy more freedom and control in sexual relations than their peers who work among nationals. Neither single nor married women in Thailand are allowed much sexual freedom and are traditionally expected to be obliging docile, and submissive. The greater than normal personal latitude enjoyed by both sex worker and foreigner lead to more negotiation on condom use and overall lower use. As such, Thailand's commercial sex market with foreigners' involvement therein threatens to spread HIV to many other countries throughout the world.

  13. Sex tourism in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Van Kerkwijk, C

    1992-01-01

    Many foreigners visit Thailand in search of sex. While long-distance tourism was long enjoyed by members of more privileged social classes, even the lower economical classes of Japan, Malaysia, Europe, America, and Australia can now afford to travel over long distances. This relatively new breed of tourist is more likely to be of lower socioeconomic and educational status and less likely to use condoms when having sex. An estimated 30,000 sex workers are active in Bangkok, of whom 7000/10,000 are females who work specifically in the tourism sector. 1/2-1/3 of the 600 commercial sex establishments in the city are visited by foreigners. Phuket, Pattaya, Koh Samui, and Chiangmai are also well-frequented by sex tourists. Overall, a large, diverse, inexpensive, and accessible commercial sex market exists in Thailand. One may meet sex workers quasi-ubiquitously and be assured to find someone capable of meeting one's sexual needs. With these attributes, Thailand strongly attracts tourists in search of sex. A certain degree of recklessness also prevails among those on vacation. Away from the peers and social mores of their native lands, tourists may engage in sexually activities without criticism. Likewise, Thai sex workers who cater to foreigners, especially females, enjoy more freedom and control in sexual relations than their peers who work among nationals. Neither single nor married women in Thailand are allowed much sexual freedom and are traditionally expected to be obliging docile, and submissive. The greater than normal personal latitude enjoyed by both sex worker and foreigner lead to more negotiation on condom use and overall lower use. As such, Thailand's commercial sex market with foreigners' involvement therein threatens to spread HIV to many other countries throughout the world. PMID:12286018

  14. Trichinosis: Epidemiology in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya Jatesadapattaya; Philasri, Chutikan; Leksomboon, Ratana; Maneenin, Chanvit; Sirilaph, Samaporn; Pengsaa, Prasit

    2006-01-01

    Trichinosis is one of the most common food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand and many outbreaks are reported each year. This paper reviews the history, species, and epidemiology of the disease and food habits of the people with an emphasis on the north, northeast, central and south regions of Thailand. The earliest record of trichinosis in Thailand was in 1962 in the Mae Sariang District, Mae Hong Son Province. Since then, about 130 outbreaks have been reported involving 7392 patients and 97 deaths (1962-2005). The highest number of cases, 557, was recorded in 1983. The annual epidemiological surveillance reports of the Bureau of Epidemiology, Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, show that trichinosis cases increased from 61 in 1997 to 351 in 1998. In contrast to these figures, the number of reported cases decreased to 16 in 1999 and 128 cases in 2000. There was no record of trichinosis in 2001, but then the figures for 2002, 2003 and 2004 were 289, 126 and 212 respectively. The infected patients were mostly in the 35-44 years age group and the disease occurred more frequently in men than women at a ratio of 1.7-2.0:1. There were 84 reported cases of trichinosis in Chiang Rai, Nan, Chiang Mai, Si Sa ket, Nakhon Phanom, Kalasin, Nakhon Ratchasima, Nakhon Nayok, Nakhon Pathom and Surat Thani, provinces located in different parts of Thailand in 2005. The outbreaks were more common in the northern areas, especially in rural areas where people ate raw or under-cooked pork and/or wild animals. This indicates the need for health education programs to prevent and control trichinosis as soon as possible in the high-risk areas. PMID:17072975

  15. Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loh, Eudora I.

    1992-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 30 government documents published between 1988 and 1991 by Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Burundi, Chile, China, Columbia, Denmark, France, Gambia, Guinea Bissau, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Luxembourg, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Portugal, Rwanda, South Africa, and Thailand. Topics addressed include the environment,…

  16. Taiwan Regulation of Biobanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chien-Te; Hung, Tzu-Hsun; Yeh, Chan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces legal framework and governance structure in relation to the management and development of biobanks in Taiwan. At first, we briefly describe Taiwan's population, political system and health care system. Secondly, this research introduces biobanking framework of Taiwan including 25 biobanks established with the approval of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In those biobanks, "Taiwan Biobank" is the first and the largest government-supported biobank which comprises population-based cohort study and disease- oriented study. Since the collection of information, data, and biological specimen of biobanks often involve highly sensitive personal information, in the legal framework of Taiwan, there is a specific regulation, "Human Biobank Management Act" (HBMA), which plays an important role in regulating biobanks in Taiwan. HBMA, the Personal Information Act and other regulations constitute a comprehensive legal and regulatory privacy framework of biobanks. Through the introduction and analysis of the current legal framework applicable to biobanks, we found that there are several challenges that need to be solved appropriately that involve duplicate review systems, the obstacles in the international collaboration, and data sharing between biobanks in Taiwan.

  17. Paleotsunamis in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, J. Y.; Yu, N. T.; Chyi, S. J.; Lin, L. H.; Hirakawa, K.; Sugawara, D.

    2015-12-01

    Sitting between the Ryukyu and Manila subduction systems, Taiwan is among the world's most tectonically and seismically active areas. However, unlike Japan (from Hokkaido to the southernmost tip of Ryukyu), Taiwan is not known for tsunami events. Historical documents and folklores in Taiwan show a couple of records with different degree of certainty of tsunami, yet very few researches were conducted in paleotsunami researches. During the past two years, we have conducted detail field surveys in Taiwan, and in several chosen area we have conducted shallow bore holes, trench excavations, and following geological and geomorphological researches. Our data show that northern Taiwan has been affected by tsunami both on and off historical records, and could be as many as 8 events. In eastern Taiwan, there are three probable tsunami events, and in western Taiwan, three or four inudation events were discovered that have features very similar to tsunamis. In addtion to continuing field survey, we are performing numerical modeling based on the newly discovered geological evidences. The purpose is the reconstruct the processes of events and find the possilbe sources.

  18. Taiwan Regulation of Biobanks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chien-Te; Hung, Tzu-Hsun; Yeh, Chan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces legal framework and governance structure in relation to the management and development of biobanks in Taiwan. At first, we briefly describe Taiwan's population, political system and health care system. Secondly, this research introduces biobanking framework of Taiwan including 25 biobanks established with the approval of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In those biobanks, "Taiwan Biobank" is the first and the largest government-supported biobank which comprises population-based cohort study and disease- oriented study. Since the collection of information, data, and biological specimen of biobanks often involve highly sensitive personal information, in the legal framework of Taiwan, there is a specific regulation, "Human Biobank Management Act" (HBMA), which plays an important role in regulating biobanks in Taiwan. HBMA, the Personal Information Act and other regulations constitute a comprehensive legal and regulatory privacy framework of biobanks. Through the introduction and analysis of the current legal framework applicable to biobanks, we found that there are several challenges that need to be solved appropriately that involve duplicate review systems, the obstacles in the international collaboration, and data sharing between biobanks in Taiwan. PMID:26711420

  19. Child prostitution in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carmen

    2008-06-01

    Child prostitution is an old, global and complex phenomenon, which deprives children of their childhood, human rights and dignity. Child prostitution can be seen as the commercial sexual exploitation of children involving an element of forced labour, and thus can be considered as a contemporary form of slavery. Globally, child prostitution is reported to be a common problem in Central and South America and Asia. Of all the south-east Asian nations, the problem is most prolific in Thailand. In Thailand, there appears to be a long history of child prostitution, and this article explores the factors that underpin the Thai child sex industry and the lessons and implications that can be drawn for health care and nursing around the world.

  20. Astronomy education in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutawarakorn, Busaba; Soonthornthum, B.; Kirdkao, T.

    Thailand is one of the developing countries which pursues the goal to advance economy, technology as well as science. Education in Astronomy is considered as a supporting factor, since it is one of the basic sciences which can teach the young generation to understand and conserve their mother nature and at the same time helps to develop analytical thinking. The poster reports the present developments in astronomical education in Thailand which includes (1) current astronomy education in school and university; (2) educational activities outside school; (3) development of programs for teaching astronomy in school (including teacher training); (4) the access of educational resources via internet. Proposals for future development and collaborations will be presented and discussed.

  1. Thailand's reproductive revolution.

    PubMed

    Knodel, J

    1987-01-01

    Thailand has achieved a remarkable population revolution in the past 15 years, resulting in a fertility decline of 44%, the 3rd greatest decline of the major developing countries. Thailand is quite distinct from either China or South Korea, the leaders in fertility decline. It has neither China's authoritarian power system to enforce population control nor the highly developed, Westernized outlook of South Korea. Instead it achieved its astounding fertility drop through a noncoercive family planning program operating within a context of rapid social change and a cultural setting. Thailand's drop in population growth has touched almost all segments of Thai society. The preferred number of children among couples married less than 5 years has dropped in both rural and urban families at almost exactly the same rate, from about 3.2 in 1969 to 2.3 in 1984. Religious groups represent the only substantial difference in family size preference; Moslem women married less than 5 years stated a desired average of 3.1 children versus 2.3 for Buddhist women. The direct case of the fertility drop is a national increase in contraceptive use. In 1984, 65% of Thai women reported using contraception. The Thai population, however, was ripe for using contraception when it became available due to 1) mass media creating a desire for consumer goods, 2) the increased costs of education to parents, 3) the willingness of parents to trade off "parent repayment" from many children for a few quality children, 4) couples' autonomy in fertility decision making, 5) the high status of women in Thailand, and 6) the fact that Buddhism poses no barriers to contraception. Current trends show no immediate sign of change.

  2. Village power in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Bergey, M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the electric power system in Thailand. 99% of the country is electrified, but much of this is with diesel generators which leaves high costs but a high level of service. The paper discusses renewable energy projects which have been sited in the country, and examples of hybrid systems which have been retrofit into existing diesel generator systems. Photovoltaic and hydroelectric power projects are described. Dedicated systems have been installed for water pumping and battery charging applications.

  3. Palliative care in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Krongyuth, Panit; Campbell, Cathy L; Silpasuwan, Pimpan

    2014-12-01

    In Thailand, several barriers exist that prevent people with life-limiting illnesses from accessing good-quality palliative care, namely: lack of palliative care providers; lack of training and education for the palliative care workforce; and issues with availability and distribution of opioids. Without palliative care, people suffer needlessly during the last months of their life. This paper gives an analysis of these issues and provides recommendations for clinical practice, research and health policy that may help to alleviate these issues.

  4. Human pythiosis in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Imwidthaya, P.

    1994-01-01

    Pythium insidiosum is a protoctista and causes diseases in plants and animals. In Thailand it can cause a unique human infection of three types. The first type is a subcutaneous lesion in thalassaemic patients, with the pathological findings of a granulomatous reaction, diffuse infiltration, and oedema of the vessel walls. The patients responded to a saturated solution of potassium iodide. The second type is chronic inflammation and occlusion of blood vessels mainly in the lower extremities which results in gangrene or aneurysm formation. This type of infection is only found in thalassaemic patients and leads to amputation of the affected extremities or resection of the involved arteries. The third type is keratitis. This type of infection may or may not be associated with thalassaemia. The clinical signs and symptoms do not differentiate it from other types of myocotic keratitis. The patients end up with keratoplasty, evisceration or enucleation. Thailand is an agricultural country, and there are plenty of swampy areas and several plants to support the life cycle of Pythium. Moreover, many people suffer from thalassaemia, and there is no drug available for Pythium. Pythiosis plays an important role in medicine in Thailand. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7937448

  5. Human pythiosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Imwidthaya, P

    1994-08-01

    Pythium insidiosum is a protoctista and causes diseases in plants and animals. In Thailand it can cause a unique human infection of three types. The first type is a subcutaneous lesion in thalassaemic patients, with the pathological findings of a granulomatous reaction, diffuse infiltration, and oedema of the vessel walls. The patients responded to a saturated solution of potassium iodide. The second type is chronic inflammation and occlusion of blood vessels mainly in the lower extremities which results in gangrene or aneurysm formation. This type of infection is only found in thalassaemic patients and leads to amputation of the affected extremities or resection of the involved arteries. The third type is keratitis. This type of infection may or may not be associated with thalassaemia. The clinical signs and symptoms do not differentiate it from other types of myocotic keratitis. The patients end up with keratoplasty, evisceration or enucleation. Thailand is an agricultural country, and there are plenty of swampy areas and several plants to support the life cycle of Pythium. Moreover, many people suffer from thalassaemia, and there is no drug available for Pythium. Pythiosis plays an important role in medicine in Thailand.

  6. Caulicolous Botryosphaeriales from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trakunyingcharoen, T; Lombard, L; Groenewald, J Z; Cheewangkoon, R; To-Anun, C; Crous, P W

    2015-06-01

    Members of Botryosphaeriales are commonly encountered as endophytes or pathogens of various plant hosts. The Botryosphaeriaceae represents the predominant family within this order, containing numerous species associated with canker and dieback disease on a wide range of woody hosts. During the course of routine surveys from various plant hosts in Thailand, numerous isolates of Botryosphaeriaceae, including Aplosporellaceae were collected. Isolates were subsequently identified based on a combination of morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of a combined dataset of the ITS and EF1-α gene regions. The resulting phylogenetic tree revealed 11 well-supported clades, correlating with different members of Botryosphaeriales. Other than confirming the presence of taxa such as Lasiodiplodia theobromae, L. pseudotheobromae and Neofusicoccum parvum, new records for Thailand include Pseudofusicoccum adansoniae and P. ardesiacum. Furthermore, four novel species are described, namely Diplodia neojuniperi from Juniperus chinensis, Lasiodiplodia thailandica from Mangifera indica, Pseudofusicoccum artocarpi and Aplosporella artocarpi from Artocarpus heterophyllus, while a sexual morph is also newly reported for L. gonubiensis. Further research is presently underway to determine the pathogenicity and relative importance of these species on different woody hosts in Thailand.

  7. Human pythiosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Imwidthaya, P

    1994-08-01

    Pythium insidiosum is a protoctista and causes diseases in plants and animals. In Thailand it can cause a unique human infection of three types. The first type is a subcutaneous lesion in thalassaemic patients, with the pathological findings of a granulomatous reaction, diffuse infiltration, and oedema of the vessel walls. The patients responded to a saturated solution of potassium iodide. The second type is chronic inflammation and occlusion of blood vessels mainly in the lower extremities which results in gangrene or aneurysm formation. This type of infection is only found in thalassaemic patients and leads to amputation of the affected extremities or resection of the involved arteries. The third type is keratitis. This type of infection may or may not be associated with thalassaemia. The clinical signs and symptoms do not differentiate it from other types of myocotic keratitis. The patients end up with keratoplasty, evisceration or enucleation. Thailand is an agricultural country, and there are plenty of swampy areas and several plants to support the life cycle of Pythium. Moreover, many people suffer from thalassaemia, and there is no drug available for Pythium. Pythiosis plays an important role in medicine in Thailand. PMID:7937448

  8. Caulicolous Botryosphaeriales from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trakunyingcharoen, T; Lombard, L; Groenewald, J Z; Cheewangkoon, R; To-Anun, C; Crous, P W

    2015-06-01

    Members of Botryosphaeriales are commonly encountered as endophytes or pathogens of various plant hosts. The Botryosphaeriaceae represents the predominant family within this order, containing numerous species associated with canker and dieback disease on a wide range of woody hosts. During the course of routine surveys from various plant hosts in Thailand, numerous isolates of Botryosphaeriaceae, including Aplosporellaceae were collected. Isolates were subsequently identified based on a combination of morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of a combined dataset of the ITS and EF1-α gene regions. The resulting phylogenetic tree revealed 11 well-supported clades, correlating with different members of Botryosphaeriales. Other than confirming the presence of taxa such as Lasiodiplodia theobromae, L. pseudotheobromae and Neofusicoccum parvum, new records for Thailand include Pseudofusicoccum adansoniae and P. ardesiacum. Furthermore, four novel species are described, namely Diplodia neojuniperi from Juniperus chinensis, Lasiodiplodia thailandica from Mangifera indica, Pseudofusicoccum artocarpi and Aplosporella artocarpi from Artocarpus heterophyllus, while a sexual morph is also newly reported for L. gonubiensis. Further research is presently underway to determine the pathogenicity and relative importance of these species on different woody hosts in Thailand. PMID:26240447

  9. 78 FR 6322 - Economic Impact Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ..., Malaysia, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Turkey, and...: Netherlands, Japan, United Arab Emirates, United States, South Korea, and Thailand. The balance of the...

  10. Taiwan: growing, growing, gone.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R

    1979-10-01

    Accommodation between Taiwan and the People's Republic of China may not be inconceivable as trade contacts (though officially disallowed) grow. Because of Taiwan's well-established success and the pressing need in China to industrialize, it appears, however, that such an accommodation will occur only after China becomes more like Taiwan. Taiwan owes its success, first, to land reform and then, in the 1960s, to steady industrialization. Besides broad controls over money supply and capital designed to ward off inflationary pressures when needed, and the grand outlines for development, another factor in the island's economic success is that the government has interfered little with private enterprise. The economy has an underpinning of small to medium size businesses. There are more than 10,000 trading companies. This diverse foundation has given the economy as a whole a flexible buffer on which more sophisticated industires can be formed. PMID:12278253

  11. Diagnosis and management of imported Chikungunya fever in Taiwan: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko; Hsieh, Hsiao-Chen; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Lin, Wei-Ru; Lu, Po-Liang; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2010-05-01

    Chikungunya virus, a mosquito-borne alphavirus, is endemic in Africa and Southeast Asia but is rarely reported in Taiwan. We report the case of a Taiwanese woman who developed Chikungunya fever, which was first diagnosed by a clinician rather than by fever screening at an airport. The woman presented with fever, maculopapular rash, and arthralgia, the triad for the disease, on the day she returned home after a trip to Malaysia. These symptoms are very similar to those of dengue fever, which is endemic in Southern Taiwan. Chikungunya infection was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and seroconversion on paired serum specimens. For approximately 40 years until 2006, no cases of Chikungunya fever had been found in Taiwan. Clinicians in Taiwan should consider Chikungunya fever as a possible diagnosis for a febrile patient with arthralgia, rash, and a history of travel to an endemic area, such as Africa or Southeast Asia.

  12. The dinosaurs of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffetaut, Eric; Suteethorn, Varavudh

    After more than ten years of Thai-French research, the Thai dinosaur record, from the continental rocks of the Khorat Plateau, is, to date, the best in Southeast Asia. The oldest evidence consists of footprints of small dinosaurs from the Middle to Late Jurassic Phra Wihan Formation. The most varied dinosaur assemblage hitherto found in Thailand comes from the Late Jurassic Sao Khua Formation; it is dominated by sauropods, but also includes various theropods. Large theropod footprints are known from the Early Cretaceous Phu Phan Formation. Theropods and the primitive ceratopsian Psittacosaurus occur in the Aptian-Albian Khok Kruat Formation.

  13. Fires in Thailand and Cambodia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Many fires (red pixels) were seen burning across Thailand and Southern Cambodia on January 8, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Almost the entire countries of Thailand (center) and Cambodia (lower right) were remarkably cloud-free in this true-color scene. Thailand is bordered by the countries of Myanmar to the west, Laos to the north and east, and Cambodia to the southeast. Thailand's capital city of Bangkok sits on its southern shore, where the Chao Phraya River flows into the large bay in the northern Gulf of Thailand. Moving eastward from Bangkok, one can see the Tonle Sap-Cambodia's largest inland body of water. Waters from the Tonle Sap flow southeastward and converge with the mighty Mekong River, just east of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital. The Mekong River defines much of the border between Thailand and Laos. The captal of Laos-Viangchan-is situated just across the Mekong from Thailand's northern border. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. Family Planning in Thailand.

    PubMed

    1980-12-01

    Until 1958, when the World Bank Economic Mission reported that Thailand's high rate of population growth was adversely affecting its development efforts, Thailand had a pronatalist policy. Government concern led to a formal declaration of voluntary family planning support in 1970. The National Family Planning Program (NFPP) under the auspices of the Ministry of Public Health has the following objectives: reduce the population growth rate to 2.5% per annum by the end of 1976; inform and motivate women about family planning, using methods of mass communication; increase availability of family planning services throughout the country; and to integrate family planning activities with maternal and child health services. Activities include training and supervision of NFPP personnel, research and evaluation, and the coordination of public and private family planning organizations. The NFPP has been successful in reducing the growth rate to 2.55% in 1976 and in surpassing its target contraceptive acceptor level of 1,975,000 to a level of 2,490,850. Future concerns of NFPP include its dependence on foreign financial support, and its need to encourage local funding.

  15. Reprieve for Thailand's AIDS campaign.

    PubMed

    Clements, A

    1992-07-25

    A promilitary coalition began to govern Thailand in March 1992. It reduced the budget for the original proposed national AIDS awareness campaign from 30 million British pounds to almost 15 million British pounds. The Ministry of Health professed that the campaign had exaggerated the problem of AIDS in Thailand and had damaged tourism. Yet prodemocracy demonstrations in Bangkok in which troops killed many protesters restored the politicians who started the AIDS campaign to power in May 1992. There were to remain in power until new elections in September 1992. In July, the Minister of Health, Mechai Viravaidya, said he would step down if the government did not completely restore the 30 million British pounds for the AIDS campaign. It then increased the budget to almost that amount. Mr. Viravaidya initiated Thailand's open policy on the AIDS crisis and was known as Mr. Condom. He claimed that at the present HIV prevalence rate, Thailand may have between 2-4 million HIV infected people by 2000. If the country would take on anti-AIDS efforts now, however, they could cut the spread of HIV by 75%. As of mid-1992, about 400,000 people living in Thailand were HIV positive. The AIDS campaign planned to sue the mass media to inform people about AIDS especially those in universities and schools and high risk occupational groups. The increasing number of construction workers in Bangkok and existing sex workers were a high risk occupational group. At the 2nd national seminar of AIDS, the Minister of Health reproached tourists who come to Thailand for its sex industry. He said that Thailand does not need the 1 billion British pounds they bring to Thailand annually, and Thais do not want their homeland to be referred to as the sex capital.

  16. Reprieve for Thailand's AIDS campaign.

    PubMed

    Clements, A

    1992-07-25

    A promilitary coalition began to govern Thailand in March 1992. It reduced the budget for the original proposed national AIDS awareness campaign from 30 million British pounds to almost 15 million British pounds. The Ministry of Health professed that the campaign had exaggerated the problem of AIDS in Thailand and had damaged tourism. Yet prodemocracy demonstrations in Bangkok in which troops killed many protesters restored the politicians who started the AIDS campaign to power in May 1992. There were to remain in power until new elections in September 1992. In July, the Minister of Health, Mechai Viravaidya, said he would step down if the government did not completely restore the 30 million British pounds for the AIDS campaign. It then increased the budget to almost that amount. Mr. Viravaidya initiated Thailand's open policy on the AIDS crisis and was known as Mr. Condom. He claimed that at the present HIV prevalence rate, Thailand may have between 2-4 million HIV infected people by 2000. If the country would take on anti-AIDS efforts now, however, they could cut the spread of HIV by 75%. As of mid-1992, about 400,000 people living in Thailand were HIV positive. The AIDS campaign planned to sue the mass media to inform people about AIDS especially those in universities and schools and high risk occupational groups. The increasing number of construction workers in Bangkok and existing sex workers were a high risk occupational group. At the 2nd national seminar of AIDS, the Minister of Health reproached tourists who come to Thailand for its sex industry. He said that Thailand does not need the 1 billion British pounds they bring to Thailand annually, and Thais do not want their homeland to be referred to as the sex capital. PMID:1392821

  17. Education for development in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sasidhorn, N

    1981-06-01

    In the future freedom for Thailand and for other developing countries will depend more than ever on political stability and economic expansion. Both of these factors are critically tied to education. For nearly 50 years Thailand has struggled to make democracy in Southeast Asia a reality but with little success. If democracy in Thailand is to withstand the encroachment of communism from the east, the people need to be educated to assume their civic responsibilities. 80% of the 46 million Thai citizens live in rural areas, and agriculture is their primary occupation. Yet, if agricultural production is to keep pace with demand, the already fast growing agriculturally related services and industries must expand and move into the rural areas. This means that education must spread to a larger segment of the population in these areas. The emphasis on reading and writing must remain in education, but the aims toward which these skills are directed need to change to reflect the new purpose of education in Thailand, i.e., socioeconomic and political development. Education leaders in Thailand must replace the purely personal goals of traditional practices with social and national goals that promote development. Education for life--Thailand's new goal--focuses on the political and economic problems of the country by initially concentrating on basic literacy. Possibly the most underdeveloped resource in Thailand is the human resources of the rural population. The structure of Thai education must also change if the rural people are to be served. Additionally, education in Thailand must be spread over a longer time; it must become a lifelong experience.

  18. Country watch: Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sivaraksa, S

    1996-01-01

    Many of Thailand's 300,000 monks have only a rudimentary understanding of HIV/AIDS, and, in 1990, some senior monks debated about whether or not to ordain persons with AIDS as monks. Buddhism teaches that preparing for death is a way to gain enlightenment, however, and in 1991 a Buddhist monk was asked to develop a hospice care center for AIDS sufferers. After a difficult first year, the center expanded to include day care and home care facilities. In addition, a community care project was begun to raise HIV awareness. These centers have reduced the still widespread stigmatization of persons with AIDS, and three other monasteries have begun treating persons with AIDS with kindness, herbs, and meditation. As Buddhists begin to approach AIDS more seriously, the next step will be to find a way to convey information about the disease to the poverty-stricken population which will be most affected by it.

  19. AIDS in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M P

    1991-02-18

    The reasons for the rapid spread of AIDS in Thailand, and the impact of the unique non-governmental agency Population and Community Development Association (PDA) directed by the charismatic Dr. Mechai are described. The rapid spread of AIDS in Thailand is due to presence of all possible factors facilitating HIV transmission, a large population of injecting drug addicts, an extensive mobile domestic and tourist sex industry, and an active gay community. The number of HIV-positive persons rose from 179 in 1988 to 16,359 in 1989, and is now estimated at 100,000. 1% of the Thai population works in prostitution, and from 16% of the high-income to 72% of the low-income prostitutes are infected, with their infection rates rising 10% per month. 75% of Thai men use cheap prostitutes. While the government was ignoring the AIDS threat in the early '80s, Dr. Mechai, whose name translated as "condom," was organizing the grass-roots community-based condom distribution system PDA, said to be responsible for the fall in annual population growth from 3.4% in 1968 to 1.5% in 1990. His organization now distributes contraceptives to 16,000 villages by 12,000 volunteers. He uses booklets, cards, cassettes, slide shows, videos and appearances with condom-inflating contests and costumes to de-mystify condoms with humor. Now AIDS messages are heard in taxis, on military TV and radio, and in remote villages. Converting knowledge into practice is more difficult, requiring tactful convincing of brothel operators and finding some way to reach their clients, who exert economic control over young female prostitutes. PMID:1867668

  20. AIDS in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M P

    1991-02-18

    The reasons for the rapid spread of AIDS in Thailand, and the impact of the unique non-governmental agency Population and Community Development Association (PDA) directed by the charismatic Dr. Mechai are described. The rapid spread of AIDS in Thailand is due to presence of all possible factors facilitating HIV transmission, a large population of injecting drug addicts, an extensive mobile domestic and tourist sex industry, and an active gay community. The number of HIV-positive persons rose from 179 in 1988 to 16,359 in 1989, and is now estimated at 100,000. 1% of the Thai population works in prostitution, and from 16% of the high-income to 72% of the low-income prostitutes are infected, with their infection rates rising 10% per month. 75% of Thai men use cheap prostitutes. While the government was ignoring the AIDS threat in the early '80s, Dr. Mechai, whose name translated as "condom," was organizing the grass-roots community-based condom distribution system PDA, said to be responsible for the fall in annual population growth from 3.4% in 1968 to 1.5% in 1990. His organization now distributes contraceptives to 16,000 villages by 12,000 volunteers. He uses booklets, cards, cassettes, slide shows, videos and appearances with condom-inflating contests and costumes to de-mystify condoms with humor. Now AIDS messages are heard in taxis, on military TV and radio, and in remote villages. Converting knowledge into practice is more difficult, requiring tactful convincing of brothel operators and finding some way to reach their clients, who exert economic control over young female prostitutes.

  1. Inclusive Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu-Tien, Wu

    2007-01-01

    As an echo of the worldwide movement of inclusive education and because of the conviction of inclusive ideas, special education in Taiwan is moving toward a goal of inclusion, though not necessarily full inclusion. While its terminology is as yet undesignated, principles and strategies are significantly reflected in the Special Education Act and…

  2. Country Profiles, Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeny, S. M.; And Others

    A profile of Taiwan is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  3. Promising results. Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rojanapithayakorn, W

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the Thailand Ministry of Health's program for promotion of condom use. Since 1984, findings indicate that AIDS has been a leading public health problem that is spread through heterosexual intercourse. Since 1989, the government has conducted IEC programs to increase knowledge and change attitudes and practices for controlling HIV infections, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). A variety of institutions dispense condoms. Condom use was promoted over a 25-year period. The 100% condom program, implemented in 1989, has been successful in promotion of condoms among sex workers and clients. IEC to prevent AIDS has been operating since 1984. Messages focus on prevention of sexually transmitted HIV infections and correct use of condoms. Family planning programs over the past 30 years have supplied condoms free of charge. Condoms are available for sale through pharmacies and convenience stores. Health service facilities also supply condoms. The 100% condom program began as a pilot in Ratchaburi province. All owners of sex establishments cooperated. The program was initiated jointly by government officials and owners of sex establishments. Owners instructed sex workers about use of condoms in all sexual encounters. Penalties were imposed on owners for noncompliance. Condom use increased gradually and STDs declined. In 1991, the program was expanded nationwide. In 1992, condom quality control measures were instituted. Water soluble lubricants for condoms were added to prevent breakage and increase customer satisfaction. This program needs to be expanded to other sectors of the population. PMID:12294621

  4. Bat consumption in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Schuler, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Background Human consumption of bats poses an increasing public health threat globally. Communities in which bat guano is mined from caves have extensive exposure to bat excreta, often harvest bats for consumption, and are at risk for bat-borne diseases. Methods This rapid ethnographic study was conducted in four provinces of Thailand (Ratchaburi, Sakaeo, Nakorn Sawan, and Phitsanulok), where bat guano was mined and sold during the period April–August 2014. The aim of this study was to understand behaviors and risk perceptions associated with bat conservation, exposure to bats and their excreta, and bat consumption. Sixty-seven respondents playing various roles in bat guano mining, packaging, sale, and use as fertilizer participated in the study. Data were collected through interviews and/or focus group discussions. Results In spite of a bat conservation program dating back to the 1980s, the benefits of conserving bats and the risks associated with bat consumption were not clear and infrequently articulated by study respondents. Discussion Since bat consumption continues, albeit covertly, the risk of bat-borne diseases remains high. There is an opportunity to reduce the risk of bat-borne diseases in guano-mining communities by strengthening bat conservation efforts and raising awareness of the health risks of bat consumption. Further research is suggested to test behavior change strategies for reducing bat consumption. PMID:26806167

  5. Country watch: Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tantipiwatanaskul, P

    1999-01-01

    In response to the needs of people living with HIV/AIDS (PHA) and their families to improve preventive clinical practice, the Department of Mental Health in the Ministry of Public Health in Thailand launched a counseling service in 1993 in every public hospital in the country. The initial goal of the counseling training program was to train 10,000 counselors in 3 years. As more people got trained, a critical mass of counselors helped the health care system understand its essence. However, technical and administrative problems have caused the return of these counselors to their hospitals. Due to this, the Department of Mental Health set up a technical center in 1996 to support counselors in the northern region. Working with different groups, the AIDS Counselling Center for Training and Research (ACCTaR) develops understanding of problems and practical solutions for the counseling service system. One key program of ACCTaR involved people with HIV/AIDS to help themselves. ACCTaR developed a new counseling training program based on practical models developed by and for the PHA. After 7 years of implementation, most health workers and administrators now consider counseling a core activity in HIV/AIDS prevention and care programs, as well as in other health areas.

  6. Southern Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Southern Africa     View larger JPEG image ... visibility of smoke plumes and haze. The southern tip of South Africa is at the bottom of the image, and Zambia is at the top. ... MISR Team. Aug 25, 2000 - South Africa to Zambia including the Okavango Delta. project:  ...

  7. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk versus formula. We found that the time when mothers returned to work coincided with the duration of guaranteed leave. In particular, mothers with a labor pension plan resumed work significantly earlier than mothers with no pension plan, and mothers with no pension plan returned to work significantly later than those with pension plans. The short leave of absence guaranteed under existing policies translated into mothers spending less time with their children and being more likely to exclusively use formula by 6 months after birth. In contrast, mothers who resumed work later than 6 months after birth were more likely to have not worked before birth or to have quit their jobs during pregnancy. Implications and recommendations for parental leave policy in Taiwan are discussed. PMID:21603074

  8. Pleistocene microvertebrates from fissure-fillings in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Suteethorn, Varavudh

    Microvertebrates (and among them specially, rodents) have contributed to the elaboration of precise biochronological time scales and to the reconstitution of Pleistocene paleoenvironments in several parts of the world (North America, Africa, Europe and Japan). They have been demonstrated to be highly sensitive to climatic changes since they are very sensitive to vegetation changes. Up to now, no data is available for Southeast Asia and very few information is available concerning the nature of climatic changes which affected that part of the tropical world during the Pleistocene. In the past few years, we have discovered several fissure fillings in Thailand yielding numerous remains of microvertebrates which have been extracted by dissolution in acetic acid solution. These deposits are the result of the feeding activity of predators, like owls or diurnal raptors, whose pellets are accumulated in caves or fissures. Eleven localities, located in Central (2), Eastern (1), Western (2) and Peninsular Thailand (6) have been investigated so far. Several rodent species, belonging to 9 genera of Murinae (rats and mice) and 9 genera of Sciuridae (squirrels) have been identified in these localities. The most important differences with the extant representatives often concern the size of the teeth of these fossil species. The meaning of these size differences is not yet clearly understood since they can be attributed either to significant time differences between localities (microevolution) or as the result of size variations related to climatic changes (clinical variations). More data will have to be collected to calibrate the temporal frame. Already, important modification of the geographic distribution of some species have been discovered which testify that during the Pleistocene, significative climatic changes have affected Southeast Asia. For example, Exilisciurus, a squirrel which is presently restricted to Borneo has been recognized in Peninsular Thailand. Also, Iomys

  9. The refugee situation in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D

    1985-01-01

    This statement by Dennis Gallagher, Director of the Refugee Policy Group, discusses the refugee situation in Thailand. Laotians have been entering Thailand in increasing numbers; some 86,000 Laotians are now in Thailand whereas there were 67,000 in November, 1983. The time is well past for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and the Thai government to initiate screening for new arrivals from Laos to determine whether or not they are refugees. The question needs to be examined as to what national interest and humanitarian obligation Thailand has to afford safe havens for refugees and others from Indochina. While the Thai government does not want the Khmer resistance to be crippled, it also must be concerned that providing the resistance with a base of operations of Thai territory could invite attack by the Vietnamese. Refugee resettlement alone has not and cannot resolve the refugee problem in Thailand; a more comprehensive approach is required. In areas where there is a substantial number of Indochinese who are unlikely to be resettled, projects need to be developed and funded that contribute to a more productive life for them and, preferably, for the broader region in which they reside. It is important that modification of policies occur within a comprehensive framework rather than on a piecemeal basis. Encouraging the Thais to accept supporting self-reliance projects will not happen if commitments to resettlement are not sustained. That the refugee situation in Thailand is complex and is constantly evolving argues for policies that permit more options for addressing it. PMID:12178936

  10. Bovine ephemeral fever in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F I; Hsu, A M; Huang, K J

    2001-11-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is a vector-borne disease of cattle, spanning tropical and subtropical zones of Asia, Australia, and Africa, caused by Ephemerovirus of the Rhabdoviridae. Taiwan has had 3 BEF epizootics, occurring in 1989, 1996, and 1999, since the vaccination regimen was initiated in 1984, given once a year in the spring with a single-dose formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine using the 1983 isolate as the seed virus. This study evaluated the 1999 population immunity against BEF virus in Taiwanese dairy cows with a neutralization test and whether the recent BEF virus isolates have mutated significantly from the vaccine virus. In March 1999, before vaccination, 94% of the animals studied were already seropositive, suggestive of an endemic or persistent infection from the previous year. By June 1999, when 51% of herds had been vaccinated, the antibody level rose, and by September 1999, the serum-neutralizing antibody (SNA) level fell to a minimum, preceding the outbreak of BEF in October 1999, during which the antibody levels of vaccinated cows continued to decline while those of unvaccinated cows rose sharply. The results suggest that, in 1999, vaccine-induced immunity was partially protective against BEE Because the current single-dose vaccination regimen resulted in minimal population immunity by September, a booster vaccination given in late summer may be advisable for future disease control. Analysis of the glycoprotein gene of Taiwanese isolates between 1983 and 1999 showed a 97.4-99.6% homology, with an alteration of 4 amino acids in antigenic sites G1, G3b, and G3c. Phylogenetic analysis of Taiwanese isolates revealed at least 2 distinct clusters: the 1983-1989 isolates and the 1996-1999 isolates. Both were distinct from 2 Japanese strains and the Australian BB7721 strain. Thus, at least 2 distinct BEF viruses, which had diverged before 1983, existed in Taiwanese dairy cows. PMID:11724135

  11. Taiwan Space Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jann-Yenq

    Taiwan space programs consist of FORMOSAT-1, -2, and -3, sounding rockets, and international cooperation. FORMOSAT-1, a low-earth-orbit (LEO) scientific experimental satellite, was launched on January 26, 1999. It circulates with an altitude of 600 km and 35 degree inclination around the Earth every 97 minutes, transmitting collected data to Taiwan's receiving stations approximately six times a day. The major mission of FORMOSAT-1 includes three scientific experiments for measuring the effects of ionospheric plasma and electrodynamics, taking the ocean color image and conducting Ka-band communication experiment. The FORMOSAT- 1 mission was ended by June 15, 2004. FORMOSAT-2, launched on May 21, 2004 onto the Sun-synchronous orbit located at 891 km above ground. The main mission of FORMOSAT-2 is to conduct remote sensing imaging over Taiwan and on terrestrial and oceanic regions of the entire earth. The images captured by FORMOSAT-2 during daytime can be used for land distribution, natural resources research, environmental protection, disaster prevention and rescue work etc. When the satellite travels to the eclipsed zone, it observes natural phenomena of lighting in the upper atmosphere. FORMOSAT-3 is an international collaboration project between Taiwan and the US to develop advanced technology for the real-time monitoring of the global climate. This project is also named Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate, or FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC for short. Six micro-satellites were launched on 15 April 2007 and eventually placed into six different orbits at 700 800 kilometer above the earth ground. These satellites orbit around the earth to form a LEO constellation that receives signals transmitted by the 24 US GPS satellites. The satellite observation covers the entire global atmosphere and ionosphere, providing over 2,500 global sounding data per day. These data distribute uniformly over the earth's atmosphere. The global climate information

  12. A new species of the leafhopper genus Matsumuratettix Metcalf (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Deltocephalinae: Deltocephalini) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yani; Dietrich, Christopher H; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-01-01

    Matsumura (1914) established Epitettix with the type species E. hiroglyphicus Matsumura, 1914 from Taiwan. Metcalf (1952) proposed the new name Matsumuratettix for Epitettix Matsumura, which was preoccupied by Epitettix Hancock, 1907. Dash & Viraktamath (1995) synonymised Pruthiorosius Ghauri with Matsumuratettix Metcalf. Currently, Matsumuratettix comprises a single species, M. hiroglyphicus (Matsumura, 1914). The genus is easily distinguished from other Old World Deltocephalini by the aedeagal shaft being strongly laterally compressed over the distal two-thirds and with asymmetrical distal spines. In this paper, a new species is described from Thailand and a key to distinguish the two known species is provided. PMID:27396016

  13. Women's Information Centre, Bangkok, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The Women's Information Centre in Bangkok, Thailand, focuses on the creation of modules for professional skills training, awareness-building, organizing, and self-determination of women in rural areas, urban areas, and factories. It also supports women-related research. (JOW)

  14. North Central Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This radar image shows the dramatic landscape in the Phang Hoei Range of north central Thailand, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the city of Lom Sak. The plateau, shown in green to the left of center, is the area of Phu Kradung National Park. This plateau is a remnant of a once larger plateau, another portion of which is seen along the right side of the image. The plateaus have been dissected by water erosion over thousands of years. Forest areas appear green on the image; agricultural areas and settlements appear as red and blue. North is toward the lower right. The area shown is 38 by 50 kilometers (24 by 31 miles) and is centered at 16.96 degrees north latitude, 101.67 degrees east longitude. Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar on October 3, 1994, when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR is a joint mission of the U.S./German and Italian space agencies.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by

  15. Clinical studies on angiostrongyliasis cantonensis among children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, K P; Chen, E R

    1991-12-01

    Angiostrongyliasis cantonensis is a disease commonly seen in Taiwan, especially in children during the summer rainy season. Most of the cases reported in other countries were adults and their clinical manifestations were different from children. Studies on special clinical characteristics of angiostrongyliasis cantonensis among 82 children in Taiwan were performed. Thirty-eight (46.3%) were male and 44 (53.7%) females, and 87% could be traced to a history of contact with the intermediate host, the giant African snail, Achatina fulica, which plays a major role in transmission. The incubation period (average: 13.2 days) was shorter in children than in adults (average: 16.5 days). In about one-third (30.5%) of the total cases, the clinical form was meningoencephalitis, which was higher than in adult cases seen in Thailand (5%). The most common clinical symptom was fever (91.5%), followed by vomiting and headache. The percentages of sixth and seventh cranial neuropathy associated with the disease were 19.5% and 11.0% respectively. Ophthalmologic fundoscopy showed that 25.0% with papilledema which was significantly higher than seen in adults (12%) in Thailand. Most of the cases in this study had peripheral leukocytosis (above 10,000/mm3) and eosinophilia (above 10%); the percentages were 82.9% and 84.1%, respectively. The worm recovery rate from cerebrospinal fluid by lumbar puncture of 82 cases was 41.5%; 141 worms were collected from one female patient using a pumping method. In the recent 2 years, albendazole and levamisole were used clinically with good result.

  16. Heptageniidae (Insecta, Ephemeroptera) of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonsoong, Boonsatien; Braasch, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Nine genera and twenty-two species of heptageniid mayflies from Thailand are defined in this present work as well as one suggested further subgenus, Compsoneuria (Siamoneuria) kovaci (species “incertae sedis”) including some particular characters. Taxonomic remarks, diagnoses, line drawings of key characters, distribution, habitat and biological data, and a larval key to the genera and species are provided. The chorionic eggs of eight genera and eight species were observed and shown using a scanning electron microscope. PMID:23794803

  17. Infrared view of Bangkok, Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Bight of Bangkok and the city of Bangkok, Thailand are visible in this west looking view. The city, of almost four million people, long famous as a jewelry, silver and bronze ware trading center is also a major rice grower. Situated in a vast lowland ideal for rice agriculture, it is now a major export commodity. The vast network of canals are used for irrigation and drainage and the deforested hills of the Bilauktaung Range are seen nearby.

  18. Synchrotrons: Taiwan unveils new synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Noriaki

    2015-05-01

    Competitive activities around the globe to develop the world's brightest synchrotron light source have accelerated in recent years. Taiwanese scientists now aspire to be at the top of the list with the recently constructed Taiwan Photon Source.

  19. Scrap car recycling in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Tai, H.S.; Fan, R.K.S.

    1997-12-31

    The official figure of registered automobiles released by the Ministry of Transportation of Taiwan, R.O.C. as of the end of April 1996, is approximately 4.8 millions. Among them, 18% of the cars are between seven and ten years old and 15% of the cars are old than ten years. The result of this large number of old cars is the problem of abandoned cars on the street of Taiwan. This phenomena not only hinders traffic flow but also undermines the living quality in the cities. To minimize these negative effects, EPA has promulgated a Scrap Motor Vehicles Management Regulation to enforce the scrap car recycling in Taiwan. Under this regulation, a buyer of a new vehicle has to pay the Scrap Motor Vehicle Disposal fee (NT$ 3000, or US$ 110 for a car; and NT$ 700, or US$ 25 for a motorcycle). This paper presents the current status of scrap car recycling in Taiwan.

  20. [Gastric cancer in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Wu, M S; Lin, J T; Lee, W J; Yu, S C; Wang, T H

    1994-09-01

    The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis and thus primary prevention is feasible after improvement of these factors. The 5-year survival rate of resected early gastric cancer is over 90% and this provides an excellent paradigm for secondary prevention. Though its mortality rate has declined since 1970, gastric cancer remains common and carries a high mortality in Taiwan where about 2,000 patients die of gastric cancer annually. The age-adjusted mortality is 16.54 and 8.16/100,000 for male and female, ranking the third and fourth cancer death respectively. Epidemiologic data disclose a positive association between gastric cancer and some dietary factors in Taiwan. However, the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and hereditary susceptibility should be elucidated in the future. Endoscopy with biopsy is an excellent method of the diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its invasiveness makes it impractical as a screening tool and thus the proportion of early gastric cancer to gastric cancer remains as low as 30% in most reports. The value of lymph node dissection remains controversial although surgery is one of the most effective methods of eradicating gastric cancer. Overall, the 5 year survival rate is 24.5% to 54%. Laser therapy is usually reserved for patients with high operative risk and specific types of gastric cancer. To improve the survival results, development of a simple and economic screening program based on the epidemiologic results and utilization of noninvasive examinations such as serologic markers to diagnose and treat gastric cancer at its earliest stage deserves further study.

  1. 'Reproductive revolution' succeeds in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ismartono, Y

    1984-01-01

    Between 1964-81, fertility in Thailand declined about 40% and the country is well on its way to a target growth rate of 1.5% by 1986. Thais, like many agrlcultural peoples, have traditionally preferred large families, but lower infant mortality and longer life spans resulting form medical advances produced a rapidly growing population that threatened the country's economic and social well-being. Rising prosperity led the growth rate to increase form 1.9% in 1937-47 to 3.2%/year by the mid-1960s. The government in 1970 promulgated its national population policy which led to incorporation of the family planning program into the next 5-year plan. Contraceptive use among currently married women aged 15-44 quadrupled from 1970-81, with the number of users increasing from 225,000 to 1,126,000. The pill is utilized by about 60% of users, followed by female sterilization, injectables, and the IUD. Despite the rapid fertility decline, Thailand still faces serious demographic pressures, sch as rapidly growing labor force and a population doubling time of 35 years. Factors in the success of Thailand's family planning program have included the adherence of 95% of the population to Theravada Buddhism, which has no problem with the concept of limiting births to ensure an individual's well-being; the progressive position of women, who may act independently of their husbands in family planning; and the supportive government strategy, which has welcomed private efforts in family planning. Among private agencies which have contributed to the success of the family planning program is the Population and Community Development Association. The government's call for wide public participation activated a rare spirit of innovation. Thai surgeons developed the minilaparotomy operation and thailand was among the 1st countries to implement community based distribution of contraceptives. Thailand will need to recruit about 4.6 million new users and retain 4.1 million continuing users if the

  2. Thailand's head-on approach.

    PubMed

    Ismartono, Y

    1989-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education in Thailand takes place in such unlikely places as bars and prisons. A gay activist and founder of the Fraternity for AIDS Cessation in Thailand (FACT) informs bar patrons and the homosexual community in Thailand on AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). 5 brightly dressed male dancers perform with this activist whose name is Natee Teerarojanapong. They visit gay bars and bath houses in Bangkok and will now go to the provinces. The Thai government realizes the seriousness of the AIDS problem. Recently it began a 3-year program and set up an AIDS Prevention and Control Center headed by the Ministry of Public Health. It has started an intensive information campaign. Plans to distribute 30 million condoms are underway. This year's AIDS budget has been increased. The government has called upon nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector to help. With FACT, groups like Empower, a sister organization of prostitutes, the Duang Prateep Foundation of the Klong Toey slums, Population and Development Association (PDA), the Red Cross and Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand (PPAT) have begun their own AIDS prevention and control programs. Public Health Ministry officials say only 18 persons are showing full-blown AIDS symptoms. But, more than 7500 tested positive for HIV antibodies. 84% of current seropositives are intravenous drug users; there are an estimated 500,000 heroin addicts in Thailand. The main activities of the AIDS programs has been concerned with heroin addiction. 400,000 of the 1/2 million heroin addicts are in Bangkok. In Klong Toey, the biggest slum area in Bangkok, the AIDS problem is compounded by extreme poverty. The Thai Red Cross is very active in the AIDS program. Officials at Bangkok's Klong Prem prison are being trained by PPAT. They are taught about AIDS control and prevention. Among the 400 prison inmates, those infected with AIDS are mostly intravenous drug users; some

  3. Lexical Profiles of Thailand University Admission Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherngchawano, Wirun; Jaturapitakkul, Natjiree

    2014-01-01

    University Admission Tests in Thailand are important documents which reflect Thailand's education system. To study at a higher education level, all students generally need to take the University Admission Tests designed by the National Institute of Educational Testing Service (NIETS). For the English test, vocabulary and reading comprehension is…

  4. Fatal melioidosis in goats in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tonpitak, Walaiporn; Sornklien, Chulabha; Chawanit, Mongkol; Pavasutthipaisit, Suvarin; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Hantrakun, Viriya; Amornchai, Premjit; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Day, Nicholas P J; Yingst, Samuel; Peacock, Sharon J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2014-08-01

    Bangkok, Thailand, is a city considered to be at low risk for melioidosis. We describe 10 goats that died of melioidosis in Bangkok. Half of them were born and reared in the city. Multilocus sequence typing ruled out an outbreak. This finding challenges the assumption that melioidosis is rarely acquired in central Thailand.

  5. Knowledge Management in Higher Education in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chumjit, Surat

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how knowledge management (KM) is applied to higher education in Thailand, and it will also examine whether higher education in Thailand is ready to combine KM with their educational missions in terms of teaching, research, administration, and strategic planning. Knowledge creation and social networking frameworks are used to…

  6. Digital Initiatives and Metadata Use in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SuKantarat, Wichada

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide information about various digital initiatives in libraries in Thailand and especially use of Dublin Core metadata in cataloguing digitized objects in academic and government digital databases. Design/methodology/approach: The author began researching metadata use in Thailand in 2003 and 2004 while on sabbatical…

  7. Tembusu-Related Flavivirus in Ducks, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Ninvilai, Patchareeporn; Tunterak, Wikanda; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Chaiyavong, Supassma; Angkabkingkaew, Kingkarn; Mungkundar, Chatthapon; Phuengpho, Woranuch; Oraveerakul, Kanisak; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013, outbreaks of disease caused by duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) have been observed in layer and broiler duck farms in Thailand. The virus is closely related to Chinese DTMUVs and belongs to the Ntaya group of mosquitoborne flaviviruses. These findings represent the emergence of DTMUV in ducks in Thailand.

  8. Building Bridges of Understanding. People of Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT. Language Research Center.

    This book attempts to provide cultural information that will enable an American to communicate effectively with people in Thailand. The book discusses differences between American and Thai culture in such areas as food, laws, customs, religion, language, dress, and basic attitudes. Background information is given on Thailand and the…

  9. Inclusive Education in Thailand: Practices and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorapanya, Sermsap; Dunlap, Diane

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Thailand passed legislation on the educational provisions for students with disabilities to mandate the implementation of inclusive education. This article provides a historical overview of special education in Thailand and the emergence of inclusive education as it moves from policy to practice. To further identify the challenges faced…

  10. Tembusu-Related Flavivirus in Ducks, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Thontiravong, Aunyaratana; Ninvilai, Patchareeporn; Tunterak, Wikanda; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Chaiyavong, Supassma; Angkabkingkaew, Kingkarn; Mungkundar, Chatthapon; Phuengpho, Woranuch; Oraveerakul, Kanisak

    2015-01-01

    Since 2013, outbreaks of disease caused by duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) have been observed in layer and broiler duck farms in Thailand. The virus is closely related to Chinese DTMUVs and belongs to the Ntaya group of mosquitoborne flaviviruses. These findings represent the emergence of DTMUV in ducks in Thailand. PMID:26584133

  11. West Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Hazy and Dusty Skies over Western Africa     View Larger Image ... the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the ...

  12. South Africa

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters     ... and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached ...

  13. ILLICIT CIGARETTE TRADE IN THAILAND

    PubMed Central

    Pavananunt, Pirudee

    2012-01-01

    The sale and consumption of illicit tobacco increases consumption, impacts public health, reduces tax revenue and provides an argument against tax increases. Thailand has some of the best tobacco control policies in Southeast Asia with one of the highest tobacco tax rates, but illicit trade has the potential to undermine these policies and needs investigating. Two approaches were used to assess illicit trade between 1991 and 2006: method 1, comparison of tobacco used based on tobacco taxes paid and survey data, and method 2, discrepancies between export data from countries exporting tobacco to Thailand and Thai official data regarding imports. A three year average was used to smooth differences due to lags between exports and imports. For 1991–2006, the estimated manufactured cigarette consumption from survey data was considerably lower than sales tax paid, so method 1 did not provide evidence of cigarette tax avoidance. Using method 2 the trade difference between reported imports and exports, indicates 10% of cigarettes consumed in Thailand (242 million packs per year) between 2004 and 2006 were illicit. The loss of revenue amounted to 4,508 million Baht (2002 prices) in the same year, that was 14% of the total cigarette tax revenue. Cigarette excise tax rates had a negative relationship with consumption trends but no relation with the level of illicit trade. There is a need for improved policies against smuggling to combat the rise in illicit tobacco consumption. Regional coordination and implementation of protocols on illicit trade would help reduce incentives for illegal tax avoidance. PMID:22299425

  14. Smart disaster mitigation in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimmanee, S.; Ekkawatpanit, C.; Asanuma, H.

    2016-04-01

    Thailand is notoriously exposed to several natural disasters, from heavy thunder storms to earthquakes and tsunamis, since it is located in the tropical area and has tectonic cracks underneath the ground. Besides these hazards flooding, despite being less severe, occurs frequently, stays longer than the other disasters, and affects a large part of the national territory. Recently in 2011 have also been recorded the devastating effects of major flooding causing the economic damages and losses around 50 billion dollars. Since Thailand is particularly exposed to such hazards, research institutions are involved in campaigns about monitoring, prevention and mitigation of the effects of such phenomena, with the aim to secure and protect human lives, and secondly, the remarkable cultural heritage. The present paper will first make a brief excursus on the main Thailand projects aimed at the mitigation of natural disasters, referring to projects of national and international relevance, being implemented, such as the ESCAP1999 (flow regime regulation and water conservation). Adaptable devices such as foldable flood barriers and hydrodynamically supported temporary banks have been utilized when flooding. In the second part of the paper, will be described some new ideas concerning the use of smart and biomimicking column structures capable of high-velocity water interception and velocity detection in the case of tsunami. The pole configuration is composite cylindrical shell structure embedded with piezoceramic sensor. The vortex shedding of the flow around the pole induces the vibration and periodically strains the piezoelectric element, which in turn generates the electrical sensorial signal. The internal space of the shell is filled with elastic foam to enhance the load carrying capability due to hydrodynamic application. This more rigid outer shell inserted with soft core material resemble lotus stem in nature in order to prolong local buckling and ovalization of column

  15. [Laboratory medicine in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Chen, J S

    1998-07-01

    Laboratory medicine and hospital central laboratory system were adopted in Taiwan after World War II. In medical schools, laboratory medicine or clinical pathology teaching is allocated to junior students. Three years of clinical pathology or four years of anatomical pathology training is required for pathology resident. Recent trend indicates that both the hospitals and the young doctors favor the five years combined C.P. (two-years) and A.P. (three years) training program. At present, 75 clinical pathologists and 213 anatomical pathologists are qualified. Approximately 70% of them work in medical centers and medical schools. Consequently, the medium and small size hospitals suffer from serious shortage of pathologist. Studies during the part 50 years indicate substantial difference in the improvement of laboratory medicine and central laboratory before and after 1975. Significant improvement in the working space, facility, equipment, staff, quality control and productivity was evident after 1975. The three health care policies contributing to the overall improvement are: 1. hospital accreditation project, 2. medical care network plan, and 3. medical specialist system.

  16. Outbreak of anthrax in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kunanusont, C; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Foy, H M

    1990-10-01

    An outbreak of anthrax occurred among 14 persons exposed to the meat of two water buffalo which had died from anthrax, in two neighbouring villages in the northeastern region of Thailand. All but one case had typical eschars or blisters. Three had eaten raw meat; one of them died from gastric anthrax with severe haematemesis. All the others were successfully treated with penicillin. The incubation period varied between two and 11 days. Sporadic outbreaks of human and animal anthrax still occur in Southeast Asia.

  17. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  18. A new species of Spongilla-fly from Western Africa (Neuroptera: Sisyridae).

    PubMed

    Monserrat, Victor J; Duelli, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A new species of spongilla-fly (Neuropterida, Neuroptera, Sisyridae: Sisyra) is described from Western Africa (Guinea and Ivory Coast). This new Sisyra species differs from all other known African species both in its morphology and genitalia, and it seems to be most closely related to a species in Thailand. PMID:25543749

  19. Black monazite from Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, J.J.; Overstreet, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    Two forms of detrital monazite are known in offshore bars in southwestern Taiwan: a yellow-green to colorless form and an unusual but abundant pelletlike form, generally black but also colored gray or brown. These black pellets, which are about 160 by 200 microns in size, are composed of fine-grained monazite crystals from 2 to 20 microns in size. The pellets are associated with highly variable amounts of discrete grains of detrital quartz, rutile, amphibole, tourmaline, and other minerals. Intergrown with the monazite are quartz, a cerium oxide mineral, chlorite, sulfides, and other minerals. Opaqueness of the pelletlike monazite is due principally to the cryptocrystalline nature of part of the monazite; only a small part of the opaqueness can be attributed to opaque inclusions. The black pelletlike monazite lacks thorium and has a high content of europium. In this respect, as in color, shape, size, and inclusions, the pelletlike monazite differs from the yellow-green detrital monazite. Despite the fact that they occur together in the littoral placers, they appear to have had different origins. The yellow-green monazite originated as an accessory mineral in plutonic rocks and has accumulated at the coast through erosion and transport. The origin of the pelletlike monazite is as yet unknown, but it is here inferred that it originated in unconsolidated coastal plain sediments through migration of cerium from the detrital monazite during weathering, and of the intermediate weight mobile rare earths from clay minerals during diagenesis. Possibly these pelletlike grains are detrital particles formed through erosion and transport from originally larger aggregates cemented by diagenetic monazite.

  20. Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.

    1998-12-31

    Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

  1. Ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Lin, I-Chan; Shen, Yun-Dun; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    We describe in this paper the current status of ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan. Data were collected from the Bureau of National Health Insurance of Taiwan, the Bulletin of the Taiwan Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Society, and the Statistics Yearbook of Practicing Physicians and Health Care Organizations in Taiwan by the Taiwan Medical Association. We ascertained that 94 ophthalmologists were oculoplastic surgeons and accounted for 5.8% of 1621 ophthalmologists in Taiwan. They had their fellowship training abroad (most ophthalmologists trained in the United States of America) or in Taiwan. All ophthalmologists were well trained and capable of performing major oculoplastic surgeries. The payment rates by our National Health Insurance for oculoplastic and orbital surgeries are relatively low, compared to Medicare payments in the United States. Ophthalmologists should promote the concept that oculoplastic surgeons specialize in periorbital plastic and aesthetic surgeries. However, general ophthalmologists should receive more educational courses on oculoplastic and cosmetic surgery.

  2. Transsexual emergence: gender variant identities in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ocha, Witchayanee

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to understanding of emergent gender/sexual identities in Thailand. Thailand has become a popular destination for sex change operations by providing the medical technology for a complete transformation, with relatively few procedures and satisfactory results at a reasonable price. Data were gathered from 24 transsexual male-to-female sex workers working in Pattaya and Patpong, well-known sex-tourism hot spots in Thailand. Findings suggest the emergence of new understandings of gender/sexual identity. Sex-tourism/sex work significantly illuminates the process through which gender is contested and re-imagined. The coming together of cultures in Thailand's sex industry, coupled with advances in medical technology, has resulted in the emergence of new concepts of gender.

  3. Political economy of tobacco control in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chantornvong, S.; McCargo, D.

    2001-01-01

    Thailand has some of the world's strongest anti-tobacco legislation. This paper examines the political economy of tobacco control in Thailand, emphasising the identification of forces which have supported and opposed the passage of strong anti-tobacco measures. It argues that while a powerful tobacco control coalition was created in the late 1980s, the gains won by this coalition are now under threat from systematic attempts by transnational tobacco companies to strengthen their share of the Thai cigarette market. The possible privatisation of the Thailand Tobacco Monopoly could threaten the tobacco control cause, but the pro-control alliance is fighting back with a proposed Health Promotion Act which would challenge the tobacco industry with a hypothecated excise tax dedicated to health awareness campaigns.


Keywords: anti-tobacco legislation; political economy; Thailand; transnational tobacco companies PMID:11226361

  4. Kindergartener's Technology Education in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Chun-Chin

    According to the American Association for Advancement of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the International Technology Education Association (ITEA) and its Technology for All Americans Project (TfAAP), technology education should begin in kindergarten. Educators in Taiwan have also advocated beginning technology education in…

  5. Principal Leadership in Taiwan Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shouse, Roger C.; Lin, Kuan-Pei

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades, Taiwan's Ministry of Education has responded to globalization by restructuring school curricular, instructional, and decision making practices along western lines in an attempt to attain legitimacy on the world stage. As a result, Taiwanese principals, once kings within their schools, now must share power with other…

  6. Reconstructing Transition Knowledge in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chen-chen

    2012-01-01

    Taking a post-colonial stand and using school to work transition as an example, the author re-examines the special education discourses in Taiwan and attempts to construct alternate understandings of transition from sociological and cultural perspectives. A review of past transition literature and a survey of the educational background of the…

  7. Herbal Medicine Research in Taiwan*

    PubMed Central

    Kaphle, Krishna; Wu, Leang-Shin; Yang, Nai-Yen Jack; Lin, Jen-Hsou

    2006-01-01

    Of all the countries in the world, why did you choose Taiwan to pursue your study? It is a question that I (comments of the first author) have answered a thousand times. My first visit to a laboratory at National Taiwan University opened my eyes to the possibilities of herbal medicine research, especially in the area of veterinary medicine. It became my ambition to link the knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda from the Indian subcontinent and their integration with other systems of medicine, including Western medicine (WM), to achieve the concept of Sustainable Medicine, firstly for animals and then for humans. The Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) has implemented a technology development program to quickly establish the key technologies, and this is a moment of opportunity for Taiwan's traditional herbal medicine industry to upgrade and transform itself. This paper, initially intended to be a student's narration, has evolved into a multi-author treatise on the present state and likely future scenario of herbal medicine research in Taiwan. PMID:16550238

  8. South Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of South Africa was acquired on May 14, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution visible wavelength bands. As part of the opening ceremony to begin the joint U.S.-South Africa SAFARI Field Experiment, NASA presented print copies of this image as GIFts to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Science and Technology, and Honorable Advocate Ngoaka Ramathlodi, Premier of the Northern Province, South Africa. The area shown in this image encompasses seven capital cities and a number of the region's distinctive geological features can be seen clearly. Toward the northern (top) central part of the image, the browns and tans comprise the Kalahari Desert of southern Botswana. The Tropic of Capricorn runs right through the heart of the Kalahari and the Botswanan capital city of Gaborone sits on the Limpopo River, southeast of the Kalahari. Along the western coastline of the continent is the country of Namibia, where the Namib Desert is framed against the sea by the Kaokoveld Mountains. The Namibian capital of Windhoek is obscured by clouds. Looking closely in the center of the image, the Orange River can be seen running from east to west, demarcating the boundary between Namibia and South Africa. On the southwestern corner of the continent is the hook-like Cape of Good Hope peninsula and Cape Town, the parliamentary capital of South Africa. Running west to east away from Cape Town are the Great Karroo Mountains. The shadow in this image conveys a sense of the very steep grade of the cliffs along the southern coast of South Africa. Port Elizabeth sits on the southeasternmost point of South Africa, and a large phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the water about 100 miles east of there. Moving northward along the east coast, the Drakensberg Mountains are visible. The two small nations of Lesotho and Swaziland are in this region, completely

  9. [Dengue hemorrhagic fever. Experiences from Thailand].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, E

    1992-06-30

    Increased incidence of dengue haemorrhagic fever has been observed in South East Asia. The etiology, clinical features and epidemiology of dengue virus infections are presented, with special emphasis on experience from Thailand. Reduction of sources, in terms of eliminating breeding sites for mosquitos, is the major approach in controlling dengue haemorrhagic fever, an approach which can succeed only through participation by the local community. The involvement of schools has proven to be successful in campaigns to reduce mosquito breeding sites in Thailand.

  10. Musculoskeletal trauma service in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mahaisavariya, Banchong

    2008-10-01

    Trauma is becoming a leading cause of death in most of the low-income and middle-income countries worldwide. The growing number of motor vehicles far surpasses the development and upkeep of the road and highway networks, traffic laws, and driver training and licensing. In Thailand, road traffic injuries have become the second leading cause of death and morbidity overall since 1990. The lack of improvement to existing roadways, implementation of traffic safety and ridership laws including seatbelt regulations, and poor emergency medical assistance support systems all contribute to these statistics. An insufficient number and inequitable distribution of healthcare professionals is also a national problem, especially at the district level. Prehospital care of trauma patients remains insufficient and improvements at the national level are suggested. PMID:18629597

  11. Severe Dengue Fever Outbreak in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Ko; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a vector-borne disease caused by dengue viruses (DENVs). Epidemic dengue occurs intermittently in Taiwan. In 2014, Taiwan experienced its largest DF outbreak. There were 15,732 DF cases reported. There were a total of 136 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases, of which 20 resulted in death. Most DF cases were reported in southern Taiwan. A total of 15,043 (96%) cases were from Kaohsiung, a modern city in southern Taiwan. This report reviews DF epidemics in Taiwan during 2005-2014. The correlation between DF and DHF along with temperature and precipitation were conjointly examined. We conclude that most dengue epidemics in Taiwan resulted from imported DF cases. Results indicate three main factors that may have been associated with this DF outbreak in Kaohsiung: an underground pipeline explosion combined with subsequent rainfall and higher temperature. These factors may have enhanced mosquito breeding activity, facilitating DENV transmission.

  12. An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2009-10-01

    Thailand has continued to promote domestic biofuel utilization. Production and consumption of biofuel in Thailand have continued to increase at a fast rate due to aggressive policies of the Thai government in reducing foreign oil import and increasing domestic renewable energy utilization. This paper focuses on ethanol production and consumption, and the use of gasohol in Thailand. The paper is an update on the previous paper--Biofuel Infrastructure Development and Utilization in Thailand--in August 2008.

  13. Towards a Curriculum for the Thai Lao of Northeast Thailand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John

    2015-01-01

    This article considers a fundamental issue in language planning, namely, whether or not to introduce a curriculum for the mother tongue (MT), in the wider context of a complex language planning situation in Thailand. It details recent moves in the consideration of this issue for the Thai Lao (Isan) of Northeast Thailand, Thailand's largest…

  14. Structural features offshore northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yicheng Yang, Eason; Liu, Char-Shine; Chang, Jih-Hsin; Chiu, Chien-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    The area offshore northern Taiwan is the place where East China Sea Shelf extends into the Southern Okinawa Trough, and where pre-Pleistocene arc-continental collision had occurred. Comparison between fault distribution in the area with previously published results suggests that the fault distribution and regional structural framework are still controversial. Using marine multichannel seismic reflection data collected in 3 marine geophysical survey cruises, we remapped the fault distribution in the northern offshore area of Taiwan. By analyzing all the seismic profiles using the KINGDOM suite (a seismic interpretation software), a new fault distribution map is presented, and a subsurface unconformity PRSB (Pliocene reflection sequence boundary) is identified. Six major NE-SW trending high-angle normal faults cut the PRSB can be traced to the fault systems on land northernmost Taiwan. These normal faults are located between the Southern Okinawa Trough and the East China Sea continental shelf basin, and have been suggested to be reactivated from pre-existing reverse faults. The offsets of fault ramps in PRSB increase toward southeast. The isopach map of the study area compiled shows that sediment strata overlying PRSB thin toward northwest.

  15. Occupational Neurotoxic Diseases in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hung; Huang, Chu-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Occupational neurotoxic diseases have become increasingly common in Taiwan due to industrialization. Over the past 40 years, Taiwan has transformed from an agricultural society to an industrial society. The most common neurotoxic diseases also changed from organophosphate poisoning to heavy metal intoxication, and then to organic solvent and semiconductor agent poisoning. The nervous system is particularly vulnerable to toxic agents because of its high metabolic rate. Neurological manifestations may be transient or permanent, and may range from cognitive dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction to neuromuscular junction disorders. This study attempts to provide a review of the major outbreaks of occupational neurotoxins from 1968 to 2012. A total of 16 occupational neurotoxins, including organophosphates, toxic gases, heavy metals, organic solvents, and other toxic chemicals, were reviewed. Peer-reviewed articles related to the electrophysiology, neuroimaging, treatment and long-term follow up of these neurotoxic diseases were also obtained. The heavy metals involved consisted of lead, manganese, organic tin, mercury, arsenic, and thallium. The organic solvents included n-hexane, toluene, mixed solvents and carbon disulfide. Toxic gases such as carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide were also included, along with toxic chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, organophosphates, and dimethylamine borane. In addition we attempted to correlate these events to the timeline of industrial development in Taiwan. By researching this topic, the hope is that it may help other developing countries to improve industrial hygiene and promote occupational safety and health care during the process of industrialization. PMID:23251841

  16. US fossil fuel technologies for Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Buehring, W.A.; Dials, G.E.; Gillette, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.; Traczyk, P.A.

    1990-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has been encouraging other countries to consider US coal and coal technologies in meeting their future energy needs. Thailand is one of three developing countries determined to be a potentially favorable market for such exports. This report briefly profiles Thailand with respect to population, employment, energy infrastructure and policies, as well as financial, economic, and trade issues. Thailand is shifting from a traditionally agrarian economy to one based more strongly on light manufacturing and will therefore require increased energy resources that are reliable and flexible in responding to anticipated growth. Thailand has extensive lignite deposits that could fuel a variety of coal-based technologies. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors could utilize this resource and still permit Thailand to meet emission standards for sulfur dioxide. This option also lends itself to small-scale applications suitable for private-sector power generation. Slagging combustors and coal-water mixtures also appear to have potential. Both new construction and refurbishment of existing plants are planned. 18 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. 77 FR 68776 - Economic Impact Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ..., Poland, Romania, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Turkey, and United Kingdom. Interested... Emirates, United States, South Korea, and Thailand. The balance of the foreign production will be sold...

  18. West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With its vast expanses of sand, framed by mountain ranges and exposed rock, northwestern Africa makes a pretty picture when viewed from above. This image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The Canary Islands can be seen on the left side of the image just off Africa's Atlantic shore. The light brown expanse running through the northern two thirds of the image is the Sahara Desert. The desert runs up against the dark brown Haut Atlas mountain range of Morocco in the northwest, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the semi-arid (light brown pixels) Sahelian region in the South. The Sahara, however, isn't staying put. Since the 1960s, the desert has been expanding into the Sahelian region at a rate of up to 6 kilometers per year. In the 1980s this desert expansion, combined with over cultivation of the Sahel, caused a major famine across west Africa. Over the summer months, strong winds pick up sands from the Sahara and blow them across the Atlantic as far west as North America, causing air pollution in Miami and damaging coral reefs in the Bahamas and the Florida Keys. The white outlines on the map represent country borders. Starting at the top-most portion of the map and working clockwise, the countries shown are Morocco, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Fasso, Nigeria, Mali (again), and Algeria. Image by Reto Stockli, Robert Simmon, and Brian Montgomery, NASA Earth Observatory, based on data from MODIS

  19. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Regional Activities Division. Session on Africa, Asia and Oceania, and Latin America. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on regional activities in Africa, Asia and Oceania, and Latin America which were presented at the 1986 IFLA general conference include: (1) "Appropriate Technology for Libraries in Developing Countries" (Peter N. Chateh, Cameroon); (2) "The Impact of Information Technology on Libraries in Thailand--Present and Future Scene" (Nonglak…

  20. Applied atmospheric resources research program in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, J. G.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Dennis, A. S.; Silverman, B. A.

    1989-08-01

    The Royal Thai Government requested assistance of the United States Agency for International Development for the development and implementation of a more comprehensive scientific approach to the design, operation, and evaluation of Thailand's weather modification program. Upon visiting Thailand, a team of American scientists recommended a 5-year developmental program to improve Thai technical capabilities through training, additional equipment, and a demonstration cloud seed project. The program will test for an increase in rainfall from: (1) warm clouds seeded with hygroscopic agents; and (2) cold clouds seeded for dynamic effects with glaciogenic materials. The field program will be conducted in the Nam Mae Tun River Watershed of western Thailand. The primary response variable is rainfall measured by rain-gauge-adjusted radar. Given equal numbers of warm and cold cloud units and typical operations problems and weather variability, at least four seasons of field experimentation are required.

  1. Acid rain in Laos and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Halpern, M

    1996-09-01

    Acid rain has an impact on forestry and human health. Forest degradation was noticed in the early 90's in Laos, a country without polluting industries nor intense automobile traffic. Therefore, in 1993-1994, we collected rain in one location in Thailand (Bangkok) and 4 in Laos (Luang Prabang, Vientiane, Savannaketh, Pakse); measured pH in each sample and resistivity in 2 locations. We obtained sequential meteorological satellite pictures showing the far motion of clouds, their location and course, and ultimately rain over Indochina. We conclude that acid rain forms over Thailand and falls in Laos (Vientiane, Pakse). We also measured peak flows in large groups of children, adults both non-smokers and chronic heavy smokers, in all five locations. Except for a small number of individual variations, we could not correlate the presence of acid rain and deterioration of pulmonary function in these subjects. However, we recommend active measures to curb pollution both in Thailand and Laos.

  2. Lessons of Aedes aegypti control in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Gratz, N G

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Thailand has increased cyclically since the first recognized outbreak in 1958. Without an effective vaccine against dengue, and considering the clinical difficulty of treating DHF cases, vector control is needed to prevent dengue transmission. Since the establishment of the WHO Aedes Research Unit in 1964, continued since 1973 as the WHO Collaborating Centre at the Department of Medical Research in Bangkok, much operational research has been carried out in Thailand on the bionomics and control of dengue vectors: Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. This review shows that, as in most other countries, dengue vector control programmes in Thailand make little use of the procedures arising from research, nor have they reduced the upward trend of dengue or prevented DHF outbreaks. Implications of the reluctance to use results of operational research on vector control are considered and remedial suggestions made.

  3. AIDS in Thailand: a medical student's perspective.

    PubMed

    Chow, D C

    1994-12-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has become the biggest problem facing the health profession of Thailand today. The Ministry of Public Health reports that there are 400,000 individuals in Thailand already infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and is predicting that 4 million will be infected by the year 2000. This explosive epidemic first occurred among intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) and subsequently spread to other high risk groups, especially prostitutes. The heterosexual population was next affected. The AIDS problem in Thailand was seen close-up by this writer, then a fourth year medical student, studying during an international health elective. At all three hospitals where I worked, I encountered large numbers of AIDS related admissions. Ten percent of medical beds at a Bangkok hospital were occupied by patients with AIDS related problems. In comparison, two hospitals located in the northern province of Chiang Mai had 15-20% and 30-40% of their beds occupied by patients with AIDS complications. Opportunistic infections were the primary reason for admissions. This paper describes the current AIDS epidemic in Thailand and the preventive measures being undertaken to combat it. Strategies to combat AIDS focus on preventive measures. The current program in Thailand emphasizes AIDS education and awareness, the promotion of condom usage, decreasing needle sharing, the screening of donated blood, and the development of the GP160 vaccine. The program, however, has been undermined by the country's well organized sex industry. Without a clear commitment from the Thai government, Thailand faces serious health and economic consequences from this epidemic in the coming decade.

  4. Opisthorchiasis in Thailand: Review and current status

    PubMed Central

    Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Pengsaa, Prasit

    2008-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini (O. viverrini) remains a major public health problem in many parts of Southeast Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia. The infection is associated with a number of hepatobiliary diseases, including cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatomegaly, cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and cholangiocarcinoma. The liver fluke infection was induced by eating raw or uncooked fish products that is the tradition and popular in the northeastern and northern region, particularly in rural areas of Thailand. Health education programs to prevent and control opisthorchiasis are still required in high-risk areas. PMID:18416453

  5. Educating Students with Learning Disabilities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2011-01-01

    In East Asia, Taiwan is one of only a few countries that has a clear definition of learning disabilities (LD) as well as operational criteria for the identification of LD. In Taiwan, special education services for students with LD are mandated in the Special Education Act of 1984. According to the official statistics from the Taiwanese Special…

  6. 76 FR 13660 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... 4, 2010 (75 FR 61175). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on January 25, 2011, and all persons... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... United States is materially injured by reason of imports from Taiwan of polyvinyl alcohol, provided...

  7. Ethnic Inequalities and Educational Attainment in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jao, Jui-Chang; McKeever, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine educational stratification in Taiwan against the background of an ethnically based political economy. They investigate how educational attainment is related to ethnicity and other background factors, such as parental class and education, and if these relationships changed over time as Taiwan became a more…

  8. 78 FR 41421 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... subsidized by the Governments of India and Turkey. Unless the Department of Commerce extends the time for... 201, subparts A through E (19 CFR part 201), and part 207, subparts A and B (19 CFR part 207). ] DATES... of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC...

  9. Childhood trauma, country report (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Junnanond, C; Ruangkanchanasetr, S; Chunharas, A

    1993-10-01

    In Thailand, each year approximately 15,000 people die from accidents, a figure exceeded only by cardiovascular diseases. Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) is the principal cause of death and injuries in children of all ages except preschool group. In 1988 there were 554,452 cases of injuries out of which 10,031 died from MVA. In Bangkok alone MVA accounts for an average of 300 childhood and teenage death and 1,900 cases of injuries each year. Falls, burns and poisonings are relatively high in children less than 4 years old while MVA and injuries from sharp and blunt objects of both accidental and non-accidental cases increase with age and become the two leading causes of injury in older children. The sex ratio (F:M) in preschool ages are 1:1.4 and 1:2 in preteen. Poisonings, though less common, are considered to be very important because of their severity. Drugs, hydrocarbon, insecticides, lead and corrosive substances are leading agents. As for injuries caused by animals, 150 cases of rabies were reported each year while around 5,000 cases of snake bites were found in 1987 and 20 per cent of the victims were children. The study from Ramathibodi Hospital revealed that the majority of accidents (65-72%) occur at home and 20 per cent in the street in children younger than 12 years. Peak incidence were found between 5-9 pm. During weekend and holidays the incidence is higher. Ninety-five per cent of the accidents reported were mild cases, 15 per cent moderate, 3 per cent severe and less than 1 per cent caused death.

  10. OCCUPATIONAL CARBAMATE POISONING IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Tongpoo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-07-01

    Carbamate insecticide is a leading cause of poisoning in Thailand. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical manifestations and modes of occupational exposure in carbamate poisoning cases. We retrospectively studied all the cases of carbamate poisoning due to occupational exposure recorded in the Ramathibodi Poison Center Toxic Exposure Surveillance system during 2005 to 2010. Demographic data, clinical manifestations and severity were analyzed statistically. During the study period, 3,183 cases were identified, of which 170 (5.3%) were deemed to be due to occupational exposure. Ninety-six cases (56.5%) and 35 cases (20.6%) were poisoned by carbofuran and methomyl, respectively. Carbofuran is sold as a 3% grain and applied by sowing; methomyl is sold as a liquid and is applied by spraying. The majority of poisoned patients did not wear personal protective equipment (PPE) while applying the carbamates. The clinical manifestations of occupational carbofuran poisoning recorded were nausea and vomiting (82.3%), headaches (56.3%) and miosis (19.8%). The clinical manifestations of methomyl poisoning were nausea and vomiting (74.3%), headaches (57.1%) and palpitations (11.4%). Most patients in both groups had mild symptoms. Only one case in each group required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation support. There were no deaths and the lengths of hospitalization ranged from 2 hours to 2 days. Occupational carbamate poisoning cases in our series were mostly mild and the patients recovered quickly. There were only rare cases of serious symptoms. Lack of knowledge and inadequate PPE were the major factors contributing to occupational poisoning. Educating agricultural workers about correct precautions and pesticide use could minimize this type of poisoning.

  11. Childhood trauma, country report (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Junnanond, C; Ruangkanchanasetr, S; Chunharas, A

    1993-10-01

    In Thailand, each year approximately 15,000 people die from accidents, a figure exceeded only by cardiovascular diseases. Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) is the principal cause of death and injuries in children of all ages except preschool group. In 1988 there were 554,452 cases of injuries out of which 10,031 died from MVA. In Bangkok alone MVA accounts for an average of 300 childhood and teenage death and 1,900 cases of injuries each year. Falls, burns and poisonings are relatively high in children less than 4 years old while MVA and injuries from sharp and blunt objects of both accidental and non-accidental cases increase with age and become the two leading causes of injury in older children. The sex ratio (F:M) in preschool ages are 1:1.4 and 1:2 in preteen. Poisonings, though less common, are considered to be very important because of their severity. Drugs, hydrocarbon, insecticides, lead and corrosive substances are leading agents. As for injuries caused by animals, 150 cases of rabies were reported each year while around 5,000 cases of snake bites were found in 1987 and 20 per cent of the victims were children. The study from Ramathibodi Hospital revealed that the majority of accidents (65-72%) occur at home and 20 per cent in the street in children younger than 12 years. Peak incidence were found between 5-9 pm. During weekend and holidays the incidence is higher. Ninety-five per cent of the accidents reported were mild cases, 15 per cent moderate, 3 per cent severe and less than 1 per cent caused death. PMID:7822995

  12. Upper-ocean currents around Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.-D.; Tang, T. Y.; Yang, Y. J.; Ko, M. T.; Chuang, W.-S.

    2003-03-01

    Current velocity, measured by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Sb-ADCP) during 1991-2000, was used to study the upper-ocean (<300 m) currents around Taiwan. The collected data were debugged, calibrated, grid, and averaged to compose a three-dimensional current-velocity distribution. The validity of the composite current velocity was supported by 12 sets of moored current-velocity time series. Qualitative agreement was obtained. The moored time series also indicated that the seasonal variation of current around Taiwan was generally weak except for the shallow-water regimes. The composite and moored currents revealed a branch of the Kuroshio that intruded steadily and persistently into the South China Sea. Part of the intruded Kuroshio flowed out of the South China Sea through the northern Luzon Strait and re-united with the main stream Kuroshio. The Kuroshio had two velocity maximum cores southeast of Taiwan, but gradually combined into one as the Kuroshio flowed north. The Kuroshio was deflected by the I-Lan Ridge east of Taiwan and the zonal-running shelf break northeast of Taiwan. At the shelf break, the Kuroshio split, with one branch intruding onto the shelf. West of the Luzon Strait, the Kuroshio intruded into the South China Sea. Some water flowed northward into the Taiwan Strait and re-joined the Kuroshio. Currents in the Taiwan Strait flowed primarily in a northward direction, except for the southward current near the coast of Mainland China. North of the Taiwan Strait, a branch of the northward flow followed the northern coast of Taiwan to join the Kuroshio. The composite current varied consistently from season to season. There was generally poor correlation between currents and local winds, especially in the deep-water regime. Remote forces were important in the currents around Taiwan.

  13. Educational Innovation in Thailand: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Kristan

    2009-01-01

    The Ministry of Education in the country of Thailand recently announced the establishment of two distinct educational tracks--a conventional/ traditional track and an unconventional/progressive/alternative track. This decision was perhaps guided by the success of innovative pilot education programs in the country, collectively called "the…

  14. Girls' and Women's Education in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    Statistically, Thailand has eliminated gender disparity in access to education. Reasons that four women's conferences made very little impression on education reform could be no significant or overt discrimination against girls' enrollment and employment; education opportunity as more an issue of class (affordability) than gender (culture); and…

  15. Educational Development in Thailand (1974-1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Bangkok (Thailand).

    This report describes Thailand's National Education Scheme which was designed to stabilize conditions resulting from frequent changes in the government during the years 1974-76. The general objectives of the scheme are: (1) to promote the appreciation of a constitutional democracy using the nation; (2) to enhance an awareness of being Thai through…

  16. Liver cancer mortality rate model in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriwattanapongse, Wattanavadee; Prasitwattanaseree, Sukon

    2013-09-01

    Liver Cancer has been a leading cause of death in Thailand. The purpose of this study was to model and forecast liver cancer mortality rate in Thailand using death certificate reports. A retrospective analysis of the liver cancer mortality rate was conducted. Numbering of 123,280 liver cancer causes of death cases were obtained from the national vital registration database for the 10-year period from 2000 to 2009, provided by the Ministry of Interior and coded as cause-of-death using ICD-10 by the Ministry of Public Health. Multivariate regression model was used for modeling and forecasting age-specific liver cancer mortality rates in Thailand. Liver cancer mortality increased with increasing age for each sex and was also higher in the North East provinces. The trends of liver cancer mortality remained stable in most age groups with increases during ten-year period (2000 to 2009) in the Northern and Southern. Liver cancer mortality was higher in males and increase with increasing age. There is need of liver cancer control measures to remain on a sustained and long-term basis for the high liver cancer burden rate of Thailand.

  17. Chikungunya virus was isolated in Thailand, 2010.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Mikiko; Benjathummarak, Surachet; Kawashita, Norihito; Rukmanee, Prasert; Sangmukdanun, Suntaree; Masrinoul, Promsin; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Puiprom, Orapim; Wuthisen, Pitak; Kurosu, Takeshi; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Maneekan, Pannamas; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Luplertlop, Natthanej

    2014-12-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) is an acute febrile illness caused by a mosquito-borne alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV). This disease re-emerged in Kenya in 2004, and spread to the countries in and around the Indian Ocean. The re-emerging epidemics rapidly spread to regions like India and Southeast Asia, and it was subsequently identified in Europe in 2007, probably as a result of importation of chikungunya cases. On the one hand, chikungunya is one of the neglected diseases and has only attracted strong attention during large outbreaks. In 2008-2009, there was a major outbreak of chikungunya fever in Thailand, resulting in the highest number of infections in any country in the region. However, no update of CHIKV circulating in Thailand has been published since 2009. In this study, we examined the viral growth kinetics and sequences of the structural genes derived from CHIKV clinical isolates obtained from the serum specimens of CHIKF-suspected patients in Central Thailand in 2010. We identified the CHIKV harboring two mutations E1-A226V and E2-I211T, indicating that the East, Central, and South African lineage of CHIKV was continuously circulating as an indigenous population in Thailand.

  18. Production, Consumption and Imagination in Rural Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigg, Jonathan; Ritchie, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Transformation of Thailand's rural areas from agricultural production to arenas of consumption of a constructed "rural idyll" is illustrated in cases of a hotel with a "working rice farm," and an elite school. The school (and companion resident "village") created an idealized rural past for rich consumers who wanted a modern education for their…

  19. OUTLINE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN THAILAND.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Perth.

    THE 1964 POPULATION OF THAILAND WAS 30 MILLION. ITS ECONOMY IS LARGELY DEPENDENT ON AGRICULTURE, BUT RAPID INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION IS UNDERWAY. THE NATION IS DIVIDED INTO 12 EDUCATIONAL REGIONS CONTROLLED BY AN EDUCATION OFFICER. PRESCHOOL EDUCATION OF 1 TO 3 YEARS IS NONCOMPULSORY. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION OF 4 YEARS IS COMPULSORY, AND THIS REQUIREMENT…

  20. Scientific Literacy and Thailand Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuenyong, Chokchai; Narjaikaew, Pattawan

    2009-01-01

    Education and political leaders worldwide are increasingly placing emphasis on developing scientific literacy. This also is the case in Thailand with science education influenced by educational reform in 1999, in which the goals of science education are shaped by the notion of scientific literacy. Thai science education emphasizes the scientific…

  1. The Teaching Practicum in Thailand: Three Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phairee, Chatpong; Sanitchon, Nalinee; Suphanangthong, Irada; Graham, Steve; Prompruang, Jidapa; de Groot, Freek Olaf; Hopkins, Dave

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the teaching practicum in Thailand as it occurs in three settings: "Rajabhats"--four-year universities which offer an additional period of teaching practice, and where the vast majority of EFL teachers are educated; regular universities; and a TESOL short course certificate program for non-Thais preparing to teach English as…

  2. Standards for Bibliographic Control in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiruppapa, Siriporn

    This paper summarizes initiatives related to standards for bibliographic control in Thailand. Topics addressed include: (1) standardized forms for headings; (2) standard bibliographic description; (3) standardized subject headings; (4) standards for classification schemes; (5) standardized format; (6) software application in libraries and…

  3. Cultural Sensitivity and Cognitive Therapy in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorzelli, James F.; Reinke-Scorzelli, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Reports on an exploratory study with school and rehabilitation agency directors in Thailand that seeks to determine whether cognitive approaches to counseling conflict with their religious and personal beliefs. Results indicate that 93.1% of the participants felt that the two cognitive approaches to counseling did not conflict with their Buddhist…

  4. Cancer incidence in Thailand, 1995-1997.

    PubMed

    Sriplung, Hutcha; Sontipong, Sineenat; Martin, Nimit; Wiangnon, Surapon; Vootiprux, Visoot; Cheirsilpa, Arkom; Kanchanabat, Chol; Khuhaprema, Theeravud

    2005-01-01

    There are five population-based cancer registries in Thailand in different regions of the country. Four of them (Chiang Mai, Khon Kaen, Bangkok, and Songkhla) have been operating since 1988 and the other (Lampang) since the early 1990s. These registries have published regular 3-year cancer incidence reports since the first in 1993 for the period 1989-1991. The objective of this article is to summarize the figures of cancer incidence in Thailand during 1995-1997. The population of Thailand in 1996, at the middle of the period, was 27 million males and 27.5 million females. Information of cancer cases residing in the five provinces was collected and abstracted from different sources. Age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of cancer in males and females was calculated for each registry and that for the whole country was estimated using the five registries as representatives for the four geographical regions of Thailand. The estimated number of new cancer cases in 1996 for the whole country was 35,539 men and 38,476 women and the ASRs were 149.2 and 125.0 per 10(5) population in men and women respectively. Cancer incidences greatly differed from region to region. Lung cancer was the commonest in Chiang Mai and Lampang in the Northern region in both sexes. The incidence of liver cancer in Khon Kaen in the Northeastern region outnumbered all the others in both sexes; cholangiocarcinoma was the major type of liver cancer. In Bangkok, lung cancer was the most important cancer in males and breast cancer was in females. Though it was lung and cervix uteri cancer that ranked the first in men and women in Songkhla, the rate of oral and pharyngeal cancer was exceptionally higher than in other registries. The geographical variability in cancer patterns in Thailand reflects exposure of the population to different risk factors unique to the different regions. In the study as a whole, there are some methodological weak points in estimating the ASRs and number of cancer cases for the

  5. [Anatomy cadaver ceremonies in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Kao, T; Ha, H

    1999-07-01

    The practice of holding annual ceremonies in honor of cadaver donors in Taiwan's medical schools has a history of nearly a hundred years. It originated in Japan, where such ceremonies have been widely held in medical schools since the practice was founded by Toyo Yamawaki, who was the first medical scholar in Japan to engage in dissection of the human body and was the author of the first anatomy book to appear in Japan, the Zoshi. The practice of holding donor ceremonies was introduced into Taiwan after the Jaiwu Sino - Japanese war, when the island became a Japanese colony. The tradition was upheld in the Viceroy's Medical School, the Viceroy's College of Medicine, and Taihoku (Taipei) Imperial University College of Medicine, and continued since the restoration of Chinese power to the present. The practice of holding cadaver donor ceremonies in institutions of medical education is intended to express respect for the donor as well as to encourage the practice of cadaver donation to the benefit of medical education.

  6. Marine Educational and Research Cruise in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Lallemand, S.; Wu, F. T.

    2009-12-01

    During April 2009, we conducted a seismic and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) cruise as part of the Taiwan mountain building process study, called the TAIGER. The seismic is shot by the US Columbia University’s research vessel Langseth and the OBSs, including Taiwan, French and American OBSs, are carried out by a Taiwanese student training ship, called Yu-Yin (means to educate the young people) No. 2. Both ships take a big number of research scientists and technical staff (15-25 people) to conduct the seismic and OBS survey. In addition, the Yu-Yin No. 2 ship hosts a total of 25 students, both MS and PhD graduate students, from Taiwan, France and USA. The student group consists of 13 from the National Taiwan Ocean University (Taiwan), 1 from the National Central University (Taiwan), 9 from the Montpellier University (France) and 2 from the New York State University. Nearly all the French and American students are on their very first trip to Taiwan. The research activities will be reported in the T25 Tectonophysics Section. This paper only deals with the educational events. The cruise includes two parts: the first mainly to deploy the OBSs and the second to retrieve the OBSs back to the ship. In addition, the French group arranges a field geological trip onshore Taiwan to put into their hands of the actions of Taiwan mountain building processes. The marine educational courses are filled in the daily ship time at 4 hours per day. As a result, we believe that we have achieved the followings: (1) mix the students and encourage a lovely study environment, (2) mix the teachers and enhance their teaching spectrum, (3) stay in a live and work together boat, allowing more and wider culture exchange. In the future, we certainly will use every possible opportunity to promote more Marine Educational and Research Cruises.

  7. The Epidemiology of Imported Malaria in Taiwan between 2002–2013: The Importance of Sensitive Surveillance and Implications for Pre-Travel Medical Advice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-Chien; Chang, Hsiao-Ling; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the epidemiology of imported malaria in Taiwan between 2002 and 2013. We analyzed the national data recorded by the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (Taiwan CDC). Malaria cases were diagnosed by blood films, polymerase chain reaction, or rapid diagnostic tests. The risk of re-establishment of malarial transmission in Taiwan was assessed. A total of 229 malaria cases were included in our analysis. All of the cases were imported. One hundred and ninety-two cases (84%) were diagnosed within 13 days of the start of symptoms/signs; 43% of these cases were acquired in Africa and 44% were acquired in Asia. Plasmodium falciparum was responsible for the majority (56%) of these cases. Travel to an endemic area was associated with the acquisition of malaria. The malaria importation rate was 2.36 per 1,000,000 travelers (range 1.20–5.74). The reproductive number under control (Rc) was 0. No endemic transmission of malaria in Taiwan was identified. This study suggests that a vigilant surveillance system, vector-control efforts, case management, and an educational approach focused on travelers and immigrants who visit malaria endemic countries are needed to prevent outbreaks and sustain the elimination of malaria in Taiwan. PMID:24871257

  8. The Geopolitics of Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousek, Joseph S.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a geopolitical history of the African continent. Its geography, mineral resources, regional industrial development, and international role are discussed. The impact of African foreign policies on the struggle between China and Taiwan is examined. (AM)

  9. E-Learning Readiness in the Academic Sector of Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laohajaratsang, Thanomporn

    2009-01-01

    As e-learning in the academic sector serves as a crucial driving force in the development of e-learning in Thailand, this article looks at e-learning readiness in Thailand with a focus on the academic sector. The article is divided into four parts: (1) a brief history of e-learning in Thailand; (2) the infrastructure related to e-learning…

  10. BRC waste management in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.D.S.

    1993-12-31

    The nuclear safety authority recently in its regulations proclaimed individual and collective dose limits. Accordingly, the guidelines for implementing the Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) concept has been developed by the Radwaste Administration. Recognizing the significance of implementing the BRC concept, the RWA completed a study on evaluation of the BRC implementation in Taiwan, in which the types and amounts of potential BRC waste were tabulated and costs for the disposal of LLRW and BRC wastes were also compared. The public acceptability of the BRC concept appears to be low in the wake of events which recently occurred at home and abroad. To dispose of BRC wastes on-site is believed to be a less conflicting alternative.

  11. Deformation and seismicity of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Vita-Finzi, C

    2000-10-10

    14C-dated Holocene coastal uplift, conventional and satellite geodetic measurements, and coseismic and aseismic fault slip reveal the pattern of distributed deformation at Taiwan resulting from convergence between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasia; as in other subduction orogenic settings, the locus of strain release and accumulation is strongly influenced by changes in fault geometry across strike. Uplift evidence from the islands of Lutao and Lanhsu is consistent with progressive oblique collision between the Luzon arc and the Chinese continental margin. In the Coastal Range, geodetic and seismic records show that shortening is taken up serially by discontinuous slip on imbricate faults. The geodetic data point to net extension across the Central Range, but deformed Holocene shorelines in the Hengchun Peninsula at its southern extremity suggest that the extension is a superficial effect partly caused by blind reverse faulting. The fastest shortening rates indicated by geodesy are recorded on the Longitudinal Valley fault and across the Chukou fault within the fold-and-thrust belt. In the former, the strain is dissipated mainly as aseismic reverse and strike-slip displacement. In contrast, the fold-and-thrust belt has witnessed five earthquakes with magnitudes of 6.5 or above in the 20th century, including the 1999.9.21 Chi-Chi earthquake (magnitude approximately 7.6) on a branch of the Chukou fault. The neotectonic and geodetic data for Taiwan as a whole suggest that the fold-and-thrust belt will continue to host the majority of great earthquakes on the island.

  12. Onychomycosis Associated with Exophiala oligosperma in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu-Min; Rajendran, Ranjith Kumar; Lin, Ying-Fang; Kirschner, Roland; Hu, Sindy

    2016-02-01

    A fungus was isolated from a nail of a 54-year-old female patient with onychomycosis in Taiwan. Based on ITS rDNA as well as beta tubulin gene sequences and microscopic analyses, this fungus was identified as Exophiala oligosperma. This is the first record of E. oligosperma in Taiwan. Negative keratin azure test indicates that keratin degradation is not involved in cases of E. oligosperma associated with skin and nail diseases. PMID:26378025

  13. Women scientists in Taiwan: an update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Yun; Stocker, Joel Floyd

    2010-06-01

    This paper reflects upon issues of gender and science in Taiwan. Its starting point is the first academic paper on the subject published in Taiwan in 1996 by Fu and Wang, and then it draws upon the biographical accounts of 20 women scientists. We emphasize the importance of focusing on the specific contexts of the history of science and women in Taiwan. Partly as a result of Taiwan's colonial past and women's limited access to education, women scientists did not emerge in Taiwan until the second half of the 20(th) century when higher education became available to women. The gender issues with which women scientists in Taiwan have had to cope include the ways in which women have been excluded or included, their marital and career status, the local and global politics of scientific knowledge, and negotiating social networks. These issues have remained largely the same since the Fu and Wang study, but they have certainly gained wider attention and understanding, and greater articulation, both within academia and society.

  14. Early Austronesians: Into and Out Of Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Chen, Chung-Yu; Fu, Qiaomei; Delfin, Frederick; Li, Mingkun; Chiu, Hung-Lin; Stoneking, Mark; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2014-01-01

    A Taiwan origin for the expansion of the Austronesian languages and their speakers is well supported by linguistic and archaeological evidence. However, human genetic evidence is more controversial. Until now, there had been no ancient skeletal evidence of a potential Austronesian-speaking ancestor prior to the Taiwan Neolithic ∼6,000 years ago, and genetic studies have largely ignored the role of genetic diversity within Taiwan as well as the origins of Formosans. We address these issues via analysis of a complete mitochondrial DNA genome sequence of an ∼8,000-year-old skeleton from Liang Island (located between China and Taiwan) and 550 mtDNA genome sequences from 8 aboriginal (highland) Formosan and 4 other Taiwanese groups. We show that the Liangdao Man mtDNA sequence is closest to Formosans, provides a link to southern China, and has the most ancestral haplogroup E sequence found among extant Austronesian speakers. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis allows us to reconstruct a history of early Austronesians arriving in Taiwan in the north ∼6,000 years ago, spreading rapidly to the south, and leaving Taiwan ∼4,000 years ago to spread throughout Island Southeast Asia, Madagascar, and Oceania. PMID:24607387

  15. Women scientists in Taiwan: an update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiu-Yun; Stocker, Joel Floyd

    2010-06-01

    This paper reflects upon issues of gender and science in Taiwan. Its starting point is the first academic paper on the subject published in Taiwan in 1996 by Fu and Wang, and then it draws upon the biographical accounts of 20 women scientists. We emphasize the importance of focusing on the specific contexts of the history of science and women in Taiwan. Partly as a result of Taiwan's colonial past and women's limited access to education, women scientists did not emerge in Taiwan until the second half of the 20(th) century when higher education became available to women. The gender issues with which women scientists in Taiwan have had to cope include the ways in which women have been excluded or included, their marital and career status, the local and global politics of scientific knowledge, and negotiating social networks. These issues have remained largely the same since the Fu and Wang study, but they have certainly gained wider attention and understanding, and greater articulation, both within academia and society. PMID:20538245

  16. First lady meets AIDS patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    1996-12-01

    First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, during her tour of Thailand: 1) joined a panel discussion at New Life Center, a missionary shelter and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) hospice that houses and educates 151 girls from remote hill tribes who were rescued from being, or from becoming, brothel prostitutes or "restaurant hostesses"; 2) inspected a U.S. supported program in Chiang Rai province that provides scholarships, vocational training, and jobs to 1200 girls as income alternatives to their sale; and 3) toured a school that extends the education of girls beyond the mandatory age of 12, the age at which many are sold to Bangkok brothel middlemen. There are 500,000-700,000 prostitutes in Thailand; many die of AIDS. Girls can be sold for $1000 and send money home later; instead of poverty, the family has a new home, a motorcycle, and status. Mrs. Clinton emphasized the lifetime benefit available to a family when a girl is educated.

  17. First lady meets AIDS patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    1996-12-01

    First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, during her tour of Thailand: 1) joined a panel discussion at New Life Center, a missionary shelter and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) hospice that houses and educates 151 girls from remote hill tribes who were rescued from being, or from becoming, brothel prostitutes or "restaurant hostesses"; 2) inspected a U.S. supported program in Chiang Rai province that provides scholarships, vocational training, and jobs to 1200 girls as income alternatives to their sale; and 3) toured a school that extends the education of girls beyond the mandatory age of 12, the age at which many are sold to Bangkok brothel middlemen. There are 500,000-700,000 prostitutes in Thailand; many die of AIDS. Girls can be sold for $1000 and send money home later; instead of poverty, the family has a new home, a motorcycle, and status. Mrs. Clinton emphasized the lifetime benefit available to a family when a girl is educated. PMID:12320489

  18. Abortion in Thailand: a feminist perspective.

    PubMed

    Lerdmaleewong, M; Francis, C

    1998-01-01

    With the passing of the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, China, women's issues in Asia have moved increasingly to the forefront. One such issue, abortion, continues to generate controversy as many women argue for protection and/or recognition of their reproductive rights. The objectives of this paper are threefold: (1) To examine the abortion debate in Thailand, identifying issues raised by Thai feminist scholars about the status of women; (2) To overview some of the more prominent feminist arguments regarding abortion (particularly those written by Canadian and American scholars) as a tool for defining women's reproductive rights; (3) To focus on a study of attitudes toward abortion among health care personnel and post-induced abortion patients in Bangkok, Thailand in order to discern the degree of support (if any) for feminist abortion arguments.

  19. Angiostrongyliasis in Thailand: epidemiology and laboratory investigations.

    PubMed

    Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral angiostrongyliasis due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis continues to affect human health and productivity in Thailand. The dietary habits of the populace have been an important contributing factor, particularly in the northeast of the country where the disease is endemic and the indigenous people enjoy a local undercooked snail dish called "koi-hoi". Hundreds of cases of disease continue to be reported annually. Because of the difficulty in obtaining a definitive diagnosis, immunological methods have played an important role in the confirmation of A. cantonensis infection. Although enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot are test formats that have been used over the past decade, modern molecular approaches, such as PCR-based diagnostic techniques, are being developed and assessed as additional tests for the diagnosis of cerebral angiostrongyliasis. This short review focuses on the history, incidence, and laboratory diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis in Thailand. PMID:23901379

  20. Malaria vaccine offers hope. International / Africa.

    PubMed

    1995-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) may soon sign an agreement with the Colombian government to build a plant in Colombia for the mass production of the malaria vaccine SPf66. SPf66 consists of a combination of synthetic peptides. It will eventually be available in Africa, where 90% of all recorded malaria cases occur each year. 1 million of the 1.5-3 million malaria-related deaths each year also occur in Africa. Many of these deaths take place in children. The indirect costs of malaria in Africa is expected to increase from $800 million to $1.8 billion between 1987 and the end of 1995. Based on findings from the various clinical trials in Colombia, Thailand, The Gambia, and Tanzania, WHO's director of Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) claims that, if SPf66 can reduce the malaria incidence rate by 50% and thereby also the malaria-related death rate, the lives of 500,000 children in Africa would be spared. TDR will meet in mid-1996 to sort through all the SPf66 findings and then develop a policy for further development or production and use of SPf66. The price of each SPf66 vaccination should be around $5, comparable with the higher range of costs of other vaccines provided by WHO's Expanded Program of Immunization and UNICEF. At the 1992 WHO summit in Amsterdam, the president of the Congo called for the international community to join forces to eliminate malaria. When it was first tested on humans, in Colombia, the protection rate of SPf66 ranged from 22% to 77%, with the best results among the young and the very old. It has not caused any harmful side effects.

  1. A new Theosbaena (Thermosbaenacea: Halosbaenidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D Christopher; Sanoamuang, La-Orsri

    2016-01-01

    We present a second species of Theosbaena, which also represents the second species of Thermosbaenacea from mainland Asia. This new species is apparently endemic to a limestone cave in Nakhon Sawan Province in central Thailand. Theosbaena kiatwongchai n. sp. is separated from T. cambodjiana by the form of the gnathopod, the form of the pereopod exopodites, the lack of a pleopod I, and a cleft telson. PMID:27394879

  2. A Survey of Pharmacy Education in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Low, Bee Yean; Wongpoowarak, Payom; Moolasarn, Summana; Anderson, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To explore the current status of pharmacy education in Thailand. Methods. The International Pharmaceutical Federation of the World Health Organization’s (FIP-WHO) Global Survey of Pharmacy Schools was used for this study. The survey instrument was distributed to the deans of the 19 faculties (colleges) of pharmacy in Thailand. Results. More than half the colleges have been in existence less than 20 years, and the government owns 80% of them. There were 2 paths of admission to study pharmacy: direct admission and central admission system. The doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs can be divided into 4 types. Approximately 60% of all teaching staff holds a doctoral degree. Regarding the work balance among teaching staff, around 60% focus on teaching activities, 20% focus on research, and less than 20% focus on patient care services concurrent with real practice teaching. The proportion of student time dedicated to theory, practice, and research in PharmD programs is 51.5%, 46.7%, and 1.8%, respectively. Sites owned by the colleges or by others were used for student training. Colleges followed the Office of the National Education Standards’ Internal Quality Assurance (IQA) and External Quality Assurance (EQA), and the Pharmacy Council’s Quality Assessment (ONESQA) . Conclusion. This study provides a picture of the current status of curriculum, teaching staff, and students in pharmacy education in Thailand. The curriculum was adapted from the US PharmD program with the aim of meeting the country’s needs and includes industrial pharmacy and public health tracks as well as clinical tracks. However, this transition in pharmacy education in Thailand needs to be monitored and evaluated. PMID:26056400

  3. New insight into structural heterogeneity beneath Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    To know whether the Eurasian lithosphere subducts beneath Taiwan is an important issue for a better understanding of mountain building, arc magmatism and plate collision in the western Pacific region. High- resolution 3-D velocity images are estimated at depths of 0-400 km beneath Taiwan by inverting a large number of arrival times from local and teleseismic events simultaneously. We used 215,676 P-wave arrival time data from 6782 shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes that are located in and around the Taiwan Island. We also used 12,078 P-wave arrival times that are collected from 3-componenet seismograms of 1108 teleseismic events recorded by the networks installed by Taiwan, Japan and China. Our tomographic images provide further direct geophysical evidence for the tectonic models proposed by previous studies and revealed some new features of structural heterogeneity related to the subducted Eurasian lithosphere and the subducting Philippine Sea slab. Low-velocity anomalies beneath the active volcanoes are visible in the subduction zone of Taiwan, which might caused by the collision between the subducted Eurasian plate and the subducting Philippine Sea slab. In the southern portion of Taiwan, the Eurasian lithosphere is clearly imaged as a high velocity zone with a thickness of 65-80 km and subducted down to a depth of 300 km, whilst it has not been observed beneath North Taiwan. Despite that the existence of subducted Eurasia slab beneath Taiwan has been documented by Lellamant et al. (2001), the present study is the first one to provide high-resolution image and indicate that the Eurasian lithosphere stops at the depth of 300 km beneath South Taiwan but not under North Taiwan. Meanwhile, the present tomographic results are also coherent well with the geology and with plate reconstructions in the region. The previous study proposed that the plate convergence rate is constant at about 7 cm/yr (Seno et al., 1993), it takes about 4-5 Ma for the subducted slab

  4. Diabetes in Thailand: Status and Policy.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn

    2016-03-01

    Like other countries in the Western Pacific region, Thailand is facing increasing numbers of patients with diabetes due to unhealthy diets, high obesity rates, and an aging society. Diabetes is a considerable burden for developing countries as it reduces quality of life, increases mortality, and drives up healthcare costs. The disease detection rate in Thailand has improved in recent years, but glycemic control remains suboptimal and significant numbers of patients suffer from complications. Universal healthcare coverage has increased access to care, but inequality exists between different health plans and non-medication diabetes supplies are not yet widely covered. Diabetes self-management education has not yet been standardized and a multidisciplinary team approach is not widely utilized. The Thai government recognizes the burden of diabetes and has launched nationwide programs of health promotion and disease prevention. In addition, local initiatives have targeted reductions in specific complications, including retinopathy and diabetic foot problems, which has resulted in better disease prevention and treatment. Along with strategic public health planning, increased collaboration between private and public sectors, enhanced professional training, increased use of technology and data management, and equitable distribution of care are all needed to improve outcomes of patients with diabetes in Thailand.

  5. Diabetes in Thailand: Status and Policy.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn

    2016-03-01

    Like other countries in the Western Pacific region, Thailand is facing increasing numbers of patients with diabetes due to unhealthy diets, high obesity rates, and an aging society. Diabetes is a considerable burden for developing countries as it reduces quality of life, increases mortality, and drives up healthcare costs. The disease detection rate in Thailand has improved in recent years, but glycemic control remains suboptimal and significant numbers of patients suffer from complications. Universal healthcare coverage has increased access to care, but inequality exists between different health plans and non-medication diabetes supplies are not yet widely covered. Diabetes self-management education has not yet been standardized and a multidisciplinary team approach is not widely utilized. The Thai government recognizes the burden of diabetes and has launched nationwide programs of health promotion and disease prevention. In addition, local initiatives have targeted reductions in specific complications, including retinopathy and diabetic foot problems, which has resulted in better disease prevention and treatment. Along with strategic public health planning, increased collaboration between private and public sectors, enhanced professional training, increased use of technology and data management, and equitable distribution of care are all needed to improve outcomes of patients with diabetes in Thailand. PMID:26894266

  6. Malaria-associated rubber plantations in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Kaewwaen, Wuthichai; Maneekan, Pannamas; Pimnon, Suntorn

    2013-01-01

    Rubber forestry is intentionally used as a land management strategy. The propagation of rubber plantations in tropic and subtropic regions appears to influence the economical, sociological and ecological aspects of sustainable development as well as human well-being and health. Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries are the world's largest producers of natural rubber products; interestingly, agricultural workers on rubber plantations are at risk for malaria and other vector-borne diseases. The idea of malaria-associated rubber plantations (MRPs) encompasses the complex epidemiological settings that result from interactions among human movements and activities, land cover/land use changes, agri-environmental and climatic conditions and vector population dynamics. This paper discusses apparent issues pertaining to the connections between rubber plantations and the populations at high risk for malaria. The following questions are addressed: (i) What are the current and future consequences of rubber plantations in Thailand and Southeast Asia relative to malaria epidemics or outbreaks of other vector-borne diseases? (ii) To what extent is malaria transmission in Thailand related to the forest versus rubber plantations? and (iii) What are the vulnerabilities of rubber agricultural workers to malaria, and how contagious is malaria in these areas?

  7. Palliative Care Nursing Interventions in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Eaton, Linda H.; Rue, Tessa; Hong, Elizabeth; Coenen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to describe the nursing interventions that nurses in Thailand identify as most important in promoting dignified dying. Design This study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. Method A total of 247 Thai nurses completed a paper-and-pencil survey written in Thai. The survey included both demographic questions and palliative care interventions, listed with summative rating scales, from the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) catalogue Palliative Care for Dignified Dying. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Findings The five most important nursing interventions to promote dignified dying, ranked by average importance rating, were (a) maintain dignity and privacy, (b) establish trust, (c) manage pain, (d) establish rapport, and (e) manage dyspnea. Conclusions This research identified the palliative care nursing interventions considered most important by nurses in Thailand to promote dignified dying. Implications for Practice The ICNP catalogue Palliative Care for Dignified Dying can be used for planning and managing palliative nursing care in Thailand. PMID:24014487

  8. Taeniasis, cysticercosis and echinococcosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Waikagul, Jitra; Dekumyoy, Paron; Anantaphruti, Malinee T

    2006-01-01

    Taeniasis is one of the major food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand. During the years 1957-1997, the prevalence was low in most parts of the country. Recent (2000-2005) country prevalence was lower than 1%. A high prevalence (5.9%) was found among 1450 villagers from 30 villages in the North, and among 1233 stool samples from 19 provinces in the Northeast (2.8%). Taenia saginata was the dominant species. Cysticercosis in Thailand is somewhat under-reported/recorded. During the period 1965-2005, diagnosis was based on techniques other than serodiagnosis, giving a total of cysticercosis cases of less than 500. However, an immunoblot technique using delipidized cyst antigen showed 314 positive cases out of 754 samples tested in 2000-2005. Reports of neurocysticercosis appeared more often than cutaneous cysticercosis. A total of 24 cases of echinococcosis, mostly hydatid cysts (only 2 cases of alveolar cysts), were recorded during 1936-2005. These records included 3 cases of foreigners seeking surgery in hospitals in Bangkok. Most Thai patients were migrant workers from the Middle East, and only a few cases were indigenous. The prevalence of cysticercosis and echinococcosis is increasing resulting from sensitive modern diagnostic tests. Taeniasis will persist in Thailand as the consumption of raw/half-cooked meat dishes is still a normal practice for Thai people.

  9. Taeniasis, cysticercosis and echinococcosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Waikagul, Jitra; Dekumyoy, Paron; Anantaphruti, Malinee T

    2006-01-01

    Taeniasis is one of the major food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand. During the years 1957-1997, the prevalence was low in most parts of the country. Recent (2000-2005) country prevalence was lower than 1%. A high prevalence (5.9%) was found among 1450 villagers from 30 villages in the North, and among 1233 stool samples from 19 provinces in the Northeast (2.8%). Taenia saginata was the dominant species. Cysticercosis in Thailand is somewhat under-reported/recorded. During the period 1965-2005, diagnosis was based on techniques other than serodiagnosis, giving a total of cysticercosis cases of less than 500. However, an immunoblot technique using delipidized cyst antigen showed 314 positive cases out of 754 samples tested in 2000-2005. Reports of neurocysticercosis appeared more often than cutaneous cysticercosis. A total of 24 cases of echinococcosis, mostly hydatid cysts (only 2 cases of alveolar cysts), were recorded during 1936-2005. These records included 3 cases of foreigners seeking surgery in hospitals in Bangkok. Most Thai patients were migrant workers from the Middle East, and only a few cases were indigenous. The prevalence of cysticercosis and echinococcosis is increasing resulting from sensitive modern diagnostic tests. Taeniasis will persist in Thailand as the consumption of raw/half-cooked meat dishes is still a normal practice for Thai people. PMID:16338166

  10. The present status of trichinellosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khamboonruang, C

    1991-12-01

    The epidemiology of trichinellosis in northern Thailand may be unique. Since 1962, outbreaks of the disease have occurred almost every year. The Department of Communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health reported 118 discrete outbreaks of the disease, involving 5,400 patients, 95 of whom have died. Epidemiological investigations reveal that the outbreaks have occurred mostly in rural areas, associated with villagers celebrating local and traditional festivals such as the northern Thai New Year, wedding ceremonies, or other festive occasions. In almost all cases the source of infection has been traced to either hilltribe pigs, which are raised like wild animals, or to meat from wild boar. Infection is usually acquired through consumption of a local dish called "lahb," traditionally served during these festivities. This popular dish consists of raw finely chopped meat mixed with spices and chilies and is served nearly raw. Common clinical symptoms of trichinellosis in northern Thailand are fever and myalgia, presenting about two weeks after ingestion of raw meat containing encysted Trichinella larvae. Based on its infectivity for rats and pigs and on alloenzyme typing, the species appears to be Trichinella spiralis. The transmission cycle of trichinellosis in northern Thailand is primarily of a sylvatic type. Hilltribe pigs, wild boars, black bear and jackal are common reservoirs. Man intrudes into the cycle by eating the raw or under-cooked meat of these animals. PMID:1822914

  11. Africa: Prosperous times

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Political instability and corruption is the rule, rather than the exception, in Africa`s main producing regions, but exploration and production prospects there are bright and attractive to foreign operators. The paper discusses exploration, drilling, resource development, and production in Nigeria, Libya, Algeria, Egypt, Angola, Congo, Gabon, and Tunisia. The other countries of Africa are briefly mentioned, i.e., Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, South Africa, Sudan, Namibia, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Zaire, Mozambique, Ghana, Niger, and Seychelles.

  12. Africa's Geomosaic under Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Blij, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Traces the transformation of Subsaharan Africa during the last 35 years. Contends that the domino effect hastened decolonization and increased polarization within South Africa. Argues that modernization is taking place only in South Africa's core and that the geopolitical framework appears stable but may collapse from within. (NL)

  13. Biochemical Education in Thailand: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svasti, Jisnuson; Surarit, Rudee

    1991-01-01

    Traces the history of Thailand's biochemical education from its initial evolution from medicine to modern day. Discusses the following aspects of Thailand's modern biochemical education: biochemistry teaching at Thai schools, university departments and biochemistry courses, textbooks, degree programs, interplay between research and teaching, and…

  14. An Expert System Adviser for Tourists Planning To Visit Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanchanosatha, Vinita

    This document reports on an examination of the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation of an interactive computer program. The program is called an expert system adviser, and is for tourists planning on visiting Thailand. The expert system contains well-organized information that provides detailed coverage of Thailand. The…

  15. Educational Expenditures in Thailand: Development, Trends, and Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarik, Danuvas

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to investigate the trends of education expenditure policy during the past few decades, as well as the recent allocation and distribution of education expenditure in Thailand. It also focuses on the development of the substance of education policy in Thailand. Political connection with the education expenditure policy is also…

  16. Decentralisation And School-Based Management In Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamage, David T.; Sooksomchitra, Pacharapimon

    2004-01-01

    School-based management (SBM) in Thailand began in 1997 in the course of a reform aimed at overcoming a profound crisis in the education system. The present contribution reports on the introduction and institutionalisation of decentralisation and SBM with community participation in Thailand. The data reported here are based on an empirical survey…

  17. Inferring Ethnolinguistic Vitality in a Community of Northeast Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John Charles

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of ethnolinguistic vitality as the framework for a sociolinguistic survey measuring attitudes to multilingualism and reporting on the experiences of a community of Northeast Thailand (Isan) that forms part of Thailand's largest minority. The aim of the study was to examine the experiences of participants in a…

  18. Physics teaching in the medical schools of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Hsu, Roy

    2012-02-01

    We describe and analyze the statistics of general physics and laboratory courses in the medical schools of Taiwan. We explore the development of the general physics curriculum for medical students of Taiwan. Also, an approach to designing a general physics course in combination with its application to medical sciences is proposed. We hope this preliminary study can provide a useful reference for physics colleagues in the medical schools of Taiwan to revolutionize the dynamics of teaching physics to the medical students of Taiwan.

  19. Land, carbon and water footprints in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yung-Jaan

    2015-09-15

    The consumer responsibility approach uses footprints as indicators of the total direct and indirect effects of a product or consumption activity. This study used a time-series analysis of three environmental pressures to quantify the total environmental pressures caused by consumption in Taiwan: land footprint, carbon footprint, and water footprint. Land footprint is the pressure from appropriation of biologically productive land and water area. Carbon footprint is the pressure from greenhouse gas emissions. Water footprint is the pressure from freshwater consumption. Conventional carbon footprint is the total CO{sub 2} emitted by a certain activity or the CO{sub 2} accumulation during a product life cycle. This definition cannot be used to convert CO{sub 2} emissions into land units. This study responds to the needs of “CO{sub 2} land” in the footprint family by applying the carbon footprint concept used by GFN. The analytical results showed that consumption by the average Taiwan citizen in 2000 required appropriation of 5.39 gha (hectares of land with global-average biological productivity) and 3.63 gha in 2011 in terms of land footprint. The average Taiwan citizen had a carbon footprint of 3.95 gha in 2000 and 5.94 gha in 2011. These results indicate that separately analyzing the land and carbon footprints enables their trends to be compared and appropriate policies and strategies for different sectors to be proposed accordingly. The average Taiwan citizen had a blue water footprint of 801 m{sup 3} in 2000 and 784 m{sup 3} in 2011. By comparison, their respective global averages were 1.23 gha, 2.36 gha and 163 m{sup 3} blue water in 2011, respectively. Overall, Taiwan revealed higher environmental pressures compared to the rest of the world, demonstrating that Taiwan has become a high footprint state and has appropriated environmental resources from other countries. That is, through its imports of products with embodied pressures and its exports, Taiwan has

  20. Super Typhoon Halong off Taiwan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On July 14, 2002, Super Typhoon Halong was east of Taiwan (left edge) in the western Pacific Ocean. At the time this image was taken the storm was a Category 4 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 115 knots (132 miles per hour), but as recently as July 12, winds were at 135 knots (155 miles per hour). Halong has moved northwards and pounded Okinawa, Japan, with heavy rain and high winds, just days after tropical Storm Chataan hit the country, creating flooding and killing several people. The storm is expected to be a continuing threat on Monday and Tuesday. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on July 14, 2002. Please note that the high-resolution scene provided here is 500 meters per pixel. For a copy of the scene at the sensor's fullest resolution, visit the MODIS Rapid Response Image Gallery. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Management of scrap computer recycling in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Chang, S L; Wang, K M; Wen, L C

    2000-04-28

    It is estimated that approximately 300,000 scrap personal computers are generated each year in Taiwan [S.-L. Chang, A Study on the Scrap Computer Treatment Cost, Environment Protection Administration of Taiwan, December 1998 (in Chinese)]. The disposal of such a huge number of scrap computers presents a difficult task for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. Also, the hazardous materials contained (i.e., phosphor coatings of cathode ray tubes (CRTs), batteries, polychlorinated biphenyl capacitors, mercury-containing parts, liquid crystal display, high-lead content CRT funnel glass, and plastic containing flame-retardant bromine, etc.) in the scrap computers may seriously pollute the environment if they are not properly disposed of. Therefore, the EPA of Taiwan declared scrap personal computers the producer's recycling responsibility as of July 1997. Under this decree, the manufacturers, importers and sellers of personal computers have to properly recover and recycle the scrapped computers which they originally sell. On June 1, 1998, a producer responsibility recycling program for scrap computers was officially implemented in Taiwan. Under this program, consumers can bring their unwanted personal computers to the designated collection points and receive reward money. Currently, only six computer items are mandated to be recycled in this recycling program. They are notebooks, monitors, hard disks, power supplies, printed circuit boards and main frame shells. This article outlines the current scrap computer recycling system in Taiwan.

  2. What University Governance Can Taiwan Learn from the United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Land, Ming H.

    2010-01-01

    Due to changes from centralization to marketization, Taiwan's university governance must increase its effectiveness. The purpose of this paper was to introduce trends in and issues of Taiwan's university governance, describe university governance in the United States, and draw implications that Taiwan's university governance needs to learn from…

  3. Taiwan Y-chromosomal DNA variation and its relationship with Island Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Much of the data resolution of the haploid non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplogroup O in East Asia are still rudimentary and could be an explanatory factor for current debates on the settlement history of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). Here, 81 slowly evolving markers (mostly SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats were used to achieve higher level molecular resolution. Our aim is to investigate if the distribution of NRY DNA variation in Taiwan and ISEA is consistent with a single pre-Neolithic expansion scenario from Southeast China to all ISEA, or if it better fits an expansion model from Taiwan (the OOT model), or whether a more complex history of settlement and dispersals throughout ISEA should be envisioned. Results We examined DNA samples from 1658 individuals from Vietnam, Thailand, Fujian, Taiwan (Han, plain tribes and 14 indigenous groups), the Philippines and Indonesia. While haplogroups O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 follow a decreasing cline from Taiwan towards Western Indonesia, O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 decline northward from Western Indonesia towards Taiwan. Compared to the Taiwan plain tribe minority groups the Taiwanese Austronesian speaking groups show little genetic paternal contribution from Han. They are also characterized by low Y-chromosome diversity, thus testifying for fast drift in these populations. However, in contrast to data provided from other regions of the genome, Y-chromosome gene diversity in Taiwan mountain tribes significantly increases from North to South. Conclusion The geographic distribution and the diversity accumulated in the O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 haplogroups on one hand, and in the O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 haplogroups on the other, support a pincer model of dispersals and gene flow from the mainland to the islands which likely started during the late upper Paleolithic, 18,000 to 15

  4. [AIDS research and prevention strategies in Thailand].

    PubMed

    Leisch, H

    1997-04-01

    The first case of AIDS was registered in Thailand in 1984; this syndrome was deemed to be mainly a disease affecting homosexuals and foreigners. However, soon thereafter its incidence among prostitutes and intravenous drug users increased. According to 1995 data, the number of AIDS patients was about 20,000 and there were approximately 800,000 HIV-positive people. A 1991 map of the AIDS incidence showed that, after the Bangkok metropolitan area, the province of Chiang Mai in the north exhibited a particularly high rate of infection. According to a medium-range forecast, by the year 2010 there will be close to 2.3 million cumulative HIV infection cases and 1.2 million AIDS cases in Thailand. This corresponds to an infection rate of about 3.2% vs. the present 2%. It is estimated that about 20% of all mortality in the age range of 20-48 years in the year 2000 will be caused by AIDS. In 1995, the prime minister predicted that AIDS would cause a 20% drop of the GDP by 2000. The boom of the economy in the 1980s and the early 1990s led to migration to the cities, where prostitution and drug use are rampant, as well as to the emergence of sex tourism, mainly from Germany (40,000-60,000 Germans traveled to Thailand in 1990). The age-old tradition among married men of seeking out the services of prostitutes, lack of condom use (only 20% of men intend to use it, according to recent studies), and disregard for the AIDS problem among the populace are other factors contributing to the rapid spread of AIDS. UNAIDS has undertaken sex education and other information campaigns to counter the epidemic.

  5. GEOPHYSICS. Layered deformation in the Taiwan orogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, T-Y; Gung, Y; Kuo, B-Y; Chiao, L-Y; Chen, Y-N

    2015-08-14

    The underthrusting of continental crust during mountain building is an issue of debate for orogens at convergent continental margins. We report three-dimensional seismic anisotropic tomography of Taiwan that shows a nearly 90° rotation of anisotropic fabrics across a 10- to 20-kilometer depth, consistent with the presence of two layers of deformation. The upper crust is dominated by collision-related compressional deformation, whereas the lower crust of Taiwan, mostly the crust of the subducted Eurasian plate, is dominated by convergence-parallel shear deformation. We interpret this lower crustal shearing as driven by the continuous sinking of the Eurasian mantle lithosphere when the surface of the subducted plate is coupled with the orogen. The two-layer deformation clearly defines the role of subduction in the formation of the Taiwan mountain belt. PMID:26273051

  6. Violence against women migrant workers in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaiyanukij, Charnchao

    2004-10-01

    A paper on "Violence against Women Migrant Workers in Thailand" will show the situation of women migrant workers in Thailand, why they have to come to Thailand, what kind of job they do, how they are abused and exploited by employer in many types of violence and how the Thai government manages to solve the problems and assist them. The term or definition of "violence against women-VAW" and "discrimination against women" is provided and based on the definition stated in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Readers will see that violence against women is a form of discrimination committed on a basis of sex. In other words, VAW is a clear violation of women's inherent human rights including the rights to life, liberty, and security of person, equality, equal protection under the law and freedom from all forms of discrimination. More than one hundred thousands of women illegal migrant workers work in Thailand. They come from countries in the Mekong Sub-region namely Myanmar Lao PDR, Cambodia, Vietnam and China (Yunnan province). As they come illegally and have low level of education and working skills, they are vulnerable to exploitation, abuse or face violence. In general, they work in small factories, domestic work and restaurant. They are forced begging, forced prostitution or work in a slavery-like condition. Root causes of illegal migration and VAW are interrelated and occur in both sending and receiving countries of migrant workers. Poverty, demand and supply sides of labor, level of education, no knowledge of their own rights, impact of capitalism and gender issues, are mentioned as original factors of migration and VAW. The Thai government has national policy, plan, instrument and measures to cope with in- migration of illegal workers. Not only government agencies are active to solve the problems and assist the women migrant workers, but also non

  7. [The Taiwan Nurses Association and professional diplomacy].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan

    2014-08-01

    The Taiwan Nurses Association (TWNA) is publishing a special centenary issue to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the association in 2014. For this issue, TWNA invited the author to write a review article that addresses the involvement of the TWNA in professional diplomacy and international exchange over the past century. The author reviews the history of both TWNA and the International Council of Nurses and introduces the contributions of the association in the field of professional diplomacy and the positive contributions of many Taiwan nursing leaders to global healthcare and society. The purpose of the paper is to convey the traditions and experiences of TWNA forward to the next generation. PMID:25125155

  8. [The Taiwan Nurses Association and professional diplomacy].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan

    2014-08-01

    The Taiwan Nurses Association (TWNA) is publishing a special centenary issue to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the association in 2014. For this issue, TWNA invited the author to write a review article that addresses the involvement of the TWNA in professional diplomacy and international exchange over the past century. The author reviews the history of both TWNA and the International Council of Nurses and introduces the contributions of the association in the field of professional diplomacy and the positive contributions of many Taiwan nursing leaders to global healthcare and society. The purpose of the paper is to convey the traditions and experiences of TWNA forward to the next generation.

  9. THEOS: The1st Thailand EO System and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peanvijarnpong, Chanchai

    Thailand has engaged in remote sensing satellite technological and scientific development many years since early 1980s. Thailand Landsat Station was established as a regional center of data processing and dissemination for Thai scientists for data applications. Over the years, GISTDA and Thai user community have been gaining technical experience and expertise in satellite data applications around the country such natural resources and environmental management, forest inventory, forest change detections, soil mapping, land-use and land cover mapping, crop type mapping, coastal shrimp farming, flood zone mapping, base mapping, water and drought management. The Government of Thailand realizes that remote sensing satellite technology is an important mechanism for social and economic development of the country. So the 1st Thailand Earth Observation System (THEOS) development program was approved by the Government since 2003. THEOS system is sub-synchronous satellite orbiting around the earth at 822 km. altitude same as SPOT satellites. It carries two imaging instruments; 2-m Panchromatic telescope with 22 km. swath width and 15-m resolution camera with four-multi-spectral band and 90-km swath wide. THEOS is scheduled to launch around March 2008. A number of technological and scientific activities has been implementing for Thailand and international scientific user community. Therefore THEOS is strong endorsement from the Government of Thailand on the value of remote sensing technology. This paper presents Thailand EO activities including THEOS System and its plans.

  10. Interannual and Interdecadal Variability of Thailand Summer Monsoon Season.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhrattna, Nkrintra; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Krishna Kumar, K.; Clark, Martyn

    2005-06-01

    Summer monsoon rains are a critical factor in Thailand's water resources and agricultural planning and management. In fact, they have a significant impact on the country's economic health. Consequently, understanding the variability of the summer monsoon rains over Thailand is important for instituting effective mitigating strategies against extreme rainfall fluctuations. To this end, the authors systematically investigated the relationships between summer monsoon precipitation from the central and northern regions of Thailand and large-scale climate features. It was found that Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs), in particular, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have a negative relationship with the summer monsoon rainfall over Thailand in recent decades. However, the relationship between summer rainfall and ENSO was weak prior to 1980. It is hypothesized that the ENSO teleconnection depends on the SST configuration in the tropical Pacific Ocean, that is, an eastern Pacific-based El Niño pattern, such as is the case in most of the post-1980 El Niño events, tends to place the descending limb of the Walker circulation over the Thailand-Indonesian region, thereby significantly reducing convection and consequently, rainfall over Thailand. It is believed that this recent shift in the Walker circulation is instrumental for the nonstationarity in ENSO-monsoon relationships in Thailand. El Niños of 1997 and 2002 corroborate this hypothesis. This has implications for monsoon rainfall forecasting and, consequently, for resources planning and management.

  11. Housing and health transition in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Friel, S; McMichael, A J; Kjellstrom, T; Prapamontol, T

    2004-01-01

    Over the past half-century, Thailand's health profile has been undergoing an epidemiologic transition in association with various fundamental societal changes, shifting from one with a predominant burden of communicable disease to one in which noncommunicable diseases and accidents now predominate. The primary question is why have the disease rates in the Thai population changed? Answering this question requires an examination of the underlying transitions in social and contextual factors. This paper explores, using published data, how housing conditions, as one set of environmental health risks, have undergone transition in recent years and how this change maps on the health-transition process. A combination of economic development, urbanization, modernization, and increased health literacy resulted in a range of health-protecting changes in housing design and materials. Pre-eminent among such changes are improvements in household sanitation and in equipment, ventilation, and fuel pertaining to indoor cooking and heating. In tropical countries like Thailand, gains have been made in mosquito-proofing houses and in minimizing open pools of water to combat the risks of malaria, dengue fever, and other mosquito-borne infections. Meanwhile, the growth in shantytown and slum housing around the urban fringe, often in precarious environmental settings, introduced a negative dimension to the evolving profile of housing-related health risks, whereas the urban sprawl of modern residences creates health risks that are due to traffic crashes and the lack of walking in daily transport.

  12. Distribution of pathogenic Naegleria spp in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tiewcharoen, S; Junnu, V

    2001-01-01

    Research concerning the distribution, isolation, viability, ultrastructure, morphology and immunogenicity of Naegleria fowleri has been increasing in Thailand during 1988-2000. The distribution of the organism was carried out from 1985 to 1987 in Si Sa Ket and Ubon Rachathani Provinces, after the first fatal case was reported in Si Sa Ket. Since then in a 1998 survey of N. fowleri in stagnant water around industrial areas was carried out in Pathum Thani, Samut Prakan and Lopburi provinces. The results showed that 10% of pathogenic Naegleria belonged to species fowleri as characterized by morphology and the occurrence of pathogenesis in mice after nasal inoculation. In the same year, Nacapunchai et al (1999) determined the prevalence of amebae in aquatic habitat of human environments in five parts of Thailand during the summer. Fourteen percent of free living Naegleria spp were found in both soil and water resources. Recent studies of the ultrastructure, factors affecting the viability and SDS-PAGE electrophoretic patterns of 3 Thai strains of pathogenic Naegleria spp indicated their similarities in morphological characteristics of pathogenic reference control, Naegleria fowleri CDC VO 3081. Additional study using a genetic approach to species criteria using allozyme electrophoresis had been conducted.

  13. Light work at Chiang Mai University, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongtawatnugool, C.; Ngamjarurojana, A.; Lacharojana, Samran

    2002-05-01

    The teaching and learning optics in Thailand is some how rather slowly developed. This is could possibly due to its importance, as seen by the educators and scientists in Thailand, was not so pronounced in the past. This made Thai scientists and researchers in many other disciplines lag of basic optics knowledge to getting involve with today advanced optics and photonics technologies. The need for high precision and high speed of the measurement and control in today experiment urges them to get involve in optics and photonics techniques more than ever before. At Chiang Mai university we offer 4-credit course: Optics and Spectroscopy. It covers a conventional optics course detail as referred in most conventional optics text books. Advanced optics course is also offered at higher level. The development of research activities utilizing optics and photonics techniques has been very slow due to the higher cost for most of the equipment involved. Very often that we have to assemble our own designed micro-computer-based equipment. The multi-scaler and a computer to serve as a photon correlator in dynamic light scattering (DLS) system to study correlation length in a liquid mixture at its critical point is one of the examples. The Ph.D. projects work in our section involve medical laser and electro-optics properties of a liquid mixture are some examples of our interest.

  14. Isolation of Langat virus from Haemaphysalis papuana Thorell in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, W H; Scott, R M; Snitbhan, R; Weaver, R E; Gould, D J

    1976-05-01

    A strain of Langat virus (LGT), T-1674, was isolated from a pool of Haemaphysalis papuana Thorell collected in the forest of Khao Yai National Park in Central Thailand. The isolated virus was found to have growth and antigenic similarity to the prototype Langat strain (TP-21). This is the first report of a natural infection of Haemaphysalis ticks with LGT and of the isolation of this arbovirus in Thailand. The wide distribution of known vectors of LGT in Thailand suggests that the virus may be present in other areas of the country.

  15. Disaster management: vulnerability and resilience in disaster recovery in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Busapathumrong, Pattamaporn

    2013-01-01

    This project explores disaster management in Thailand with a focus on the vulnerability and resilience of women, children, the elderly, and the disabled population and on the impact of disaster on these subpopulations. The 2 main findings deal with the major models of disaster management in Thailand and building resilience for social recovery. The selected 5 major models currently employed in disaster management in Thailand are the (a) model of royal project and international cooperation on disaster preparedness and response, (b) ASEAN Socio-Cultural Blueprint, (c) rights-based approach, (d) welfare mix model, and (e) knowledge management model.

  16. Sustainability of Higher Education Institutions in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, H. Jenny; Chang, Tzu-chau

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide the rationale and context for recent national policy and funded initiatives to support sustainability developments within higher education in Taiwan, including practical and educational aspects. Concrete examples and specific outcomes are reviewed, to produce a profile across the higher education…

  17. The Quality of Life in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Grace; Cheng, Yen-Pi; Cheng, Chiao-Pi

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer survey of 1,006 respondents shows that in Taiwan, people have access to modern utilities and digital media, signs of materialistic achievement, and yet are more concerned with physical security and financial safety than with personal growth. Regardless of their demographic backgrounds and value priorities, the Taiwanese, like…

  18. Internet Addiction among High Schoolers in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Sunny S. J.; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid measurement for the identification of Internet addictive high school students. There were 615 subjects selected by a stratified sampling from the population of Taiwanese 10th to 12th graders. The final version of the Internet Addiction Scale for Taiwan High Schoolers (IAST) contained 20…

  19. Ambient noise levels in the Taiwan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W.; Liu, C.; Chen, R.; Huang, B.; Wu, F. T.; Wang, C.

    2008-12-01

    To characterize the island-wide background seismic noise in Taiwan, we estimate the power spectral density (PSD) at broadband stations of both the BATS (Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology) and the TAIGER experiment (Apr. 2006~Apr. 2008) for periods ranging from ~0.2 to 100 seconds. A new approach to calculate the probability density functions of noise power (PDFs, MaNamara and Buland, 2004) is used in this study. The results indicate that the cultural noise at higher frequencies is significant at populated area, which shows diurnal and weekly variation as what we expected. The noise power for microseisms centered at a period of ~5 seconds around the western costal plain show ~20dB higher than what observed at eastern Taiwan. This observation supports the inference that the coastal regions having narrow shelf with irregular coastlines are know to be especially efficient at radiating the predominat microseisms. Results from the linear array across central Taiwan demonstrate that the average noise power is quietest at the eastern Central Range. We have mapped the PDF mode for stations at various periods to see the spatial distribution of ambient noise levels, which could be used as the basic information for future station siting. Temporal variation of noise PSD is also present to provide a quantitative description of the seismic data quality collected by both BATS and TAIGER experiment. Some operational problems like base tilt, sensitivity change can be identified easily as well.

  20. Improving the Textbook Adoption Process in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Hsuan-fu; Hsu, Ying-tsun

    2011-01-01

    Textbooks were centrally selected in Taiwan until 1996 when the government commissioned its Textbook Liberalization Reform. Although this policy received complements from scholars and the general public, it encounters many unexpected problems in its implementation. The aims of this research are thus to identify the major criteria used by…

  1. Gestalt Group Dreamwork Demonstrations in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coven, Arnold B.

    2004-01-01

    The application of Gestalt dreamwork was explored with counselor education students and professors at two Taiwan universities. The literature indicates Asians are reluctant to disclose personal matters or to display emotions. Contrary to expectations, the Taiwanese participants readily enacted roles, were personally open, and expressed intense…

  2. Great Expectations: Teaching and Learning in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    The author recounts his experience as a Fulbright Scholar in the Department of Special Education at National Changhua University of Education (NCUE) in Changhua, Taiwan, during the fall of 2003. Several aspects of his experience are highlighted, including teaching foreign college students, learning Mandarin, conducting workshops, and consulting…

  3. Self-Efficacy, Taiwan Elementary Teachers Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brady M.; Liu, Chia-Ju; Chiu, Hoan-Lin

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a case study involving Taiwanese elementary teachers who teach science at the elementary grade school level. It advocates the position that a teacher's personal science efficacy belief influences his or her science teaching outcome expectations. It promotes the position that the success Taiwan has experienced in…

  4. Women's Aspirations for Graduate Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Meng-Jie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates female undergraduates' aspirations for master's and doctoral degree programs in Taiwan's universalized and stratified higher education system. It considers the potential effects of economic prospects, parental attitudes, and gender values. First, graduate education is perceived as a means to enhance one's comparative…

  5. Taiwan's underwater cultural heritage documentation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Y.-Y.

    2015-09-01

    Taiwan is an important trading and maritime channels for many countries since ancient time. Numerous relics lie underwater due to weather, wars, and other factors. In the year of 2006, Bureau of Cultural Heritage (BOCH) entrusted the Underwater Archaeological Team of Academia Sinica to execute the underwater archaeological investigation projects. Currently, we verified 78 underwater targets, with 78 site of those had been recognized as shipwrecks sites. Up to date, there is a collection of 638 underwater objects from different underwater archaeological sites. Those artefacts are distributed to different institutions and museums. As very diverse management methods/systems are applied for every individual institution, underwater cultural heritage data such as survey, excavation report, research, etc. are poorly organized and disseminated for use. For better communication regarding to Taiwan's underwater cultural heritage in every level, a universal format of documentation should be established. By comparing the existing checklist used in Taiwan with guidelines that are followed in other countries, a more intact and appropriate underwater cultural heritage condition documentation system can be established and adapted in Taiwan.

  6. 75 FR 61175 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Commission's rules, as amended, 67 FR 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where electronic filing of a document is... Handbook on Electronic Filing Procedures, 67 FR 68168, 68173 (November 8, 2002). Additional written... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission....

  7. No Aboriginal Students left Behind in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sue-Jen; Hartzler-Miller, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    The project is motivated by Taiwan's huge gap of educational levels between the aborigines and the Hans. The low achievement of aboriginal students lies in factors related to problems in finance, health, and cultural difference, which contribute to their sense of self-deprecation. The purpose of the project is to provide early intervention and…

  8. Development of University Counseling Profession in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yii-nii; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yien-Hua; Lai, Pi-hui

    2015-01-01

    This article was to elaborate the development of the university counseling profession in Taiwan through an intensive literature review. The university student body has been expanding radically in the last three decades, and the student population, as well as their problems, have become more diverse and complex. Thus, the importance of university…

  9. An Inquiry into Teacher Concerns in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yih-fen; Reeves, Carolyn

    This study identified concerns of teachers in Taiwan and contrasted concerns of these teachers with the 56 concerns which comprise the Teacher Concerns Checklist (TCC), Form B, developed in the United States. A total of 294 teachers (155 preservice teachers and 139 inservice teachers) completed a Chinese version of the Survey of Teacher Concerns.…

  10. Ethos Derived from Karaoke Performance in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Ringo

    Karaoke (singing along to music videos) has swept Taiwan with such force that many people go to singing schools to improve their singing. Three cases in this paper demonstrate how the ethos, or credibility, of the singer is a combination of initial and derived ethos. Who the singer is tends to determine how much attention he or she receives…

  11. The Workforce Education and Development in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Workforce education and development (WED) can be broadly defined as those formal, informal and nonformal activities that prepare people for work. In Taiwan, it includes technological and vocational education (TVE), human resource development (HRD), public vocational training and adult education. In order to promote information exchanges and…

  12. Language Policy and Group Identification in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ruey-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Taiwan is a multicultural and multilingual society. Generally speaking, Taiwanese residents fall into one of four ethnic groups. Each ethnic group has a different cultural context and a preferred language. Therefore, one's use of language may reveal his/her identification with an ethnic group, and language policy implementation may imply the power…

  13. Language Skills and Status Attainment in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-Ling

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of language underlying the stratification process in Taiwan within the context of globalization. Specifically, I ask if one's language skills may serve as a key to getting ahead. The Taiwanese government has imposed Mandarin as the official language since 1945 and introduced English courses into compulsory…

  14. Factors Related to Parenting Practices in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fu-Mei; Luster Tom

    2002-01-01

    This study examined factors related to authoritarian and authoritative parenting practices among 463 Chinese mothers with preschoolers in Taiwan. Questionnaire findings suggested that maternal depression, child temperament, and degree of parenting daily hassles might have cross-culturally universal influence on parenting practices. Chinese…

  15. The gravity field in Taiwan Strait

    SciTech Connect

    Su Daquan; Chen Xue; Liu Zuhui )

    1990-06-01

    Gravity surveys have been carried out in the western part of Taiwan Strait by South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Academia Sinica, from 1986 to 1989. More than 3,000 km of gravity profile data have been collected. The accuracy of the gravity is about {plus minus}2.5 mGal. Based on these data, gravity maps of Taiwan Strait (1:2,000,000) have been compiled, combined with the data from University of Tokyo, Lamont-Doherty geological observatory, and the USSR, which were collected from the east and southeast parts of Taiwan Strait. The interval of contour is 5 mGal. These maps cover part of East China Sea and South China Sea, where good gravity data have been gathered. Comparing the data from different sources in the same area, the authors think they are in very good agreement. These maps for the first time give detailed gravity information in the Taiwan Strait. It is very useful for the tectonic study and oil exploration in this area. The relationship between gravity anomalies and sedimentary basins has been studied in this area. Most of data show that the gravity low corresponds to the basin area and the gravity high is related to tectonic structure high. Xia-Peng depression, Wuqiuy depression, and Xinzhu depression, etc., show the gravity low. The relationship also can be seen in the gravity profiles clearly. The general tendency of gravity in the Taiwan Strait is that the gravity values gradually increase from the south part to the north part. It can be probably explained by deep geological structures. The relationship between gravity and geological structure units is also studied. They think the undulation of gravity anomalies is closely related to tectonic structures. Some main faults can be confirmed by the gravity maps.

  16. HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa: scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2015-01-01

    More than decades have already elapsed since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The HIV has since spread to all parts of the world with devastating effects. In sub-saharan Africa, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached unprecedented proportions. Safe, effective and affordable HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africans are therefore urgently needed to contain this public health problem. Although, there are challenges, there are also scientific opportunities and strategies that can be exploited in the development of HIV/AIDS vaccines for Africa. The recent RV144 Phase III trial in Thailand has demonstrated that it is possible to develop a vaccine that can potentially elicit modest protective immunity against HIV infection. The main objective of this review is to outline the key scientific opportunities, challenges and strategies in HIV/AIDS vaccine development in Africa.

  17. Generation 2030/Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Danzhen; Hug, Lucia; Anthony, David

    2014-01-01

    Until relatively recently, much of Africa has been among the economically least developed and least densely populated places on earth, replete with villages and rural communities. Africa is changing rapidly, in its economy, trade and investment; in climate change; in conflict and stability; in urbanization, migration patterns, and most of all in…

  18. Teaching about Francophone Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merryfield, Mary; Timbo, Adama

    Lessons and resources for Social Studies and French courses are included in this document. The major goals of these materials are to help students (1) explore the history and geography of Francophone Africa, (2) examine French influences in contemporary Africa, (3) recognize and appreciate cultural differences and similarities in values and…

  19. Language in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesthrie, Rajend, Ed.

    This collection of 24 papers focuses on language and society in South Africa. Part 1, "The Main Language Groupings," includes (1) "South Africa: A Sociolinguistic Overview" (R. Mesthrie); (2) "The Khoesan Languages" (A. Traill); (3) "The Bantu Languages: Sociohistorical Perspectives" (Robert K. Herbert and Richard Bailey); (4) "Afrikaans:…

  20. Historical Capsule: South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Briefly traces the history of South Africa from British acquisition in 1815 through the creation of the Union of South Africa in 1910. Presents a chronicle of the year 1900 to show part of the European achievement in close-up. Lists accomplishments in literature, fine arts, science, technology, music, theater, and dance. (GEA)

  1. Multilingualism in Southern Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peirce, Bonny Norton; Ridge, Stanley G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews recent research in multilingualism in Southern Africa, focusing on the role of languages in education, sociolinguistics, and language policy. Much of the research is on South Africa. Topics discussed include language of instruction in schools, teacher education, higher education, adult literacy, language contact, gender and linguistic…

  2. Malaria Modeling and Surveillance in Thailand and Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Soebiyanto, Radina

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the modeling of malaria transmission in Thailand and Indonesia to assist in the understanding and reducing the incidence of the deadly disease. Satellite observations are being integrated into this work, and this is described herein.

  3. Sex behaviour of male Japanese tourists in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Fumihiko

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores why Japanese men engage in potentially risky commercial sexual behaviours while on holiday in Thailand. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 heterosexual male Japanese tourists, aged 19-36, who paid for sex with Thai women. Study participants were recruited at guesthouses in Bangkok. Analysis revealed eight main factors that encourage participation in commercial sex: a sense of freedom and anonymity during "time-out" spent travelling in a foreign country; a sense that there are permissive norms governing commercial sex in Thailand; the perceived sexual desirability of Thai women, a sense of economic and racial superiority relative to Thai women; a sense of loneliness or feeling in need of companionship; peer influence; the widespread availability of inexpensive sexual services in Thailand; and sexual desire or need. Findings indicate that Japanese male sexual conduct reflects individual drives while on holiday, in the context of interactions among Japanese peers, shaped by Thailand's socio-cultural environment.

  4. Overview of Botanical Status in EU, USA, and Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Mahady, Gail B.

    2013-01-01

    The botanical status in EU, USA, and Thailand is different owing to the regulatory status, the progress of science, and the influence of culture and society. In the EU, botanicals are positioned as herbal medicinal products and food supplements, in the US they are regulated as dietary supplements but often used as traditional medicines, and in Thailand, they are regulated and used as traditional medicines. Information for some of the most popular botanicals from each country is included in this review. PMID:24228061

  5. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Thailand, 1987.

    PubMed

    Ungchusak, K; Kunasol, P

    1988-09-01

    In 1987, situation of DHF in Thailand was the worst for the past 30 years. There were 152,840 cases and 785 deaths from the preliminary report. The incidence was highest ever reported. Outbreak begun early in January and reached its peak in July. All 73 provinces were affected except six provinces which had incidence of less than 60 per 100,000 population. The highest attack rates were in school children, especially 5-9 year olds. Virus isolation in a north-eastern province recovered Den-3 and Den-2 more common than other serotypes. Although a large outbreak in 1987 is unlikely to happen in 1988 but with the endemic areas all over the country there is a potential for small outbreaks to occur. The Ministry of Public Health needs new approaches and increased resources to control this disease.

  6. Current status of taeniasis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Anantaphruti, Malinee Thairungroj

    2013-02-01

    Taeniasis is prevalent in all regions of Thailand, except the South. Infections were more frequently found in males than females of any age from 7-83 years. Taenia saginata is the most common species throughout the country. Taenia asiatica was reported only in the province of Kanchanaburi in the Central region. Co-infections, with Taenia solium and T. asiatica or T. solium and T. saginata, were found. Hybridization between T. asiatica and T. saginata is evidence that co-infection is never found between these 2 species. Finding more than 1 worm in a single patient was not entirely rare. Genetic variation was found without correlation to its geographic distribution in T. saginata, whereas no variation was found in T. asiatica.

  7. Trichinosis in Thailand during 1962-1983.

    PubMed

    Dissamarn, R; Indrakamhang, P

    1985-12-01

    Various studies on trichinosis in Thailand since the first outbreak in 1962 up until 15 July 1983 are reviewed. There were 67 outbreaks, affecting 2,792 persons and resulting in 85 deaths. Most of the outbreaks occurred in the north of the country which is mountainous. Hilltribe pigs and wild boars were the common sources of human infection. Incidence of Trichinella spiralis larvae in dog meat in the area favoring of dog meat consumption is cautioned to create a public health problem in the future. Some Thai dishes are proved as viable T. spiralis larvae source due to cooking procedures. Control measures of trichinosis launched by the Department of Livestock Development are described. PMID:3836212

  8. Trichinosis: A recent outbreak in Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khamboonruang, C; Nateewatana, N

    1975-03-01

    During April, 1973, and outbreak of trichinosis occurred in Mae Sruay District, Chiang Rai Province, about 900 kilometers north of Bangkok, Thailand. Thirty-one persons were involved, of whom 27 (20 males, and 7 females), ranging in age from 9 to 72 years, were questioned. One adult female died before being brought to hospital. All subjects gave a history of having consumed raw pork in the form of "lahb" and "nahm", favourite dishes of the northern Thai. Beginning the third week after exposure, all developed fever and myalgia. Other less common complaints were diarrhoea and oedema of extremities and palpebral skin. Leucocytosis was revealed in 37% and 55% had eosinophilia exceeding 20%. Nineteen patients had hookworm and Opisthorchis infections. About 63% were skin test positive with Trichinella antigen. Eight patients were admitted to hospital; muscle biopsy was done on one serious case and trichina larvae were detected. PMID:1145241

  9. Seismic hazards in Thailand: a compilation and updated probabilistic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pailoplee, Santi; Charusiri, Punya

    2016-06-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Thailand was performed and compared to those of previous works. This PSHA was based upon (1) the most up-to-date paleoseismological data (slip rates), (2) the seismic source zones, (3) the seismicity parameters ( a and b values), and (4) the strong ground-motion attenuation models suggested as being suitable models for Thailand. For the PSHA mapping, both the ground shaking and probability of exceedance (POE) were analyzed and mapped using various methods of presentation. In addition, site-specific PSHAs were demonstrated for ten major provinces within Thailand. For instance, a 2 and 10 % POE in the next 50 years of a 0.1-0.4 g and 0.1-0.2 g ground shaking, respectively, was found for western Thailand, defining this area as the most earthquake-prone region evaluated in Thailand. In a comparison between the ten selected specific provinces within Thailand, the Kanchanaburi and Tak provinces had comparatively high seismic hazards, and therefore, effective mitigation plans for these areas should be made. Although Bangkok was defined as being within a low seismic hazard in this PSHA, a further study of seismic wave amplification due to the soft soil beneath Bangkok is required.

  10. Agricultural Pesticide Management in Thailand: Situation and Population Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Panuwet, Parinya; Siriwong, Wattasit; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Ryan, P. Barry; Fiedler, Nancy; Robson, Mark G.; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2012-01-01

    As an agricultural country and one of the world’s major food exporters, Thailand relies heavily on the use of pesticides to protect crops and increase yields. During the past decade, the Kingdom of Thailand has experienced an approximate four-fold increase in pesticide use. This increase presents a challenge for the Royal Thai Government in effectively managing and controlling pesticide use based upon the current policies and legal infrastructure. We have reviewed several key components for managing agricultural pesticides in Thailand. One of the main obstacles to effective pesticide regulation in Thailand is the lack of a consolidated, uniform system designed specifically for pesticide management. This deficit has weakened the enforcement of existing regulations, resulting in misuse/overuse of pesticides, and consequently, increased environmental contamination and human exposure. This article provides a systematic review of how agricultural pesticides are regulated in Thailand. In addition, we provide our perspectives on the current state of pesticide management, the potential health effects of widespread, largely uncontrolled use of pesticides on the Thai people and ways to improve pesticide management in Thailand. PMID:22308095

  11. A Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposit in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankaew, K.; Choowong, M.; Charoentitirat, T.; Machado, T.; Martin, M. E.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Napradit, T.; Weerahong, A.; Surakiatchai, P.

    2007-05-01

    A sand layer from a predecessor to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami underlies a freshwater marsh on Phra Thong Island, Phang Nga Province, Thailand. At this marsh, about 300 meters from the sea, the 2004 tsunami left a sand layer about 13 cm thick on top of a peaty soil. The previous tsunami deposit, of similar thickness, rests on another peaty soil about 40 cm below present ground surface. It probably correlates with a pre-2004 tsunami deposit previously reported from Phra Thong Island in a web posting by Shigehiro Fujino. Observed in trenches and cores, the pre-2004 deposit begins with a razor-sharp contact with the underlying soil. The sand itself contains no fewer than 6 layers, all horizontal, defined by differences in particle size (fine sand and very fine sand) and by detrital plant fragments. We also noticed pebble-size clasts of peaty soil. These observations come from the vicinity of UTM coordinates 418975E, 1009496N, zone 47. Many of us participated in previous, unsuccessful attempts to find pre-2004 tsunami deposits in Thailand. We hunted for sand sheets between Phuket to the south and Kho Khao Island to the north, on beach-ridge plains disturbed by tin mining and in mangrove swamps. We also checked pristine, grassy beach-ridge plains of Phra Thong Island, the next island north of Kho Khao. None of these environments offer both a host deposit that contrasts with tsunami-laid sand and a lack of disturbance by tin miners, mud lobsters, and real-estate developers.

  12. Safe water for Africa (Africa-1000)

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, R.; Kashkari, C.

    1996-12-31

    Africa-1000 is a program to provide safe water to thousands of villages in Africa. It is a formidable effort and needs the support of the international scientific community. Science and technology is the only hope for a solution of the African crisis. There are vast areas in the Sub-Saharan Africa that have water under the ground but due to lack of electric power, the water cannot be pumped. Thus the land is dry and barren and people are starving. The African continent has abundant renewable energy in the form of solar and wind energy. The technologies are well developed and available in the developed countries. Therefore, the solution is as follows: dig and drill wells and boreholes to reach underground water; install standardized solar or wind driven pumps to bring water to the surface; train village technicians to operate, maintain and repair these energy systems; and replicate these installations in thousands of villages, thus establishing standard water and energy systems across Africa.

  13. [Response of Taiwan nursing education to today's nursing shortage].

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2012-10-01

    The shortage of nursing manpower has recently attracted significant attention from Taiwan society. Government efforts to improve the nursing practice environment have challenged the quality of current domestic nursing education. This article provides an overview of Taiwan nursing education in terms of its development under current nursing shortage conditions and in light of Taiwan's low birthrate, ageing society. A few suggestions for nursing education are listed at the end of the article.

  14. Poverty reduction in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Poverty in Africa has been rising for the last quarter-century, while it has been falling in the rest of the developing world. Africa's distinctive problem is that its economies have not been growing. This article attempts to synthesize a range of recent research to account for this failure of the growth process. I argue that the reasons lie not in African peculiarities but rather in geographic features that globally cause problems but that are disproportionately pronounced in Africa. These features interact to create three distinct challenges that are likely to require international interventions beyond the conventional reliance on aid. PMID:17942702

  15. VOC concentration in Taiwan's household drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kuo, H W; Chiang, T F; Lo, I I; Lai, J S; Chan, C C; Wang, J D

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in Taiwan's drinking water supply. Focusing on Taiwan's three major metropolitan areas--Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung (in the north, middle and south, respectively)--171 samples were taken from tap water and 68 from boiled water. Tests showed VOC concentrations were highest in Kaohsiung. This is due to different water sources and methods of treatment. Except for bromoform, trihalomethane (THM) concentrations were highest. Detection rates of toluene and 1,2-dichloroethane were slightly higher than other VOC compounds. VOC concentrations decreased significantly after water was boiled. THMs had a removal rate from 61% to 82%. The authors conclude that the three metropolitan areas contain significantly different levels of VOCs and that boiling can significantly reduce the presence of VOCs. Other sources of pollution that contaminate drinking water such as industrial plants and gas stations must be further investigated.

  16. Molluscan fauna of Gueishan Island, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Hsiung, Ta-Wei; Lin, Si-Min; Wu, Wen-Lung

    2013-01-01

    This dataset records the occurrence and inventory of molluscan fauna on Gueishan Island, the only active volcanic island in Taiwan, based on the literature survey and field investigation conducted between 2011 and 2012. The literature review involved seven studies published from 1934 to 2003, which collectively reported 112 species from 61 genera and 37 families of Mollusca on Gueishan Island. Through our field investigation, we identified 34 species from 28 genera and 23 families. Fourteen of these species were new records on Gueishan Island: Liolophura japonica, Lottia luchuana, Nerita costata, Nerita rumphii, Diplommatina suganikeiensis, Littoraria undulata, Solenomphala taiwanensis, Assiminea sp., Siphonaria laciniosa, Laevapex nipponica, Carychium hachijoensis, Succinea erythrophana, Zaptyx crassilamellata, and Allopeas pyrgula. In Total, there are 126 species from 71 genera and 45 families of Mollusca on Gueishan Island. These data have been published through GBIF [http://taibif.org.tw/ipt/resource.do?r=gueishan_island] and integrated into the Taiwan Malacofauna Database (http://shell.sinica.edu.tw/). PMID:23717182

  17. Transmission capability of asymmetric digital subscriber lines in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shyue-Win; Leu, Shyue-Tzong; Wei, Che-Ho

    1995-04-01

    The transmission capacity of discrete multitone (DMT) modulation system for Taiwan's subscriber loops is evaluated in this study. Based on the characteristics of Taiwan's local loops, the transmission capacity is estimated to be 1.544 Mb/s and 6 Mb/s in Taiwan. Simulation results also show how many percents of users in Taiwan may have 1.544 Mb/s or 6 Mb/s of asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL) services. Self far-end crosstalk (FEXT) and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) are considered to be the dominant noise sources in the work.

  18. Echovirus 18 meningitis in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min; Ho, Tzong-Shiann; Shen, Ching-Fen; Wang, Jen-Ren; Liu, Ching-Chuan

    2011-03-01

    Eighty cases of echovirus 18 infection among young children during an outbreak in 2006 in Taiwan were enrolled. Twenty percent of the patients had a comorbid condition. Twenty-five cases (31%) were complicated by aseptic meningitis. The most frequent diagnoses in children without meningitis were pharyngitis/tonsillitis (35%) and vesicular viral exanthem (33%). The case-fatality rate among the children with meningitis was 4%. Echovirus 18 was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of 68% of the children.

  19. Environmental and occupational skin diseases in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, H S; Lee, C H; Jee, S H; Ho, C K; Guo, Y L

    2001-11-01

    This presentation focuses on the four most important skin diseases in Taiwan thought to be of environmental and/or occupational origin. The majority of work-related dermatoses are contact dermatitis patients. Among occupational contact dermatitis patients, 58.5% involved irritant and 41.5%, allergic dermatitis. Electronics, hairdressing, medical practice, and construction were the most important occupations causing contact dermatitis. An endemic occurrence of chronic arsenism causing hyperpigmentation, keratosis, and cancer has been reported in Taiwan. Arsenical skin cancers present as multiple lesions at different disease stages. The skin cancers are usually found in non-sun-exposed areas. UVB exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of arsenical cancers; this may explain its non-sun-exposed nature. An outbreak of premalignant and malignant skin lesions was reported among paraquat manufacturers in 1985. The skin lesions were mainly distributed over the sun-exposed areas. Photodamage and photocarcinogenesis revealed a strong association with exposure to bipyridines among paraquat manufacturers. In 1979, a mass poisoning occurred in Taiwan from cooking oil contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Over 60% of patients were in grades O-II by the Japanese classification. The blood PCB levels of the Taiwanese patients were found to be higher than those of the Yusho subjects.

  20. Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Kao, Tsair; Wang, Jia-Jung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a biomedical engineer in Taiwan. Most of BME students can be trained in biomedical engineering departments with at least one of specialties in bioelectronics, bio-information, biomaterials or biomechanics. Students are required to have internship trainings in related institutions out of campus for 320 hours before graduating. Almost all the biomedical engineering departments are certified by IEET (Institute of Engineering Education Taiwan), and met the IEET requirement in which required mathematics and fundamental engineering courses. For BMEs after graduation, Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (TSBME) provides many continue-learning programs and certificates for all members who expect to hold the certification as a professional credit in his working place. In current status, many engineering departments in university are continuously asked to provide joint programs with BME department to train much better quality students. BME is one of growing fields in Taiwan. PMID:25571153

  1. Buckwheat anaphylaxis: an unusual allergen in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsung-Chi; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Wen, Da-Chin; Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Li-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to buckwheat is common in Korea, Japan, and some other Asian countries. However, buckwheat is not a common allergen in Taiwan. We report a woman with asthma who had anaphylactic shock, generalized urticaria, and an acute exacerbation of asthma five minutes after ingesting buckwheat. The patient underwent skin prick and Pharmacia CAP testing (Uppsala, Sweden) for specific IgE to buckwheat, white sesame and soybean as well as other common allergens in Taiwan including Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), D. farinae (Df), cat and dog dander, cockroach, egg white, cow milk and codfish. The patient had a strongly positive skin prick test response to buckwheat and positive reactions to Dp and latex. Specific IgE results were class 6 for buckwheat, class 4 for Dp and Df, and class 2 for dog dander, wheat, sesame and soybean. Results of an open food challenge with white sesame and soybean were negative. Although buckwheat is a rare allergen in Taiwan, it can cause extremely serious reactions and should be considered in patients presenting with anaphylaxis after exposure to buckwheat. PMID:17136883

  2. Preliminary Study on Rock Avalanche in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Wen, Y.; Hsieh, M.

    2012-12-01

    Rock avalanche is a kind of rapid (average >100 km/h) granule flow caused by crushing and pulverization of rock materials during catastrophic rock slide. Literature researches show that rock avalanches typically occur on steep, high-relief slopes underlain by hard rocks, and have volumes >10,000,000 m3. Rock avalanches also are characterized by long runout distances, which are 5 to 10 times the total fall heights. Some cases can run up the opposing valley wall. Rock avalanches generally occurred in active mountains (e.g., New Zealand) and were triggered by earthquakes or rainfall (snowmelt), but with exceptions. There were few rock avalanches in historical time in Taiwan. This could reflect: (1) intrinsic instability of hillslopes due to weak rock, frequent earthquakes/heavy rains, which resulted in landslides of high frequency/low magnitude; (2) limited runout space along deeply incised river-valley systems, which increased the likelihood of rock-slope failures to transform to debris flows. However, there are ancient rock-avalanche records, found at Shou-shan coast (SW Taiwan) and Shin-she, Chang-pin, Tu-lan along Hua-tung coast (E Taiwan), which is likely to have undergone coseismic uplift. These places, with steep slopes, underlain by hard rock, and free for materials to run, are most prone to rock avalanches in the future.

  3. Education of biomedical engineering in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kang-Ping; Kao, Tsair; Wang, Jia-Jung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical Engineers (BME) play an important role in medical and healthcare society. Well educational programs are important to support the healthcare systems including hospitals, long term care organizations, manufacture industries of medical devices/instrumentations/systems, and sales/services companies of medical devices/instrumentations/system. In past 30 more years, biomedical engineering society has accumulated thousands people hold a biomedical engineering degree, and work as a biomedical engineer in Taiwan. Most of BME students can be trained in biomedical engineering departments with at least one of specialties in bioelectronics, bio-information, biomaterials or biomechanics. Students are required to have internship trainings in related institutions out of campus for 320 hours before graduating. Almost all the biomedical engineering departments are certified by IEET (Institute of Engineering Education Taiwan), and met the IEET requirement in which required mathematics and fundamental engineering courses. For BMEs after graduation, Taiwanese Society of Biomedical Engineering (TSBME) provides many continue-learning programs and certificates for all members who expect to hold the certification as a professional credit in his working place. In current status, many engineering departments in university are continuously asked to provide joint programs with BME department to train much better quality students. BME is one of growing fields in Taiwan.

  4. OBS development and data analysis in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Wang, C.; Chen, P.; Chang, H.; Jang, J.; Kuo, B.

    2012-12-01

    Since 1991 there have been various types of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed in the waters around Taiwan with different scientific goals. A few years of experiences taught us that many aspects of the instruments can be improved without too much effort. These include extension of deployment time, extension of the recording bandwidth of a short period OBS, and more flexibly to accommodate scientific demands without instrumental overhaul. Scientists will not burden themselves by these tasks, and sending back the instrument to original manufactory for modifications is usually impractical budget-wise, in timeline, and for mission goals. It is thus necessary to develop a sustainable OBS program in Taiwan. Academia Sinica has been collaborating with Taiwan Ocean Research Institute (TORI) and National Sun Yat-sen University (NSYSU) to build a new short-period OBS which has passed a series of tests and have been deployed in the Okinawa trough, Bashi channel, east Korea offshore and on service in Huatung basin. This paper describes the design goal of this OBS, component specification, and reports the preliminary analyses of data and the future directions of instrument development. Keywords: Ocean bottom seismometer, OBS

  5. Terrorism in Taiwan, Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Che; Chuang, Chia-Chang; Arnold, Jeffrey; Lee, Mau-Hwa; Hsu, Sun-Chieh; Chi, Chih-Hsien

    2003-01-01

    The Republic of China on the island of Taiwan has experienced at least 20 terrorist events since 1979, including 13 aircraft hijackings and five bombings. Factors responsible for the relatively small burden of terrorism on Taiwan in the past include tight military control over political dissent until 1987, a warming relationship with the People's Republic of China in the 1990s, political inclusion of major internal cultural groups, geographic isolation, and a lack of other significant international enemies. Nevertheless, today Taiwan faces a new prospect of terrorism by adversaries of the United States and its allies and by an international paradigm shift in the types of weapons used by terrorists. National emergency management has been enhanced significantly since the Ji Ji earthquake in 1999, including the assignment of lead government agencies to the planning and preparedness for specific types of terrorist events involving nuclear, biological, and/or chemical releases. Other significant improvements at the operations level, include the establishment of two national disaster medical assistance teams, four urban search and rescue teams, 13 local disaster medical assistance teams, and eight chemical emergency response hospitals. Future challenges include improving the coordination of inter-agency response at the national level and the quantity and quality of local disaster response assets. PMID:15074495

  6. Predictors of Burnout Among Nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Huan-Fang; Yen, Miaofen; Fetzer, Susan; Chien, Tsair Wei

    2015-08-01

    Nurse burnout is a crucial issue for health care professionals and impacts nurse turnover and nursing shortages. Individual and situational factors are related to nurse burnout with predictors of burnout differing among cultures and health care systems. The predictors of nurse burnout in Asia, particularly Taiwan, are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of burnout among a national sample of nurses in Taiwan. A secondary data analysis of a nationwide database investigated the predictors of burnout among 1,846 nurses in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis determined the relationship between predictors and burnout. Predictors of Taiwanese nurse burnout were age, physical/psychological symptoms, job satisfaction, work engagement, and work environment. The most significant predictors were physical/psychological symptoms and work engagement. The variables explained 35, 39, and 18 % of the emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment, and depersonalization variance for 54 % of the total variance of burnout. Individual characteristics and nurse self-awareness, especially work, engagement can impact Taiwanese nurses' burnout. Nurse burnout predictors provide administrators with information to develop strategies including education programs and support services to reduce nurse burnout. PMID:25536942

  7. Predictors of Burnout Among Nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Huan-Fang; Yen, Miaofen; Fetzer, Susan; Chien, Tsair Wei

    2015-08-01

    Nurse burnout is a crucial issue for health care professionals and impacts nurse turnover and nursing shortages. Individual and situational factors are related to nurse burnout with predictors of burnout differing among cultures and health care systems. The predictors of nurse burnout in Asia, particularly Taiwan, are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of burnout among a national sample of nurses in Taiwan. A secondary data analysis of a nationwide database investigated the predictors of burnout among 1,846 nurses in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis determined the relationship between predictors and burnout. Predictors of Taiwanese nurse burnout were age, physical/psychological symptoms, job satisfaction, work engagement, and work environment. The most significant predictors were physical/psychological symptoms and work engagement. The variables explained 35, 39, and 18 % of the emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment, and depersonalization variance for 54 % of the total variance of burnout. Individual characteristics and nurse self-awareness, especially work, engagement can impact Taiwanese nurses' burnout. Nurse burnout predictors provide administrators with information to develop strategies including education programs and support services to reduce nurse burnout.

  8. 78 FR 33350 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Preliminary Countervailing Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Preliminary Countervailing... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of certain frozen warmwater shrimp (frozen shrimp) from Thailand. The period of investigation is January 1, 2011, through December 31,...

  9. 78 FR 54912 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand; Termination of Investigations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... connection with the subject investigations concerning Indonesia (78 FR 50379) and Thailand (78 FR 50383... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Indonesia and Thailand; Termination of Investigations AGENCY: United...(a)), the countervailing duty investigations concerning frozen warmwater shrimp from Indonesia...

  10. Research Management in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benneh, George

    2002-01-01

    Examines research management, particularly within higher education institutions, in Africa including, research and current trends in knowledge production, institutional aspects, research funding, and good practice in research management. (EV)

  11. Women in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Manon

    1975-01-01

    The role and status of women in Africa has changed profoundly since the end of the colonial period. Many differences in women's status and role are based on geography, history, nationality, political and socioeconomic systems, culture, and religion. (JR)

  12. Genomics Study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains from Different Ethnic Populations in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Horng-Yunn; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Tsong; Chang, Jia-Ru; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Keh-Ming; Lin, Ming-Shian; Su, Ih-Jen; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the transmission and evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in Taiwan, six different MTB isolates (representatives of the Beijing ancient sublineage, Beijing modern sublineage, Haarlem, East-African Indian, T1, and Latin-American Mediterranean (LAM)) were characterized and their genomes were sequenced. Discriminating among large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) that occur once versus those that occur repeatedly in a genomic region may help to elucidate the biological roles of LSPs and to identify the useful phylogenetic relationships. In contrast to our previous LSP-based phylogeny, the sequencing data allowed us to determine actual genetic distances and to define precisely the phylogenetic relationships between the main lineages of the MTB complex. Comparative genomics analyses revealed more nonsynonymous substitutions than synonymous changes in the coding sequences. Furthermore, MTB isolate M7, a LAM-3 clinical strain isolated from a patient of Taiwanese aboriginal origin, is closely related to F11 (LAM), an epidemic tuberculosis strain isolated in the Western Cape of South Africa. The PE/PPE protein family showed a higher dn/ds ratio compared to that for all protein-coding genes. Finally, we found Haarlem-3 and LAM-3 isolates to be circulating in the aboriginal community in Taiwan, suggesting that they may have originated with post-Columbus Europeans. Taken together, our results revealed an interesting association with historical migrations of different ethnic populations, thus providing a good model to explore the global evolution and spread of MTB. PMID:27721649

  13. Profile of South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.; Tonneson, L.C.

    1996-08-01

    A broad overview of the Republic of South Africa`s nuclear energy program is presented. Economic aspects are the main focus of the article, and numerical data is provided for electricity generation and use and uranium production. The role of the molecular laser isotope process for enrichment is discussed. The research reactor program, waste disposal and decommissioning, mining history, uranium production, and nonproliferation policy are other highlighted topics.

  14. Astronomy Landscape in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemaungani, Takalani

    2015-01-01

    The vision for astronomy in Africa is embedded in the African Space Policy of the African Union in early 2014. The vision is about positioning Africa as an emerging hub for astronomy sciences and facilities. Africa recognized the need to take advantage of its natural resource, the geographical advantage of the clear southern skies and pristine sites for astronomy. The Pan African University (PAU) initiative also presents an opportunity as a post-graduate training and research network of university nodes in five regions of Africa and supported by the African Union. The Southern African node based in South Africa concentrates on space sciences which also includes astronomy. The PAU aims to provide the opportunity for advanced graduate training and postgraduate research to high-performing African students. Objectives also include promoting mobility of students and teachers and harmonizing programs and degrees.A number of astronomy initiatives have burgeoned in the Southern African region and these include the Southern Africa Largest Optical Telescope (SALT), HESS (High Energy Stereoscopic System), the SKA (Square Kilometre Array) and the AVN (African Very Long Baseline Interferometer Network). There is a growing appetite for astronomy sciences in Africa. In East Africa, the astronomy community is well organized and is growing - the East African Astronomical society (EAAS) held its successful fourth annual conference since 2010 on 30 June to 04 July 2014 at the University of Rwanda. Centred around the 'Role of Astronomy in Socio-Economic Transformation,' this conference aimed at strengthening capacity building in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Space Science in general, while providing a forum for astronomers from the region to train young and upcoming scientists.

  15. Update on HIV/AIDS in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruxrungtham, K; Phanuphak, P

    2001-06-01

    Thailand experienced its first case of AIDS in 1984. Approximately 800,000 Thais were infected with HIV in 1995 and 1 million Thais became infected by the year 2000. There have been 5 major epidemic waves: among male homosexuals (started 1984-5), intravenous drug users (started 1988), female commercial sex workers (started 1989), male clients (started 1990), and housewives and the newborn (started 1991). Approximately 96 per cent of HIV-1 infected Thais carried recombinant subtype A/E, the rest carried B'. In a male seroconvertors cohort of 235 cases, median time to show CD4 <200 cells/microL was 6.8 years. Five years survival was significantly lower than that of the other subtype B seroconvertors study, i.e., 82 per cent compared to 90 per cent. Interestingly, 13.5 per cent of seronegative Thais showed homozygous SDF1-3'A polymorphism, which suggests that approximately one-tenth of Thais may become long-term non-progressors after HIV-1 infection. Primary HIV infection syndrome is rare among Thai patients (1.1%). In contrast, it was 50-90 per cent in Western cohorts. In early symptomatic patients, one-third developed pruritic pappular eruptions (PPEs). In advanced stage, disseminated tuberculosis, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), cryptococcosis, and esophageal candidiasis are commonly found. In Northern Thailand, however, Penicillium marneffei infection or penicillosis is more common than cryptococcosis. The recent understanding of HIV pathogenesis suggests that HIV eradication is unlikely to be achievable with current strategies. Several National HIV treatment guidelines including the Thai guideline have been recommended treatment with triple antiretroviral regimen when patients become symptomatics or CD4+ <200. Current development of antiretroviral therapy which includes new agents, new formulas, and pharmacokinetic enhancements, is directed to better potency, higher genetic resistant barrier, less pill burden, and once a day dosing. These will ultimately

  16. Usutu virus in Africa.

    PubMed

    Nikolay, Birgit; Diallo, Mawlouth; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2011-11-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) was discovered in South Africa in 1959. Since then, it has been reported in several African countries including Senegal, Central African Republic, Nigeria, Uganda, Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, and Morocco. In 2001, USUV has been identified for the first time outside of Africa, namely in Europe, where it caused a significant mortality among blackbirds in Vienna, Austria. In 2009, the first two human cases of USUV infection in Europe have been reported in Italy, causing encephalitis in immunocompromised patients. The host range in Africa includes mainly Culex mosquitoes, birds, and also humans with one benign and one severe case. Given its role as a potential human pathogen and the similar appearance compared with other emerging arboviruses, it is essential to investigate the natural history and ecology of USUV in Africa. In this regard, we review the emergence of USUV in Africa, summarizing data about isolations, host range, and potential vectors, which should help to improve our understanding of the factors underlying the circulation of USUV in Europe and Africa. PMID:21767160

  17. 75 FR 1078 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam (70 FR 5143-5156).\\2\\ The Commission is... shrimp from Thailand with respect to certain manufacturer/exporters. 74 FR 5638 (January 30, 2009). On... affirmative determinations on frozen warmwater shrimp from India and Thailand. 70 FR 23384 (May 5, 2005)....

  18. 78 FR 50376 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... at Less Than Fair Value: Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand, 69 FR 34122- 34124 (June 18... Review, 72 FR 1982, 1983 (January 17, 2007), Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags from Thailand: Final... Administrative Review, 72 FR 64580 (November 16, 2007), Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags from Thailand:...

  19. Latent Profile Analysis of Good Citizenship of Rajabhat Universities' Students in the Northeast of Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siphai, Sunan; Srisa-ard, Boonchoom

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was 1) to develop good citizenship indicators of Rajabhat Universities' Students in the Northeast of Thailand. 2) to classify latent profile of good citizenship of Rajabhat University's students in the northeast of Thailand. The sample was 800 Rajabhat University's students in the northeast of Thailand. Findings 1) there…

  20. A new Late Eocene primate from the Krabi Basin (Thailand) and the diversity of Palaeogene anthropoids in southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Chavasseau, Olivier; Lazzari, Vincent; Euriat, Adélaïde; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    According to the most recent discoveries from the Middle Eocene of Myanmar and China, anthropoid primates originated in Asia rather than in Africa, as was previously considered. But the Asian Palaeogene anthropoid community remains poorly known and inadequately sampled, being represented only from China, Myanmar, Pakistan and Thailand. Asian Eocene anthropoids can be divided into two distinct groups, the stem group eosimiiforms and the possible crown group amphipithecids, but the phylogenetic relationships between these two groups are not well understood. Therefore, it is critical to understand their evolutionary history and relationships by finding additional fossil taxa. Here, we describe a new small-sized fossil anthropoid primate from the Late Eocene Krabi locality in Thailand, Krabia minuta, which shares several derived characters with the amphipithecids. It displays several unique dental characters, such as extreme bunodonty and reduced trigon surface area, that have never been observed in other Eocene Asian anthropoids. These features indicate that morphological adaptations were more diversified among amphipithecids than was previously expected, and raises the problem of the phylogenetic relations between the crown anthropoids and their stem group eosimiiforms, on one side, and the modern anthropoids, on the other side. PMID:24089342

  1. Thailand: A Study of the Educational System of Thailand and a Guide to the Academic Placement of Students from Thailand in Educational Institutions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. K.

    The educational system of Thailand is described, and guidelines concerning students who wish to study in U.S. institutions are provided. After a description of the organizational structure of Thai education and national education policy, attention is directed to elementary and secondary education, vocational and technical education, teacher…

  2. AIDS and family planning: Thailand conference breaks new ground.

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1990-12-01

    The July 1990 2-day meeting in Pattaya, Thailand, attended by over 220 family planning practitioners was the first nationwide conference in the developing world to address integration of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention and education into the family planning service delivery system. The conference was co-sponsored by the Thailand Ministry of Public Health, the Thailand Fertility Research Association, and Family Health International, with funding from the US Agency for International Development and the Hewlett Foundation. As of September 1990, 22,075 cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection--including 53 AIDS cases--has been documented in Thailand. There is general consensus that the actual number of HIV-infected persons is 50,000-100,000, with commercial sex workers, their clients, the clients' spouses, and newborns at highest risk. Conference organizers hope to boost AIDS prevention and control effectiveness by building on the already established cooperation between governmental and nongovernmental organizations in a nationwide network for family planning service delivery. A priority need is the development of counseling materials aimed at various target populations. A Women and AIDS Week is planned to involve women's groups. Another projected program centers on counseling men who visit commercial sex workers. In addition to AIDS education to family planning clients, family planning centers plan to provide counseling to contacts of HIV-infected persons and condoms to infected couples. At present, condoms are available at 18,000 family planning clinics and 10,000 pharmacies in Thailand. PMID:12283719

  3. Bone marrow leishmaniasis: a review of situation in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important tropical vector-borne disease. This infection can be seen in tropical area and it is considered to be one of the most important vector-borne infections at present. The general situation of the leishmaniasis in Thailand is hereby reviewed. Although Thailand is a tropical country, the leishmaniasis is not endemic but sporadic. The imported cases are documented in some literatures. The serious form of leishmaniasis, the visceral leishmaniasis is also detectable in Thailand. Also, the author performed an in depth literature review of the reports of bone marrow leishmaniasis, a specific kind of visceral leishmaniasis, in Thailand in order to summarize the characteristics of this infection among Thai patients. According to this review, there have been at least 5 reports in the literature of 6 cases of bone marrow leishmaniasis in the Thai population, of which no case was lethal. Concerning the clinical manifestations, all except had prolonged fever with unknown origin. From physical examination, all had hepatosplenomegaly. The striking findings were active hemophagocytosis with increased proliferation of lymphoidplasma cell line in the bone marrow and amastigotes of Leishmania donovani was demonstrated. Considering the treatment, pantavalent antimony compound was used and the excellent improvement and complete recovery. Finally, the author also discussed on the importance of leishmaniasis in Thailand relating to the present globalization and good traveling system.

  4. An analysis on DNA fingerprints of thirty papaya cultivars (Carica papaya L.), grown in Thailand with the use of amplified fragment length polymorphisms technique.

    PubMed

    Ratchadaporn, Janthasri; Sureeporn, Katengam; Khumcha, U

    2007-09-15

    The experiment was carried out at the Department of Horticulture, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani province, Northeast Thailand during June 2002 to May 2003 aims to identify DNA fingerprints of thirty papaya cultivars with the use of Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP) technique. Papaya cultivars were collected from six different research centers in Thailand. Papaya plants of each cultivar were grown under field conditions up to four months then leaf numbers 2 and 3 of each cultivar (counted from top) were chosen for DNA extraction and the samples were used for AFLP analysis. Out of 64 random primers being used, 55 pairs gave an increase in DNA bands but only 12 pairs of random primers were randomly chosen for the final analysis of the experiment. The results showed that AFLP markers gave Polymorphic Information Contents (PIC) of three ranges i.e., AFLP markers of 235 lied on a PIC range of 0.003-0.05, 47 for a PIC range of 0.15-0.20 and 12 for a PIC range of 0.35-0.40. The results on dendrogram cluster analysis revealed that the thirty papaya cultivars were classified into six groups i.e., (1) Kaeg Dum and Malador (2) Kaeg Nuan (3) Pakchong and Solo (4) Taiwan (5) Co Coa Hai Nan and (6) Sitong. Nevertheless, in spite of the six papaya groups all papaya cultivars were genetically related to each other where diversity among the cultivars was not significantly found. PMID:19090101

  5. Fertility drop precedes development in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R

    1978-01-01

    In Thailand, birthrates among married women have declined by almost 1/2 over a 5-year period. Simultaneously, the proportion of women using contraception has doubled, knowledge of at least the rudiments of contraception has become close to universal, and family size preferences have dropped markedly. Authors John Knodel and Nibbon Debavalya, writing in a recent issue of "International Family Planning Perspectives and Digest," report a concurrent development of one of the world's largest family planning programs. They conclude that existing evidence suggests a relationship between improved fertility regulation and the growth of the family planning programs. The most significant features of the transition between 1968-1975 have included a decline in birthrates among rural women that is twice that of their counterparts and a nearly tripling of the proportion of women who had "ever" used contraception (from 19 to 51%). Also, the impact of the family planning program has been heightened by supportive factors in the Thai culture, the most important of which is the relatively high status of women in that country.

  6. Outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis infection, Thailand.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Katie S; Guntapong, Ratigorn; Thattiyaphong, Aree; Wangroongsarb, Piyada; Hall, Aron J; Olsen, Sonja J; Holtz, Timothy H

    2013-05-01

    Norovirus is a leading cause of gastrointestinal illness worldwide. We investigated an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness in Pattaya, Thailand, among participants of a course. We asked participants and family members to complete a questionnaire asking about symptoms, meals eaten, and foods consumed during the course. We collected stool samples from persons reporting illness and analyzed specimens for several viruses and enteropathogenic bacteria. We defined a case as a person having one or more episodes of diarrhea, with onset between 30 August and 1 September 2010, in a participant or family member who attended the course. Of 56 people who attended, 95% completed the questionnaire: nine met the case definition (attack rate, 17%). Common symptoms included abdominal cramps, nausea, fatigue, headache, and vomiting. Food items with elevated risk ratios included: crispy fish maw, dried squid, and cashew nut salad [risk ratio (RR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-37]; assorted salad bar with dressing (RR 3.0; 95% CI 0.9-11); and seafood kebab (RR 5.8; 95% CI 0.8-43). Among ill persons, four (44%) provided stool samples and two (50%) were positive for norovirus. Our data suggest a foodborne outbreak of norovirus. Increased use of norovirus diagnostics as well as measures to prevent transmission may help identify additional outbreaks and improve control measures to limit the spread of outbreaks. PMID:24050072

  7. Chemical water quality in Thailand and its impacts on the drinking water production in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kruawal, Kornprabha; Sacher, Frank; Werner, Andreas; Müller, Jutta; Knepper, Thomas P

    2005-03-20

    In Thailand, surface water and groundwater are the main water sources for tap water and drinking water production. Thirty-six different samples from surface waters from Chao Praya and Mae Klong rivers, tap waters, bottled drinking waters, groundwaters and commercial ice cubes from around the Bangkok area were collected. Water samples were also taken from two waterworks in the Chonburi province. The extensive survey showed that, overall in all water samples investigated, there was only a minor pollution which could be traced back to the analyses performed including amongst others total organic carbon, inorganics and heavy metals, pesticides, organochlorine compounds, volatile organic compounds, surfactants, pharmaceuticals and disinfection by-products. However, whenever organic micropollutants could be detected in surface water, such as, e.g. the herbicide atrazine, they were also present in the tap water produced thereof proving that the present treatment steps are not sufficient for removal of such pollutants. The concentration of disinfection by-products was higher in tap water produced from Chao Praya river than from Mae Klong river. Disinfection by-products were also found in bottled drinking water. Commercial ice cubes contained anionic surfactants and their metabolites at elevated concentrations. The data of this study constitute the first set of homogenous data for the chemical water quality and also aid development of new water quality criteria in Thailand. PMID:15752492

  8. Research on English Teaching and Learning: Taiwan (2004-2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Suchiao; Tsai, Yachin

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes research in second/foreign language teaching and learning conducted in Taiwan over the period 2004-2009. Representative articles published in local refereed journals and conference proceedings--not readily accessible outside Taiwan--are reviewed to reflect current trends in English teaching and learning. The main themes…

  9. Intercultural Training for US Business Expatriates in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Tien-Chen; McLean, Gary N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the intercultural training needs for US business expatriates on assignment in Taiwan. The study assesses Taiwan culture-specific training needs of US expatriates from the perspectives of both US expatriates and their Taiwanese colleagues and compares the perceived importance of these intercultural training needs…

  10. A Study of Neutral-Tone Syllables in Taiwan Mandarin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation studies the realization of the rhythm of Taiwan Mandarin and focuses on the quality of its unstressed (neutral-tone) syllables. Taiwan Mandarin (TM) is often described as more syllable-timed than Standard Mandarin (SM). In TM, the unstressed syllables occur less frequently. The quality of the unstressed (neutral-tone) syllables…

  11. Negotiating for Change: Women's Movements and Education Reform in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shu-Ching

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic changes during the past 20 years in Taiwan offer a good example of how gender policy in education is facilitated by a combination of interrelated economic, political and social forces. Taiwan's policy on gender education emerged from the interaction of state, education, academic and non-academic feminist positions in reforms. This…

  12. Higher Education Research Community in Taiwan: An Emerging Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sheng-Ju; Chan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the evolution and characteristics of the higher education research community in Taiwan. In echoing the development of the East Asian region, Taiwan has made substantial progress during the past two decades. The massification of higher education itself has played a major role in promoting the academic differentiation or…

  13. Development of Taiwan Undergraduates' Volunteer Service Motivation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho-Tang, Wu; Chin-Tang, Tu; Mei-Ju, Chou; Jing-Fang, Hou; Meng-Shan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop Taiwan undergraduates' volunteer service motivation scale. To begin with, item pool was proposed on the basis of literature. After discussing with three Taiwan undergraduates, item pool, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (N = 150) was proceeded, where three tests were conducted EFA: 1. Item analysis: comparisons of…

  14. Teacher Preparation for Early Childhood: Special Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Hua-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is intended to present the current model of teacher preparation for early childhood special education in Taiwan. Documentary analysis was conducted in the study to collect and analyze the obtained data. The main features of teacher preparation policies for early childhood special education in Taiwan could be summarized…

  15. Taiwan Teacher Preparation Program Evaluation: Some Critical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tze-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences and changes of recent Taiwan teacher preparation program evaluation (TTPPE) as one of the national evaluation projects conducted by the Higher Education Evaluation and Accreditation Council of Taiwan. The main concerns are what kind of ideology is transformed through the policy by means of evaluation, and what…

  16. Kindergarten Teachers' Experience with Reporting Child Abuse in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Jui-Ying; Huang, Tzu-Yi; Wang, Chi-Jen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objectives were to examine factors associated with reporting child abuse among kindergarten teachers in Taiwan based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Method: A stratified quota sampling technique was used to randomly select kindergarten teachers in Taiwan. The Child Abuse Intention Report Scale, which includes demographics,…

  17. A Re-Examination of the Suicide Rates in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Hwei-Lin; Huang, Wei-Chiao

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the suicide rates of 23 cities and counties in Taiwan from 1983 to 2001. We found that a combination of economic and social variables can significantly account for the tremendous variations in suicide rates across Taiwan's cities and counties over the last two decades. The level of income per capita in a region appears as the…

  18. Operations: A Comparative Study of the United States and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Becker, Jerry; Byun, Mi-Ran; Yang, Der-Ching; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This study examined (a) the differences in preservice teachers’ procedural knowledge in four areas of fraction operations in Taiwan and the United States, (b) the differences in preservice teachers’ conceptual knowledge in four areas of fraction operations in Taiwan and the United States, and (c) correlation in preservice teachers’ conceptual…

  19. International Collaborative Development: Curriculum and Instructional Change in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Phoebe Po

    This study examined an international educational partnership between Florida International University and Taiwan's Fu-Hsing school that emphasized curriculum and instructional change to improve educational quality in Taiwan. Collaborators from the institutions developed criteria for teaching effectiveness and established an evaluation system for…

  20. GIS Adoption among Senior High School Geography Teachers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Jinn-Guey; Chen, Yu-Wen; Chi, Yu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the adoption of geographic information system (GIS) knowledge and skills through in-service training for high school geography teachers in Taiwan. Through statistical analysis of primary data collected from a census of Taiwan's high school geography teachers, it explores what motivates these teachers to undertake GIS…

  1. Counseling Psychology Licensure in Taiwan: Development, Challenges, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Li-fei; Kwan, Kwong-Liem K.; Huang, Su-Fei

    2011-01-01

    The development and consequences of licensure for counseling psychologists in Taiwan are presented to promote cross-cultural awareness surrounding issues in the counseling psychology profession. The national licensure statute for counseling psychologists in Taiwan was established by the Taiwanese Legislature in 2001. While the licensing system…

  2. Transformation and Framework of Teacher Professional Development in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Bo-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the situation of teacher professional development in Taiwan, including the history and the framework of teacher professional development. With diversification of teacher education systems and institutions, teacher professional development in Taiwan is undergoing a gradual governance shift from the model of centralised state…

  3. Teaching Benchmark Strategy for Fifth-Graders in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Der-Ching; Lai, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    The key purpose of this study was how we taught the use of benchmark strategy when comparing fraction for fifth-graders in Taiwan. 26 fifth graders from a public elementary in south Taiwan were selected to join this study. Results of this case study showed that students had a much progress on the use of benchmark strategy when comparing fraction…

  4. Taiwan Personnel Development Program. The Vocational Training Program in Taiwan, R.O.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kung, Wen-Kuang

    The Personnel Development Program is essential to the national economic development of Taiwan, Republic of China. The program consists of vocational training, employment services, and a labor market information service. Thirteen public vocational training institutions, along with in-plant training programs, aim to increase the number of skilled…

  5. International energy outlook. Volume 1. Mideast, Far East, and Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The developing nations of the Mideast, Far East, and Africa face a bleaker - and more-complicated - energy picture than that of the West. Rapid industrial and agricultural expansion in the region severely drains already-inadequate energy systems. Energy-importing countries find they must diversify and develop indigenous resources, but often lack the technical known-how to do so. Volume 1 is a compilation of official US government intelligence reports examining the way 22 countries in the Mideast, Far East, and Africa are responding to the energy problems. The countries covered are: Algeria, Australia, Burma, China, Egypt, Gabon, India, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Mozambique, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sudan, Taiwan, Tunisia and Turkey. The range and detail of country reports vary, due to availability of reports. Although the book details current energy situations, its main emphasis is on the future, including estimates of future production and consumption, and descriptions of energy development plans. Some of the countries in this region are fortunate to have petrochemical resources, while electric energy expansion is crucial to national development in all. Coal will be filling the gap left by diminishing oil supplies. 61 tables.

  6. Terrane-controlled crustal shear wave splitting in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, David; Christensen, Nikolas I.; Ross, Zachary E.; Wu, Francis T.

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan is the result of arc-continent collision associated with the convergence of the Philippine Sea plate with the eastern Eurasian plate continental margin. The locus of deformation is found in eastern Taiwan in the form of mountain building (Central Range) with underlying thickened lithosphere. Rapid tectonic exhumation in the Central Range has uncovered low-to-high-grade metamorphic rocks marked by steep cleavage. We carried out a crustal seismic anisotropy study across Taiwan, producing a database of over 27,000 local earthquake shear wave splitting measurements. Additionally, we carried out rock physics measurements of metamorphic outcrop samples to quantify shear wave rock anisotropy. We produced a map of station-averaged splitting measurements across Taiwan. Patterns of fast shear wave directions correlate with tectonic terranes produced by plate convergence. Deformation-related mineral-preferred orientation in the metamorphic rocks produces a significant amount of the crustal anisotropy in the Taiwan collision zone.

  7. Feminine transformations: gender reassignment surgical tourism in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Aizura, Aren Z

    2010-10-01

    Every year, hundreds of transgendered people from the United States, Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia travel to Thailand to undergo cosmetic and gender reassignment surgeries (GRS). Many GRS clinics market themselves almost exclusively to non-Thai trans women (people assigned a male sex at birth who later identify as female). This article draws on ethnographic research with patients visiting Thailand for GRS to explore how trans women patients related their experience of medical care in Thailand to Thai cultural traditions, in particular "traditional" Thai femininity and Theravada Buddhist rituals and beliefs. Foreign patients in Thai hospital settings engage not only with medical practices but also with their perceptions of Thai cultural traditions--which inflect their feminine identifications. I draw on two patients' accounts of creating personal rituals to mark their gender reassignment surgery, placing these accounts within the context of biomedical globalization and debates about the touristic appropriation of non-"Western" cultural practices.

  8. Venomous snakebite in Thailand. I: Medically important snakes.

    PubMed

    Chanhome, L; Cox, M J; Wilde, H; Jintakoon, P; Chaiyabutr, N; Sitprija, V

    1998-05-01

    Thailand has an abundance of venomous snakes. Among the neurotoxic family Elapidae, there are three species of the genus Naja (cobras), three of the genus Bungarus (kraits), and the king cobra of the genus Ophiophagus. Other Elapidae snakes in Thailand include sea snakes and Asian coral snakes of the genus Calliophis. They have potent venoms but rarely bite humans. Tissue and hemotoxic snakes are represented by family Viperidae, subfamilies Viperinae and Crotalinae. They remain an occupational hazard for farmers and rubber tappers, causing serious morbidity but only rare deaths, since competent treatment is now widely available throughout Thailand. Purified equine antivenin is manufactured locally for the monocled and Siamese spitting cobras (Naja kaouthia and N. siamensis), king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), banded krait (Bungarus fasciatus), most green pit vipers (Trimeresurus sp.), Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma), and the Siamese Russell's viper (Daboia russelli siamensis).

  9. Influenza in Thailand: a case study for middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Simmerman, James Mark; Thawatsupha, Pranee; Kingnate, Darika; Fukuda, Keiji; Chaising, Arunee; Dowell, Scott F

    2004-11-25

    Recent studies in Hong Kong and Singapore suggest that the annual impact of influenza in these wealthy tropical cities may be substantial, but little is known about the burden in middle-income tropical countries. We reviewed the status of influenza surveillance, vaccination, research, and policy in Thailand as of January 2004. From 1993 to 2002, 64-91 cases of clinically diagnosed influenza were reported per 100,000 persons per year. Influenza viruses were isolated in 34% of 4305 specimens submitted to the national influenza laboratory. Vaccine distribution figures suggest that less than 1% of the population is immunized against influenza each year. In January 2004, Thailand reported its first documented outbreak of influenza A H5N1 infection in poultry and the country's first human cases of avian influenza. Thailand's growing economy, well-developed public health infrastructure, and effective national immunization program could enable the country to take more active steps towards influenza control.

  10. Ilyocryptus thailandensis sp. nov. (Cladocera: Anomopoda: Ilyocryptidae) from North Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Alexey A.; Sanoamuang, La-Orsri

    2004-05-01

    Previously only a single species of Ilyocryptus Sars, 1862 (Cladocera: Anomopoda: Ilyocryptidae) was reported from Thailand, I. spinifer Herrick, 1882. However, our examination of numerous samples from this country resulted in the discovery of four other species of Ilyocryptus. Ilyocryptus thailandensis sp. nov. is described from two adjacent water bodies in Uttaradit Province, North Thailand. It has at least two characters which distinguish it from any other species of the Ilyocryptus: (1) a row of lateral setae reaching medial anus, and continuing along preanal margin up to base of the postabdomen; (2) a large projection bearing the sensory setae, situated on the coxal region of antenna II. It appears to be a rare species, may be, endemic of the North Thailand.

  11. Influenza activity in Thailand and occurrence in different climates.

    PubMed

    Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Vichaiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Felber, Joshua A; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This study observed influenza activity between June 2009 and July 2014 in Thailand, a country in the Northern hemisphere with a tropical climate, and compared the results to activity in the United States (US) and Australia, which represent temperate climates in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, respectively. From Thailand, a total of 17,416 specimens were collected from patients exhibiting influenza-like illnesses and subjected to real-time PCR for the detection of influenza viruses. For comparison, laboratory confirmations of influenza originating from the US and Australia were obtained from the US CDC's FluView surveillance reports and the Australian Government's Department of Health and Ageing websites. We found that, generally, the influenza season in Thailand starts with the rainy season. This observation of influenza's annual incidence pattern provides a better understanding of its occurrence, suggesting that vaccination campaigns should be started before the influenza season begins in order to reduce transmission.

  12. 78 FR 64008 - Hot-Rolled Steel Products From China, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine; Revised...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... conduct of the subject five year reviews (78 FR 24435, April 25, 2013). Subsequently, due to the lapse in... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-405, 406, and 408 and 731-TA-899-901 and 906-908 (Second Review)]...

  13. 76 FR 21331 - Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, 51 FR 45152 (December 17, 1986); Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Japan, 52 FR 4167 (February 10, 1987); Antidumping Duty... of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 60731 (October 1, 2010) (Notice of Initiation). As a...

  14. 76 FR 5205 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (75 FR 60814, October 1... amended, 67 FR 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where electronic filing of a document is permitted, certain... Electronic Filing Procedures, 67 FR 68168, 68173 (November 8, 2002). \\2\\ The Commission has found...

  15. 77 FR 39736 - Certain Circular Welded Pipe and Tube From Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ....2(f)). Background The Commission instituted these reviews on July 1, 2011 (76 FR 38691) and determined on October 4, 2011 that it would conduct full reviews (76 FR 65748, October 24, 2011). Notice of... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on January 17, 2012 (77...

  16. Hantaviruses in Africa.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Peter T; Klempa, Boris; Ithete, Ndapewa L; Auste, Brita; Mfune, John K E; Hoveka, Julia; Matthee, Sonja; Preiser, Wolfgang; Kruger, Detlev H

    2014-07-17

    This paper summarizes the progress in the search for hantaviruses and hantavirus infections in Africa. After having collected molecular evidence of an indigenous African hantavirus in 2006, an intensive investigation for new hantaviruses has been started in small mammals. Various novel hantaviruses have been molecularly identified not only in rodents but also in shrews and bats. In addition, the first African hantavirus, Sangassou virus, has been isolated and functionally characterized in cell culture. Less is known about the ability of these hantaviruses to infect humans and to cause diseases. To date, no hantavirus genetic material could be amplified from patients' specimens collected in Africa. Serological studies in West Africa, based on a battery of screening and confirmatory assays, led to the detection of hantavirus antibodies in the human population and in patients with putative hantavirus disease. In addition to this overview, we present original data from seroepidemiological and field studies conducted in the Southern part of Africa. A human seroprevalence rate of 1.0% (n=1442) was detected in the South African Cape Region whereas no molecular evidence for the presence of hantavirus was found in 2500 small animals trapped in South Africa and Namibia.

  17. Hantaviruses in Africa.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Peter T; Klempa, Boris; Ithete, Ndapewa L; Auste, Brita; Mfune, John K E; Hoveka, Julia; Matthee, Sonja; Preiser, Wolfgang; Kruger, Detlev H

    2014-07-17

    This paper summarizes the progress in the search for hantaviruses and hantavirus infections in Africa. After having collected molecular evidence of an indigenous African hantavirus in 2006, an intensive investigation for new hantaviruses has been started in small mammals. Various novel hantaviruses have been molecularly identified not only in rodents but also in shrews and bats. In addition, the first African hantavirus, Sangassou virus, has been isolated and functionally characterized in cell culture. Less is known about the ability of these hantaviruses to infect humans and to cause diseases. To date, no hantavirus genetic material could be amplified from patients' specimens collected in Africa. Serological studies in West Africa, based on a battery of screening and confirmatory assays, led to the detection of hantavirus antibodies in the human population and in patients with putative hantavirus disease. In addition to this overview, we present original data from seroepidemiological and field studies conducted in the Southern part of Africa. A human seroprevalence rate of 1.0% (n=1442) was detected in the South African Cape Region whereas no molecular evidence for the presence of hantavirus was found in 2500 small animals trapped in South Africa and Namibia. PMID:24406800

  18. The epidemiology of HIV infection and AIDS in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Weniger, B G; Limpakarnjanarat, K; Ungchusak, K; Thanprasertsuk, S; Choopanya, K; Vanichseni, S; Uneklabh, T; Thongcharoen, P; Wasi, C

    1991-01-01

    There were very few AIDS cases reported in Thailand as of 1988, where HIV was introduced relatively late in the course of the AIDS pandemic. Thailand was therefore classified as an epidemiologic pattern III country with regard to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Also in 1988, however, Thailand experienced a major and rapid increase in HIV prevalence among IV drug users (IVDU). The Thai experience with HIV after the rapid spread first among IVDUs has been successive waves of HIV transmission to female prostitutes, then to their non-IVDU male clients, and then into the non-prostitute wives and girlfriends of these latter men in the general population. Three years after being declared a pattern III country, 300,000 people in Thailand were estimated to be infected out of a population of 55 million. Reasons for this unprecedented rapid spread of HIV infection may eventually come from research on sexual behavior and related diseases given the lack of evidence for human host genetic factors or particularly virulent etiologic agent factors to explain the phenomenon. The reason and dynamics behind the timing and rapidity of the 1988 epidemic among IVDUs for now remains unknown. The authors note that the scenario of HIV transmission observed in Thailand also seems to be unfolding in neighboring countries. HIV infection among female prostitutes and heterosexual men is consistently highest in the northern Thai provinces adjacent to Myanmar and Laos. This paper reviews the epidemiology and prevention of HIV infection and AIDS in Thailand, updating previous reports and commentary, and including previously unpublished or not widely available data.

  19. Contribution to the Permian fusulinacean faunas of Peninsular Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingavat-Helmcke, Rucha

    Data on the faunas from limestones from the eastern coast of Peninsular Thailand are reported. The faunas contain fusulinids, smaller foraminifera, algae, some corals, bryozoa, echinoids and shell fragments. The fusulinids are of biostratigraphic value, and some genera occur which are also common in central and central northern Thailand. The age ranges from Asselian to Dzhulfian. The smaller foraminifera and calcareous algae are more facies controlled. The depositional environment indicate shallow marine platform to platform margin with high energy, redeposition in low energy environment can also be proven.

  20. Thailand national programme of the Earth Resources Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheosakul, P. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 data has been used to delineate floating rice regions with a clear distinction between irrigated and nonirrigated areas and recognition of orchard and horitcultural crops. Alluvial fans marking the ancient river outlets in the northwestern portion of the Central Plain of Thailand and the shape and size of the flood plains in the central region have been identified and outlined. A new forestry map was constructed using band 5 and band 7 imagery combined with ground observations. A geologic map of Thailand has been constructed from ERTS imagery.

  1. Thailand National Programme of the Earth Resources Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabhasri, S.; Swasdiyakorn, C. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Forest inventory of Thailand was completed in January 1975, using LANDSAT-1 imagery and ground truth survey. Results showed the existing forest covers only 37% of the land area. The last country-wide survey using aerial survey photographs at 1:60,000 scale conducted in 1961 gave the figure of 58%. ERTS-1 imagery showed that Thailand's mangrove forest covers an area of approximately 3130 sq k. The previous aerial survey showed 3681 sq k of mangroves.

  2. Schistosoma mansoni-like infection in Phayao Province, Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Attawibool, S; Bunnag, T; Thirachandra, S; Sinthuprama, K; Sornmani, S

    1983-12-01

    Schistosome ova were found in the serosa of colon mass of a 65-year old Thai woman from Dokkhumtai District, Phayao Province. On the basis of the shape and microscopic appearance of the ova, they probably belonged to those of Schistosoma mansoni complex. In follow-up study, no ova were found by faecal examinations and rectal biopsy. There are evidences suggesting the presence of two distinct mammalian strains in Thailand: Orientobilhorzia harinasutai, a schistosome of water buffalo in Southern region and Tricula bollingi schistosome, a rodent schistosome in Northern region. This case is believed to be the first human schistosome infection with mammalian strain of S. mansoni complex in Thailand.

  3. [Nursing discourse on domestic violence in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Joh-Jong

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to perform a critical appraisal of nursing discourses on domestic violence published in journals between 1999 and 2007 in Taiwan. All searched materials were retrieved from official websites using key words "domestic violence" or "marital violence". Ten related articles were obtained in all. The most significant finding was related to autonomic nursing intervention, which can effectively meet the needs of abused women. Such an approach differs from traditional order-based nursing activities in the patriarchal practicum of medical teams and offers a promising way to reform medical team hierarchies.

  4. Endemic cretinism in Thailand: a multidisciplinary survey.

    PubMed

    Rajatanavin, R; Chailurkit, L; Winichakoon, P; Mahachoklertwattana, P; Soranasataporn, S; Wacharasin, R; Chaisongkram, V; Amatyakul, P; Wanarata, L

    1997-10-01

    Endemic cretinism has been classified into neurological and myxedematous types. Profound mental deficiency, deaf-mutism and cerebral diplegia are predominantly found in the former. The latter have been described as less mentally retarded but with severe growth retardation and myxedematous features. The pathogenesis of different clinical types of endemic cretinism is still unclear. Recently, a unifying hypothesis suggested that iodine deficiency, severe enough to cause maternal and fetal hypothyroxinemia, results in neurological defects in all cretins. We conducted the present study in northern Thailand to determine the validity of this hypothesis in another geographical area. The study consisted of a multidisciplinary survey on 112 endemic cretins aged 2-66 years in Nan. They were categorized clinically into three types of endemic cretins, neurological (n = 57), myxedematous (n = 19) and mixed form (n = 36). The subjects were generally short and the majority had severe mental retardation (mean intellectual quotient (I.Q.) 30.8 +/- 8.8), psychomotor defect and profound sensorineural hearing loss. The I.Q. score and proportion of cretins with sensorineural hearing loss and psychomotor defect were similar among the three types of cretins. The most frequent neurological abnormalities were spasticity, hyper-reflexia, the presence of primitive reflexes and gait disturbance. These abnormalities were distributed equally among the three types of endemic cretins. Delayed skeletal maturation and abnormal epiphysis were also present in all types of cretins. However, myxedematous cretins were shorter (P < 0.01), having more myxedematous features (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) and less sexual maturation (P < 0.05). Thyroid volume was lower in cretins with hypothyroidism (P < 0.01). In conclusion, our findings support the hypothesis that neurological features are present in all types of cretins, and are the consequence of maternal and fetal hypothyroxinemia due to severe iodine

  5. Disparity in motorcycle helmet use in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suriyawongpaisa, Paibul; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Rangpueng, Aratta; Jiwattanakulpaisarn, Piyapong; Techakamolsuk, Pimpa

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion of motorcycle related injuries and deaths might be a result of disparity in motorcycle helmet use. This study uses national roadside survey data, injury sentinel surveillance data and other national data sets in 2010 of Thailand, a country with high mortality related to motorcycle injuries, to explore the disparity in helmet use, explanatory factors of the disparity. It also assessed potential agreement and correlation between helmet use rate reported by the roadside survey and the injury sentinel surveillance. This report revealed helmet use rate of 43.7%(95% CI:43.6,43.9) nationwide with the highest rate (81.8%; 95% CI: 44.0,46.4) in Bangkok. Helmet use rate in drivers (53.3%; 95% CI: 53.2,53.8) was 2.5 times higher than that in passengers (19.3%; 95% CI:18.9,19.7). In relative terms (highest-to-lowest ratio,HLR), geographical disparity in helmet use was found to be higher in passengers (HLR = 28.5). Law enforcement activities as indicated by the conviction rate of motorcyclists were significantly associated with the helmet use rate (spline regression coefficient = 3.90, 95% CI: 0.48,7.33). Together with the finding of HLR for conviction rate of 87.24, it is suggested that more equitable improvement in helmet use could be achieved by more equitable distribution of the police force. Finally, we found poor correlation (r = 0.01; p value = 0.76) and no agreement (difference = 34.29%; 95% CI:13.48%, 55.09%) between roadside survey and injury sentinel surveillance in estimating helmet use rate. These findings should be considered a warning for employing injury surveillance to monitor policy implementation of helmet use.

  6. Anthocyanin composition of wild bananas in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kitdamrongsont, Kasipong; Pothavorn, Pongsagon; Swangpol, Sasivimon; Wongniam, Siripope; Atawongsa, Kanokporn; Svasti, Jisnuson; Somana, Jamorn

    2008-11-26

    Anthocyanins were isolated from male bracts of 10 wild species of bananas (Musa spp. and Ensete spp.) distributed in Thailand. Six major anthocyanin pigments were identified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), mass spectrometry (MS), and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). They are delphinidin-3-rutinoside (m/z 611.2), cyanidin-3-rutinoside (m/z 595.8), petunidin-3-rutinoside (m/z 624.9), pelargonidin-3-rutinoside (m/z 579.4), peonidin-3-rutinoside (m/z 608.7), and malvidin-3-rutinoside (m/z 638.8). On the basis of the types of pigment present, the wild bananas can be divided into 5 groups. The first group comprises M. itinerans, Musa sp. one, Musa sp. two, and M. acuminata accessions, which contain almost or all anthocyanin pigments except for pelargonidin-3-rutinoside, including both nonmethylated and methylated anthocyanins. The second group, M. acuminata subsp. truncata, contains only malvidin-3-rutinoside while the third group, M. coccinea, contains cyanidin-3-rutinoside and pelargonidin-3-rutinoside. The forth group, M. acuminata yellow bract and E. glaucum do not appear to contain any anthocyanin pigment. The fifth group consists of M. balbisiana, M. velutina, M. laterita, and E. superbum which contain only nonmethylated anthocyanin, delphinidin-3-rutinoside, and cyanidin-3-rutinoside. Total anthocyanin content in the analyzed bracts ranged from 0-119.70 mg/100 g bract fresh weight. The differences in the type of anthocyanin and variation in the amounts present indicate that wild bananas show biochemical diversity, which may be useful for identifying specific groups of bananas or for clarifying the evolution of flavonoid metabolism in each banana group.

  7. Disparity in motorcycle helmet use in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion of motorcycle related injuries and deaths might be a result of disparity in motorcycle helmet use. This study uses national roadside survey data, injury sentinel surveillance data and other national data sets in 2010 of Thailand, a country with high mortality related to motorcycle injuries, to explore the disparity in helmet use, explanatory factors of the disparity. It also assessed potential agreement and correlation between helmet use rate reported by the roadside survey and the injury sentinel surveillance. This report revealed helmet use rate of 43.7%(95% CI:43.6,43.9) nationwide with the highest rate (81.8%; 95% CI: 44.0,46.4) in Bangkok. Helmet use rate in drivers (53.3%; 95% CI: 53.2,53.8) was 2.5 times higher than that in passengers (19.3%; 95% CI:18.9,19.7). In relative terms (highest-to-lowest ratio,HLR), geographical disparity in helmet use was found to be higher in passengers (HLR=28.5). Law enforcement activities as indicated by the conviction rate of motorcyclists were significantly associated with the helmet use rate (spline regression coefficient = 3.90, 95% CI: 0.48,7.33). Together with the finding of HLR for conviction rate of 87.24, it is suggested that more equitable improvement in helmet use could be achieved by more equitable distribution of the police force. Finally, we found poor correlation (r=0.01; p value = 0.76) and no agreement (difference = 34.29%; 95% CI:13.48%, 55.09%) between roadside survey and injury sentinel surveillance in estimating helmet use rate. These findings should be considered a warning for employing injury surveillance to monitor policy implementation of helmet use. PMID:24119233

  8. Modeling Malaria Transmission in Thailand and Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard; Adimi, Farida; Nigro, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Malaria Modeling and Surveillance is a project in the NASA Applied Sciences Public Health Applications Program. The main objectives of this project are: 1) identification of the potential breeding sites for major vector species: 2) implementation of a malaria transmission model to identify they key factors that sustain or intensify malaria transmission; and 3) implementation of a risk algorithm to predict the occurrence of malaria and its transmission intensity. Remote sensing and GIs are the essential elements of this project. The NASA Earth science data sets used in this project include AVHRR Pathfinder, TRMM, MODIS, NSIPP and SIESIP. Textural-contextual classifications are used to identify small larval habitats. Neural network methods are used to model malaria cases as a function of precipitation, temperatures, humidity and vegetation. Hindcastings based on these environmental parameters have shown good agreement to epidemiological records. Examples for spatio-temporal modeling of malaria transmissions in Southeast Asia are given. Discrete event simulations were used for modeling the detailed interactions among the vector life cycle, sporogonic cycle and human infection cycle, under the explicit influences of selected extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The output of the model includes the individual infection status and the quantities normally observed in field studies, such as mosquito biting rates, sporozoite infection rates, gametocyte prevalence and incidence. Results are in good agreement with mosquito vector and human malaria data acquired by Coleman et al. over 4.5 years in Kong Mong Tha, a remote village in western Thailand. Application of our models is not restricted to Southeast Asia. The model and techniques are equally applicable to other regions of the world, when appropriate epidemiological and vector ecological parameters are used as input.

  9. The Geothermal Potential, Current and Opportunity in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Located in the west Pacific Rim of Fire, Taiwan possesses rich geothermal resources due to volcanic activities and rapid uplifting of plate collision. Based on available data prior to 1980, Taiwan may have about 1 GWe of potential shallow geothermal energy, which is less than 3% of the national gross power generation. A 3-Mw pilot power plant, therefore, was constructed in 1981 and terminated in 1993 in the Chingshui geothermal field of Ilan, northeastern Taiwan. Recently, one of the National Science & Technology Program (NSTP) projects has been conducting research and reevaluating the island-wide deep geothermal energy. Four hot potential sites have been recognized. They are: (1) Tatun Volcano Group of northern Taiwan; (2) I-Lan Plain of NE Taiwan; (3) Lu-Shan area of Central Taiwan; and (4) Hua-Tung area of eastern Taiwan. We found that the geothermal resource in Taiwan may be as high as 160 GWe, with 33.6 GWe of exploitable geothermal energy. There are no any commercial geothermal power plants until now in Taiwan, although the potential is great. However, geothermal energy has been listed as one of major tasks of National Energy Program, Phase II (NEP-II) in Taiwan. We will conduct more detailed geothermal energy surveys on some proposed hot sites and to construct an EGS pilot geothermal plant with 1 MWe capability in a few years. Currently, there are three nuclear power plants, named No. 1, 2 & 3, in operations, which produce 16.5% gross generation of electricity and one (No. 4) is under construction, but is stopped and sealed now in Taiwan. Furthermore, the life-span of 40-year operation for those three power plants will be close-at hand and retire in 2018-2019, 2021-2023 and 2024-2025, respectively. Therefore, to find alternative energy sources, especially on the clean, renewable and sustainable ones for generating electricity are emergent and important for Taiwan's government in next few years. Among various energy sources, geothermal energy can be as base

  10. DETECTION OF PUTATIVE ANTIMALARIAL-RESISTANT PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN ANOPHELES VECTORS AT THAILAND-CAMBODIA AND THAILAND-MYANMAR BORDERS.

    PubMed

    Rattaprasert, Pongruj; Chaksangchaichot, Panee; Wihokhoen, Benchawan; Suparach, Nutjaree; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of multidrug-resistant (MDR)falciparum and vivax malaria has recently been included in the Global Plan for Artemisinin Resistance Containment (GPARC) of the Greater Mekong Sub-region, particularly at the Thailand-Cambodia and Thailand-Myanmar borders. In parallel to GPARC, monitoring MDR malaria parasites in anopheline vectors is an ideal augment to entomological surveillance. Employing Plasmodium- and species-specific nested PCR techniques, only P. vivax was detected in 3/109 salivary gland DNA extracts of anopheline vectors collected during a rainy season between 24-26 August 2009 and 22-24 September 2009 and a dry season between 29-31 December 2009 and 16-18 January 2010. Indoor and out- door resting mosquitoes were collected in Thong Pha Phum District, Kanchanaburi Province (border of Thailand-Myanmar) and Bo Rai District, Trat Province (border of Thailand-Cambodia): one sample from Anopheles dirus at the Thailand-Cambodia border and two samples from An. aconitus from Thailand-Myanmar border isolate. Nucleotide sequencing of dihydrofolate reductase gene revealed the presence in all three samples of four mutations known to cause high resistance to antifolate pyrimethamine, but no mutations were found in multidrug resistance transporter 1 gene that are associated with (falciparum) resistance to quinoline antimalarials. Such findings indicate the potential usefulness of this approach in monitoring the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites in geographically regions prone to the development of drug resistance and where screening of human population at risk poses logistical and ethical problems. Keywords: Anopheles spp, Plasmodium vivax, antimalarial resistance, Greater Mekong Sub-region, nested PCR, vector surveillance

  11. DETECTION OF PUTATIVE ANTIMALARIAL-RESISTANT PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN ANOPHELES VECTORS AT THAILAND-CAMBODIA AND THAILAND-MYANMAR BORDERS.

    PubMed

    Rattaprasert, Pongruj; Chaksangchaichot, Panee; Wihokhoen, Benchawan; Suparach, Nutjaree; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of multidrug-resistant (MDR)falciparum and vivax malaria has recently been included in the Global Plan for Artemisinin Resistance Containment (GPARC) of the Greater Mekong Sub-region, particularly at the Thailand-Cambodia and Thailand-Myanmar borders. In parallel to GPARC, monitoring MDR malaria parasites in anopheline vectors is an ideal augment to entomological surveillance. Employing Plasmodium- and species-specific nested PCR techniques, only P. vivax was detected in 3/109 salivary gland DNA extracts of anopheline vectors collected during a rainy season between 24-26 August 2009 and 22-24 September 2009 and a dry season between 29-31 December 2009 and 16-18 January 2010. Indoor and out- door resting mosquitoes were collected in Thong Pha Phum District, Kanchanaburi Province (border of Thailand-Myanmar) and Bo Rai District, Trat Province (border of Thailand-Cambodia): one sample from Anopheles dirus at the Thailand-Cambodia border and two samples from An. aconitus from Thailand-Myanmar border isolate. Nucleotide sequencing of dihydrofolate reductase gene revealed the presence in all three samples of four mutations known to cause high resistance to antifolate pyrimethamine, but no mutations were found in multidrug resistance transporter 1 gene that are associated with (falciparum) resistance to quinoline antimalarials. Such findings indicate the potential usefulness of this approach in monitoring the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites in geographically regions prone to the development of drug resistance and where screening of human population at risk poses logistical and ethical problems. Keywords: Anopheles spp, Plasmodium vivax, antimalarial resistance, Greater Mekong Sub-region, nested PCR, vector surveillance PMID:27244954

  12. Tobacco in Africa.

    PubMed

    Yach, D

    1996-01-01

    Tobacco has been a common commodity in Africa for over three centuries. By 1993, some 500 000 tons of tobacco were being grown in 33 African countries, with only two countries exporting more than they import. Attempts to measure the current and potential impact of the tobacco business on health, society and the environment are still in their early stages, but the need for preventive action is already inescapably clear. Comprehensive control strategies are urgently required to prevent a major epidemic of tobacco-related disease in Africa. PMID:8820139

  13. Telecommunications and Development in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiplagat, B. A., Ed.; Werner, M. C. M., Ed.

    The Telecommunications Foundation of Africa (TFA) was created in 1992 out of a conviction that insufficient telecommunications in Africa are an impediment to economic growth, and that more resources could be mobilized to strengthen this sector. This volume was made by TFA for readers both inside and outside of Africa and the telecommunications…

  14. Family Planning Programmes in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pradervand, Pierre

    The countries discussed in this paper are the francophone countries of West Africa and the Republic of Congo, with comparative references made to North Africa (mainly Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia). Obstacles to the adoption of family planning in the countries of tropical Africa are a very high mortality rate among children; a socioeconomic…

  15. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  16. Molluscan fauna of Gueishan Island, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Hsiung, Ta-Wei; Lin, Si-Min; Wu, Wen-Lung

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This dataset records the occurrence and inventory of molluscan fauna on Gueishan Island, the only active volcanic island in Taiwan, based on the literature survey and field investigation conducted between 2011 and 2012. The literature review involved seven studies published from 1934 to 2003, which collectively reported 112 species from 61 genera and 37 families of Mollusca on Gueishan Island. Through our field investigation, we identified 34 species from 28 genera and 23 families. Fourteen of these species were new records on Gueishan Island: Liolophura japonica, Lottia luchuana, Nerita costata, Nerita rumphii, Diplommatina suganikeiensis, Littoraria undulata, Solenomphala taiwanensis, Assiminea sp., Siphonaria laciniosa, Laevapex nipponica, Carychium hachijoensis, Succinea erythrophana, Zaptyx crassilamellata, and Allopeas pyrgula. In Total, there are 126 species from 71 genera and 45 families of Mollusca on Gueishan Island. These data have been published through GBIF [http://taibif.org.tw/ipt/resource.do?r=gueishan_island] and integrated into the Taiwan Malacofauna Database (http://shell.sinica.edu.tw/). PMID:23717182

  17. "Foreign brides" meet ethnic politics in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chang

    2011-01-01

    A great number of women from China, Vietnam, and Indonesia recently arrived in Taiwan to marry men of lower social strata. Such an unusual pattern of migration has stimulated debates about the status and the citizenship of the new arrivals. This study analyzes Taiwanese responses toward these marriage migrants by using a national survey conducted in 2004. Three aspects of restrictive attitudes were tapped concerning these newcomers: (1) rights to work; (2) access to public health insurance; and (3) full citizenship. Immigrants from China were most opposed, compared to women with other origins (Southeast Asia, Japan, Europe, and the US). The seemingly unrelated regression estimation regression results do not support the split labor market hypotheses, as marriage migrants do not appear to be economic threats toward members of the lower classes. In contrast, ethnic nationalism plays a key role in determining the natives’ restrictive attitudes. The case of Taiwan represents a special genre, where ethnic politics selectively arouses the social rejection of women immigrants of certain origins. PMID:22069767

  18. [Surveillance of scrub typhus in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Chen, H L; Chen, H Y; Horng, C B

    1993-11-01

    Although scrub typhus, a rickettsial exanthematous febrile disease, has designated as a reportable communicable disease in Taiwan since 1955, only Pescadores island, Hualien and Taitung counties had more reported and confirmed cases. Suspected dengue fever and scrub typhus serum specimens sent from the Bureau of Health and health stations to this institute from January 1991 to December 1992 were tested for antibody to scrub typhus by indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFA). The results showed that: 1) there were serologically positive cases in many counties except Hsinchu and Iilan, 2) the disease occurred mostly from July to October, 3) more males than females were infected and their age ranged from 21 to 60 years old with a peak of the twenties and 4) higher incidence rate in children under five years old was observed in Pescadores and Orchid islands. The above data call the attention of people and physicians to be aware of the fact that there were probable scrub typhus cases in every county in Taiwan.

  19. Dermatoses in cement workers in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Wang, B J; Yeh, K C; Wang, J C; Kao, H H; Wang, M T; Shih, H C; Chen, C J

    1999-01-01

    Construction workers are known to have occupational dermatoses. The prevalence of such dermatoses was unknown in Taiwanese construction workers. The objective of this study was to determine the work exposure, prevalence of skin manifestations, and sensitivity to common contact allergens in cement workers of southern Taiwan. A total of 1147 current regular cement workers were telephone-interviewed about skin problems during the past 12 months, work exposure, and personal protection. Among those interviewed, 166 were examined and patch tested with common contact allergens. A high % of cement workers reported skin problems in the past 12 months. More men (13.9%) reported skin problems possibly related to work than women (5.4%). Prevalence was associated with lower use of gloves, duration of work as cement worker, and more time in jobs involving direct manual handling of cement, especially tiling. A high % of dermatitis was noted in the 166 workers examined, which correlated with reported skin problems. On patch testing, construction workers had a high frequency of sensitivity to chromate. Sensitivity to chromate or cobalt was associated with reported skin problems, or dorsal hand dermatitis on examination. These workers' dermatitis was under-diagnosed and inadequately managed. It is concluded that cement workers in southern Taiwan had a high prevalence of skin problems related to cement use. Protective measures, work practice, and physician education should be improved to prevent or manage such problems.

  20. "Foreign brides" meet ethnic politics in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Chang

    2011-01-01

    A great number of women from China, Vietnam, and Indonesia recently arrived in Taiwan to marry men of lower social strata. Such an unusual pattern of migration has stimulated debates about the status and the citizenship of the new arrivals. This study analyzes Taiwanese responses toward these marriage migrants by using a national survey conducted in 2004. Three aspects of restrictive attitudes were tapped concerning these newcomers: (1) rights to work; (2) access to public health insurance; and (3) full citizenship. Immigrants from China were most opposed, compared to women with other origins (Southeast Asia, Japan, Europe, and the US). The seemingly unrelated regression estimation regression results do not support the split labor market hypotheses, as marriage migrants do not appear to be economic threats toward members of the lower classes. In contrast, ethnic nationalism plays a key role in determining the natives’ restrictive attitudes. The case of Taiwan represents a special genre, where ethnic politics selectively arouses the social rejection of women immigrants of certain origins.

  1. Fetal exposure to environmental neurotoxins in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuen-Bin; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Fan, Chun-Hua; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As) are recognized neurotoxins in children that particularly affect neurodevelopment and intellectual performance. Based on the hypothesis that the fetal basis of adult disease is fetal toxic exposure that results in adverse outcomes in adulthood, we explored the concentrations of key neurotoxins (i.e., Hg, Pb, Cd, and As) in meconium to identify the risk factors associated with these concentrations. From January 2007 to December 2009, 545 mother-infant pairs were recruited. The geometric mean concentrations of Pb and As in the meconium of babies of foreign-born mothers (22.9 and 38.1 µg/kg dry weight, respectively) were significantly greater than those of babies of Taiwan-born mothers (17.5 and 33.0 µg/kg dry weight, respectively). Maternal age (≥30 y), maternal education, use of traditional Chinese herbs during pregnancy, and fish cutlet consumption (≥3 meals/wk) were risk factors associated with concentrations of key prenatal neurotoxins. The Taiwan government should focus more attention on providing intervention programs for immigrant mothers to help protect the health of unborn babies. Further investigation on how multiple neurotoxins influence prenatal neurodevelopment is warranted.

  2. Recycling and reuse of industrial wastes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wei, M S; Huang, K H

    2001-01-01

    Eighteen million metric tons of industrial wastes are produced every year in Taiwan. In order to properly handle the industrial wastes, the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (Taiwan EPA) has set up strategic programs that include establishment of storage, treatment, and final disposal systems, establishment of a management center for industrial wastes, and promotion of recycling and reuse of industrial wastes. The Taiwan EPA has been actively promoting the recycling and reuse of industrial wastes over the years. In July 1995 the Taiwan EPA amended and promulgated the Criteria for the Industrial Waste Storage, Collection and Processing Facility, July, 1995 that added articles related to general industrial waste recycling and reuse. In June 1996 the Taiwan EPA promulgated the Non-listed General Industrial Waste Reuse Application Procedures, June, 1996, followed by the Regulations Governing the Permitting of Hazardous Industrial Waste Reuse, June 1996, setting up a full regulatory framework for governing industrial waste reuse. To broaden the recycling and reuse of general industrial wastes, the Taiwan EPA has listed 14 industrial waste items for recycling and reuse, including waste paper, waste iron, coal ash, tempered high furnace bricks (cinder), high furnace bricks (cinder), furnace transfer bricks (cinder), sweetening dregs, wood (whole/part), glass (whole/part), bleaching earth, ceramics (pottery, brick, tile and cast sand), individual metal scraps (copper, zinc, aluminum and tin), distillery grain (dregs) and plastics. As of June 1999, 99 applications for reuse of industrial wastes had been approved with 1.97 million metric tons of industrial wastes being reused.

  3. Epidemic of fever of unknown origin in rural Thailand, caused by influenza A (H1N1) and dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Silarug, N; Foy, H M; Kupradinon, S; Rojanasuphot, S; Nisalak, A; Pongsuwant, Y

    1990-03-01

    In the late summer (rainy season) of 1987, a sharp outbreak of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in rural southern Thailand was investigated by a field epidemiology team. In a random survey of households, 40 percent of the children and 20 percent of adults were reported to have had febrile illnesses within the last month. There was at least one death, possibly from Reye's syndrome. Testing 34 pairs of acute and convalescent sera showed significant HI antibody titer rises to influenza A (Taiwan/(H1N1) (9 cases) and dengue virus (12 cases). Testing 79 single sera with the antibody capture ELISA test for dengue, revealed that 23 percent had high titers in the IgM serum fraction suggesting recent infection. There were also six antibody titer rises to coxsackie B viruses, three from well controls. Dengue has previously been observed as a cause of FUO in rural areas in the tropics, but finding a combined epidemic of dengue and influenza was unexpected. With cooperative villagers, adequate personnel and laboratory support, especially the antigen capture ELISA test for dengue infections, it is feasible to successfully investigate disease outbreaks with serologic methods in remote villages.

  4. Pythiosis in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rivierre, Christine; Laprie, Caroline; Guiard-Marigny, Olivier; Bergeaud, Patrick; Berthelemy, Madeleine

    2005-01-01

    We report the first case of pythiosis from Africa in an 8-month-old dog with a chronic and ulcerative cutaneous lesion. The etiologic agent belonged to the genus Pythium. Phylogenetic analysis placed the isolate in a sister group to the other P. insidiosum strains. However, the isolate may belong to a new Pythium species. PMID:15757572

  5. Photomontage. Water in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKoski, David

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Photomontage,"…

  6. Anglicising Postapartheid South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, P. Eric

    2004-01-01

    The apartheid state deliberately encouraged linguistic diversity and actively built cultural infrastructures which impeded Anglicisation. With the end of apartheid has come "de facto" Anglicisation. So although South Africa has, since 1994, had 11 official languages, in reality, English is swamping the other 10 languages. Afrikaans has, in…

  7. Topical Research: Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Karen

    This lesson plan can be used in social studies, language arts, or library research. The instructional objective is for students to select a topic of study relating to Africa, write a thesis statement, collect information from media sources, and develop a conclusion. The teacher may assign the lesson for written or oral evaluation. The teacher…

  8. Out of Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    Karen Blixen (Isak Dinesen), author of "Out of Africa," said, "God made the world round so people would never be able to see too far down the road." The author embraced this wonderful thought by venturing on a three-week journey to Kenya and Tanzania in search of grand adventure. In this article, the author shares her adventure with her students…

  9. Africa: Myth and Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Barbara B.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the Third International Social Studies Conference held in Nairobi, Kenya, in 1994. Discusses democracy, educational reform efforts, and the importance of tourism to the Kenyan economy. Asserts that U.S. teachers must use accurate and nonstereotypical instructional materials in teaching about Africa. (CFR)

  10. West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Lydie, N; Robinson, N J

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews scientific and other literature during the 1990s that links migration and mobility with the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS. The focus is on key population groups linked to the spread of HIV and STDs in West and Central Africa: migrant laborers, truck drivers, itinerant traders, commercial sex workers (CSWs), and refugees. Countries with high emigration and immigration tend to have high levels of HIV infection, with the exception of Senegal. The main destination of immigrants are Senegal, Nigeria, and Cote d'Ivoire in West Africa and Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, and Congo in Central Africa. The risk of infection and the spread of HIV is variable among migrants. There is little in the literature that substantiates hypotheses about the strong association between migration and HIV-positive status. Information is needed on the duration, frequency of return visits, living conditions, sexual activities with multiple partners, and information before departure, along the routes, at final destination, and at the time of returns. Action-based research in five West African countries (Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, and Senegal) should produce results in late 1998. Comparable studies in Central Africa are unknown. Regional studies should be complemented by local studies. Prevention would benefit from studies on the relative size of these five population groups by geographic location.

  11. South Africa's Constitutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getman, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Describes the striking dichotomy of South Africa's beauty and the squalor resulting from the apartheid policies of the government. Reviews reactions of black South Africans to recent constitutional changes and details efforts to secure more sweeping reform. Includes stories of several individuals who have taken actions which oppose the system of…

  12. Trends Abroad: South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Douglas H.

    1970-01-01

    In South Africa today there is a complex structure of laws and regulations which impose a variety of restrictions on individual liberties including the freedom to publish and read literary material. The successive steps by which this state of affairs has been reached are briefly described. (NH)

  13. Education in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Documentation and Information, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This selected, annotated bibliography of information resources in English and/or French is divided into sections on books; documents and articles; UNESCO publications; reference works; and African periodicals. A list of institutions concerned with education in Africa is included, as well as educational documentation and information services in…

  14. AED in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Founded in 1961, the Academy for Educational Development (AED) is an independent, nonprofit, charitable organization that operates development programs in the United States and throughout the world. This directory presents an overview of the AED programs in Africa since 1975. Current AED Programs include: (1) HIV/AIDS Prevention and Impact…

  15. Neonatal surgery in Africa.

    PubMed

    Chirdan, Lohfa B; Ngiloi, Petronilla J; Elhalaby, Essam A

    2012-05-01

    The management of neonatal surgical problems continues to pose considerable challenges, particularly in low-resource settings. The burden of neonatal surgical diseases in Africa is not well documented. The characteristics of some neonatal surgical problems are highlighted. Late presentation coupled with poor understanding of the milieu interior of the neonates by incompetent health care providers and poorly equipped hospitals combine to give rise to the unacceptable high morbidity and mortality in most parts of Africa. Proper training of all staff involved in neonatal health care coupled with community awareness must be vigorously pursued by all stakeholders. Various governments throughout the continent of Africa, in conjunction with international donor agencies, must not only provide an adequate budget for health care services and improve infrastructures, but must also deliberately encourage and provide funding for neonatal surgical care and research across the continent. The well-established pediatric surgical training programs, particularly in North and South Africa, should hold the moral responsibility of training all possible numbers of young surgeons from other African countries that do not have any existing pediatric surgical training programs or those countries suffering from remarkable shortage of trained pediatric surgeons.

  16. Africa and Applied Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makoni, Sinfree, Ed.; Meinhof, Ulrike H., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This collection of articles includes: "Introducing Applied Linguistics in Africa" (Sinfree Makoni and Ulrike H. Meinhof); "Language Ideology and Politics: A Critical Appraisal of French as Second Official Language in Nigeria" (Tope Omoniyi); "The Democratisation of Indigenous Languages: The Case of Malawi" (Themba Moyo); "Classroom Code-Switching…

  17. Literacy in Francophone Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokora, Pascal D.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in francophone Africa, where literacy is still a privilege, is reviewed in terms of the complex linguistic situation, effects of population change, concepts and definitions of literacy, promotion of literacy in adult nonformal settings (e.g., African language literacy materials, multilingual settings). (23 references) (LB)

  18. Geology and assessment of unconventional resources of Phitsanulok Basin, Thailand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) quantitatively assessed the potential for unconventional oil and gas resources within the Phitsanulok Basin of Thailand. Unconventional resources for the USGS include shale gas, shale oil, tight gas, tight oil, and coalbed gas. In the Phitsanulok Basin, only potential shale-oil and shale-gas resources were quantitatively assessed.

  19. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand. PMID:27375903

  20. After the Forest: AIDS as Ecological Collapse in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Ann Danaiya

    1992-01-01

    The steady degradation of Thailand's forests is related to the emergence of AIDS in the same period. Environmental erosion and the unraveling of rural cultures founded on particular ecosystems are among the pressures that force young people to leave villages and enter the sex industry, exposing them to AIDS. (KS)

  1. Narrative Approach to Moral Education: A Case of Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singsuriya, Pagorn; Aungsumalin, Wipada; Worapong, Seree

    2014-01-01

    In Thailand, according to, for instance, the National Education Act 1999, the National Plan of Education, Religion, Arts and Culture (2002--2013), and the Core Curriculum of Basic Education 2008, moral education is given an important role not only in human development but also in citizenship building and solution of socio-political problems.…

  2. Active Ageing Level of Older Persons: Regional Comparison in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Nuruzzaman

    2016-01-01

    Active ageing level and its discrepancy in different regions (Bangkok, Central, North, Northeast, and South) of Thailand have been examined for prioritizing the policy agenda to be implemented. Attempt has been made to test preliminary active ageing models for Thai older persons and hence active ageing index (AAI, ranges from 0 to 1) has been estimated. Using nationally representative data and confirmatory factor analysis approach, this study justified active ageing models for female and male older persons in Thailand. Results revealed that active ageing level of Thai older persons is not high (mean AAIs for female and male older persons are 0.64 and 0.61, resp., and those are significantly different (p < 0.001)). Mean AAI in Central region is lower than North, Northeast, and South regions but there is no significant difference in the latter three regions of Thailand. Special emphasis should be given to Central region and policy should be undertaken for increasing active ageing level. Implementation of an Integrated Active Ageing Package (IAAP), containing policies for older persons to improve their health and economic security, to promote participation in social groups and longer working lives, and to arrange learning programs, would be helpful for increasing older persons' active ageing level in Thailand.

  3. Female Employment and Marital Instability: Evidence from Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John N.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined female employment-marital instability linkage using data from study of intact marriages in Bangkok, Thailand. Found that effects of employment per se and number of hours worked were class-linked and tended to be mediated by marital processes (spousal disagreements, marital problems, marital companionship or positive affect, and wife…

  4. Thailand: Land of Contrasts. A Workbook for High School Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthiwan, Titima; Tadmor, Uri

    This book introduces students to the people and country of Thailand. This ancient and historic land is filled with beauty, diversity, and wonder. This book provides background information and suggested topics for an intensive study of the country. The seven chapters are entitled: (1) "The Land"; (2) "The People"; (3) "Early History"; (4)…

  5. Giant trees from the Middle Pleistocene of Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Marc; Boonchai, Nareerat; Ferguson, David K.; Jia, Hui; Songtham, Wickanet

    2013-04-01

    Giant fossil trees from the Middle Pleistocene of Thailand are described. The longest log is measured at 72.2 m. Morphological analysis suggests that the original trees towered to more than 100 m, in a wet tropical forest. As contemporaneous archaic pebble tools were reported in the same area, the subtropical rainforest was no impenetrable ecological barrier to a population of Homo erectus.

  6. Counseling in Thailand: Development from a Buddhist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuicomepee, Arunya; Romano, John L.; Pokaeo, Soree

    2012-01-01

    The authors present historical and current accounts of the counseling profession in Thailand. In addition to the influences of Buddhism on counselor training and practices, professional issues such as licensure, professional organizations, and the relationship between counselors and other mental health professionals are summarized. The role of…

  7. Internationalizing Higher Education in Thailand: Government and University Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavankura, Pad

    2013-01-01

    Each country responds to internationalization differently and offers various interpretations of the concept. Thailand has incorporated the internationalization of higher education into its plans since 1990. This article aims to discuss the primary motivations of the government and of Thai universities in moving toward the goal of…

  8. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus argenteus infections in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Amornchai, Premjit; Nickerson, Emma K; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J

    2015-03-01

    Molecular typing of 246 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from unselected patients in Thailand showed that 10 (4.1%) were actually Staphylococcus argenteus. Contrary to the suggestion that S. argenteus is less virulent than S. aureus, we demonstrated comparable rates of morbidity, death, and health care-associated infection in patients infected with either of these two species.

  9. Changes in Teacher Education in Thailand 1978-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thongthew, Sumlee

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the long attempt to transform teacher education in Thailand. Although a brief summary of educational systems and models of teacher preparation from 1892 to 1973 has been provided, the prime focus of the paper is on presenting changes in teacher education from 1974 to the present day, against the backdrop of key political and…

  10. Foreign Language Anxiety in a New English Program in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanielian, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Thailand boasts a robust ESL system in both public and private schools, where students learn various subjects from native speakers in the English language. Foreign language classroom anxiety (FLCA) is a subject that is relevant to ESL instruction and learning. This study assesses associations between FLCA and academic performance in English and…

  11. Sustainable Leadership: Honeybee Practices at Thailand's Oldest University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantabutra, Sooksan; Saratun, Molraudee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to adopt Avery and Bergsteiner's 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable organizations as a framework to examine the leadership practices of Thailand's oldest university. Design/methodology/approach: Avery and Bergsteiner's principles were grouped into six categories for analysis: long-term…

  12. Combining Education and Work; Experiences in Asia and Oceania: Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Bangkok (Thailand).

    Reflected in priorities of secondary vocational training, agricultural education, and nonformal short courses, Thailand's education policy of "productive work experience" helps solve the problems of those who have an incomplete general education, have negative work attitudes and habits, are untrained dropouts, or are vocationally trained but…

  13. The Academic Knowledge Management Model of Small Schools in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumtuma, Chamnan; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Yeamsang, Theerawat

    2015-01-01

    The Academic Knowledge Management Model of Small Schools in Thailand was created by research and development. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected via the following steps: a participatory workshop meeting, the formation of a team according to knowledge base, field study, brainstorming, group discussion, activities carried out…

  14. Nutrition transition, food retailing and health equity in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Matthew; Banwell, Cathy; Dixon, Jane; Seubsman, Sam-Ang; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Sleigh, Adrian

    2010-12-01

    AIM: Here we examine the influence of changes in food retailing, the food supply and the associated nutrition transition on health equity in Thailand, a middle income country experiencing rapid economic development. METHODS: The dietary transition underway in Thailand is reviewed along with theories regarding convergence to a globalised energy dense obesogenic diet and subsequent socio-economically related dietary divergence along with the implications for health inequity. RESULTS: Thailand is part way through a dietary, nutrition and health transition. The food distribution and retailing system is now 50% controlled by modern supermarkets and convenience stores. The problem of increasing availability of calorie dense foods is especially threatening because a substantial proportion of the adult population is short statured due to child malnutrition. Obesity is an emerging problem and for educated Thai women has already developed an inverse relationship to socio-economic status as found in high income countries. CONCLUSIONS: Thailand has reached an important point in its nutrition transition. The challenge for the Thai government and population is to boost affordable healthy diets and to avoid the socio-economic inequity of nutritional outcomes observed in many rich countries. PMID:22442643

  15. Taeniasis among Refugees Living on Thailand-Myanmar Border, 2012.

    PubMed

    McCleery, Ellen J; Patchanee, Prapas; Pongsopawijit, Pornsawan; Chailangkarn, Sasisophin; Tiwananthagorn, Saruda; Jongchansittoe, Papaspong; Dantrakool, Anchalee; Morakote, Nimit; Phyu, Hnin; Wilkins, Patricia P; Noh, John C; Phares, Christina; O'Neal, Seth

    2015-10-01

    We tested refugee camp residents on the Thailand-Myanmar border for Taenia solium infection. Taeniasis prevalence was consistent with that for other disease-endemic regions, but seropositivity indicating T. solium taeniasis was rare. Seropositivity indicating cysticercosis was 5.5% in humans, and 3.2% in pigs. Corralling pigs and providing latrines may control transmission of these tapeworms within this camp.

  16. Sex behaviour of male Japanese tourists in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Fumihiko

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores why Japanese men engage in potentially risky commercial sexual behaviours while on holiday in Thailand. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 heterosexual male Japanese tourists, aged 19-36, who paid for sex with Thai women. Study participants were recruited at guesthouses in Bangkok. Analysis revealed eight main factors that encourage participation in commercial sex: a sense of freedom and anonymity during "time-out" spent travelling in a foreign country; a sense that there are permissive norms governing commercial sex in Thailand; the perceived sexual desirability of Thai women, a sense of economic and racial superiority relative to Thai women; a sense of loneliness or feeling in need of companionship; peer influence; the widespread availability of inexpensive sexual services in Thailand; and sexual desire or need. Findings indicate that Japanese male sexual conduct reflects individual drives while on holiday, in the context of interactions among Japanese peers, shaped by Thailand's socio-cultural environment. PMID:16641061

  17. Income Contingent Student Loans for Thailand: Alternatives Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Bruce; Lounkaew, Kiatanantha

    2010-01-01

    There is significant irresolution in many countries concerning the design of student loan schemes. In no country recently has there been more uncertainty as to the form that loans should take than Thailand. The Student Loans Fund (SLF), a conventional approach to financing, was introduced in 1996, discontinued at the end of 2005, and re-introduced…

  18. Thailand--Secondary Education for Employment, Volume II: Background Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This report, a series of three background papers, was prepared as part of the Thailand Secondary Vocational Education Sector Study. The first background paper, "Intro Changing Workplaces, Changing Skills: Views from the Thai Private Sector on Work-Organization, Employee Recruitment and Selection" (Charles Abelmann, Lee Kian Chang, Pinchuda…

  19. Challenging School Leadership in Thailand's Southern Border Provinces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxcy, Brendan D.; Sungtong, Ekkarin; Nguyen, Thu Su'o'ng Thi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the challenges facing public school leadership in southern Thailand, a region destabilized by renewal of a longstanding insurgency. Seeking to implement national educational reforms on shifting social, political and cultural terrain, educators in this region face extraordinary challenges as they reconsider and renegotiate…

  20. Agricultural utilization of ERTS-1 data in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheosakul, P.; Indrambarya, B.; Morgan, J. O.; Vibulsresth, S.

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances made in three disciplinary areas that are of major importance to Thailand are briefly discussed. These areas are; (1) agriculture, (2) forestry, and (3) land use. Preliminary investigations of the ERTS-1 data have been so successful that the Thai Government has decided to develop a remote sensing data handling and research center.

  1. The Thailand programme of Earth Resources Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheosakul, P. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Multispectral scanner image quality is considered excellent. It is immediately apparent that details of the coastline, water courses, and many other features readily apparent in the imagery will permit important updating and correction of available maps of Thailand.

  2. Enriching English Language Spoken Outputs of Kindergartners in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilang, Jeffrey Dawala; Sinwongsuwat, Kemtong

    2012-01-01

    This year is designated as Thailand's "English Speaking Year" with the aim of improving the communicative competence of Thais for the upcoming integration of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in 2015. The consistent low-level proficiency of the Thais in the English language has led to numerous curriculum revisions and…

  3. Development of Electronic Resources across Networks in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratchatavorn, Phandao

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the development of electronic resources across library networks in Thailand to meet user needs, particularly electronic journals. Topics include concerns about journal access; limited budgets for library acquisitions of journals; and sharing resources through a centralized database system that allows Web access to journals via Internet…

  4. Cool Season Paleotemperatures at Tree Line in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. E.; Chan, M.

    2011-12-01

    Taiwan has over 200 mountains whose peaks exceed 3,000 meters in elevation. Despite straddling the Tropic of Cancer, the higher peaks have snow and freezing temperatures every winter. Trees growing above 3,500 meters show clear temperature variation, even producing frost rings. Yet unlike temperate tree-line species, with their warm season temperature signal, trees growing at Taiwan's tree line show sensitivity to cool season temperatures. Juniperus squamata growing above 3,500 meters in central Taiwan have ring width time series that commonly exceed 600 years. Presented are the first dendroclimatological analyses from Taiwanese Juniperus squamata.

  5. Short shrift for Africa.

    PubMed

    Collymore, Y

    1994-01-01

    The plan of action that emerged from the International Conference on Population and development (ICPD) held in Cairo in September 1994 did not directly address the major problems of pervasive poverty and dismal infant and maternal mortality rates in Africa. The Organization of African Unity met the week before ICPD to develop an integrated population and development strategy. The continent's population growth rate of 3% far exceeds that in most other developing countries; the maternal mortality rate is 640/100,000 live births vs. only 30 for industrialized countries. Its infant mortality rate is 114 deaths/1000 live births--double that of Western Europe. Africa's annual requirements under the Cairo plan for environmental, population, and development strategies would be $2.2-3 billion during 1995-2000. The estimated needs will grow to $4.3-5.6 billion by the year 2015. However, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, and South Africa warned against these ambitious goals, preferring instead individual national targets. South Africa is compiling population data that indicate that the rate of growth is 2%/year with a current estimated population of 40 million. A population policy is being considered within the context of reconstruction and development. Namibia also faces a growing population that could compromise economic development. Some nongovernmental organizations have stated that the ICPD failed to confront unsafe abortions and reproductive health problems in an effort to appease the Vatican and Islamic countries. Women's reproductive and sexual rights have also been rejected by some Latin American and Islamic countries as alien to their laws and culture. Nevertheless, an agreement was reached on information and access to family planning services for teenagers and counseling on responsible sexual behavior. There were also charges from African delegates about diverting attention from the internecine conflicts in Africa that have resulted in

  6. From waste minimization to ISO 14000: Taiwan`s experience and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Huei Chen; Wain-Sun Hou

    1996-12-31

    Taiwan has completed a very successful five-year industrial waste minimization (IWM) demonstration and promotion project sponsored by the government. From 1990 to 1995, the project successfully disseminated the IWM concept of pollution prevention (P2) to industries. It effectively reduced industrial waste while significantly benefitting the economy by assisting industries in implementing in-plant IWM programs. In July 1995, the second stage of the five-year IWM and ISO 14000 promotion project was initiated for further promoting the IWM, P2, and cleaner production and, in particular, coping with the upcoming international environmental management standards (ISO 14000). To assist industries in establishing an environmental management system (EMS) and accumulating related experience, an EMS pilot demonstration project of five model industries and an ISO 14001 EMS demonstration and promotion project for 22 factories in 13 industries were initiated in October 1995 and August 1996, respectively. These projects can assist Taiwan`s industries in changing the constitution of their enterprises, enhancing competition in the international market, and helping our nation achieve the forerunner`s profits in sustainable development. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. COPD in Taiwan: a National Epidemiology Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chan, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Wang, Hao-Chien; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Hang, Liang-Wen; Chang, Chee-Jen; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of COPD in Taiwan and to document the disease characteristics and associated risk factors. Methods We conducted a random cross-sectional national survey of adults older than 40 years in Taiwan. Respiratory health screening questions identified subjects with diagnosed COPD or whose reported symptoms also fulfilled an epidemiological case definition; these were eligible to complete the survey, which also included indices of symptom severity and disability and questions on comorbidities, medical treatments, smoking habits, and occupations potentially harmful to respiratory health. Subjects with diagnosed COPD were subdivided by smoking status. Subjects who fulfilled the case definition of COPD and smoked were designated as “possible COPD”. Participants who did not fit the case definition of COPD were asked only about their personal circumstances and smoking habits. Data from these groups were analyzed and compared. Results Of the 6,600 participants who completed the survey, 404 (6.1%) fulfilled the epidemiological case definition of COPD: 137 with diagnosed COPD and 267 possible COPD. The most common comorbidities of COPD were hypertension or cardiovascular diseases (36.1%). Subjects with definite COPD had significantly higher COPD Assessment Test scores than the possible COPD group (14.6±8.32 vs 12.6±6.49, P=0.01) and significantly more comorbid illnesses (P=0.01). The main risk factors contributing to health care utilization in each COPD cohort were higher COPD Assessment Test scores (odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.26), higher modified Medical Research Council Breathlessness Scale scores (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.11–3.51), and having more than one comorbidity (OR 5.19, 95% CI 1.05–25.61). Conclusion With estimated prevalence of 6.1% in the general population, COPD in Taiwan has been underdiagnosed. Symptoms and comorbidities were independent risk factors for health care utilization in subjects

  8. Cholera outbreaks in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mengel, Martin A; Delrieu, Isabelle; Heyerdahl, Leonard; Gessner, Bradford D

    2014-01-01

    During the current seventh cholera pandemic, Africa bore the major brunt of global disease burden. More than 40 years after its resurgence in Africa in 1970, cholera remains a grave public health problem, characterized by large disease burden, frequent outbreaks, persistent endemicity, and high CFRs, particularly in the region of the central African Great Lakes which might act as reservoirs for cholera. There, cases occur year round with a rise in incidence during the rainy season. Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, cholera occurs mostly in outbreaks of varying size with a constant threat of widespread epidemics. Between 1970 and 2011, African countries reported 3,221,050 suspected cholera cases to the World Health Organization, representing 46 % of all cases reported globally. Excluding the Haitian epidemic, sub-Saharan Africa accounted for 86 % of reported cases and 99 % of deaths worldwide in 2011. The number of cholera cases is possibly much higher than what is reported to the WHO due to the variation in modalities, completeness, and case definition of national cholera data. One source on country specific incidence rates for Africa, adjusting for underreporting, estimates 1,341,080 cases and 160,930 deaths (52.6 % of 2,548,227 estimated cases and 79.6 % of 209,216 estimated deaths worldwide). Another estimates 1,411,453 cases and 53,632 deaths per year, respectively (50 % of 2,836,669 estimated cases and 58.6 % of 91,490 estimated deaths worldwide). Within Africa, half of all cases between 1970 and 2011 were notified from only seven countries: Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, Nigeria, Somalia, Tanzania, and South Africa. In contrast to a global trend of decreasing case fatality ratios (CFRs), CFRs have remained stable in Africa at approximately 2 %. Early propagation of cholera outbreaks depends largely on the extent of individual bacterial shedding, host and organism characteristics, the likelihood of people coming into contact with

  9. Taiwan's cooperative space activities at present and in future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Wing-Huen

    2004-01-01

    Taiwan is developing a long-term space program which is entering its next 15 years of planning cycle. Since its establishment in 1992, the National Space Program Office has played a key role in introducing satellite technology and space experiments into Taiwan. In parallel, basic research in space science and remote-sensing observations are being promoted in different institutions. A combination of these efforts has earned Taiwan a compact but effective space program capable of mounting satellite missions and advanced study in various disciplines of space science. The satellite data receiving and data processing facilities are particularly valuable in addressing issues related to environmental protection, natural hazards and economic planning. At the present time, Taiwan's international cooperative space activities are still very limited in scope but there is a wide ranging of possibilities which could be pursued together with other developing nations in space research under the auspice of COSPAR.

  10. The Problems of Land Consolidation: A Case Study of Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jack F.

    1976-01-01

    Problems of agricultural land consolidation, as illustrated by Taiwan's first 10-year land reform phase, include fragmentation of holdings, cost of consolidation, corruption and maladministration by government officials, and timing of operations. (AV)

  11. Motorcycle pollution control in Taiwan, Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.W.; Hsiao, H.C.; Walsh, M.P.

    1998-12-31

    The Taiwan EPA has developed a comprehensive approach to motor vehicle pollution control. Building on its early adoption of US `83 standards for light duty vehicles (starting July 1, 1990) it recently moved to US `87 requirements, which include the 0.2 gram per mile particulate standard, as of July 1, 1995. Heavy duty diesel particulate standards almost as stringent as US `90, 6.0 grams per brake horsepower hour NO{sub x} and 0.7 particulate, using the US transient test procedure, went into effect on July 1, 1993. It is intended that US`94 standards, 5.0 NO{sub x} and 0.25 particulate, will be adopted soon. Clearly the most distinctive feature of the Taiwan program, however, is its motorcycle control effort, reflecting the fact that motorcycles dominate the vehicle fleet and are a substantial source of emissions. This paper will summarize Taiwan`s extensive efforts to address this problem.

  12. Wintertime sea surface temperature fronts in the Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi; Shimada, Teruhisa; Lee, Ming-An; Lu, Hsueh-Jung; Sakaida, Futoki; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-12-01

    We present wintertime variations and distributions of sea surface temperature (SST) fronts in the Taiwan Strait by applying an entropy-based edge detection method to 10-year (1996-2005) satellite SST images with grid size of 0.01°. From climatological monthly mean maps of SST gradient magnitude in winter, we identify four significant SST fronts in the Taiwan Strait. The Mainland China Coastal Front is a long frontal band along the 50-m isobath near the Chinese coast. The sharp Peng-Chang Front appears along the Peng-Hu Channel and extends northward around the Chang-Yuen Ridge. The Taiwan Bank Front evolves in early winter. As the winter progresses, the front becomes broad and moves toward the Chinese coast, connecting to the Mainland China Coastal Front. The Kuroshio Front extends northeastward from the northeastern tip of Taiwan with a semicircle-shape curving along the 100-m isobath.

  13. The Midwife in Taiwan: An Alternative Model for Maternity Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang-Wang, Janet F.

    1980-01-01

    The author compares and analyzes American and Taiwanese maternity care systems, discussing the history of midwifery in Taiwan; the process by which a midwife establishes her practice; and her role in childbirth, abortion, adoption, and other services. (Author/DS)

  14. The first archaic Homo from Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Hsiang; Kaifu, Yousuke; Takai, Masanaru; Kono, Reiko T.; Grün, Rainer; Matsu’ura, Shuji; Kinsley, Les; Lin, Liang-Kong

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of an increasing number of hominin fossils highlight regional and chronological diversities of archaic Homo in the Pleistocene of eastern Asia. However, such a realization is still based on limited geographical occurrences mainly from Indonesia, China and Russian Altai. Here we describe a newly discovered archaic Homo mandible from Taiwan (Penghu 1), which further increases the diversity of Pleistocene Asian hominins. Penghu 1 revealed an unexpectedly late survival (younger than 450 but most likely 190–10 thousand years ago) of robust, apparently primitive dentognathic morphology in the periphery of the continent, which is unknown among the penecontemporaneous fossil records from other regions of Asia except for the mid-Middle Pleistocene Homo from Hexian, Eastern China. Such patterns of geographic trait distribution cannot be simply explained by clinal geographic variation of Homo erectus between northern China and Java, and suggests survival of multiple evolutionary lineages among archaic hominins before the arrival of modern humans in the region. PMID:25625212

  15. Consumer choice of pork chops in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Guo, H L; Tseng, T F; Roan, S W; Ngapo, T M

    2010-07-01

    Digital photographs of pork chops varying systematically in appearance were presented to 716 Taiwanese consumers in a study that aimed to identify the most important characteristics of fresh pork which determine consumer choice in Taiwan. Relationships between consumer segmentation in choice and socio-demographic and cultural differences were also investigated. Colour and fat cover were the most frequently chosen of the four characteristics studied. Dark red colour was preferred by 64% of consumers and lean fat cover by 44%. Marbling and drip were less important in the decision making process being used by less than a half of consumers. The four preference-based clusters of consumers showed no correlation with socio-demographic-based consumer clusters, but did show significant links with possession of a refrigerator, age at which schooling was completed, liking pork for its price and gender of consumer.

  16. The first archaic Homo from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Hsiang; Kaifu, Yousuke; Takai, Masanaru; Kono, Reiko T; Grün, Rainer; Matsu'ura, Shuji; Kinsley, Les; Lin, Liang-Kong

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of an increasing number of hominin fossils highlight regional and chronological diversities of archaic Homo in the Pleistocene of eastern Asia. However, such a realization is still based on limited geographical occurrences mainly from Indonesia, China and Russian Altai. Here we describe a newly discovered archaic Homo mandible from Taiwan (Penghu 1), which further increases the diversity of Pleistocene Asian hominins. Penghu 1 revealed an unexpectedly late survival (younger than 450 but most likely 190-10 thousand years ago) of robust, apparently primitive dentognathic morphology in the periphery of the continent, which is unknown among the penecontemporaneous fossil records from other regions of Asia except for the mid-Middle Pleistocene Homo from Hexian, Eastern China. Such patterns of geographic trait distribution cannot be simply explained by clinal geographic variation of Homo erectus between northern China and Java, and suggests survival of multiple evolutionary lineages among archaic hominins before the arrival of modern humans in the region. PMID:25625212

  17. Emergency Department Response to SARS, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Chang

    2005-01-01

    How emergency departments of different levels and types cope with a large-scale contagious infectious disease is unclear. We retrospectively analyzed the response of 100 emergency departments regarding use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and implementation of infection control measures (ICMs) during the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Taiwan. Emergency department workers in large hospitals were more severely affected by the epidemic. Large hospitals or public hospitals were more likely to use respirators. Small hospitals implemented more restrictive ICMs. Most emergency departments provided PPE (80%) and implemented ICMs (66%) at late stages of the outbreak. Instructions to use PPE or ICMs more frequently originated by emergency department administrators. The difficulty of implementing ICMs was significantly negatively correlated with their effectiveness. Because ability to prepare for and respond to emerging infectious diseases varies among hospitals, grouping infectious patients in a centralized location in an early stage of infection may reduce the extent of epidemics. PMID:16022782

  18. Melioidosis: an emerging infection in Taiwan?

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, P. R.; Teng, L. J.; Lee, L. N.; Yu, C. J.; Yang, P. C.; Ho, S. W.; Luh, K. T.

    2001-01-01

    From January 1982 to May 2000, 17 infections caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei were diagnosed in 15 patients in Taiwan; almost all the infections were diagnosed from 1994 to May 2000. Of the 15 patients, 9 (60%) had underlying diseases, and 10 (67%) had bacteremic pneumonia. Thirteen (76%) episodes of infection were considered indigenous. Four patients died of melioidosis. Seventeen B. pseudomallei isolates, recovered from eight patients from November 1996 to May 2000, were analyzed to determine their in vitro susceptibilities to 14 antimicrobial agents, cellular fatty acid and biochemical reaction profiles, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA patterns. Eight strains (highly related isolates) were identified. All isolates were arabinose non-assimilators and were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and meropenem. No spread of the strain was documented. PMID:11384520

  19. Microbiological Quality of Seafood Marketed in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hin-Chung; Jiang, Huai-Yu; Lin, Hsu-Yang; Wang, Yu-Ting

    2015-11-01

    Seafood is often associated with foodborne illnesses, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common pathogen implicated in outbreaks in Taiwan. In this study, the microbiological quality of 300 raw or mixed ready-to-eat (RTE) and other cooking-needed seafood samples was examined. The total aerobic and coliform counts of the RTE samples were significantly higher than those of other cooking-needed samples. On average, 55.8 and 29.7% of the RTE samples failed to meet the local microbiological standards for total aerobic (5 log CFU/g) and coliform (3 log most probable number [MPN] per g), counts respectively; the corresponding percentages for the RTE samples from Taipei City were 9.1 and 18.2%, respectively. The total aerobic and coliform counts in the RTE samples from supermarkets and chain restaurants were significantly lower than those from traditional restaurants. The Vibrio species were more frequently identified in the cooking-needed samples than in RTE samples. Low incidences of V. parahaemolyticus (1.4%), V. vulnificus (1.9%), and V. cholerae (0%) were detected in most RTE samples. High densities of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus (1,200 MPN/g) were detected in a few RTE samples, only one of which contained toxigenic (tdh(+)) V. parahaemolyticus. The results of this investigation reveal that better hygiene of seafood providers such as chain restaurants, supermarkets, and traditional restaurants in Taipei City would effectively improve the microbiological quality of the seafood. The results will facilitate the establishment of measures for controlling the risks associated with seafood in Taiwan.

  20. Microbiological Quality of Seafood Marketed in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hin-Chung; Jiang, Huai-Yu; Lin, Hsu-Yang; Wang, Yu-Ting

    2015-11-01

    Seafood is often associated with foodborne illnesses, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common pathogen implicated in outbreaks in Taiwan. In this study, the microbiological quality of 300 raw or mixed ready-to-eat (RTE) and other cooking-needed seafood samples was examined. The total aerobic and coliform counts of the RTE samples were significantly higher than those of other cooking-needed samples. On average, 55.8 and 29.7% of the RTE samples failed to meet the local microbiological standards for total aerobic (5 log CFU/g) and coliform (3 log most probable number [MPN] per g), counts respectively; the corresponding percentages for the RTE samples from Taipei City were 9.1 and 18.2%, respectively. The total aerobic and coliform counts in the RTE samples from supermarkets and chain restaurants were significantly lower than those from traditional restaurants. The Vibrio species were more frequently identified in the cooking-needed samples than in RTE samples. Low incidences of V. parahaemolyticus (1.4%), V. vulnificus (1.9%), and V. cholerae (0%) were detected in most RTE samples. High densities of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus (1,200 MPN/g) were detected in a few RTE samples, only one of which contained toxigenic (tdh(+)) V. parahaemolyticus. The results of this investigation reveal that better hygiene of seafood providers such as chain restaurants, supermarkets, and traditional restaurants in Taipei City would effectively improve the microbiological quality of the seafood. The results will facilitate the establishment of measures for controlling the risks associated with seafood in Taiwan. PMID:26555520

  1. Groundwater Molybdenum from Emerging Industries in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuo-Sheng; Chang, Yu-Min; Kao, Jimmy C M; Lin, Kae-Long

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the influence of emerging industries development on molybdenum (Mo) groundwater contamination. A total of 537 groundwater samples were collected for Mo determination, including 295 samples from potentially contaminated areas of 3 industrial parks in Taiwan and 242 samples from non-potentially contaminated areas during 2008-2014. Most of the high Mo samples are located downstream from a thin film transistor-liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) panel factory. Mean groundwater Mo concentrations from potentially contaminated areas (0.0058 mg/L) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those from non-potentially contaminated areas (0.0022 mg/L). The highest Mo wastewater concentrations in the effluent from the optoelectronics industry and following wastewater batch treatment were 0.788 and 0.0326 mg/L, respectively. This indicates that wastewater containing Mo is a possible source of both groundwater and surface water contamination. Nine samples of groundwater exceed the World Health Organization's suggested drinking water guideline of 0.07 mg/L. A non-carcinogenic risk assessment for Mo in adults and children using the Mo concentration of 0.07 mg/L yielded risks of 0.546 and 0.215, respectively. These results indicate the importance of the development of a national drinking water quality standard for Mo in Taiwan to ensure safe groundwater for use. According to the human health risk calculation, the groundwater Mo standard is suggested as 0.07 mg/L. Reduction the discharge of Mo-contaminated wastewater from factories in the industrial parks is also the important task in the future.

  2. Application of INCSEA principles to the Taiwan Strait.

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Chung, Chai

    2003-06-01

    The waters surrounding Taiwan are important international waterways. In addition to merchant ships of every nation, the warships of the United States, Japan, Russia, and China may appear in these waters. No hostility is expected between Taiwan and the United States, Japan, or Russia; however, Taiwan and China have a tense relationship, and both sides face a potential for naval incidents. As Taiwan and China expand their naval capability, the International Maritime Organization Convention for the lnternational Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea may not be sufficient to prevent naval incidents, any of which might develop into conflict or war. Therefore, China and Taiwan need to develop maritime confidence building measures (CBMs) that could reduce the chance of naval incidents and strengthen mutual trust and confidence. Among the variety of maritime CBM concepts for military purposes, the most successful and effective measure has been the 1972 U.S.-Soviet Union Agreement on the Prevention of Incidents On and Over the High Seas (INCSEA). The success of the agreement demonstrates that CBMs represent a workable alternative to traditional arms controls. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a concrete approach to the constraint of naval activities between China and Taiwan to reduce accidents and misunderstandings. This paper outlines the categories and characteristics of incidents at sea. Next, the author identifies the successful factors of the U.S.-Soviet INCSEA and applies the INCSEA concept to the Taiwan Strait. Finally, the author develops a framework of options and a step-by-step approach for establishing an INCSEA between Taiwan and China.

  3. Control Measures for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Chen, Chien-Jen; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lee, Long-Teng; Fisk, Tamara; Hsu, Kwo-Hsiung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Kow-Tong; Chiang, I-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Shyan

    2003-01-01

    As of April 14, 2003, Taiwan had had 23 probable cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), all imported. Taiwan isolated these first 23 patients with probable SARS in negative-pressure rooms; extensive personal protective equipment was used for healthcare workers and visitors. For the first 6 weeks of the SARS outbreak, recognized spread was limited to one healthcare worker and three household contacts. PMID:12781013

  4. Internet Performance to Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, L

    2003-10-01

    We report the first results ever for real-time Internet performance to Africa using the PingER methodology. Multiple monitoring hosts were used to enable comparisons with performance from different parts of the world. From these preliminary measurements, we have found that Internet packet losses to some African sites in recent months range from very poor to bad (> 12%), some getting better, others are holding steady or getting worse. This, together with the average monthly Round Trip Times, imply end-to-end maximum TCP throughputs that are order of magnitudes different between countries in the region. Africa is shown to be far from the Internet performance in industrialized nations due to the poor infrastructure in place today. These monitoring efforts can provide valuable information to analyze the relative rates of future improvement and today they help us to quantify the digital divide and can provide quantitative information to policy makers.

  5. This Is Africa.

    PubMed

    Verlo, April R; Bailey, Hugh H; Cook, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Military deployments will always result in exposure to health hazards other than those from combat operations. The occupational and environmental health and endemic disease health risks are greater to the Special Operations Forces (SOF) deployed to the challenging conditions in Africa than elsewhere in the world. SOF are deployed to locations that lack life support infrastructures that have become standard for most military deployments; instead, they rely on local resources to sustain operations. Particularly, SOF in Africa do not generally have access to advanced diagnostic or monitoring capabilities or to medical treatment in austere locations that lack environmental or public health regulation. The keys to managing potential adverse health effects lie in identifying and documenting the health hazards and exposures, characterizing the associated risks, and communicating the risks to commanders, deployed personnel, and operational planners.

  6. sup 10 Be study of rapid erosion in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chenfeng You; Juchin Chen National Taiwan Univ., Taipei ); Typhoon Lee; Jason Jiunsan Shen ); Brown, L. )

    1988-11-01

    Cosmogenic {sup 10}Be was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry in soils and sediments to study the erosion of Taiwan, which has the highest denudation rate in the world. The river sediments in Taiwan have very low {sup 10}Be concentrations, around 5 million atoms per gram, about 1/45 the world wide average. This is the direct consequence of its high sediment yield of ore than 1,000 mg/cm{sup 2}/yr, 70 times the world average. Combining these values the authors found that, for Taiwan as a whole, the {sup 10}Be output to the sea only slightly exceeds the input from the rain, a situation typical of many areas around the world. Therefore, even in this example of extremely rapid erosion, {sup 10}Be seems to remain a useful indicator for erosion status. The total {sup 10}Be inventory found in a soil profile from a geologically stable area is at least 18% of the maximum possible inventory. The minimum age thus estimated for the soil is 0.11 Ma, in reasonable agreement with estimates from other means. The maximum erosion rate for this area thus estimated is at most 0.14 mg/cm{sup 2}/yr, four orders of magnitude slower than the average value observed for Taiwan. They also demonstrate that the shelf sediments around Taiwan have received the admixing of a {sup 10}be rich component from the ocean and would give a poor estimate for material eroded from Taiwan.

  7. Terrorism in South Africa.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Campbell

    2003-01-01

    The Republic of South Africa lies at the southern tip of the African continent. The population encompasses a variety of races, ethnic groups, religions, and cultural identities. The country has had a turbulent history from early tribal conflicts, colonialisation, the apartheid period, and post-apartheid readjustment. Modern terrorism developed mainly during the apartheid period, both by activities of the state and by the liberation movements that continued to the time of the first democratic elections in 1994, which saw South Africa evolve into a fully representative democratic state with equal rights for all. Since 1994, terrorist acts have been criminal-based, evolving in the Cape Town area to political acts, largely laid at the feet of a predominantly Muslim organisation, People against Gangsterism and Drugs, a vigilant organisation allegedly infiltrated by Muslim fundamentalists. Along with this, has been terrorist activities, mainly bombings by disaffected members of white, right-wing groups. In the apartheid era, a Draconian series of laws was enacted to suppress liberation activities. After 1994, most of these were repealed and new legislation was enacted, particularly after the events of 11 September 2001; this legislation allows the government to act against terrorism within the constraints of a democratic system. Disaster management in South Africa has been largely local authority-based, with input from provincial authorities and Civil Defence. After 1994, attempts were made to improve this situation, and national direction was provided. After 11 September 2001, activity was increased and the Disaster Management Act 2002 was brought into effect. This standardized disaster management system at national, provincial, and local levels, also facilites risk assessment and limitation as well as disaster mitigation. The potential still exists for terrorism, mainly from right-wing and Muslim fundamentalist groups, but the new legislation should stimulate disaster

  8. Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of the driest regions on Earth, the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (23.0N, 15.0E) lies adjacent to the Atlantic coast but the upwelling oceanic water causes a very stable rainless atmosphere. The few local inland rivers do not reach the sea but instead, appear as long indentations where they penetrate the dune fields and end as small dry lakes. The vast dune fields are the result of sands deposited over millions of years by the stream flow.

  9. Mozambique Coast, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The serene coastline of Mozambique (17.0S, 39.5E) Africa and the Indian Ocean offer some of the best beaches and recreational diving water in the world. Offshore reefs provide interesting coral formations that host a wide variety of marine life. Inland, the coastal savannas of this tropical nation are filled with a wide range of wildlife in some of the last animal refuges on the African continent.

  10. Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of the driest regions on Earth, the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (23.0N, 15.0E) lies adjacent to the Atlantic coast but upwelling oceanic water causes a very stable rainless atmosphere. The few local inland rivers do not reach the sea but instead appear as long indentations where rivers penetrate the dune fields and end as small dry lakes. The vast dune fields are the result of sands deposited over millions of years by the stream flow.

  11. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  12. National Health Accounts development: lessons from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tangcharoensathien, V; Laixuthai, A; Vasavit, J; Tantigate, N A; Prajuabmoh-Ruffolo, W; Vimolkit, D; Lertiendumrong, J

    1999-12-01

    National Health Accounts (NHA) are an important tool to demonstrate how a country's health resources are spent, on what services, and who pays for them. NHA are used by policy-makers for monitoring health expenditure patterns; policy instruments to re-orientate the pattern can then be further introduced. The National Economic and Social Development Board (NESDB) of Thailand produces aggregate health expenditure data but its estimation methods have several limitations. This has led to the research and development of an NHA prototype in 1994, through an agreed definition of health expenditure and methodology, in consultation with peer and other stakeholders. This is an initiative by local researchers without external support, with an emphasis on putting the system into place. It involves two steps: firstly, the flow of funds from ultimate sources of finance to financing agencies; and secondly, the use of funds by financing agencies. Five ultimate sources and 12 financing agencies (seven public and five private) were identified. Use of consumption expenditures was listed under four main categories and 32 sub-categories. Using 1994 figures, we estimated a total health expenditure of 128,305.11 million Baht; 84.07% consumption and 15.93% capital formation. Of total consumption expenditure, 36.14% was spent on purchasing care from public providers, with 32.35% on private providers, 5.93% on administration and 9.65% on all other public health programmes. Public sources of finance were responsible for 48.79% and private 51.21% of the total 1994 health expenditure. Total health expenditure accounted for 3.56% of GDP (consumption expenditure at 3.00% of GDP and capital formation at 0.57% of GDP). The NESDB consumption expenditure estimate in 1994 was 180,516 million Baht or 5.01% of GDP, of which private sources were dominant (82.17%) and public sources played a minor role (17.83%). The discrepancy of consumption expenditure between the two estimates is 2.01% of GDP. There

  13. Astrophysics in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelock, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    The government of South Africa has identified astronomy as a field in which their country has a strategic advantage and is consequently investing very significantly in astronomical infrastructure. South Africa now operates a 10-m class optical telescope, the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), and is one of two countries short listed to host the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), an ambitious international project to construct a radio telescope with a sensitivity one hundred times that of any existing telescope. The challenge now is to produce an indigenous community of users for these facilities, particularly from among the black population which was severely disadvantaged under the apartheid regime. In this paper I briefly describe the observing facilities in Southern Africa before going on to discuss the various collaborations that are allowing us to use astronomy as a tool for development, and at the same time to train a new generation of astronomers who will be well grounded in the science and linked to their colleagues internationally.

  14. Drought in West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Drought settled over West Africa's Ivory Coast region when wet season rains came late in 2007. Instead of beginning in February, the rainy season didn't start until March, and steady rains didn't start until late March, said the Famine Early Warning System Network. Though the rain had started to alleviate the drought, vegetation was still depressed in parts of Cote d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) between March 22 and April 6, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured the data used to make this image. The image shows current vegetation conditions compared to average conditions recorded since 2000. Areas where plants are growing more slowly or more sparsely than average are brown, while areas where vegetation is denser than average are green. The brown tint that dominates the image indicates that plants through most of the country are more sparse than normal. Among the crops affected by the lack of rain was West Africa's cocoa crop. About 70 percent of the world's cocoa comes from West Africa, and Cote d'Ivoire is a top grower, said Reuters. Cocoa prices climbed as the crop fell short. Farmers called the drought the worst in living memory, Reuters said. The delay in rainfall also led to water shortages in parts of Cote d'Ivoire, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

  15. Ten species of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) newly recorded from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thepparat, Arunrat; Bellis, Glenn; Ketavan, Chitapa; Ruangsittichai, Jiraporn; Sumruayphol, Suchada; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn

    2015-01-01

    A survey of biting midges in animal sheds, mangroves and beaches along the Andaman coastal region in southern Thailand between April 2012 and May 2013 collected 10 species of Culicoides which were not previously known from Thailand. These new records are C. arenicola, C. flavipunctatus, C. hui, C. kinari, C. kusaiensis, C. parabubalus, C. quatei, C. spiculae, C. pseudocordiger and C. tamada. An updated checklist of species of Culicoides reported from Thailand is provided.

  16. Ten species of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) newly recorded from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thepparat, Arunrat; Bellis, Glenn; Ketavan, Chitapa; Ruangsittichai, Jiraporn; Sumruayphol, Suchada; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn

    2015-01-01

    A survey of biting midges in animal sheds, mangroves and beaches along the Andaman coastal region in southern Thailand between April 2012 and May 2013 collected 10 species of Culicoides which were not previously known from Thailand. These new records are C. arenicola, C. flavipunctatus, C. hui, C. kinari, C. kusaiensis, C. parabubalus, C. quatei, C. spiculae, C. pseudocordiger and C. tamada. An updated checklist of species of Culicoides reported from Thailand is provided. PMID:26624391

  17. Rabies in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, R; Barnard, B J; Meredith, C D; Bishop, G C; Brückner, G K; Foggin, C M; Hübschle, O J

    1993-12-01

    The first confirmed outbreak of rabies in Africa, believed to have followed the importation of an infected dog from England in 1892, occurred in the eastern Cape Province of South Africa, and was brought under control in 1894. An unconfirmed epidemic of rabies in dogs occurred in western Zambia in 1901. By the following year the disease had apparently spread along a major trade route, to cause an outbreak in Zimbabwe which engulfed most of the country before being eradicated in 1913. The existence of endemic rabies of viverrids (mongooses and genets) was confirmed in South Africa in 1928, and since then the viverrid disease has continued to occur widely on the interior plateau of the country with spill-over of infection to cattle and a variety of other animals. From about 1947 onwards, an invasive form of dog rabies spread from southern Zambia and/or Angola into Namibia, across northern and eastern Botswana into Zimbabwe and the northern Transvaal by 1950, entered Mozambique in 1952, and spread from there to Swaziland in 1954. Dog rabies extended from southern Mozambique into Natal in 1961 to cause a major epidemic which was brought under control in 1968. The disease re-entered northern Natal from Mozambique in 1976 and since then dog rabies has proved difficult to control in the peri-urban settlements of Natal-KwaZulu. The disease spread from Natal to Lesotho in 1982, and into the Transkei region of the eastern Cape Province in 1987, to reach the Ciskei by 1990. The spread of the disease in dogs was followed by the emergence of rabies of jackals and cattle in central Namibia, northern Botswana, Zimbabwe and the northern Transvaal. A unique outbreak of rabies in kudu antelope occurred in central Namibia from 1977 to 1985, apparently involving oral spread of infection between individuals. A few cases of rabies in the bat-eared fox were recognized each year in Namibia from 1967 onwards, and from the 1970s the occurrence of the disease in the fox has emerged as a

  18. Decentralisation And School-Based Management In Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, David T.; Sooksomchitra, Pacharapimon

    2004-07-01

    School-based management (SBM) in Thailand began in 1997 in the course of a reform aimed at overcoming a profound crisis in the education system. The present contribution reports on the introduction and institutionalisation of decentralisation and SBM with community participation in Thailand. The data reported here are based on an empirical survey of 1,000 school-board members from Bangkok as well as provincial and rural areas which was followed by 45 interviews with all relevant stakeholders. The results of the study are promising, as they show broad support for the reform among school principals as well as board members. However, they also reveal a continuing need to train principals and board members in educational leadership and management.

  19. Thailand national programme of the earth resources technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabhasri, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Accomplishments include the identification of a series of active alluvial fans along the margins of the Central Plain, the compilation of crop resources maps of central and eastern Thailand, and evaluation of the Purdue/LARS printout using unsupervised mode of an area near Bangkok. Results from LANDSAT 1 imagery and ground truth survey showed that Thailand existing forest in 1973 covered an area of approximately 37% of total land area. The last countrywide survey using aerial photographs at 1:60,000 scale conducted in 1961 gave the figure of 58%. Experience has shown many advantages of LANDSAT imagery over the conventional aerial photography in locating faults and fractures in the preparation of tectonic maps. Several rock types can also be identified from LANDSAT imagery.

  20. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  1. Philanthropy, politics and promotion: Philip Morris' "charitable contributions" in Thailand.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Ross; Collin, Jeff

    2008-08-01

    The efforts of members of the tobacco industry to portray themselves as responsible corporations via ostensible commitment to improved labour practices and public philanthropy have attracted growing criticism. This is particularly true of corporate social responsibility (CSR) schemes undertaken in emerging nations that are designed to rehabilitate the tobacco industry's image among public, government and market opinions in North America and western Europe. In the case of Thailand, sponsorship of arts events and community groups has been one avenue of promoting the industry in a regulatory environment that severely curtails promotion and advertising. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Art Award, sponsored by Philip Morris (PM) has provided one such outlet for 10 years. Analysis of PM funding announcements since the end of the ASEAN art programme in Thailand reveals that recent donations to tobacco-related community organisations reinforces the extent to which seemingly generous acts are driven by corporate self-interest rather than social responsibility.

  2. Characterization of enameled glass excavated from Laem Pho, southern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanmanonda, W.; Won-in, K.; Tancharakorn, S.; Tantanuch, W.; Thongleurm, C.; Kamwanna, T.; Dararutana, P.

    2012-07-01

    Laem Pho in Surat Thani, southern province of Thailand is one of the most important historic site on the eastern shore of the Gulf of Thailand. In this work, the enameled glass fragments which looked-like Islamic glass mainly excavated from this site were analyzed using SEM-EDS, PIXE and μ-XRF, in order to understand the chemical composition by comparing the archaeological data and topology. The structure of the enameled decoration was also studied. The resulting data indicated that high-magnesia alkali-lime silicate glass was produced. The presence of transition metals such as copper, iron and manganese were affected on the glass colorations. Typological classifications, technological observations and comparative studies serve to clarify the development and cultural inter-relationships of various glass objects along the trade and exchange networks in ancient maritime.

  3. The first documented forensic entomology case in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sukontason, K; Sukontason, K; Vichairat, K; Piangjai, S; Lertthamnongtham, S; Vogtsberger, R C; Olson, J K

    2001-09-01

    The forensic entomology case described herein is the first such case documented in Thailand. A mummified corpse of a 32-yr-old man was discovered in a forested habitat, with the larvae of six species of flies (Diptera) found in association with the corpse at the time of its discovery, i.e., those of Hydrotaea (=Ophyra) spinigera Stein (family Muscidae), Piophila casei (L.) (family Piophilidae), Megaselia scalaris (Loew) (family Phoridae), Sagus sp. (family Stratiomyidae), and larvae of two unidenitified flesh fly species (family Sarcophagidae). The presence and age of the larval specimens of P. casei, M. scalaris, and H. spinigera gave entomological evidence that the postmortem interval for the corpse was 3-6 mo. This report also documets some of the forensically important fly species that occur in Thailand. PMID:11580050

  4. The 2011 Thailand flood: climate causes and return periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Emma; Saunders, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Thailand is one of the most developed and wealthiest countries in Southeast Asia. However, its tropical location and the influence of seasonal monsoon rains and local topography make it prone to floods. The Thailand floods in 2011 were especially severe causing estimated losses of US 30 billion (economic) and US 12 billion (insured) (Swiss Re, 2012). This insured loss ranks easily as the highest ever worldwide from a freshwater flood disaster (Swiss Re, 2012). We review the nature, impacts and historical ranking of the 2011 Thailand flood, and then discuss the climate causes for the exceptional rainfall which triggered the flood - annual rainfall in 2011 was the highest in Thailand's 61-year precipitation record (Thai Meteorological Department, 2011). Thai precipitation data from 100 stations for the period 1992-2011, NCEP/NCAR mean sea level pressure (MSLP) data and best-track data from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center for the period 1992-2011 are used in this study. We find that the floods were caused by a combination of a strong Southeast Asian summer monsoon that brought high rainfall across the country between May and October, and by the remnants of four tropical storms that brought high rainfall to northern Thailand between June and October. During the monsoon season the Southern Oscillation was moderately positive and, as a result, likely contributed to the high monsoonal rains. We estimate the return periods for the 2011 Thai rains and compare these to satellite-derived return periods for 2011 Thai river flow. The rainfall return period varies from 8-20 years in the north and south of the country to 1-8 years in the east and centre of Thailand. Satellite-derived river flows at two locations on the Chao Phraya River suggest a return period of 10-20 years. The return period is also estimated using historical flood records (Brakenridge, 2012) which suggest a return period of 5-6 years. A 'consensus' return period for the 2011 Thai flood is estimated to be 10

  5. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis. PMID:27086437

  6. Geographical structure of dengue transmission and its determinants in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Y; Svasti, P; Tawatsin, A; Thavara, U

    2008-06-01

    Expansion of dengue has been attributed to urbanization. To test this concept, we examined dengue transmission intensities in Thailand. We used the inverse of mean age of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases as a surrogate of dengue transmission intensity (or force of infection). The transmission intensity in Bangkok decreased rapidly since the mid-1990s, to levels that are currently lower than in other regions. Regression analysis revealed that transmission intensity is highest in the Northeastern rural region, mainly due to scarcity of private water wells. Private wells reduce the need for household water containers, the major breeding sites for vectors. Cumulatively, these results show that urbanization is not necessarily associated with intense dengue transmission in Thailand. Paradoxically, the DHF incidence in Bangkok has surpassed other regions despite declines in transmission intensity. This finding implies the existence of endemic stability (i.e. low incidence of a clinical illness in spite of high transmission intensity).

  7. Changing epidemiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chareonsook, O; Foy, H M; Teeraratkul, A; Silarug, N

    1999-02-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are reportable diseases, the third most common causes for hospitalization of children in Thailand. Data collected from the Ministry of Public Health were analysed for trends. Rates of DHF increased in Thailand until 1987 when the largest epidemic ever, 325/100000 population, was recorded. Whereas the disease used to be confined to large cities, the rate is now higher in rural (102.2 per 100000) than urban areas (95.4 per 100000 in 1997). The age of highest incidence has increased, and the age group most severely affected is now those 5-9 years old (679/100000 in 1997). The case fatality rate has decreased with improved treatment and is now only 0.28%.

  8. Sex-ratio patterns of AIDS patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rerks-Ngarm, S

    1997-01-01

    The summary report of AIDS cases in Thailand, as of 31 July 1996, was reviewed for the information on male-to female sex-ratio. The ratios were recalculated for different risk-factors and for different age-groups annually and cumulatively. The male-to-female ratios calculated for annual case reports are lower than the cumulative number. This finding demonstrates the earlier detection of change in risk behaviour among the general population by the sex-ratio from annual case reports, compared to the ratio from the cumulative number of cases. Among different age-groups, the older age shows the highest male-to-female ratio. The ratio among sexually active age-group (15-49 years of age) is declining during the most recent year. These changes confirm the present pattern of AIDS epidemic in Thailand, the fourth wave among females, followed by the last wave-pediatric AIDS.

  9. Organising services for IMD in Thailand: twenty years experience.

    PubMed

    Wasant, Pornswan

    2008-12-01

    The study of inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) in Thailand is in its infancy when compare with developed countries. Prior to 1987, majority of these disorders were clinically diagnosed since there were only a handful of clinicians and scientists with expertise in inborn errors of metabolism, lack of well-equipped laboratory facilities and government support. In developing countries, inherited metabolic disorders are not considered a priority due to the prevalence of infectious diseases such as HIV infection and congenital infections. A multicentre survey conducted in 1994 and 2001 revealed the existence of numerous cases of IMD from all over the country. Case reports and publications on IMD in Thai (and international) medical journals in past 20 years had undoubtedly raised its awareness among Thai paediatricians and scientists. In 2001, the Genetic Metabolic Centre was first established in Siriraj Hospital Faculty of Medicine, Thailand. Numerous new cases of IMD had been identified since then.

  10. Detection of Rickettsia and Anaplasma from hard ticks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Malaisri, Premnika; Hirunkanokpun, Supanee; Baimai, Visut; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Ahantarig, Arunee

    2015-12-01

    We collected a total of 169 adult hard ticks and 120 nymphs from under the leaves of plants located along tourist nature trails in ten localities. The results present data examining the vector competence of ticks of different genera and the presence of Rickettsia and Anaplasma species. The ticks belonged to three genera, Amblyomma, Dermacentor, and Haemaphysalis, comprising 11 species. Rickettsia bacteria were detected at three collection sites, while Anaplasma bacteria were detected at only one site. Phylogenetic analysis revealed new rickettsia genotypes from Thailand that were closely related to Rickettsia tamurae, Rickettsia monacensis, and Rickettsia montana. This study was also the first to show that Anaplasma bacteria are found in Haemaphysalis shimoga ticks and are closely related evolutionarily to Anaplasma bovis. These results provide additional information for the geographical distribution of tick species and tick-borne bacteria in Thailand and can therefore be applied for ecotourism management. PMID:26611960

  11. Domestic ducks and H5N1 influenza epidemic, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Songserm, Thaweesak; Jam-on, Rungroj; Sae-Heng, Numdee; Meemak, Noppadol; Hulse-Post, Diane J; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine M; Webster, Robert G

    2006-04-01

    In addition to causing 12 human deaths and 17 cases of human infection, the 2004 outbreak of H5N1 influenza virus in Thailand resulted in the death or slaughter of 60 million domestic fowl and the disruption of poultry production and trade. After domestic ducks were recognized as silent carriers of H5N1 influenza virus, government teams went into every village to cull flocks in which virus was detected; these team efforts markedly reduced H5N1 infection. Here we examine the pathobiology and epidemiology of H5N1 influenza virus in the 4 systems of duck raising used in Thailand in 2004. No influenza viruses were detected in ducks raised in "closed" houses with high biosecurity. However, H5N1 influenza virus was prevalent among ducks raised in "open" houses, free-ranging (grazing) ducks, and backyard ducks.

  12. Detection of Rickettsia and Anaplasma from hard ticks in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Malaisri, Premnika; Hirunkanokpun, Supanee; Baimai, Visut; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Ahantarig, Arunee

    2015-12-01

    We collected a total of 169 adult hard ticks and 120 nymphs from under the leaves of plants located along tourist nature trails in ten localities. The results present data examining the vector competence of ticks of different genera and the presence of Rickettsia and Anaplasma species. The ticks belonged to three genera, Amblyomma, Dermacentor, and Haemaphysalis, comprising 11 species. Rickettsia bacteria were detected at three collection sites, while Anaplasma bacteria were detected at only one site. Phylogenetic analysis revealed new rickettsia genotypes from Thailand that were closely related to Rickettsia tamurae, Rickettsia monacensis, and Rickettsia montana. This study was also the first to show that Anaplasma bacteria are found in Haemaphysalis shimoga ticks and are closely related evolutionarily to Anaplasma bovis. These results provide additional information for the geographical distribution of tick species and tick-borne bacteria in Thailand and can therefore be applied for ecotourism management.

  13. Migrant Interactions with Elderly Parents in Rural Cambodia and Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Zachary; Korinek, Kim; Knodel, John; Chayovan, Napaporn

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines interactions between older adults living in rural areas of Thailand and Cambodia and their adult children. Thai data come from the Survey of the Welfare of the Elderly (N = 3,202 older adults and 17,517 adult children). Cambodia data are from the Survey of the Elderly in Cambodia (N = 777 older adults and 3,751 adult children).…

  14. Poverty, income inequality, and health care consumption in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sarntisart, I

    1994-12-01

    The Thai economy has grown rapidly during the past three decades of modern industrialization. The structure of the economy has been changing from an agricultural to manufacturing based. Because industrial development policies has been biased toward Bangkok and surrounding provinces, regional income disparities have been widening. Despite the high growth record, Thailand has failed to distribute the benefits of economic growth equitably. This problem of income distribution could have many important consequences of relevance to the health of population.

  15. Taeniasis among Refugees Living on Thailand-Myanmar Border, 2012.

    PubMed

    McCleery, Ellen J; Patchanee, Prapas; Pongsopawijit, Pornsawan; Chailangkarn, Sasisophin; Tiwananthagorn, Saruda; Jongchansittoe, Papaspong; Dantrakool, Anchalee; Morakote, Nimit; Phyu, Hnin; Wilkins, Patricia P; Noh, John C; Phares, Christina; O'Neal, Seth

    2015-10-01

    We tested refugee camp residents on the Thailand-Myanmar border for Taenia solium infection. Taeniasis prevalence was consistent with that for other disease-endemic regions, but seropositivity indicating T. solium taeniasis was rare. Seropositivity indicating cysticercosis was 5.5% in humans, and 3.2% in pigs. Corralling pigs and providing latrines may control transmission of these tapeworms within this camp. PMID:26401787

  16. Medical tourism in Thailand: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Noree, Thinakorn; Hanefeld, Johanna; Smith, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the magnitude and characteristics of medical tourism in Thailand and the impact of such tourism on the Thai health system and economy. Methods In 2010, we checked the records of all visits to five private hospitals that are estimated to cover 63% of all foreign patients. We reviewed hospital records of foreign patients and obtained data on their countries of origin, diagnoses and interventions. We surveyed 293 medical tourists to collect demographic characteristics and information on their expenditure and travelling companions. To help understand the impact of medical tourism on the Thai health system, we also interviewed 15 hospital executives and 28 service providers from the private hospitals. Findings We obtained 911 913 records of hospital visits, of which 324 906 came from 104 830 medical tourists. We estimated that there were 167 000 medical tourists in Thailand in 2010. Of the medical tourists who attended our study hospitals, 67 987 (64.8%) came from the eastern Mediterranean region or Asia and 109 509 (34%) of them were treated for simple and uncomplicated conditions – i.e. general check-ups and medical consultations. The mean self-reported non-medical expenditure was 2750 United States dollars. According to the hospital staff interviewed, medical tourism in 2010 brought benefits to – and apparently had no negative impacts on – the Thai health system and economy. Conclusion We estimate that the total number of medical tourists visiting Thailand is about 10% of previous national government estimates of 1.2 million. Such tourists appear to bring economic benefits to Thailand and to have negligible effects on the health system. PMID:26769994

  17. Larvae of hydromanicus (insecta: trichoptera: hydropsychidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Prommi, Taeng On; Permkam, Surakrai

    2015-01-29

    Larvae of only 2 of the 13 species of Hydromanicus known from Thailand have been described previously. In this research, the "metamorphotype method" was used to associate yet-unidentifiable larvae and pupae with their identifiable adults: Pupal identifications were based on genitalic features in common with described adults, and larvae were associated with the pupae. Herein, the final larval instar of Hydromanicus malayanus, H. abiud and H. inferior are described and illustrated. 

  18. Increased number of dengue cases in Swedish travellers to Thailand.

    PubMed

    Heddini, A; Janzon, R; Linde, A

    2009-02-01

    Between 2004 and 2008, around 30-60 cases of dengue fever in travellers were reported annually in Sweden. Over 75% of cases in 2005-2008 were infected when travelling to Southeast Asia, most if them in Thailand, one of the Swedes most popular holiday destinations. Since 2007, we have observed a 55% increase in the number of dengue fever cases reported per month, with 17 cases reported in January 2009 alone.

  19. Toward integrated opisthorchiasis control in Northeast Thailand: The Lawa Project

    PubMed Central

    Sripa, Banchob; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mallory, Frank F.; Smith, John F.; Wilcox, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, a food-borne trematode is a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand. Despite a long history of control programs in Thailand and a nationwide reduction, O. viverrini infection prevalence remains high in the Northeastern Provinces. Therefore, a new strategy for controlling the liver fluke infection using the EcoHealth/One Health approach was introduced into the Lawa Lake area in Khon Kaen province where the liver fluke is endemic. A program has been carried using anthelminthic treatment, novel intensive health education methods both in the communities and in schools, ecosystem monitoring and active community participation. As a result, the infection rate in the more than 10 villages surrounding the Lake has declined to approximate one third of the average of 50% as estimated by a baseline survey. Strikingly, the Cyprinoid fish species in the Lake, which are the intermediate host, now showed less than 1% prevalence compared to a maximum of 70% at baseline. This liver fluke control program, named “Lawa model,” is now recognized nationally and internationally, and being expanding to other parts of Thailand and neighboring Mekong countries. Challenges to O. viverrini disease control, and lessons learned in developing an integrative control program using a community-based, ecosystem approach, and scaling-up regionally based on Lawa as a model are described. PMID:25102053

  20. Toxoplasmosis in rodents: ecological survey and first evidences in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sarataphan, Nachai; Maruyama, Soichi; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Morand, Serge; Herbreteau, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    Domestic and wild rodents known as the most abundant and diversified order of mammals have a key role in the ecological food chain and also in the transmission of parasites and pathogens to other animals. While foraging on the ground, they can get infected by Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite, which is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Therefore, they serve as intermediate hosts of T. gondii and can transmit it to their predators. To assess their role in the maintenance of T. gondii lifecycle in Thailand, we sampled rodents in a range of biotopes representative of the high biodiversity and conducted a serological survey with latex agglutination test to detect anti-T. gondii antibodies. Overall, 21 of 461 (4.6%) rodents had diagnostically significant antibody titers (cutoff, 1:64). Every species with at least 37 individuals captured tested positive, confirming the wide range of potential mammalian hosts of toxoplasmosis. None of the ecological traits (sex, maturity, morphology, season, or habitat) was found significant to predict the susceptibility to T. gondii both univariately and in a multivariate analysis. However, high prevalences were reported in either forested or anthropized areas. This survey constitutes the first confirmed serological investigation of T. gondii in rodents in Thailand. The rarity of both domestic and wild felids in Thailand emphasizes the importance of rodents in maintaining T. gondii, and questions the involvement of other carnivores in the life cycle. PMID:20645868

  1. Business leaders form alliance to fight AIDS. Thailand.

    PubMed

    1993-10-11

    It is estimated that 33% of deaths among the working population in Thailand by the year 2000 will result from AIDS. AIDS mortality will bring decreased productivity, increased healthcare costs, a decline in tourism, reduced labor exports, and labor shortages. The AIDS epidemic in the country therefore has a direct impact upon companies' productivity and resulting profitability. Acknowledging this reality and the need for action, the Managing Director of Northwest Airlines for Thailand, Indochina, and West Asia, James P. Reinnoldt, and the General Manager of Bangkok's Regent Hotel, Bill Black, started the nonprofit Thailand Business Coalition on AIDS (TBCA) to combat AIDS. The TBCA will provide leadership, coordination, education, and resources to help companies and the business sector get a positive response to the AIDS dilemma. The organization was established to lead through and beyond the AIDS epidemic in the interest of business by promoting coherent HIV/AIDS policies and workplace education with help from nongovernmental organizations. The TBCA will be supported by membership dues, private contributions, and grants. Member companies will receive a manual and a quarterly newsletter and be allowed to join a training course on managing AIDS in the workplace. The organization's target of enlisting 250 member companies within the next 12 months means that help will be rendered in the training of 50,000 Thai workers. PMID:12345308

  2. Advanced health biotechnologies in Thailand: redefining policy directions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thailand faces a significant burden in terms of treating and managing degenerative and chronic diseases. Moreover, incidences of rare diseases are rising. Many of these—such as diabetes, cancer, and inherited inborn metabolic diseases—have no definite treatments or cure. Meanwhile, advanced health biotechnology has been found, in principle, to be an effective solution for these health problems. Methods Qualitative approaches were employed to analyse the current situation and examine existing public policies related to advanced health biotechnologies in Thailand. The results of this analysis were then used to formulate policy recommendations. Results Our research revealed that the system in Thailand in relation to advanced health biotechnologies is fragmented, with multiple unaddressed gaps, underfunding of research and development (R&D), and a lack of incentives for the private sector. In addition, there are no clear definitions of advanced health biotechnologies, and coverage pathways are absent. Meanwhile, false advertising and misinformation are prevalent, with no responsible bodies to actively and effectively provide appropriate information and education (I&E). The establishment of a specialised institution to fill the gaps in this area is warranted. Conclusion The development and implementation of a comprehensive national strategic plan related to advanced health biotechnologies, greater investment in R&D and I&E for all stakeholders, collaboration among agencies, harmonisation of reimbursement across public health schemes, and provision of targeted I&E are specifically recommended. PMID:23281771

  3. Systematic approach to characterisation of NORM in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, S; Kranrod, C; Pengvanich, P

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information on the systematic approach that has been developed for the measurement of natural radiation exposure and the characterisation of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in terms of occurrence and distribution in various industrial processes, including the produced waste from the mineral industries in Thailand. The approach can be adapted for various types of study areas. The importance of collaboration among research institutions is discussed. Some developments include 25 documents; the redesign of the field equipment, such as the gamma survey meter, for convenient access to conduct measurement in various study areas; the method to collect and analyse radon gas from a natural gas pipeline and the manganese dioxide fibre to adsorb radium on-site for laboratory analysis. The NORM project in Thailand has been carried out for more than 10 y to support the development of NORM regulation in Thailand. In the previous studies as well as current, international standards for action levels have been adopted for safety purpose.

  4. Migrant Workers in Agriculture: A View from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thetkathuek, Anamai; Daniell, William

    2016-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the global movement of workers during the last few decades. As Thailand has developed rapidly over the past 20 years, it has attracted laborers (both authorized and unauthorized) from the neighboring countries of Myanmar, People's Democratic Republic of Lao (Lao PDR), and Cambodia. Given that agriculture has been Thailand's most important industry, its continued growth has been dependent on migrant workers. Both crop agriculture and animal-production agriculture have employed migrant labor. Migrants have been hired to plant, weed, fertilize, spray pesticides, and harvest crops such as rice, corn, sugar cane, and cassava. They have worked at rubber and coffee plantations, as well as in the production of ornamental crops. Also, migrants have labored on pig, beef, and duck farms. There have been numerous documented health problems among migrant workers, including acute diarrhea, malaria, and fever of unknown causes. Occupational illness and injury have been a significant concern, and there has been limited health and safety training. This article reviewed the demographic changes in Thailand, studied the agricultural crops and animal production that are dependent on migrant labor, discussed the health status and safety challenges pertaining to migrant workers in agriculture, and described several recommendations. Among the recommendations, the conclusions of this study have suggested that addressing the cost for health care and solutions to health care access for migrant labor are needed. PMID:26479089

  5. Rodent-borne hantaviruses in Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Thailand.

    PubMed

    Blasdell, Kim; Cosson, Jean François; Chaval, Yannick; Herbreteau, Vincent; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Lundqvist, Ake; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Morand, Serge; Buchy, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    In order to evaluate the circulation of hantaviruses present in southeast Asia, a large scale survey of small mammal species was carried out at seven main sites in the region (Cambodia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, and Thailand). Small scale opportunistic trapping was also performed at an eighth site (Cambodia). Using a standard IFA test, IgG antibodies reacting to Hantaan virus antigens were detected at six sites. Antibody prevalence at each site varied from 0 to 5.6% with antibodies detected in several rodent species (Bandicota indica, B. savilei, Maxomys surifer, Mus caroli, M. cookii, Rattus exulans, R. nitidius, R. norvegicus, and R. tanezumi). When site seroprevalence was compared with site species richness, seropositive animals were found more frequently at sites with lower species richness. In order to confirm which hantavirus species were present, a subset of samples was also subjected to RT-PCR. Hantaviral RNA was detected at a single site from each country. Sequencing confirmed the presence of two hantavirus species, Thailand and Seoul viruses, including one sample (from Lao PDR) representing a highly divergent strain of Seoul virus. This is the first molecular evidence of hantavirus in Lao PDR and the first reported L segment sequence data for Thailand virus.

  6. In vitro sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to artesunate in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Wongsrichanalai, C.; Wimonwattrawatee, T.; Sookto, P.; Laoboonchai, A.; Heppner, D. G.; Kyle, D. E.; Wernsdorfer, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the in vitro susceptibilities of Plasmodium falciparum to artesunate, mefloquine, quinine and chloroquine of 86 isolates and to dihydroartemisinin of 45 isolates collected from areas of high resistance to mefloquine within Thailand near the borders with Myanmar and Cambodia, and from southern Thailand where P. falciparum is generally still sensitive to mefloquine. All the isolates were highly sensitive to artesunate, but the geometric mean IC50S were higher in isolates from the Thai-Myanmar and Thai-Cambodian borders than in those from southern Thailand. The IC50S for mefloquine and artesunate were strongly correlated (Pearson r = 0.605; n = 86; P < 0.00001). As expected, the in vitro sensitivities to dihydroartemisinin and artesunate were similar and strongly correlated (at IC50, Pearson r = 0.695; n = 45; P < 0.00002). The correlation between the activity of mefloquine and artesunate requires further investigation in order to determine the potential for development of cross-resistance in nature. Our results suggest that combination with mefloquine is not the ideal way of protecting the usefulness of artemisinin and its derivatives. A search for more suitable partner drugs to these compounds and careful regulation of their use are necessary in the interest of ensuring their long therapeutic life span. PMID:10361756

  7. Trends in Thailand pan evaporation from 1970 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limjirakan, Sangchan; Limsakul, Atsamon

    2012-05-01

    One of the expected consequences of an anthropogenically warmed climate is the increase in evaporation. Paradoxically, terrestrial observations across the world show that the rates of pan evaporation (Epan) have been steadily decreasing since 1950s. In this study, we present a trend in Thailand Epan based on quality-controlled data from 28 weather stations from 1970 to 2007. Results indicated that, despite the annual mean air temperature increased by 0.91 °C over the past 38 years (0.024 °C per annum), the trend in annual Epan has steadily declined on average by ~ 7.7 mm a-2 (i.e. mm per annum per annum). By comparing, this change is larger than those previously reported for several countries. A further examination by Kendal's rank correlation and stepwise regression analysis based on some available weather data showed that reduction in wind speed and, to a lesser degree, sunshine duration were the likely causative meteorological factors affecting the Epan decrease in Thailand over the past 38 years. The findings of this study highlight local changes in aerodynamic and radiative drivers of the hydrological cycle, and their linkages to climate change could have important implications for Thailand's nature and society.

  8. Zoonotic Echinostome Infections in Free-Grazing Ducks in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Saijuntha, Weerachai; Duenngai, Kunyarat

    2013-01-01

    Free-grazing ducks play a major role in the rural economy of Eastern Asia in the form of egg and meat production. In Thailand, the geographical location, tropical climate conditions and wetland areas of the country are suitable for their husbandry. These environmental factors also favor growth, multiplication, development, survival, and spread of duck parasites. In this study, a total of 90 free-grazing ducks from northern, central, and northeastern regions of Thailand were examined for intestinal helminth parasites, with special emphasis on zoonotic echinostomes. Of these, 51 (56.7%) were infected by one or more species of zoonotic echinostomes, Echinostoma revolutum, Echinoparyphium recurvatum, and Hypoderaeum conoideum. Echinostomes found were identified using morphological criteria when possible. ITS2 sequences were used to identify juvenile and incomplete worms. The prevalence of infection was relatively high in each region, namely, north, central, and northeast region was 63.2%, 54.5%, and 55.3%, respectively. The intensity of infection ranged up to 49 worms/infected duck. Free-grazing ducks clearly play an important role in the life cycle maintenance, spread, and transmission of these medically important echinostomes in Thailand. PMID:24516271

  9. Characteristics and management of infectious industrial waste in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.-C. Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-11-15

    Infectious industrial waste management in Taiwan is based on the specific waste production unit. In other countries, management is based simply on whether the producer may lead to infectious disease. Thus, Taiwan has a more detailed classification of infectious waste. The advantage of this classification is that it is easy to identify the sources, while the disadvantage lies in the fact that it is not flexible and hence increases cost. This study presents an overview of current management practices for handling infectious industrial waste in Taiwan, and addresses the current waste disposal methods. The number of small clinics in Taiwan increased from 18,183 to 18,877 between 2003 and 2005. Analysis of the data between 2003 and 2005 showed that the majority of medical waste was general industrial waste, which accounted for 76.9%-79.4% of total medical waste. Infectious industrial waste accounted for 19.3%-21.9% of total medical waste. After the SARS event in Taiwan, the amount of infectious waste reached 19,350 tons in 2004, an increase over the previous year of 4000 tons. Waste minimization was a common consideration for all types of waste treatment. In this study, we summarize the percentage of plastic waste in flammable infectious industrial waste generated by medical units, which, in Taiwan was about 30%. The EPA and Taiwan Department of Health have actively promoted different recycling and waste reduction measures. However, the wide adoption of disposable materials made recycling and waste reduction difficult for some hospitals. It has been suggested that enhancing the education of and promoting communication between medical units and recycling industries must be implemented to prevent recyclable waste from entering the incinerator.

  10. Massive Open Online Courses for Africa by Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyo, Benedict; Kalema, Billy Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Africa is known for inadequate access to all sorts of human needs including health, education, food, shelter, transport, security, and energy. Before the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs), open access to higher education (HE) was exclusive of Africa. However, as a generally affordable method of post-secondary education delivery,…

  11. [Epidemiology of dengue fever in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Ko, Y C

    1989-01-01

    Dengue fever, a tropical communicable disease, is caused by an infectious viral disease. It is also known as break bone fever. There have been a number of epidemics over the last century in Taiwan. Following an islandwide epidemic in 1942, dengue fever had not been presented on the island for about forty years. In 1981, an outbreak of dengue occurred in Liuchiu Hsiang, a small off-shore island of Pingtung county. The estimated attack rate was 80%. DEN-2 was isolated during that outbreak. Another occurrence occurred in the fall of 1987 in the southern part of Taiwan. The accumulated reported cases reached 1,387 at the end of that year. A majority of cases were reported in the Sanmin district of Kaohsiung city. The reported cumulative incidence was 0.2% in Sanmin. However, according to one survey, the attack rate in that area was 2.9%. DEN-1 was most commonly isolated but DEN-2 was also found in five cases. The latest outbreak took place in 1988. The estimation of reported cases exceeded 10,000 at the end of November, 1988. Two cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever were confirmed. More than fifty percent of the report case came from Kaohsiung city. The reported cumulative incidence rate was 0.5% in that area. Another survey reported that the adult attack rate exceeded 5% in the same area. It is estimated that the number of patients with mild symptoms and those without any symptoms would be a few times more than the number of those actually reported. However, a large space of herd immunity for susceptible hosts has remained. DEN-1 was isolated from all of the reported cases except two in which DEN-4 were isolated. Among the various variables which would effect the proliferation of disease, such as Aedes aegypti density, precipitation, and temperature, only a prior month of precipitation can explain the outbreak of dengue by stepwise multiple regression. Besides this, there was also a higher relative risk due to a higher population density with a trend correlation

  12. Border Malaria Associated with Multidrug Resistance on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia Borders: Transmission Dynamic, Vulnerability, and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Adisak; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa; Maneekan, Pannamas; Koyadun, Surachart

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review elaborates the concepts and impacts of border malaria, particularly on the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance (MDR) malaria on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders. Border malaria encompasses any complex epidemiological settings of forest-related and forest fringe-related malaria, both regularly occurring in certain transmission areas and manifesting a trend of increased incidence in transmission prone areas along these borders, as the result of interconnections of human settlements and movement activities, cross-border population migrations, ecological changes, vector population dynamics, and multidrug resistance. For regional and global perspectives, this review analyzes and synthesizes the rationales pertaining to transmission dynamics and the vulnerabilities of border malaria that constrain surveillance and control of the world's most MDR falciparum and vivax malaria on these chaotic borders. PMID:23865048

  13. AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Evian, C; Matjilla, J; Steinberg, M; Schneider, H

    1993-01-01

    The National AIDS Convention in South Africa (NACOSA) in October 1992 was the first real attempt to address HIV/AIDS. In Soweto, government, the African National Congress, nongovernmental organizations, and organized industry and labor representatives worked for 2 days to develop a national plan of action, but it did not result in a united effort to fight AIDS. The highest HIV infection rates in South Africa are among the KwaZulu in Natal, yet the Inkatha Freedom Party did not attend NACOSA. This episode exemplifies the key obstacles for South Africa to prevent and control AIDS. Inequality of access to health care may explain why health workers did not diagnose the first AIDS case in blacks until 1985. Migrant labor, Bantu education, and uprooted communities affect the epidemiology of HIV infection. Further, political and social polarization between blacks and whites contributes to a mindset that AIDS is limited to the other race which only diminishes the personal and collective sense of susceptibility and the volition and aptitude to act. The Department of National Health and Population Development's voluntary register of anonymously reported cases of AIDS specifies 1517 cumulative AIDS cases (October 1992), but this number is low. Seroprevalence studies show between 400,000-450,000 HIV positive cases. Public hospitals cannot give AIDS patients AZT and DDI. Few communities provided community-based care. Not all hospitals honor confidentiality and patients' need for autonomy. Even though HIV testing is not mandatory, it is required sometimes, e.g., HIV testing of immigrants. AIDS Training, Information and Counselling Centers are in urban areas, but not in poor areas where the need is most acute. The government just recently developed in AIDS education package for schools, but too many people consider it improper, so it is not being used. The poor quality education provided blacks would make it useless anyhow. Lifting of the academic boycott will allow South African

  14. Regions. [Africa, Middle East].

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    This discussion of population focuses on the regions of Africa and the Middle East. In South Africa more white women are working but fewer black women work. The overall result is that the percentage of women who work is declining. Marita de Beer, research liaison executive at the South African Advertising Research Foundation, reports that the female population grew by 31% in the past 10 years while the number of working women has grown by only 11%. Among blacks the female population rose by 36%, but the number of workers among them declined by about 1%. Married women are among the fastest growing groups of working women in South Africa. The most recent estimate of the population of Nigeria is 92 million. According to Professor Vremudia Diejomaoh, Nigeria's population will probably reach 155 million by 2000 with 33% living in urban areas. In Saudi Arabia the Pan Arab Research Center recently completed a census of retail outlets in 3 metropolitan areas: Jeddah, Riyadh, and Dammam. The types of outlets surveyed include large supermarkets, small supermarkets, groceries with and without deep freeze, tobacco shops, meat shop/delis, small cafeterias, large restaurants/hotels, cosmetics shops or perfumeries, camera stores, toy shops, pharmacies, watch and gift shop, newsstands, department store, and appliance outlets. Using the Census of Retail Outlets as a base, Pan Arab Research Center also has a new distribution audit system that will cover 500 outlets. By plotting Arab countries according to their population policies and their current growth rates, it is possible to project where the middle class will grow fastest in the Arab world. The countries that have declining growth rates and strong population programs designed to encourage lower fertility rates among women are Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Lebanon. The countries most likely to have a better per capita distribution of resources within this decade are those where governments encourage reductions in

  15. Regions. [Africa, Middle East].

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    This discussion of population focuses on the regions of Africa and the Middle East. In South Africa more white women are working but fewer black women work. The overall result is that the percentage of women who work is declining. Marita de Beer, research liaison executive at the South African Advertising Research Foundation, reports that the female population grew by 31% in the past 10 years while the number of working women has grown by only 11%. Among blacks the female population rose by 36%, but the number of workers among them declined by about 1%. Married women are among the fastest growing groups of working women in South Africa. The most recent estimate of the population of Nigeria is 92 million. According to Professor Vremudia Diejomaoh, Nigeria's population will probably reach 155 million by 2000 with 33% living in urban areas. In Saudi Arabia the Pan Arab Research Center recently completed a census of retail outlets in 3 metropolitan areas: Jeddah, Riyadh, and Dammam. The types of outlets surveyed include large supermarkets, small supermarkets, groceries with and without deep freeze, tobacco shops, meat shop/delis, small cafeterias, large restaurants/hotels, cosmetics shops or perfumeries, camera stores, toy shops, pharmacies, watch and gift shop, newsstands, department store, and appliance outlets. Using the Census of Retail Outlets as a base, Pan Arab Research Center also has a new distribution audit system that will cover 500 outlets. By plotting Arab countries according to their population policies and their current growth rates, it is possible to project where the middle class will grow fastest in the Arab world. The countries that have declining growth rates and strong population programs designed to encourage lower fertility rates among women are Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Lebanon. The countries most likely to have a better per capita distribution of resources within this decade are those where governments encourage reductions in

  16. Zika Virus Outside Africa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus related to yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. In 2007 ZIKV caused an outbreak of relatively mild disease characterized by rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis on Yap Island in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. This was the first time that ZIKV was detected outside of Africa and Asia. The history, transmission dynamics, virology, and clinical manifestations of ZIKV disease are discussed, along with the possibility for diagnostic confusion between ZIKV illness and dengue.The emergence of ZIKV outside of its previously known geographic range should prompt awareness of the potential for ZIKV to spread to other Pacific islands and the Americas. PMID:19788800

  17. Fires in Central Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of fires are set every year during the dry season in Central Africa. This true color image from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) shows dozens of smoke plumes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on June 29, 2000. Residents burn away scrub and brush annually in the woody savanna to clear land for farming and grazing. For more information, visit the SeaWiFS Home Page, Global Fire Monitoring Fact Sheet, and 4km2 Fire Data Image Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  18. Zika virus outside Africa.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Edward B

    2009-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus related to yellow fever, dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. In 2007 ZIKV caused an outbreak of relatively mild disease characterized by rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis on Yap Island in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. This was the first time that ZIKV was detected outside of Africa and Asia. The history, transmission dynamics, virology, and clinical manifestations of ZIKV disease are discussed, along with the possibility for diagnostic confusion between ZIKV illness and dengue.The emergence of ZIKV outside of its previously known geographic range should prompt awareness of the potential for ZIKV to spread to other Pacific islands and the Americas.

  19. Immunology in Africa.

    PubMed

    Cose, Stephen; Bagaya, Bernard; Nerima, Barbara; Joloba, Moses; Kambugu, Andrew; Tweyongyere, Robert; Dunne, David W; Mbidde, Edward; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Elliott, Alison M

    2015-12-01

    Africa is a continent with a large burden of both infectious and non-communicable diseases. If we are to move forward as a continent, we need to equip our growing cadre of exceptional young scientists with the skills needed to tackle the diseases endemic to this continent. For this, immunology is among the key disciplines. Africans should be empowered to study and understand the diseases that affect them, and to perform their cutting-edge research in their country of origin. This requires a multifaceted approach, with buy-in from funders, overseas partners and perhaps, most important of all, African governments themselves.

  20. Initiatives in Africa.

    PubMed

    Goliber, T J; Middleberg, M I

    1986-03-01

    Since the 1st oil crisis in 1973, the economies of sub-Saharan Africa have barely kept pace with their burgeoning populations. Women in Sub-Saharan Africa give birth more often than women in any other region of the world, with an average of more than 6.5 live births each. The region's natural increase average 2.5% a year in the 1960s, 2.7% in the 1970s, and in the mid-1980s, it is 3.1% per annum--a rate that will double the regions population in 22 years. National leaders in Sub-Saharan Africa were slow to consider population policy as a key component of the social and economic development effort. The neglect of population issues is reflected in the limited scope of public or private family planning programs in the sub-continent. Donor countries and institutions play an important role in developing the information base by providing technical training to government staff, supporting research, and disseminating information to a broad spectrum of political actors. Some examples of policy reconsiderations in Nigeria, Zambia, Liberia, and Niger are given. These countries are starting to give active consideration to population policies to reduce fertility and high rates of population growth by expanding family planning services, raising the age of marriage, improving the status of women, providing family-life education, and incorporating economic incentives for smaller families into the provision of social services. The highly centralized nature of African governments dictates that the acquiescence of the governmental elite must be obtained before any policy can take hold. Overall, high population growth rates in combination with a stagnating social and economic development effort throughout the region have provided the catalyst for a new look at Sub-Saharan Africa population policy. The ability of African nations to implement policies that reduce fertility is more open to question; no African nation has as yet done so, and the socioeconomics factors contributing to high

  1. Chinese culture and demographic trends in Thailand and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Barbie, J

    1992-01-01

    The Chinese nationality contributes to over 5 million of 10% of the total population of Thailand and almost 35% of the total population of Malaysia. The aim of this paper is to summarize the nature and extent of Chinese influence on Thai and Malay culture. Migration of Chinese to southeast Asia dates back 2000 years; on the Malay peninsula, the first arrivals were in 1349. In Malaysia, arrivals began in the 15th century. The reasons were population pressure, floods, and famines. Social and political unrest also accounted for migration between 1855 and 1970. The Chinese in Malaysia are characterized as having a lower population growth rate than Malays and an abnormal sex ratio of 1000:930 in 1957, but severe ratios of 8 men to 1 woman in the 1820s. Islam forbids intermarriages. The Chinese have benefited from improvement in health care and had a low birth rate of 25/1000 in 1980. Migration has traditionally been from south China, and included migrations from Fujian, Hakkas, Guangdong, Chaozhou, and Hainan. The Chinese have maintained their own culture among the Muslim population. In Thailand, migrations occurred during the 13th century, following the collapse of Nan-Chao in 1253, but are first recorded during the Ming dynasty at the end of the 16th century. There are larger numbers of Chinese in Thailand than Malaysia. Chinese assimilated and the current rate of annual growth is estimated at 2%. The sex ratio was 1.4:1 in the late 1940s. 50% of the Chinese live in Bangkok and central Thailand. Older traditions are still maintained in Bangkok. There is the Chaozhou opera on Chinese New Year's Day and marriage is still preferred within one's own dialect. After 1946, the Chinese were not permitted to receive their education in their native language. By the third generation, there is greater assimilation. The minority of minorities in Malaysia were the Baba, who spoke better Malay than other Chinese. In Thailand, the comparable minority is the Yunnan who do not belong

  2. Chinese culture and demographic trends in Thailand and Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Barbie, J

    1992-01-01

    The Chinese nationality contributes to over 5 million of 10% of the total population of Thailand and almost 35% of the total population of Malaysia. The aim of this paper is to summarize the nature and extent of Chinese influence on Thai and Malay culture. Migration of Chinese to southeast Asia dates back 2000 years; on the Malay peninsula, the first arrivals were in 1349. In Malaysia, arrivals began in the 15th century. The reasons were population pressure, floods, and famines. Social and political unrest also accounted for migration between 1855 and 1970. The Chinese in Malaysia are characterized as having a lower population growth rate than Malays and an abnormal sex ratio of 1000:930 in 1957, but severe ratios of 8 men to 1 woman in the 1820s. Islam forbids intermarriages. The Chinese have benefited from improvement in health care and had a low birth rate of 25/1000 in 1980. Migration has traditionally been from south China, and included migrations from Fujian, Hakkas, Guangdong, Chaozhou, and Hainan. The Chinese have maintained their own culture among the Muslim population. In Thailand, migrations occurred during the 13th century, following the collapse of Nan-Chao in 1253, but are first recorded during the Ming dynasty at the end of the 16th century. There are larger numbers of Chinese in Thailand than Malaysia. Chinese assimilated and the current rate of annual growth is estimated at 2%. The sex ratio was 1.4:1 in the late 1940s. 50% of the Chinese live in Bangkok and central Thailand. Older traditions are still maintained in Bangkok. There is the Chaozhou opera on Chinese New Year's Day and marriage is still preferred within one's own dialect. After 1946, the Chinese were not permitted to receive their education in their native language. By the third generation, there is greater assimilation. The minority of minorities in Malaysia were the Baba, who spoke better Malay than other Chinese. In Thailand, the comparable minority is the Yunnan who do not belong

  3. The First Rapid Assessment of Avoidable Blindness (RAAB) in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Isipradit, Saichin; Sirimaharaj, Maytinee; Charukamnoetkanok, Puwat; Thonginnetra, Oraorn; Wongsawad, Warapat; Sathornsumetee, Busaba; Somboonthanakij, Sudawadee; Soomsawasdi, Piriya; Jitawatanarat, Umapond; Taweebanjongsin, Wongsiri; Arayangkoon, Eakkachai; Arame, Punyawee; Kobkoonthon, Chinsuchee; Pangputhipong, Pannet

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of vision loss is preventable or treatable. Population surveys are crucial for planning, implementation, and monitoring policies and interventions to eliminate avoidable blindness and visual impairments. This is the first rapid assessment of avoidable blindness (RAAB) study in Thailand. Methods A cross-sectional study of a population in Thailand age 50 years old or over aimed to assess the prevalence and causes of blindness and visual impairments. Using the Thailand National Census 2010 as the sampling frame, a stratified four-stage cluster sampling based on a probability proportional to size was conducted in 176 enumeration areas from 11 provinces. Participants received comprehensive eye examination by ophthalmologists. Results The age and sex adjusted prevalence of blindness (presenting visual acuity (VA) <20/400), severe visual impairment (VA <20/200 but ≥20/400), and moderate visual impairment (VA <20/70 but ≥20/200) were 0.6% (95% CI: 0.5–0.8), 1.3% (95% CI: 1.0–1.6), 12.6% (95% CI: 10.8–14.5). There was no significant difference among the four regions of Thailand. Cataract was the main cause of vision loss accounted for 69.7% of blindness. Cataract surgical coverage in persons was 95.1% for cut off VA of 20/400. Refractive errors, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and corneal opacities were responsible for 6.0%, 5.1%, 4.0%, and 2.0% of blindness respectively. Conclusion Thailand is on track to achieve the goal of VISION 2020. However, there is still much room for improvement. Policy refinements and innovative interventions are recommended to alleviate blindness and visual impairments especially regarding the backlog of blinding cataract, management of non-communicative, chronic, age-related eye diseases such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, prevention of childhood blindness, and establishment of a robust eye health information system. PMID:25502762

  4. Ambient Noise Tomography of the Huatung Basin Offshore Eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruo-Shan; Huang, Tzu-Ying; Chen, Ying-Nien; Chen, Chin-Wu

    2016-04-01

    The island of Taiwan is a young and active orogenic belt resulting from the oblique subduction and collision between the Eurasian Plate and the Philippine Sea Plate, where the Philippine Sea Plate is converging northwesterly toward the Eurasian Plate at a rate of 81 mm/year. In Southern Taiwan, the Eurasian Plate is subducting eastward beneath the Philippine Sea Plate along the Manila Trench. Offshore northeastern Taiwan, on the other hand, the Philippine Sea Plate is subducting northward beneath the Eurasian Plate along the Ryukyu Trench. Between the Ryukyu Trench and Luzon Arc lies the Huatung Basin, a 4000 m deep ocean basin in the westernmost part of the western Philippine Sea Basin. The intertwined tectonic processes result in complex geological structures of Taiwan, from surface to the crust and uppermost mantle. Previous seismic tomographic studies have suggested the effects of collision and subduction on the tectonic structures beneath Taiwan, but the details remain elusive, especially in the crustal depth range, due to limited station coverage and earthquake sources. Recently, ambient noise analysis fills the gap by offering high resolution tomographic model at crustal depths, derived from frequency-dependent Rayleigh wave measurements using noise cross-correlations. A most recent ambient noise tomography of Taiwan has revealed the presence of distinct layered deformation pattern throughout the crust, indicating integrated effect of collision and subduction on the evolution of Taiwan orogeny. However, this study used only land station and thus did not resolve structure in the surrounding region of the island. In our work, we aim to expand such analysis to offshore eastern Taiwan, taking advantage of the data from an OBS network as part of the recent TAIGER experiment. We integrate the data of OBS with that of selected land stations along the east coast, deriving Rayleigh wave Green functions from cross-correlation between all available station pairs. We

  5. [The dispute over Taiwan's genetic health law].

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Ming

    2007-04-01

    Population growth in Taiwan reached four hundred thousand births per year in the 1980s. Responding to the challenges presented by this significant increase in the population, the government implemented the Genetic Health Law in 1985 to improve quality of life and provide relief to those with large families. The Law promoted health awareness, birth control and the legalization of abortion. Although this policy has significantly and successfully lowered the birthrate over the past 20 years, abortion-related disputes have been on the rise in recent years. On side, womanfs rights activists argue that current Department of Health regulations that require the consent of a spouse or of parents, mandatory counseling and a deliberation period prior to obtaining an abortion violates a woman's autonomy. On the other side, religious groups appeal for a tightening of legal strictures in order to reduce the number of abortions as well as enforced counseling and a six-day deliberation period before an abortion could be permitted. As the Executive Yuan's deliberated over a proposed amendment to relevant laws, legislators were aggressively lobbied by both sides to support their respective positions. The polar positions stalemated a decision on the amendment by one vote during a Legislative Yuan vote on a draft amendment in January 2007. The author urges all parties to reconsider the proposed amendment rationally and hopes that the amendment can be passed in the near future.

  6. Radar Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chang, P.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) has shown increasing values in hydrological predictions in the last decade. Such QPEs are especially valuable in complex terrain where rain gauge network is sparse and hard to maintain while flash floods and mudslides are common hazards. Taiwan Central Weather Bureau has deployed four S-band radars to support their flood warning operations in recent years, and a real-time multi-radar QPE system was developed. Evaluations of the real-time system over one-year revealed some underestimation issues in the radar QPE. The current work investigates these issues and develops a series of refinements to the system. The refinements include replacing the general R-Z relationships used in the old system with the local ones, mitigating non-standard beam blockage artifacts based on long-term accumulations, and applying vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) corrections. The local R-Z relationships were derived from 2D video disdrometer observations of winter stratiform precipitation, meiyu fronts, local convective storms, and typhoons. The VPR correction was applied to reduce radar QPE errors in severely blocked area near the Central Mountain Range (CMR). The new radar QPE system was tested using different precipitation events and showed significant improvements over the old system especially along the CMR.

  7. Finasteride use and acute pancreatitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. This population-based case-control study used the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 2,530 male subjects aged 40-84 years with a first-attack of acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998-2011 as the case group and 10,119 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as the control group. Both groups were matched by age and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who never had finasteride prescription were defined as "never use." Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for finasteride before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis were defined as "ever use." The association of acute pancreatitis with finasteride use was examined by the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. The crude OR of acute pancreatitis was 1.78 (95%CI 1.33, 2.39) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, when compared with subjects with never use of finasteride. After adjusting for potential confounders, the adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis decreased to 1.25 (95%CI 0.90, 1.73) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, but no statistical significance was seen. No association can be detected between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis.

  8. Hazardous workplace review program in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Kuo; Chuang, Kuen-Yuan; Tseng, Jo-Ming; Lin, Fang-Chen; Su, Teh-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In Taiwan, relevant mid-term plans and projects of mitigating occupational hazards have been launched in recent years in the hopes of lowering the incidence of occupational hazards. In light of the lack of objective methodologies for researches on issues pertaining occupational safety and health, this research aims to explore the priorities of safety and health issues through focal groups, expert questionnaires and interviews on relevant issues such as hazard installations identified in R181 Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents Recommendation, 1993 proposed during the 18th World Congress on Safety and Health at work in Seoul 2008. Results revealed that distribute reports of major domestic/foreign occupational disasters to relevant sectors for the prevention of major accidents is needed, both from the importance and feasibility analysis. It is the only topic that scored over 4 points in average for expert and focal group consensus. Furthermore, the experts and focal groups came to consensus in the ranking of priority for 4 items, namely: 1) Installations containing/using large quantities of hazardous materials should be prioritized for inspection, 2) Incorporation of hazard installation review/inspection into OSH management system accreditation, 3) Impose operation shutdown as a means of penalty) and 4) Prioritize the promotion of preliminary PHA.

  9. Structural design of Kaohsiung Stadium, Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watanabe, Hideyuki; Tanno, Yoshiro; Nakai, Masayoshi; Ohshima, Takashi; Suguichi, Akihiro; Lee, William H.; Wang, Jensen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an outline description of the structural design of the main stadium for the World Games held in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, in 2009. Three new design concepts, unseen in previous stadiums, were proposed and realized: “an open stadium”, “an urban park”, and “a spiral continuous form”. Based on the open stadium concept, simple cantilever trusses in the roof structure were arranged in a delicate rhythm, and a so-called oscillating hoop of steel tubes was wound around the top and bottom surfaces of a group of cantilever trusses to form a continuous spiral form. Also, at the same time by clearly grouping the structural elements of the roof structure, the dramatic effect of the urban park was highlighted by unifying the landscape and the spectator seating area to form the stadium facade. This paper specifically reports on the overview of the building, concepts of structural design, structural analysis of the roof, roof design, foundation design, and an outline of the construction.

  10. Post-war mortality decline and consumption expenditures in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsay, G

    1977-03-01

    With the objective of testing whether or not mortality decline is independent of economic development, changes are analyzed in mortality levels and consumption patterns in post-World War 2 Taiwan. According to the official statistics, the crude death rate in post-war Taiwan declined continuously from 11.5/1000 in 1950 to 6.8 in 1960, and then to 4.8 in 1974. During the same period, Taiwan also experienced impressive economic growth, with real per capita income rising from less than $150 in the early 1950s to almost $200 in the early 1960s, and then to more than $400 since 1973. Hence, it is hypothesized that mortality decline in post-war Taiwan was not independent of its economic development. The data for the study are annual aggregate statistics from official reports from 1950 to 1974. After eliminating the effect of the age composition from the mortality trend, the data show that the level of mortality improved much more during the 1st 1/2 of the study than during the last 1/2. Attempts were made to clarify the relationship between economic development and mortality decline by analyzing changes of mortality levels and consumption patterns. Although some weaknesses appear in the study, the preliminary results seem to imply that the mortality reduction in post-war Taiwan was not independent of economic progress. If more information becomes available, further investigation concerning this issue should lead to more conclusive results.

  11. Living donor liver transplantation in Taiwan-challenges beyond surgery.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Vinod G; Chen, Chao-Long

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan has a high prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral infections, and consequently a high burden of chronic liver diseases. Liver transplantation (LT) began in Taiwan in 1984, and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in 1994. Education and collaboration between physicians on a national and international scale were important factors in the development of transplantation in East Asia. Technical innovations in donor hepatectomy, vascular and biliary reconstruction, and interventional radiology, perioperative management of transplant patients and development of associated specialties have enabled achievement of excellent results after both adult and pediatric LDLT. The establishment of rigorous protocols to withstand strict medico-legal scrutiny, combined with technical excellence has contributed to excellent surgical outcomes. The socioeconomic development of Taiwan and the first nationwide hepatitis B vaccination program in the world have also contributed to the decrease in disease burden and improvement of quality of healthcare. This article examines the factors enabling the development of LT in Taiwan, the innovations that have contributed to excellent outcomes, and indicates the future prospects of LDLT in Taiwan. PMID:27115009

  12. Extrusional Tectonics over Plate Corner: an Example in Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chia-Yu; Lee, Jian-Cheng; Li, Zhinuo; Lee, Ching-An; Yeh, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    In northern Taiwan, contraction, transcurrent shearing, block rotation and extension are four essential tectonic deformation mechanisms involved in the progressive deformation of this arcuate collision mountain belt. The neotectonic evolution of the Taiwan mountain belt is mainly controlled not only by the oblique convergence between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate but also the corner shape of the plate boundary. Based on field observations and analyses, and taking geophysical data (mostly GPS) and experimental modelling into account, we interpret the curved belt of northern Taiwan as a result of of contractional deformation (with compression, thrust-sheet stacking & folding, back thrust duplex & back folding) that induced vertical extrusion, combined with increasing transcurrent & rotational deformation (with transcurrent faulting, bookshelf-type strike-slip faulting and block rotation) that induced transcurrent/rotational extrusion and extension deformation which in turn induced extensional extrusion. As a consequence, a special type of extrusional folds was formed in association with contractional, transcurrent & rotational and extensional extrusions subsequently. The extrusional tectonics in northern Taiwan reflect a single, albeit complicated, regional pattern of deformation. The crescent-shaped mountain belt of Northeastern Taiwan develops in response to oblique indentation by an asymmetric wedge indenter, retreat of Ryukyu trench and opening of the Okinawa trough.

  13. Extrusional Tectonics at Plate Corner: an Example in Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Lee, J. C.; Li, Z.; Yeh, C. H.; Lee, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In northern Taiwan, contraction, transcurrent shearing, block rotation and extension are four essential tectonic deformation mechanisms involved in the progressive deformation of this arcuate collision mountain belt. The neotectonic evolution of the Taiwan mountain belt is mainly controlled not only by the oblique convergence between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate but also the corner shape of the plate boundary. Based on field observations and analyses, and taking geophysical data (mostly GPS) and experimental modelling into account, we interpret the curved belt of northern Taiwan as a result of of contractional deformation (with compression, thrust-sheet stacking & folding, back thrust duplex & back folding) that induced vertical extrusion, combined with increasing transcurrent & rotational deformation (with transcurrent faulting, bookshelf-type strike-slip faulting and block rotation) that induced transcurrent/rotational extrusion and extension deformation which in turn induced extensional extrusion. As a consequence, a special type of extrusional folds was formed in association with contractional, transcurrent & rotational and extensional extrusions subsequently. The extrusional tectonics in northern Taiwan reflect a single, albeit complicated, regional pattern of deformation. The crescent-shaped mountain belt of Northeastern Taiwan develops in response to oblique indentation by an asymmetric wedge indenter and opening of the Okinawa trough at plate corner.

  14. 75 FR 75454 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for the Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... polyethylene retail carrier bags from Thailand. See Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 75 FR 53953 (September 2, 2010). The administrative... International Trade Administration Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit...

  15. 76 FR 61668 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India and Thailand: Notice of Extension of Time Limits for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... frozen warmwater shrimp From India and Thailand covering the period February 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. See Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, India, and Thailand: Notice of Initiation of... International Trade Administration Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India and Thailand: Notice of...

  16. 75 FR 2487 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Court Decision Not in Harmony with...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... tubes from Thailand covering the period March 1, 2006 through February 28, 2007. Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 73 FR... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Court...

  17. 76 FR 38349 - Notice of Availability of Pest Risk Analysis for the Importation of Dragon Fruit From Thailand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... Importation of Dragon Fruit From Thailand Into the Continental United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... States of dragon fruit from Thailand. Based on this analysis, we believe that the application of one or... disseminating plant pests or noxious weeds via the importation of dragon fruit from Thailand. We are making...

  18. 76 FR 57955 - Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Antidumping Duty Orders: Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From the Republic of Korea and Taiwan, 65 FR 33807... International Trade Administration Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain polyester staple fiber from Taiwan. The period...

  19. 76 FR 22366 - Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... Fiber from Taiwan: Final Results of Changed- Circumstances Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 75 FR... International Trade Administration Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of... review of the antidumping duty order on certain polyester staple fiber (PSF) from Taiwan. The period...

  20. An Island of Learning: Academeocracy in Taiwan. An Inquiry into Non-Traditional and Traditional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas C.

    Traditional and nontraditional education in Taiwan are considered, based on interviews with educators and scholars in Taiwan, observations, and research materials. To provide a picture of the evolution of academe in the Chinese-Taiwan setting, attention is directed to philosophy, history, academic ethics and excellence, methodology, and policy…

  1. 77 FR 17027 - Certain Stilbenic Optical Brightening Agents From Taiwan: Final Determination of Sales at Less...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Stilbenic Optical Brightening Agents From Taiwan: Final Determination... certain stilbenic optical brightening agents (stilbenic OBAs) from Taiwan are being, or are likely to be... Stilbenic Optical Brightening Agents From Taiwan: Preliminary Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair...

  2. Marginality and Aboriginal Educational Policy Analysis in the United States and Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Sheng Yao; Jacob, W. James

    The education of Taiwan Aborigines and U.S. American Indians is compared using eight criteria of educational policy analysis. The criteria of equity is addressed in Taiwan through policies that promote the educational quality of Aboriginal elementary and junior high schools, expand higher educational opportunities for Taiwan Aborigines,…

  3. Internet Service Cognition and Use, and Their Promotion of Quality of Life in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Te-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    The "e-Taiwan Program" implemented by Taiwan government is aimed at showing the e-advantage in people's life and bring about essential benefits. This research follows the e-Life indicators of the Quality of Life measurement system developed by "e-Taiwan Program", which including four major dimensions of e-Daily Life, e-Business, e-Government,…

  4. 76 FR 18519 - Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan: Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR... International Trade Administration Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan: Amended Final... terephthalate film, sheet, and strip (PET Film) from Taiwan.\\1\\ The period of review (POR) is July 1,...

  5. 76 FR 47540 - Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ..., Sheet, and Strip (PET Film) From Taiwan, 67 FR 44174 (July 1, 2002), as corrected in 67 FR 46566 (July... Taiwan, 66 FR 31888 (June 13, 2001). \\30\\ See Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From... International Trade Administration Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan:...

  6. SWOT Analysis on Educational Systems on the Two Sides of the Taiwan Strait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, I-Ming; Shieh, Chich-Jen

    2005-01-01

    It was an important, historic phenomenon for Taiwan to separate from mainland China in 1949. Mainland China and Taiwan were originally a unified country, using the same language and same alphabet characters. Now there are still similarities in many aspects; the differences are primarily governmental. Taiwan has become more Westernized and more…

  7. Aerosol characteristics in Phimai, Thailand determined by continuous observation with a polarization sensitive Mie-Raman lidar and a sky radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Jin, Yoshitaka; Khatri, Pradeep; Irie, Hitoshi; Takamura, Tamio; Aoki, Kazuma; Thana, Boossarasiri

    2015-06-01

    Distributions and optical characteristics of aerosols were continuously observed with a polarization-sensitive (532 nm), Mie-scattering (532 and 1064 nm) and Raman-scattering (607 nm) lidar and a sky radiometer in Phimai, Thailand. Polarization lidar measurements indicated that high concentration plumes of spherical aerosols considered as biomass burning smoke were often observed in the dry season. Plumes of non-spherical aerosols considered as long-range transported soil dust from Africa, the Middle East, or Northeast Asia were occasionally observed. Furthermore, low-concentration non-spherical aerosols were almost always observed in the atmospheric mixing layer. Extinction coefficient profiles of spherical aerosols and non-spherical dust exhibited different diurnal variations, and spherical aerosols including smoke were distributed in higher altitudes in the mixing layer and residual layer. The difference can be explained by hygroscopic growth of smoke particles and buoyancy of the smoke. Analysis of seasonal variations of optical properties derived from the Raman lidar and the sky radiometer confirmed that the lidar ratio, aerosol optical depth, and Angstrom exponent were higher in the dry season (October-May) and lower in the wet season (June-September). The single scattering albedo was lower in the dry season. These seasonal variations are explained by frequent biomass burning in the dry season consistent with previous studies in Southeast Asian region. At the same time, the present work confirmed that soil dust was a major aerosol component in Phimai, Thailand.

  8. Cretaceous paleogeography of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Hulver, M.L.; Ziegler, A.M.; Rowley, D.B.; Sahagian, D.

    1986-05-01

    Five stage-length maps (Valanginian, Aptian, Cenomanian, Coniacian, and Maestrichtian) of Africa integrate topography/bathymetry, lithofacies, tectonics, and climatically sensitive sediments. These reconstructions differ from currently available maps in their level of detail and accuracy, and in that computer routines were developed to plot all aspects of the maps, including lithofacies patterns. Bathymetric contours were determined from community paleoecology and from thermal subsidence models of the newly opening Atlantic and Indian oceans. Topographic contours have been estimated from uplift models of rift shoulders, as well as from the erosion and sedimentation record of both the internal and marginal basins. The uplift of rift shoulders from Nigeria to Sudan is suggested by the extensive Nubian and equivalent sandstones across north Africa. This Benue-Ngaoundere-Abu Gabra rift system approximately paralleled the paleoequator, and its shoulders must have experienced the high rainfall normally associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). In fact, these mountains would have served as a high level heat source, and would have pinned the ITCZ to their summits. Such a system tends to reduce seasonal excursions of the ITCZ, and may have influenced the high biological productivity represented by the oil source rocks of the Arabian peninsula. These sources also lie on the equator and could have resulted from a shelf incursion of the equatorial divergence zone, which is controlled by the ITCZ.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Terminalia spp. Distributed in Thailand and Authentication of Crude Drugs from Terminalia Plants.

    PubMed

    Intharuksa, Aekkhaluck; Ando, Hirokazu; Miyake, Katsunori; Sirisa-Ard, Panee; Mikage, Masayuki; Sasaki, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    Terminalia, a large genus of Combretaceae, is distributed in Tropical Asia, Africa, and America. Some Terminalia plants are used in folk medicine because they possess powerful medicinal properties. Dried fruits of Terminalia bellirica and Terminalia chebula are used as the main ingredient in Triphala, a famous polyherbal formulation in Ayurvedic medicine and Thai folk medicine, because of their laxative, detoxifying, and rejuvenating effects. To clarify the phylogenetic relationships of medicinal Terminalia species (T. bellirica, T. chebula, and T. catappa) and authenticate their crude drugs, "Samo" and Triphala, nucleotide sequencing alignments in the internal transcribed spacer one-two (ITS 1-2) regions of Terminalia plants collected in Thailand were performed. The amplified fragments of Terminalia species were approximately 800 bp in length. To compare these sequences and DDBJ registered data, a molecular phylogenetic tree was constructed. Phylogenetic analysis clearly separated the sequences into two groups: Asian Terminalia and African Terminalia with some exceptions. In the analyzed sequences, the length of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region was 674 bp in T. chebula, and 677 bp in T. bellirica and T. catappa. Eighty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and nine insertion-deletions (indels) were observed, and the nucleotide sequences of this region showed species-specific sequences. Based on these differences, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) were applied to identify medicinal Terminalia species. Moreover, the ARMS method was chosen for fingerprinting analysis of Samo crude drugs and Triphala formulations because it was a fast, cost-effective, and reproducible approach. PMID:27040622

  10. Education Course Syllabus Development, Thai Language Major According to Buddhism Way of Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waree, Chaiwat

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop Education Course Syllabus, Thai language major, according to Buddhism way of Thailand by using Taba's Approach and to evaluate the efficiency of Education Course Syllabus, Thai language major, according to Buddhism way of Thailand. This research was conducted according to research and development format and its…

  11. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of May 24, 2013 (78 FR 31574... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure...

  12. 78 FR 62583 - Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... of Antidumping Duty Investigations, 78 FR 35253 (June 12, 2013). On September 19, 2013, more than 25... International Trade Administration Welded Stainless Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist... stainless pressure pipe from Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.\\1\\ The notice...

  13. Learning Innovative Maternal Instinct: Activity Designing Semantic Factors of Alcohol Modification in Rural Communities of Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yodmongkol, Pitipong; Jaimung, Thunyaporn; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Sureephong, Pradorn

    2014-01-01

    At present, Thailand is confronting a serious problem of alcohol drinking behavior which needs to be solved urgently. This research aimed to identify the semantic factors on alcohol drinking behavior and to use maternal instinct driving for housewives as village health volunteers in rural communities, Thailand. Two methods were implemented as the…

  14. 75 FR 36359 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... Thailand. See Antidumping Duty Order: Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand, 69 FR 48204 (August 9... Plastics Ind. Co., Ltd., Thai Plastic Bags Industries Co., Ltd., and Thantawan Industry Public Co., Ltd. Id. The Department has determined previously that Thai Plastic Bags Industries Co., Ltd., APEC Film...

  15. 75 FR 34699 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags from Thailand: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... individual members, Hilex Poly Co., LLC, and Superbag Corporation (the petitioners) and by Thai Plastic Bags... International Trade Administration Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags from Thailand: Rescission of Antidumping... order on polyethylene retail carrier bags from Thailand. The period of review is August 1, 2008,...

  16. 75 FR 53953 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Antidumping Duty Order: Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand, 69 FR 48204 (August 9, 2004). On... Review, 75 FR 23673 (May 4, 2010), and Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time... Bags Industries Co., Ltd. (TPBI), and Thantawan Industry Public Co., Ltd. Id., 74 FR at 48226....

  17. 76 FR 68137 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Thai Plastic Bags Industries Co., Ltd. Amended Final Results of the Review As a result of our... the Antidumping Duty Order on Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand, 75 FR 48940 (August 12... International Trade Administration Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results...

  18. 76 FR 6603 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Thailand; Notice of Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... Review, 72 FR 52065 (Sept. 12, 2007). The period of review (POR) is August 4, 2004, through January 31... International Trade Administration Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Thailand; Notice of Amended Final... antidumping duty order on certain frozen warmwater shrimp (shrimp) from Thailand. See Certain Frozen...

  19. 75 FR 22424 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... responses to its notice of institution (75 FR 1078, January 8, 2010) were adequate for each order under... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam AGENCY: United States... concerning the antidumping duty orders on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand,...

  20. 78 FR 11221 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... notice in the Federal Register of January 4, 2013 (76 FR 764). The conference was held in Washington, DC... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam..., Thailand, and Vietnam of frozen warmwater shrimp, provided for in subheadings 0306.17.00, 1605.21.10...